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July 10 2003

News

Dry June hurts water picture

A very dry June has exasperated the water picture in the northeast corner of the state, and Modoc is no exception.

For June, just .07 inches of precipitation was measured at the U.S. Forest Service Complex in Alturas. That means for the water year to date (since September) only 9.59 inches of moisture has been measured. That's down from the average of 10.73 inches for the period. June's average precipitation is .90 inches. What doesn't make the future look any better is that July and August are normally the driest months of the year -- July averages .23 inches and August .48 inches.

Possibly the one good part of the situation is that for water year to date for 2003, at 9.59, it's better than last year at 9.01 and much better than the severe drought year of 2001 when only 5.76 inches had fallen. The average annual rainfall for Modoc is 12.01 inches. However for the past two years it has been 8.02 inches.

June turned warm for a few days, with the highest of 96 degrees on June 29, but it set no records, which was set at 102 degrees on June 9, 1960. The low temperature was 34 degrees, off the record low of 29 degrees set June 6, 1988.

Inmate walks away from jail work detail

A Modoc County Jail inmate walked away from a work project Thursday morning and remains on the loose.

Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry said Wesley Box, age 23, was working adjacent to the jail where a new structure is being placed. He was working on concrete with the contractor.

Gentry said Box and another inmate worker had asked to wear jeans instead of the thin orange work uniforms. Permission was granted to wear the regular type clothing because of the type of work they were doing.

Sometime about 9:30 a.m., said Gentry, Box told the other inmate and supervisor that he had to go to the restroom. He apparently did not return and at about noon law enforcement agencies were out in force trying to locate Box. He was not found on Thursday and his whereabouts remain a mystery. His picture and description have been placed in the computer system and Gentry said he's certain he'll be found relatively soon. Box was in jail on a stolen vehicle charge. He is from Medford, but spent some time here and has contacts in Modoc.

Nearly $1 million in building for June

The Modoc County Building Departments reports issuing 21 permits valued at $950,366 for June 2003. That's up from May's valuation of $353,470.

Included in the permits were eight homes, including a straw bale home, wood homes and manufactured homes. There was also one large barn/arena, a grain elevator and several garages and barns.

Vandalism to fence alleged on Ray Ranch

A fire in a used tire pile Friday at the Lawrence and Sandi Ray Ranch west of Alturas was deemed accidental by the California Department of Forestry, but the Rays aren't so sure.

The fire put up as huge plume of dark back smoke and local fire crews, including CDF and the Alturas Rural Fire Department responded quickly. The Rays were out of town in Idaho when the fire broke out. It burned the tire pile, (tires used to weigh down their haystacks) which was adjacent to a fence and a telephone pole. The fire burned a fence and the phone pole, knocking out the Ray‘s telephone service.

The Modoc County's Sheriff's Office was investigating as of Wednesday, but said no evidence of arson was located.

In addition to the fire, the Rays state that while they were away, someone either cut or tore down about 150 feet of barbed wire fence, allowing their cattle to move onto the neighbor's property. The Sheriff's Office is also investigating that incident.

According to the Sheriff's Office, there is evidence that the fences were cut or torn down. The fence that was cut is in the general area of a Rattlesnake Creek dam on Lawrence's ranch which is a bone of contention and subject of legal action between the Rays and the Hot Spring Irrigation District.

Surprise Valley's 4th: a swingin' good time

By Patricia Hemsley

The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce would like to thank everyone who worked so diligently to make the first "Surprise Valley Swings!" event on July 4th such a wonderful success.

Many in the valley fondly recall past dances when entire families would gather for an enjoyable evening. Their memories inspired new Lake City residents Jeff and Sheila Cotton. They approached the chamber months ago with the idea for a day-long event on the Fourth of July. Their ideas were met with enthusiasm and a committee soon formed to handle the various aspects of hosing both a country festival and an evening dance. Months of planning followed with Peggy Page, Dan Macsay, Mary Cook-Davis, Patti Hemsley and the Cottons dealing with the many details involved in pulling together such a major event.

Eagleville volunteer fire chief Bob Staton, along with Elmer Canlon's assistance, was instrumental in getting the Eagleville community hall and picnic grounds ready for the big day. Committee members were delighted to have the help of volunteers Jerry Moore, Jim Walker, Louis Vermillion, Elie Brandenburg, Sharlene Minto, Donna Vermillion, Jean Bilodeaux and Roger Davis, who helped with both setting up and various jobs on both the third and fourth.

According to Chamber president Peggy Page, Sonia and Dan Macsay deserve extra special recognition for all they did to make both the festival and the dance so successful. They undertook a variety of complex jobs and worked very hard to ensure things ran smoothly.

When folks started trickling in around noon on the Fourth, many local crafters were present, showcasing their art and interesting handmade objects under the trees and the Eagleville picnic grounds. The throngs who attended seemed to appreciate the local flavor of the items and their obvious quality craftsmanship.

The Planet X folks, John and Rachel Bogard, ventured up from Gerlach with their unique ceramic items which are truly works of art. Local author Glorianne Weigand also was present with her many books which recount area history through colorful stories of Western characters and regional families.

Several local school, church and civic organizations signed on for booth space or hosted other activities. The VFW welcomed a hug crowd to their Mexican dinner, All Nations Fellowship and Living Waters churches planned games for children, and the chamber featured several tables with "Made in Modoc" items and the newly-published cookbook, "Generation to Generation: Surprise Valley Cooks!" Project Sober Graduation 2004 and the 4-H both had booths, along with several valley families.

The hungry crowds were met with some tough gastronomic decisions: Indian tacos or burgers with all the trimmings? Cold watermelon slices or ice cream? Succulent tamales or the wonderful variety of home-baked goods offered by both the Seventh Day Adventist church women and the chamber? Then those who planned ahead and saved enough room enjoyed on the chef Juan Esquival's renowned Mexican dinners.

The day of fellowship and fun was accompanied by great music that had well-fed attendees' toes tapping. Chamber members Owen Billingsley and Edie Asrow with fellow Country Jam musicians entertained first, followed by the always-popular Likely Mountain Boys.

Jeff Cotton very early on, labeled Western swing dance music the ‘music of the Valley.' It was prominently featured on weekly Saturday afternoon Alturas radio programs sponsored by the chamber during May and June. Cotton was very happy to secure the renowned Western swing band, "Tommy Thomsen and the All-stars" as the featured performers at the evening dance held in the Eagleville community hall. Whether folks just sat and listened to the music or two-stepped the night away, everyone agreed the evening was a big success.

All in all, the day's events were a fitting tribute to the community spirit and historical roots of local residents. Folks who ventured up from Nevada or the Bay Area, drove down from Oregon or made the scenic trip from Alturas were happy to bask in friendly fellowship and enjoy the old-fashioned fun of the event. The chamber certainly thanks everyone who helped make it such a wonderful day.

Pool closed for repairs

The Alturas Municipal Swimming Pool is closed this week, as crews try to repair the pump and motor system which went down Sunday.

City crews are trying to get the facility back in operation as soon as possible, and replacement parts have been ordered. The city is hoping to have the pool open by next Wednesday.

Fandango draws big crowds

Plenty of sunshine and hot weather kicked off last Saturday's 2003 "Celebrating Tomorrow's Leaders" Fandango Day parade. Crowds of local residents and visitors were out to celebrate the Independence Day holiday weekend in Alturas and Surprise Valley

Several last minute parade entries were added to the 49 registered parade entries.

Following the parade, crowds moved to find shade, food and drink at the park. The Alturas Lions Club provided their annual barbecue for Fandango on the park patio. Local and visiting food, novelty and raffle booth participants were pleased with their results for the afternoon and the "friendliness" of local residents.

The bottled water booth operated by the local parlor of the Native Daughters of the Golden West, sold out and said they could have doubled their water order and sold it all in the heat of the day. The Federated Church sold 350 grilled hamburgers and several food booths sold out of items. The park held a total of 39 booths, with only two left unoccupied at the last minute, according to Shirley Geer, Chamber Treasurer

At the east end of the park South Fork Assembly Youth Group provided kids games with plenty of watermelons sliced for the eating contests.

The Chamber's "Molly the Cow" Cow Pie Bingo came up with Tad Ziegler as the winner, earning $500 in Alturas Bucks. Tickets were sold for $10 and $25 a pop, and the lucky winner took home the "50/50" winnings. The remainder of the proceeds go to a Chamber-sponsored scholarship, notes Geer

Several high school reunions were taking place over the weekend from the Elks Lodge to the Brass Rail along with family reunions for the weekend. Modoc Classic Cruisers Car Show ‘n Shine attracted many visiting cars and their owners from southern Oregon, northern California and Nevada, as well as local owners. The Rachel Dorris Park lawn was covered from one end to the other with the gleaming classic cars this year. The Cruisers' scholarship raffle and winner of the 1965 Mustang will be published next week, along with any car show results provided

California Pines Property Owners closed Fandango Saturday night with a fireworks display for the big crowd which always results in Modoc's only traffic jam after the fireworks, on the road leading back to Alturas. Parade winners

The Alturas Chamber of Commerce presented 2003 parade trophies to the following winners:

Sweepstakes, All Around: Church of Christ--Noah's Ark

Best Theme: I'SOT Drill Team

Commercial Float: Alturas Casino

Civic Float: TOPS (Taking Off Pounds Sensibly)

Youth Organization: Mrs. Callaghan's Kindergarten Class. Musical: I'SOT Drill Team

Novelty: Modoc Medical Center Skilled Nursing

Native American: RISE

Equestrian: Landen Flournoy and Melissa Bucher

Vehicle Prior to 1950: Terry Candrien, Adin--1933 Plymouth Convertible

Vehicle Newer than 1950: Calvin Lloyd--1970 Super Bee.

Celebration of Life

A memorial and celebration of life will be held on Saturday, July 12 at 10 a.m. for Roger D. Johnson, Alturas, CA, retired Refuge Manager of the Klamath Basin Wildlife Refuge Complex.

The will be held at the Federated Community Church, 307 East 1st Street, Alturas, CA. Dr. Ben Zandstra will be conducting the services.

Mr. Johnson passed away at his Red Bluff, CA. home on May 29.

His wife, Mary Miller Deck Johnson, Alturas, CA; stepsons and their wives Lonnie Deck, Fremont, CA; Martin and Merlinda Deck, Klamath Falls, OR; and Chris and Traci Deck, San Diego, survive him. He is also survived by his first wife, Sylvia Jaramillo Johnson, Wilder, ID; children Mark Johnson, San Francisco, CA; Patricia and Mark Kreiter, White Salmon, WA; Victoria and Scott Simmons, Hillsboro, OR; Anne and Matt Kruse, Mankato, MN; Mike and Debbie Johnson, Winnemucca, NV; nephew and niece Jack and Billie McPhillips of Carmichael, CA. He leaves a legacy of 22 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren.

Obituaries:

Clovis Othel Bagwell

Long-time building contractor and Alturas resident Clovis Othel Bagwell, 81, passed away following a lengthy illness on July 5, 2003 in Alturas, CA. Pastor Bud Kirk of the Alturas Baptist Church conducted graveside services with the Alturas Veterans organizations at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, July 9 at the Alturas Cemetery.

Born on March 22, 1922 in Byers, Oklahoma, the son of Recy (Hudson) and Dewey Bagwell, Clovis received his education in Putnum City, Oklahoma. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he served his country during World War II, from May 18, 1944 until his honorable discharge as a Corporal on January 25, 1946.

Mr. Bagwell married Ruth Boster on September 8, 1939 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and the two shared 55 years of marriage, before Ruth preceded him in death October 8, 1994.

Mr. Bagwell moved to Alturas, CA in 1959, where he worked for contractors Gibbons and Zick, and also Harry Pinneo prior to starting his own building contracting business Bagwell Construction. He constructed numerous buildings and homes in and around the Alturas area.

He was considered a wonderful father and grandfather, always thinking of his children's and grandchildren's welfare. His family was his pride and joy.

He is survived by his mother, Recy Hicks of Alturas, CA; his sons, Tim, Terry, Glen of Alturas; daughter Cindy Wright of Sparks, NV., nine grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren; brother and sister-in-law Jim and Pat Bagwell of Alturas, several nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

Jack Joseph Thomas

Jack Joseph Thomas of Adin, passed away of natural causes on July 1, 2003 at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, CA. Pastor Steven Black conducted services at the Lookout Community Church on Tuesday, July 8 at 10 a.m. Burial was at the Lookout Cemetery, Lookout , CA.

Mr. Thomas was born February 15, 1942. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, and served in Vietnam. A musician, he had relocated to Adin from Lookout this past year. He is survived by his daughter Patti Ellison of Adin and brother Buford J. Thomas of Boynton Beach, FL. McDonald's Chapel in Burney was in charge of arrangements.

Sports

Fandango golf results

Alturas’ Kris Server fired a low gross of 72 to win that division of the Arrowhead Fandango Days Golf Tournament last weekend.

Micah Eppler had the winning low net score with a 62, with Kyle Weber second with 64, third was a tie at 65 between Bob Webb and Jim Barney and fifth went to Phil Smith with a 66.

The Callaway winner was Jay Eppler with a 73 and second went to Alan Hopkins with a 74.

Kathie Widby won the ladies division with a 72.

The junior golf program will be from July 28-30, 9 a.m. to 12 noon. The program is for kids ages six through 18 interested in playing golf. Call the clubhouse at 233-3404 for more information.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Cycling between good days and some that were not so good, the wily Eagle Lake Trout challenged fishermen last week. Best producing areas include Pelican Point, Eagles Nest, Wildcat Point and out from the jetty at Eagle Lake Marina. Fish caught are averaging from 1 1/2 to 3 pounds.

Still-fishing with night crawlers under slip bobbers has produced the best results. Trollers are using down riggers or lead line set ups to get the lure or bait down to about 30-35 feet. Due to high water alkalinity the fish are concentrating deep and mostly near the various springs in the south end of the lake seeking fresher cooler water.

Fish and Game officials indicate that they will recommend that fishermen cease practicing catch and release for the next few weeks due to the high degree of stress created for the trout during capture. It is being recommended that all fish caught be kept to reduce the amount of fish that die from stress.

On July 26, Eagle Lake Marina and Campgrounds will host its annual Mountain Music Festival at the Aspen Boat Ramp. The fun will start at 10:00 a.m. with the third annual "Show by the Lake" Show and Shine car show followed by live entertainment and a Tri-tip Barbecue. Custom cars, street rods, and restorations are all welcome for the car show. Best of show will be chosen by vote of viewers.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available first-come first-serve. For camping information at Eagle Lake call (530)825-3212. For reservations call toll free (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions or further information about the Music Festival call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Blue Lake Youth Camp now taking registration

Youths interested in a week of fun camping, swimming, canoeing, spiritual growth, and great food should register to attend Blue Lake Youth Camp.

The camp is operated by the Federated Community Church in Alturas on a site leased from the Forest Service.

With almost 50 years offering camping experience, the Blue Lake fire has not stopped camp openings.

Two camps will be held this year: one for kids who have completed 6th, 7th, and 8th grades, and one for kids who have completed 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades.

The Middle School camp will be held July 21 through July 25 and will be $95 per camper. The lower grade camp will be held July 28 through August 1 and is also $95 per camper. Camp registration is on a first-come first-serve basis and each camp is limited to 10 girls and 10 boys. Anyone interested in attending camp please call 233-3355 or 233-2647 and leave a message.

Kids entering grades 9 through 12, who are interested in volunteering to be a camp counselor may pick up an application form by calling one of the above numbers. All counselor applications must be turned in by Friday, July 11. Blue Lake Youth Camp is non- denominational and is open to all youth.

July 17 2003

News

Lack of state budget causes some major local concerns

The lack of a state budget is causing local government officials all over the state to fidget in their seats. As the state legislature does nothing, the impacts are starting to be felt.

The biggest problem at the moment, said Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell is the overall uncertainty of what the state is actually going to do to counties and cities. The possibilities change almost daily and make the preparation of the county budget much more difficult.

The county has frozen hiring and fixed asset purchases and is now entering budget hearings with department heads. Maxwell said once the current county budget revenue balances are in and tallied, the real process of projecting the state's impacts will begin.

In addition to the problems with the overall lack of a state budget and knowing its impacts, the county is also looking at major increases in the PERS costs, workers' comp costs and has recently learned their insurance premiums for employees are going up drastically.

Maxwell said Modoc and most other counties are trying to find a way to meet the employees' insurance needs while not breaking the county bank. The issue has been discussed with department heads and will be brought up to employee groups.

Maxwell pointed out that the state has been late on its budget most recent years, so that's not the issue. The issue is the size of the state deficit and just where the state plans on cutting to make it balance. In the past, the state has siphoned funds from local governments.

The City of Alturas is in a financial bind on insurance as well and is considering going to a major-medical-only policy for its employees. It's not something the city wants to do, said Clerk Cary Baker, but it may be the only affordable option. The ultimate decision on the insurance has not been made at this point.

According to Don Demsher, interim Superintendent of the Modoc Joint Unified School District, cuts already made for this budget will help offset some of the impact from the state. But, Demsher said, no one knows what the final picture and impacts from the state are going to look like. The MJUSD has a solid reserve, but that reserve could be eaten up quickly if major changes in funding are realized. In addition, no one knows just what the impacts are going to be on various school programs.

County Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh said this budget year is the "worst I've seen in my history," and she's concerned about the future. "To me it doesn't look like a one year thing," she said. "I see a problem for a couple of years. At the county level we're not filling positions. We haven't laid off anyone, but were not filling positions where people have retired or resigned. Most of us are in a ‘wait and see' mode."

Harbaugh said schools in the county have good reserves, but cautioned that those reserves could dwindle quickly if state funding comes in without a cost of living increase or comes in lower than projected. All area schools have tightened their budgets and cut where they felt they could without causing fatal impacts to education.

While the state budget picture is bad, Harbaugh said one of her major concerns for schools is the federal "No Child Left Behind" program. That program came with federal mandates, but with no funding, and schools will have trouble meeting requirements. In addition, she said some of the requirements simply don't fit in rural areas

The state legislature remains in session, apparently trying to overcome major political differences on spending cuts and tax increases. While some people are projecting an agreement by the end of the week, others aren't nearly that optimistic.

In Modoc, all agencies have worked hard to avoid employee layoffs, and hope that scenario will play out. But, if the state cuts are deep, layoffs loom as a distinct possibility, albeit a last resort.

Thousands stolen in Cedarville burglary

Burglars broke through a window at the Cedarville Saloon sometime between closing, about 1 a.m. July 14 and opening at 6:30 a.m. and made off with about $6,500 in cash and goods.

According to Undersheriff Mark Gentry, the burglars stole about $6,000 in cash and change, cigarettes and tequila. The case is under investigation. Sheriff's deputies are also working a series of burglaries to absentee owners' homes in the upper hill units of California Pines. Those burglaries have been ongoing for over a month and deputies are still investigating losses with owners.

Gentry said the burglars have hit at least four vacation homes where the owners do not reside all year long. The case is under investigation.

Rash of vandalism cause of concern

A rash of summertime vandalism is a major concern for Alturas City Police as July warms up.

This last week, three more of the Alturas Chamber of Commerce's newly planted street trees have been broken. That's on top of more than a dozen earlier this spring. The trees broken this last week were newly planted in the area of Plumas Bank.

Chief of Police Ken Barnes said the city is offering a $100 reward for information leading to a conviction of the street tree vandals. The information will be kept confidential and the informant may remain anonymous to the public, said Barnes.

Additionally, Barnes said vandals caused about $1,000 in damage by breaking glass at Alturas Elementary school and about $625 damage to irrigation sprinkler heads at Modoc Middle School.

He said there was also graffiti painted on school walls.

Jobless rate is 7% for June

Modoc's jobless rate dropped to 7.0 percent for the month of June according to the state Employment Development Department.

The June rate dipped from the May rate of 7.9 percent. The number of unemployed dropped from 360 in May to 330 in June. The California unemployment rate was 6.7 percent and the federal rate was 6.5 percent. The unemployment rate for June a year ago was 5.8 percent and only 260 people were listed as unemployed. The jobless rate this for June 2003 is up 26.9 percent from last year.

Modoc ranks 28th for highest unemployment rate of the state's 58 counties or June. Siskiyou county's jobless rate was 8.4 percent, ranking it 41 and Lassen's was 5.0 percent ranking it 12th. The lowest unemployment rate is in San Luis Obispo County with 3.2 percent and the highest is in Imperial County with 18.8 percent.

Pit River Watershed Alliance reports activities

The Pit River Watershed Alliance is having the fourth meeting of the year. The meeting date is Thursday, July 24, 2003 at the Canby Fire Hall in Canby from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. All individuals interested in the management activities of the Pit River watershed are encouraged to attend.

The Pit River Watershed Alliance is a community based, non profit regulatory effort, which involves the active participation of various social, economic, and environmental interests. Private and public agencies are acting together to enhance the water quality and aquatic habitat of the Pit River watershed. The California Department of Conservation (DOC) and CALFED provide resources for the Pit River Watershed Alliance. The DOC provides services and information that promote environmental health, economic viability, informed land use decisions, and sound management of our state's natural resource. CALFED is a cooperative effort working with local communities to improve the quality and reliability of California's water supplies.

The meeting agenda includes a report on current Pit River Watershed Alliance activities, Pit River watershed assessment update by VESTRA Resources, Inc., an update on the Pit River Watershed Alliance Monitoring Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) a discussion on the agricultural irrigation discharge waiver, and a presentation of the Pit River Water Quality Study, 2001-2002 by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board.

For more information about the meeting or the Alliance, contact James Rickert, Pit River Watershed Alliance coordinator at (530)336-7007.

2003 Fandango Days Car Show Winners

Class I-Modified--Trucks, Delivery Sedans, Panels 1960--1975: 1st Place: Howard and Bernie Alcorn, 1961 Chevy Pickup, Klamath Joy Riders, Klamath Falls, OR.; 2nd Place: Larry Wedmore, 1966 GMC Pickup, Cruisin' Rebels, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class AA--Modified--1940 and Older: 1st Place: Jim and Henriette Hardy, 1940 Ford Coupe, Susanville Street Rodders, Susanville, CA.; 2nd Place: Lon and Jan Casebeer, 1931 Ford Hi Boy, Klamath Joy Riders, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class BB--Modified--1941--1954 Cars: 1st Place: John Clark, 1948 Chevy Coupe, Burney, CA.; 2nd Place: Randy Bethel, 1948 Ford, Alturas, CA. Class CC--Modified--1955--1964--Cars: 1st Place: Art and Jean Lawrence, 1955 Bel Air, Susanville, CA.; 2nd Place: Charles and Barbara Thrall, 1957 Pontiac Star Chief, Greenville, CA.

Class DD--Modified--1965--1975--Cars: 1st Place: Pete Gorbett, 1971 Chevelle, Susanville, CA.; 2nd Place: Duane Hunshaw, 1970 Chevelle, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class EE--Modified--Convertibles--1975 and Older: 1st Place: Tom Wyland, 1969 Pontiac GTO Convertible, Klamath Falls, OR.; 2nd Place: Joe and Mikele Picotte, 1967 Ford Mustang Convertible, Alturas, CA.

Best Interior Award: Tom Williams, 1939 Chrysler Coupe, Redding, CA. Best Paint Award: John Clark, 1948 Chevy Coupe, Burney, CA.

Best Engine Award: Duane Hinshaw, 1970 Chevelle, Klamath Falls, OR. Best of Show Award: Howard and Bernie Alcorn, 1961 Chevy Pickup, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class A Stock--1954 and Older: 1st Place: Bob and Bonnie Lewis, 1950 Ford Club Coupe, Susanville Street Rodders, Susanville, CA.; 2nd Place: Edward Menges, 1947 Chrysler, Cruisin' Rebels, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class B Stock--1955--1964 Stock: 1st Place: Lawrence Agee, 1956 Chevy 210, McArthur, CA.; 2nd Place: Ray Jacobson, 1955 Buick Super, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class C Stock 1965--1975 Stock: 1st Place: Chuck and Sue McNeilly, 1969 Dodge Coronet, Cruisin' Rebels, Klamath Falls, OR.; 2nd Place: Ken McMahan, 1965 Cobra, Cruisin' Rebel, Klamath Falls, OR.

Class D Stock Convertibles--1975 and Older: 1st Place: Ray and Linda Smith, 1970 Buick Wildcat, Klamath Falls, OR.; 2nd Place: Gary Hodges, 1970 Buick GS, Farside Cruisers, Reno, NV.

Class E Under Construction: 1st Place: Phil Schromm and Betty Trivett, 1931 Ford Pickup, Susanville Street Rodders, Susanville, CA.

Class F Stock Trucks, Delivery Sedans, Panels 1959 and Older: 1st Place: John and Norma Garate, 1957 Chevy Pickup, Susanville, CA.; 2nd Place: Charlie King, 1955 Studebaker Pickup, Susanville Street Rodders, Susanville, CA.

Class G Stock Trucks, Delivery Sedans, Panels 1960--1975: 1st Place: Clyde and Barbara Frolich, 1964 Chevy El Camino, Klassic Cruisers, Reno, NV. Class H--Modified--Trucks, Delivery Sedans, Panels, 1959 and Older: 1st Place: Lane and Jane Simpson, 1955 Chevy Pickup, Lake County Desertt Cruisers, Lakeview, OR.; 2nd Place: Bert and Pam Cordoba, 1958 Chevy Pickup, Susanville Street Rodders, Susanville, CA.

Friday night's poker run winners were the following: 1st Place $500.00--Dan Gustafson of Susanville; 2nd Place $300.00--Mary Acosta of Alturas; 3rd Place $200.00--Sandy Ormachea of Susanville. This year's poker route looped out to Cal Pines Lodge.

Chamber of Commerce Parade entry winners were Calvin and Debbie Lloyd--Cars 1955 to present, Terry Candrian--Cars 1955 and older. Winner--1965 Ford Mustang--Raffle: Gerri Rhodes, Adin, CA. There were over 100 cars this year with 91 registed entries for Saturday's car show.

Musical montage venue for July MPAT production at Oxley Hall

The Modoc Performing Arts Theater will present a musical montage entitled "The Robot Director" with performance dates set for the last weekend of July: Saturday, July 26 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, July 27 at 3 p.m., in Modoc High School's Shirley Oxley Hall.

The story, written by David Cohen of Alturas, revolves around MPAT's inability to find a director for its up-coming musical. A solution arrives in the form of a manic inventor, peddling her new invention, a Robot Director. Chaos ensues, but all ends well in this hilarious romp in the world of community theater.

MPAT members will be performing numbers from a variety of shows including past MPAT productions such as "Once Upon A Mattress," "Mikado," "HMS Pinafore," and "Nunsense." Also included will be the Broadway favorites: "South Pacific," "West Side Story," "My Fair Lady," "The Sound of Music," and the 2002 winner for Best Motion Picture at the Academy Awards, Chicago.

The cast will include: Robot, Niles Reynolds; Inventor, Bobbi Bobb; MPAT board of directors played by themselves: Gerry Gates, Eleanor Dorton, Midge Dier, Linda Lucier and David Cohen. Vocalists will include Kerry Davis, April Dorton, Eleanor Dorton, Marya Gates, Linda Lucier, and Nancy North-Gates; piano accompaniment by Landen Flournoy The show is being directed by Nancy North-Gates and produced by Marya Gates. This show will serve as a fund raiser toward the next Spring production of "The Sound of Music."

Sports

Arrowhead charts a new course

Improvement seems to be the watchword of the new management at Alturas own Arrowhead golf course.

Beginning in April, Jim Widby, his wife Kathie and Gary and Lynn McClellan took over operations. "It all took shape in April when the prior ownership gave the course back," says Kathie. She goes on to explain that Jim immediately contacted the city and began the process of negotiating a lease, with an option to buy the course.

"It's something I've always wanted to do," says Jim about taking over management of the course. "I got into golf 20-plus years ago. It's a great sport. You can play it from ages five to 105. And there aren't many sports you can do that with."

Kathie adds that owning the golf course has been her husbands dream ever since her parents, Gary and Lynn McClellan, managed this same course many years ago. "He's probably more excited than any of us," she says smiling.

Jim's dad, George is heading the maintenance efforts.

Since coming under new management, many improvements have been made to bring the course up to par, so to speak. "It's only going to get better!" asserts Jim.

George explains that they are steady progress in their quest to bring the course back from years of neglect. "We'll get it going," he says enthusiastically, "get it to where we want it, it's going to be beautiful guarantee it!" There are many plans to improve the play and the look of the course. However, for the moment they must content themselves with systematically fixing things. For example, they plan to have the watering system fully functioning by the end of the season. "Right now, it's just repairs," George explains. "Getting it to where we actually want it and like it, it's probably going to take another three years because we want to do landscaping too." Still, the course is eminently playable at present. "It's a beautiful little course," clarifies Kathie.

It only seems appropriate that this unpretentious golf course should be a family run enterprise in a family oriented town. Tucked away at the north end of the Warner Street, Arrowhead has all the accouterments and amenities of big city golf courses at a modest cost. Fees for a round of nine holes are modest: $11 weekdays, $13 weekends; eighteen holes $17 and $19, respectively. Annual memberships, single or family are available. There is even a student rate of only $5 for nine holes.

"We just want everybody to come up and have fun," Jim says. "We want to bring back the friendly golf atmosphere where it's fun to play and affordable." He is also quick to point out that the proximity of Arrowhead, close to the center of town, makes it convenient venue for a "quick nine" morning or evening after work. Weekends, naturally, are the busiest.

The entire 42 acre course can be visually surveyed from the elevated setting of the clubhouse, which offers gratifying views of tree lines fairways and well groomed greens. This nine hole, par 36 golfing facility is no mediocre course. "It looks small and it looks real easy," Kathie observes. But looks can be deceiving. "It's really challenging," she explains further.

Players are pleasantly surprised by how challenging the course is in spite of its size. The variety of elevations, such as the first tee at the clubhouse on the top of a respectable hill. provide a pleasing challenge to the season hacker while presenting the new duffer with a do-able game.

Because the greens are small and elevated, play is a little more difficult than it looks. "They have a lot of character," inserts George. "It's not just a flat green or a sloped green. That's what makes it tough."

A putting green next to the clubhouse provides a few minutes of practice while waiting for a tee time. For those who wish to improve their hitting skills, a driving range allows one the opportunity to do so

"Wednesday we have the business league," Kathie explains. Businesses are encouraged to put a team together and come join the league play. "We have a nine hole tournament Wednesday evening at 5:30 p.m. At the end of eight weeks, the team with the most points wins. We're going to have a barbecue and an award ceremony."

Reaction of golfers has been encouraging since the Widbys took over. "We've had a lot of positive comments from the locals and people passing through," observes Kathie. Business has already picked up this season. "We're really hopeful that it's going to be busy enough to support it and make a go of it," she adds, explaining that about 400 rounds a week are played on the course and that nearly 80 percent of the golfers are local.

"Our biggest challenge," says Jim is getting people back to play." It takes time to win back faithful golfers who have become disillusioned with the prior deplorable condition of the course, but Jim is working hard to bring them back.

"As meticulous as Jim is if there's any way, it will come true," affirms George.

"He's a hard worker," says Kathie.

"A good businessman," adds George.

The clubhouse offers other pleasing and appetizing enticements. "We have a breakfast and lunch menu, with beer, wine and sodas," says Kathie. "The clubhouse is open from seven in the morning until eight at night." There is also a small pro shop with equipment for sale where golfers can rent clubs and carts. Arrowhead also offers cart storage and men's and women's locker rooms.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Following a rough week, anglers saw a good weekend of fishing at Eagle Lake. Many trout came in at or above three pound mark. Seven year old Sammy Moyer of Modesto caught a three pound 13 ounce trout using worms near Shrimp Island Sunday morning. Two fish in excess of four pounds were caught this morning (Monday) from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty.

Still-fishing with night crawlers continues best. Trollers continue using down riggers or lead-line set ups at 25-35 foot depths. No single lure seems to be leading the pack for trolling. Lures being used include plastic grubs and needlefish. Trolling with night crawlers also works well. Many are using Wiggle Fins to enhance activity while trolling.

Best producing areas include Shrimp Island, Wildcat Point, Eagles Nest and near the Eagle Lake Marina jetty.

Due to high alkalinity and warm surface temperatures, Fish and Game officials are now recommending that fisherman cease practicing "catch and release" for the next few weeks due to the high degree of stress created for the trout during capture. It is recommended that all fish be kept to reduce that amount of fish that die from stress.

On July 26, Eagle Lake Marina and Campgrounds will host its annual Mountain Music Festival at the Aspen Boat Ramp. The fun will start at 10 a.m. with the third Annual "Show by the Lake" Show and Shine car show followed by live entertainment and Tri tip barbecue. Custom cars, street rods and restorations are all welcome for the car show. Best of show will be chosen by vote of viewers.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available first come, first serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake call (530)825-3212. For reservations call toll free (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions or further information about the Music Festival call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Alturas pool could be open by Friday

The new pump for the Alturas Swimming Pool is supposed to arrive in Alturas today and city crews are hoping to have the pool operational by Friday.

Public Works Director Stacy Chase said the pump is a duplicate of the one which malfunctioned, so it should be easily replaced. He said barring any unforeseen problems, and if the pump arrives today, the pool should be open tomorrow. Call the city at 233-2512 for status.

The pump and motor system went down last Sunday and the pool was forced to close.

M.H.A. hosts Midsummer Classic horse show

The Modoc Horseman's Association will be presenting its 21st annual "Midsummer Classic" Horseshow and Gymkhana on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 25, 26, and 27 at the Junior Livestock Show Grounds in Alturas, CA.

As a special incentive to those advanced horses/riders the organization is sponsoring four "Superior--Trophy Buckles" classes; one in trail, one in Western Pleasure, one in English Pleasure, and the other in Jumping. Friday's activities will include Reining, Trail and Gymkhana; Saturday has been designated "All Western" and Sunday will be devoted to English classes. By popular demand, another High Point Age Division has been added. As M.H.A. wishes to encourage the participation of younger riders in its shows, they are adding a special 1st/2nd Year Youth Rider High Point Division for this event. So, all young people who are just starting to ride need to plan to participate in the show to compete against other "novice" riders. All of your classes are Western and include: Trail, Showmanship, Western Pleasure Walk-Trot, Western Pleasure, and Western Equitation. Other High Point Age Divisions are: 12 and Under, 13 through 17, 18 through 39, and 40 and Over. There is also a High Point Division for Junior Horses (4 years and under).

Please note that to be eligible for consideration for any of these High Point Divisions, the rider must declare their intentions prior to the start of the show.

A concession stand will be available for cold drinks, light meals, and snacks. As in the past, all "out of towners" are welcome to camp out at the show location. Water and electricity are available. Stalls are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at $25.00. Initial bedding will be furnished. All M.H.A. members will be charged $4.00 per (regular) class. All Non M.H.A. members will be charged $6.00 per (regular) class. Membership applications will be available at the show, or mailed to you upon request. However, fees must be paid in full before the show begins.

Two $100.00 Stake Classes are on the schedule, one for Western Riding and the other for English Equitation. The entry fee will be $15.00.

Classes included on the schedule include:

Friday, July 25--2:00 p.m

Lunge Line--Junior Horse (4 years and under), Open Reining, Youth Reining--18 years and under, Modoc County Ranch Horse--Open, Trail-All Five age groups, Superior Trail--Trophy Buckle--Open.

Gymkhana--6:00 p.m:

Barrels, Poles, Single Stake, Scramble Barrels, Potato Race.

Saturday, July 26--8:00 a.m:

Showmanship--All five age groups, Foals of 2002 and 2003, Fillies-- two to three years, Geldings/Stallions--two to three years, Mares--four years and over, Geldings/Stallions--four years and over, Champion Mare, Champion Gelding/Stallion, Western Pleasure, Walk/Trot--All five age groups and Junior Horse, Western Pleasure--All five age groups and Junior Horse, Western Equitation--All five age groups and Junior Horse, Western Riding Pattern--$100.00 Stake--Open, Superior Western Pleasure--Trophy Buckle--Open

Sunday, July 27--8:00 a.m:

English pleasure, Walk/Trot--four age groups and Junior Horse, English Pleasure--four age groups and Junior Horse, English Equitation--Four age groups and Junior Horse, English Equitation--$100.00 Stake--Open, Superior English Pleasure--Trophy Buckle--Open, Hunter Hack--Four age groups and Junior Horse, Hunter Over Fences--Open (2' to 2'6").

All High Point Champions and Reserve Champions in each of the nine divisions, 1st/2nd year rider, 12 and under, 13 through 17, 18 through 39, 40 and over, Junior Horse, Western Horse/Rider Combination, English Horse/Rider Combination, and High Point Over-All Horse/Rider Combination, will be presented with their awards at a special ceremony at the conclusion of the show on Sunday afternoon. High points will be accumulated for a one horse/one rider combination (horse to be ridden by only one rider to count for any High Point Award).

All entries must be postmarked by Friday, July 18, however Post Entries (+50%) will be accepted. Early entries would be appreciated. Note: for all "early birds" the Show Office will be open for business at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Schedules and Entry Forms for the Midsummer Classic will be sent out shortly to everyone on M.H.A.'s mailing list. To request a copy of this packet of information or, if you have any questions, please contact Pat Gaylord, Show Secretary, P.O. Box 160, Adin, CA. 96006 or call her at (530)299-3310. If you have any questions pertaining to the Gymkhana events please phone Wendy Easley at (530)233-8298.

M.H.A. welcomes your participation in their Midsummer Classic and they invite you to come to Alturas for a weekend of horse show events. They plan to make their 21st Anniversary Show a memorable one, so do plan to attend, meet old friends, make new ones but, most of all, have a good time.

July 17 2003

News

Macsay calls for Dunn to resign Chair

An angry, but deliberate, Supervisor Dan Macsay Tuesday called for Chairman of the Board Mike Dunn to resign for the good of the county.

"The Chairman has shown that he is a self-serving individual and that his only interest is promoting his thoughts and beliefs, as evidenced by this fiasco, he has created turmoil, hate and discontent on this board,” Macsay said. "He is an ineffective leader who will continue to bring this county down, so for the good of this county and the people he serves, he should immediately step down as Chairman of this Board.”

Dunn, who has had conflict of interest problems in past actions is also under investigation for a conflict of interest involving his business relationship with County Counsel Vickie Cochran. He said he accepted Macsay's views as his opinion, but was not inclined to step down as chair.

Supervisor Patricia Cantrall, who has been the subject of frequent public attacks or insults by Dunn, also said she felt Dunn's lack of leadership skills and his personal agenda was placing the county in a bad light.

Macsay read a lengthy statement into the record Tuesday, over the objections of Cochran, who said he was violating a confidential report. Macsay said he wasn't revealing any of the confidential aspect of the report and finished his statement.

What prompted the condemnation of Dunn was Dunn's actions on Monday, which Macsay took exception to and wanted to set straight.

"Yesterday, (Monday) I was called on the phone by the Chairman and was given a lecture about the meaning of the words Semper Fidelis, after he looked it up in the dictionary,” said Macsay, a retired Marine Corps officer. "He then went on to tell me, in a snide manner, that the conversation I had with investigator Adrienne Moran was not confidential even if I thought it was. He got an email from her after he had asked her to obtain my statement. He then proceeded to tell me how I had falsified the statement that I had given her. I told him I would see him tomorrow and hung up the phone.”

Moran was in Modoc doing an investigation concerning certain employees and employee issues.

"It bothers me that he did not have the intestinal fortitude to personally approach me and ask me what I had told the investigator,” said Macsay. "I would have been more than happy to tell him. I have no reason to lie or cover up anything.”

Macsay suggested that the board place a phone call to Moran and let her tell the entire Board about his conversation with her to clear up the issue. That request was not considered by Dunn.

"The short of the conversation was that he is calling me a liar and that I perjured myself in the testimony I had given,” said Macsay. "Not only was my honesty being questioned, but also my integrity.”

Macsay also said that prior to him being seated on the Board, Dunn had approached a businessman in Surprise Valley and had him pass on how he should work with the board and not create any problems. He took exception to that activity by Dunn.

"At board meetings I have been chastised by the Chairman for putting an article in the paper that merely laid out my thoughts and feelings on a particular subject,” said Macsay. "Also at that meeting, I was basically told how to vote, that he, himself, votes with the majority. At another meeting he made a statement to me that I should not question Department Heads, yet that is what he has been doing, as of late. Also at meetings, he has told me to stick to the agenda item, yet he, himself, has strayed many times. As of late, he has attempted to stray off the agenda item, which has involved the trouble this board is facing, until he was reined in.

"The Chairman, other board members or staff will not sway me . . . I do my research to the best of my ability and if there is an issue I do not understand, I am not afraid to say so. I will vote what is best for this county and the people in my district. I will not let others sway my opinion for their own personal gain or stature.”

Cal Pines burglar caught with goods

It took a 24-foot U-Haul truck to bring back the stolen items from at least four residences in the Unit 3 and 4 Hill Units of California Pines.

Modoc County Sheriff's Deputies, led by Deputy Vern Seevers, arrested Karen Halus, age 43, of Magalia, Ca. on July 17 in Butte County for possession of stolen property with assistance from the Butte County Sheriff's Department.

According to Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Halus was in the California Pines area visiting friends over about a two-month period. During that period, he said, the woman allegedly entered vacation homes by using a crowbar to pry open doors or windows. She allegedly removed items from the homes, often taking the brackets off the walls. Items recovered included televisions, VCRs, radios, household decorations, drapes, pictures and wall art.

According to Seevers, the truck load of recovered items has not been itemized, but he estimates that at least $5,000 to $10,000 in items have been recovered. There may be more stolen goods in other areas.

"We certainly appreciated the help of the California Pines Hill Units residents,” said Gentry. "They were invaluable to Seevers in his investigation and they were definitely vigilant.”

At least four homes were burglarized, according to Gentry. Seevers located a couple of those homes while on patrol and homeowners contacted the Sheriff's Office to report other burglaries.

Gentry said the items recovered in Butte County have been brought back to Modoc County. The investigation is continuing.

Arts Council on chopping block?

Modoc County Arts Council Director Ken Franklin isn't holding out hope for increased funding this year from the state, he's just hoping it comes in above zero.

The California Arts Council is on the chopping block with the current state budget mess, and while Franklin doesn't think the entire state program will be eliminated, he does feel that the overall funding will be cut dramatically. So far the CAC has survived a couple of legislative attempts to cut it completely.

Franklin said the current proposal could be to fund the CAC at $750,000, down from about $21 million last year. If that level is approved, Modoc simply won't have a funded program.

Franklin has chosen not to take a paycheck from the county since the fiscal year ended because he's unsure of the funding levels. He took a 25 percent pay cut a year ago and another one last year. Modoc's overall Art Council funding has dropped form about $60,000 a year to under $30,000 last year and Franklin figures it could be halved again for this coming year.

The Modoc Arts Council has been very active in the community and has presented a wide variety of cultural events. Some of those events include: Lost River, the Artist in Residence program for the three school districts each year, performances by traveling musicians, the Missoula Children's Theater, juried art shows for students as well as the public, the town murals, and is an integral part of the Niles Theater and the Modoc Performing Arts Theater.

There has been good statewide support to keep the CAC funded, but there is continued effort to cut funding for the arts at the state level. Franklin said it's absurd to cut the CAC, since it is one of the few revenue positive programs in the state. He said studies show that for every dollar spent on the CAC, almost two dollars is earned.

He pointed out that statewide, the arts industry supports 400,000 jobs, generates $830 million is state income in the form of fees, income and sales tax. It also generates $16.75 billion in annual economic activity, excluding arts and the entertainment industry, $6.65 billion in spending by arts organizations and an additional $10.1 billion in event-related spending by arts audiences.

Locally, Franklin said the variety and quality of the entertainment available from the Arts Council has been very beneficial to students as well as the general public. Without the local Arts Council, Franklin fears many of these programs will simply not be available to Modoc.

Residents concerned about the loss of the Modoc County Arts Council should contact their legislative representatives and make their feelings known.

"You know, I realize we're going have to take a cut, but I believe the cuts should be fair and across the board of state programs,” said Franklin. "I think cutting the California Arts Council completely would be a serious loss to the state in terms of culture and education, and also in terms of revenue.”

Hot, but no record heat yet

Yes, it has been hot, but there have been no records set with the July heat wave.

According to weather records, the hottest July day was July 19, 1960 when the heat pushed the mercury to a blistering 107 degrees. It is not wholly unusual to have a few July days hit the century mark, and have many days over 90 degrees.

The temperature Tuesday hit 103 degrees and on Monday was at 102.

The average high for July is 87.6 degrees, the hottest month of the year, and the average low is 43.2 degrees. The record low temperature for the month was July 18, 1993 at 28 degrees.

What is interesting and may indicate record-setting levels is that as of today, 16 July days have been over 90 degrees, and it's expected to remain hot for the weekend.

So far, July has turned out to be very dry as well with just .01 inches of precipitation recorded. The average precipitation this month is 0.2 inches.

Street Tree reward increased to $500

Three more of the Alturas Chamber of Commerce's Main Street Trees were broken by vandals last week.

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes said local businesses and agencies have banded together to increase the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the vandals to $500.

The City of Alturas, Modoc Joint Unified School District, the Alturas Chamber of Commerce, Walt's Market and the Modoc County Record have each donated $100 to the reward fund.

Davis recall petition signatures verified

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison reports that of the 395 signatures collected in Modoc County to recall Governor Gray Davis, 301 have been verified as valid.

Madison said the petitions' signatures were generally mailed in from petitions sent to the Republican party households locally. Of the 2,450 registered Republicans, all of whom may not have received petitions, the 301 represents 12 percent.

County Clerks throughout the state are in the process of counting and verifying signatures. Since only 897,158 signatures are needed statewide to get the issue on the ballot, it seems certain there will be a recall election, either this fall or early next year.

MJUSD interviewing for new Superintendent

The Modoc Joint Unified School District interviewed three candidates Wednesday to take over as the new Superintendent. Former Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly resigned effective July 1 to take a position in the Sacramento area.

According Interim Superintendent Don Demsher, the district received 11 applications from an advertisement it ran in an education publication for a month, closing July 15.

The top three candidates were interviewed by a citizen's committee and then the Board of Trustees yesterday. Following the interviews, the Board discussed the candidates to decide whether to offer any of them the position. Demsher said the actual appointment of a new Superintendent is tentatively scheduled for August 5.

Obituaries:

William Harvey 'Bill' Boyd

William Harvey "Bill Boyd, 77, passed away in Alturas, CA on July 18, 2003, after a long fight against cancer.

The Jerome, Idaho native had called Modoc County his home since 1941, when he moved to Canby, CA. at the age of 15 and attended Modoc High School. He was born on March 20, 1926.

He and June Fulfer, his wife of almost 59 years, were married in Reno, NV. on September 9, 1944, while she was still a senior at Modoc High School. They started their family and put down deep roots in Modoc County

The history and environment of Modoc was an important part of Bill's life. He knew every backroad, had hunted the big bucks, fished the rivers and reservoirs and could tell stories about every inch of the county. He loved to hunt, fish and waterski and taught his daughter how to hunt deer and enjoy camping.

He began working in the logging industry at a young age and his primary logging jobs were in the Adin and Canby areas, although he had several logging jobs that took him to other parts. He worked for the U.S. Forest Service for a time before becoming a heavy equipment operator for CalTrans in 1968. He retired from CalTrans in 1986, after just over 18 years with the State of California.

A member of the Alturas Masonic Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, he also served for many years as President of the Canby T.V. Club, where he was instrumental in maintaining television service in the Canby area. He appreciated living in Canby, where he and June made their home until their 50th wedding anniversary, when they bought a home and relocated to Alturas in 1994.

Bill enjoyed travels in the couple's RV, visiting daughter Alexis and her family in New Hampshire and seeing the country. Family gatherings won't be the same without his tales, his laugh and the glimmer in his eye, as he shared a joke. His family and many friends will all miss him.

He was preceded in death by his mother Anne Boyd in 1995; father Eddie Boyd in 1994 and grandson Ken in 1998.v He is survived by his wife June of Alturas, daughter Alexis, son-in-law Bruce of Gilford, N.H., grandchildren Stacey in Astoria, OR. and Erin and Bradd in New Hampshire, great-grandchildren Bruce, Briana, Derrick, Tessa and Rex; brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Bud and Bea Fulfer of Adin, CA and Dick and Jean Sisson of Enid, OK.; nieces and nephews Debbie, Jeff, Connie, Clyde, Dale, Karen, Wayne, Alice Lynn, Charlie; cousins Mildred Sculley and daughters Theresa and Geri, all of Klamath Falls, OR.

Following his wishes, no services will be held.

Memorials may be made to Modoc County Sheriff's Posse for support of Search and Rescue Activities, care of Bank of America, 205 N. Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

Joyce E. Carter

Former Madeline resident, Joyce Elaine Carter, 62, of Yuba City, CA., died at Rideout Memorial Hospital in Marysville, CA., on June 30, 2003.

Born in Alamosa, Colorado, on November 3, 1940, she was a Yuba City resident for six years; formerly living in Madeline and Susanville from 1976-1997

She was a homemaker. She enjoyed traveling, spending time with her children and grandchildren, waterpainting, crocheting, surfing the web and e-mailing.

She was preceded in death by her husband of 41 years, Bobby J. Carter and her mother, Helen Van Skiver.

Survivors include two sons, Robert Carter of Yuba City and Daniel Carter of Lacombe, LA; two daughters, Debra Markos of Sacramento and Anita Fleshman of Susanville; her father, Philip Nelson of Fremont; four brothers, Charles Nelson of Pleasanton, James Nelson of Fernley, NV., Laurence Nelson of Grass Valley, and Robert Nelson of Robert Park; nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Services were held on June 5, 2003, at the Chapel of the Twin Cities, with Rev. Ray Davis, of Valley Hospice, officiating. Walton's Colonial Mortuary in Susanville was in charge of arrangements.

Robert Martin Milek

A true sportsman and a gentleman, Robert Martin Milek passed away in his Alturas, California home on June 25, 2003 of old age. A private burial service was held at the Alturas Cemetery on Thursday, July 10.

He and his wife, Ruth, moved from El Toro, CA., to Alturas in 1978. "Bob" was an active member of the Fitzhugh Creek Gun Club and also the Alturas Rifle Range.

Robert was born on March 10, 1912 in Thermopolis, Wyoming to Frank and Katherine Milek who were pioneers of the town.

Bob had a keen sense of nature, animals and hunting; surrounded always by many relatives and friends who loved to hunt for deer and birds as much as he did, the stories were endless.

An excellent rifleman, Mr. Milek was a strong believer in the Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, for all of its ramifications for past and future generations.

Robert taught himself to become an artist during the Depression years and while on his way in search of work in Las Vegas, where he felt his artistic talents could be put to use, he stopped in Los Angeles and was offered and accepted a position in 1954 at Disneyland, as foreman of the Art Department for the park, which was preparing to open. He always felt fortunate about being hired for the position and retired in 1977.

A paradox of a man's man, who had six daughters, painted beautiful pictures and his wife's nails, Modoc offered him a chance to keep his life in balance.

Mr. Milek was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth in 1988, and his second daughter, Jean Weber in 1997. He is survived by five daughters: Joan Wright of Bedford, TX., Jane Easton of San Jose, CA., Darlene Hines of Tulelake, CA., Madeline Cook of Waipahue, HI., and Kathleen Brooks of Alturas, CA. Also, eleven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Sports

Junior golf next week

Arrowhead Golf Course is hosting the junior golf program July 28, 29, and 30 at the Alturas course.

The fun instruction program is open to youth ages six to 18 and will start at 9 a.m. each day. The instruction will last approximately 3.5 hours, plus or minus, per Gary at the Golf Course.

Kids can register the first day or register early by calling 233-3404. The fee is $5 per child. Volunteers are needed to help instruct the youngsters. Contact Arrowhead for more information.

Allstars take on teams, heat

Modoc Allstar Boys Senior League baseball team headed down to a hot and humid Yuba City last weekend to take part in the Sectional play-off games. The hot weather has forced the games to move to evening play.

The first game, last Saturday, found the Modoc team losing to Westside Chico 11 to 4. The Sunday game had Modoc Allstars sending the Cottonwood team home, by beating them 6 to 3. Monday, Modoc played Westside Chico and eliminated the Chico team by winning 8 to 7.

Tuesday night, Modoc played the undefeated Sutter Butte team and Modoc won, 3 to 2. At presstime Wednesday night, the Modoc team was headed into a Championship game against Sutter Butte, once again. If they pull out a win, they have the opportunity to head to the Divisional games in Visalia.

Local Allstars are coached by Chad Jessup, with Terry Dunn as manager. Team members include Danny Randazzo, Cody Widby, K. C. Kirkreit, Cameron Wheeler, Joey Catania, Kyle Madision, Justin Mason, Micah Eppler, Taylor Dunn, David Kolvoord, Travis Potter and Dane McCombs.

July 31, 2003

News

State budget may have some impacts

While the full impacts of the state budget are being sorted out by local government agencies, it appears that in most cases the county will still be in relatively good fiscal shape.

According to Don Demsher, Interim Superintendent of Modoc Joint Unified School District, the final hit on the district will be just over $50,000 and he said "that's manageable."

Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said the approved state budget, (which still has to be signed by the Governor before it's final) looks like it will be within management range.

While there will be some balancing acts, Maxwell also said that this week's budget hearings with department heads have brought some welcome news. "I'll tell you, department heads have done an excellent job this year on their individual budgets," Maxwell said. "We're going to be coming in with more in revenue balances that we anticipated and department heads deserve a lot of the credit. They've been creative and frugal."

On Tuesday, a State Senate-approved budget had cut out huge chunks of local government money, including a $500,000 Rural Sheriff's grant. There were other areas where cuts also have added to the severity of the impacts, but the $500,000 hit would have caused some bleeding.

On Wednesday, the budget approved by the State Assembly reinstated the $500,000 grant as well as other law enforcement funding. There is still some question on overall implications of the budget, but Maxwell was breathing much easier on Wednesday. The county is currently in budget hearings and having an approved state budget will make it more realistic. The state did cut into the state library funds by half and also pretty much eliminated the California Arts Council, as well as the Modoc County Arts Council.

County Librarian Cheryl Baker, said the state cuts will have an impact on the overall budget, but she has no plans to reduce services or hours. Luckily, Modoc County passed a Mello-Roos Act measure and property owners are assessed a fee each year dedicated to the libraries.

City Treasurer Kathie Alves is concerned about impacts to the city, but has yet to get everything cemented down, not unlike other agencies. She said a shift from the city receiving its share of sales tax monthly, to getting a like amount in property tax payments, may create a cash flow issue, since property taxes are only distributed twice a year.

Next week, all agencies will be able to put their finger on the pulse of their budgets as well as the state's overall impact on those budgets, once the Governor signs the budget into law.

Tulelake fire under control

The Ackley Fire, eight miles south of Tulelake should be under complete control August 1 by 6 p.m., according to the NorCal Interagency Incident Management Team.

The fire, which has burned since last weekend, charred approximately 9,940 acres and is 90 percent contained. Currently, there is occasional burning of interior islands well inside the fire perimeter, in mixed grass, sagebrush and western juniper.

Fire crews are expecting some thunderstorm activity Thursday and Friday with temperatures cooling as low pressure moves into the area.

A fire camp was established at the Tulelake Fairgrounds and 412 personnel were assigned. That included 17 engines, 10 crews, three water tenders, one dozer, one helicopter, 11 overhead and two camp crews.

The Modoc National Forest and Bureau of Land Management have issued fire restrictions on public land in this area.

Those restrictions go into effect August 2 and include the following: campfires can only be used in developed recreation sites or in designated fire safe areas; portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel are exempt from the restriction; internal combustion engines can only be used on established roads and trails. and smoking is allowed only within enclosed vehicles or in developed recreation sites. The South Warner Wilderness and woodcutting area DG-1P on Devil's Garden are exempt from the restrictions.

Information on any site specific exemptions to the restrictions is available by calling the nearest office of the Lassen or Modoc National Forests or the BLM.

Alturas man recovering from gas truck explosion

An Alturas man, Scott Slinkard, age 32, remains in serious condition at the Oregon Burn Center in Portland, following a fuel truck explosion last Wednesday.

According to Slinkard's father, Gary, his son was burned severely in his upper body, his hands, neck and back areas. He will remain at the Burn Center about a month initially and then will have a rehabilitation period following medical treatments.

According to Slinkard, his son was filling a fuel tank with gasoline at the Cloud Ranch near Willow Ranch. Apparently, said Slinkard, conditions caused the pump on the truck to pump faster. Slinkard said the fuel line remained in the Cloud's tank, but because the gas was being pumped so fast, it was coming back out of the fill hole like a geyser.

Slinkard ran back to the truck to shut off the pump, but as he reached to switch it off, the truck exploded, throwing Slinkard back and engulfing him in flames. His clothing had gotten soaked by gas when the pump sped up. Slinkard used a water hose on the fire to keep it away from the home and outbuildings until fire crews arrived. The fire crews administered aid to Slinkard immediately and called for an ambulance. He was transported to Lakeview and then flown to Portland.

MJUSD checking overall background for new super

Teams from the Modoc Joint Unified School District board are now talking with various groups and individuals in the community of their top new superintendent candidate.

According to Interim Superintendent Don Demsher, the teams are checking background and the overall impressions of people and peers. The Trustees will have the selection of a superintendent on their August 5 meeting agenda. They will either offer the position, or could go out for more applications. That decision has not yet been made, said Demsher.

The district interviewed three candidates last Wednesday to take over as the new Superintendent out of 11 applicants. Former Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly resigned effective July 1 to take a position in the Sacramento area.

4 hurt in forest traffic accident

Four young men from Cedarville sustained moderate injuries in a single vehicle accident July 29, 3:20 p.m. on Forest Service Road 31 east of Forest Service Road 42N16.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Craig Carpenter, age 21, Cedarville, was driving a 1986 Toyota pickup at a speed too great for a gravel road and lost control. The pickup left the road and struck a tree, then rolled down an embankment.

Mark Willmon, age 19, was in the back of the pickup and was ejected. Carpenter, Jason Geaney, age 21, and Christopher Hileman, age 23, were seated in the pickup. All four were transported by ambulance to Modoc Medical Center and Willmon was then flown to Mercy Medical Center in Redding.

A motorcycle wreck caused moderate injuries to the driver, Harvey Barfell, Jr., age 45, of Lakeview, July 29, 10:45 am. on CR 58.

The CHP reports that Barfell was riding his 1985 Kawasaki Ninja southbound too fast to negotiate a turn. He ran off the road and collided with a rock, throwing him from the motorcycle. He broke both of his arms and was able to crawl to the road to obtain help.

A 91-year-old Lookout, Ca. man sustained minor injuries in an automobile accident July 23, 10:20 p.m. on County Road 91, south of County Road 85. The California Highway Patrol reports that Joe L. Potter was driving his 1982 Suburu southbound on CR91 when heavy rain started to fall and limited visibility. He slowed his car to approximately 35 miles per hour and as he approached CR85, a large cow entered the highway from the shoulder directly in its path.

Porter was unable to avoid the cow, which walked away after the collision and was not located. Porter sustained a minor cut to his forearm and sought treatment himself. The Suburu sustained major front end damage and was towed from the scene.

On July 29, a cow was killed on CR91 when it was hit by a truck driven by Iqbal Singh Shergill, age 36, of Abbotsford, B.C. The accident occurred at 10 p.m. when Shergill encountered several cows in the road, hitting just one. There were no injuries when a parked vehicle got away from its owner on Mountain Quail Drive July 23, 5:30 p.m. The CHP reports that Laura Sheppard, 48, Alturas, had parked her 1991 Mitsubishi in her driveway on a steep hill. She forgot to set the emergency brake and put the vehicle in gear when she got out. The vehicle rolled backwards down the driveway, striking an embankment before crossing over Mountain Quail Road. After crossing the road it went over another embankment where it struck some rocks and trees before coming to rest. There were no injuries in a single vehicle accident July 26, 8:45 a.m. on U.S. 395 north of County Road 133D near Willow Ranch.

According to the CHP, Amber Marie Stewart, age 17, Sparks, Nv., was northbound on U.S. 395 at 65 m.p.h. when she fell asleep and ran off the road.

The 1997 Toyota rolled over, but there were no injuries because Stewart and two passengers were wearing seatbelts.

Free bus ride to fair

The Sage Stage Bus will provide free transportation to the Modoc District Fair on Friday and Saturday, August 15 and 16. Call 233-3883 to reserve for each person riding. Seating is limited; first-come, first-served.

Friday buses leave Elks Lodge parking lot in Alturas at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., and 7:00 p.m. plus after auto races.

Saturday buses leave at 10:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 4:15 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 5:45 p.m., and 6:45 p.m.; return from fairgrounds at 11:15 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. plus after demo derby.

Time to enter the Modoc Fair

Entries for Modoc District Fair livestock, still exhibits, junior rodeo, Rancher's Day and Destruction Derby will be accepted until Friday, August 1 at 6:00 p.m. for the 2003 Fair in Cedarville.

All Floriculture, Agriculture, Horticulture, PeeWee Showmanship and Sheep Dog Trial entries close on Friday, Aug. 8 at 6:00 p.m.

Parade entry forms are due Wednesday, August 13, 2003 at 5:00 p.m. All forms may be obtained by calling the Modoc District Fair at 279-2315 or from various businesses in Alturas and Cedarville, including Seab's True Value and Plumas Bank in Alturas.

School Starts August 20

The first day of school for Modoc Joint Unified School District is Wednesday, August 20, 2003, and it will be a normal school day. If there are any questions please call 233-7201. Modoc High School Ext. 401, Modoc Middle School Ext. 301, Alturas Elementary School Ext. 201, Alternative Education Ext. 309, District Office Ext. 101.

Sports

Soccer camp starts tonight at AES field

The local youth soccer league is hosting a soccer camp for youngsters starting today, at 5:30 p.m.

July 31 is also the final day to register for the soccer league. Signups will be held at the Alturas Elementary Soccer Field starting at 5 p.m.

The camp will be held at the same field. There is a $20 registration fee for the camp, which runs July 31, and August 1, from 5:30 p.m.. to 8:30 p.m. and August 2 from 9:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. On Saturday, August 2, there will be a tournament. Volunteers are needed and welcomed and parents are encouraged to attend as they can.

Balls will be provided and children need to wear shin guards, soccer cleats, if they have them or tennis shoes, shorts and t-shirts. Kids are also encouraged to bring a water bottle.

Modoc High School Soccer Coach Jay Carrithers and members of the Braves soccer team will be instructing kids with various drills through a series of rotating stations. Proceeds from the camp go to the Modoc High Soccer team.

For more information, call A.J. McQuarrie at 233-3420.

Football car wash Sunday

The Modoc High School Football team is holding a car wash Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holiday Market. The event will help raise funds for uniforms for the team. Customers are asked to leave whatever donation they choose for the car wash.

Also, Modoc High’s J.D. Monroe will be playing in the north state Lions All-Star football game Saturday in Redding.

Arrowhead hosts August 10 Stableford tourney

Arrowhead Golf Course is hosting a two-person Stableford Tournament August 10, with a tee time of 9 a.m. The tourney is scored on a point system, certain points for pars, birdies, or eagles and negative points for bogies and so on.

Sign up at Arrowhead or call 233-3404. Coming up on Sept. 5-6 is the big Member-Guest tournament. More information will be out soon.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing continued good last week at Eagle Lake. Most fish continue to come in between three and four pounds. Best results are coming from the Eagles Nest and WildcatPoint areas in the early morning hours. Shore fishermen should try the Eagle Lake Marina jetty or the Circus Grounds between Merrill Campground and Christie Day Use.

Still fishing and trolling with night crawlers continues to work best. For trolling, use down riggers or lead-line set-ups at 25-40 foot depths. Trollers preferring the use of lures should use Needlefish with Wiggle Fins attached to enhance activity.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available first-come first-serve. For camping information at Eagle Lake call (530)825-3212, For reservations call toll free (877)444-6777. FOr current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

August 7,2003

News

Hail makes an large impression on Modoc

Monday evening's hail storm beamed down with the largest hail even long-time Modoc'ers had ever witnessed here.

Early evening, the west side of the Warner Mountains were not visible from Alturas, due to a horizontal shroud of what looked like fog, that "fog" was actually a major cloud carrying hail that pelted down across a wide swath, pelting homes on the mountain side and in Alturas. Residents described the hail sound as a racket, many worrying their windows would break. Parker Creek residents Sue Caughey and Roy Bailey reported hail stones as large as golf balls. After five minutes of rumbling thunder, the hail came pounding down covering the ground. Sheets of heavy rain followed washing out outdoor barbecues and flooding a number of outlying areas. Several solar panels, RVs and vehicles were hammered and damaged by the pounding hail around the Alturas area. The roof gutters on the Bailey home found new down spouts as the stones broke holes through the gutters. Ruined hay fields and not-yet-harvested vegetable gardens became a sad sight and loss.

In Alturas, as local residents were heading home from jobs between 5:10 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., when the hail storm moved into the city, with hail stones measuring an inch and larger in diameter, before the storm moved north.

Massive thunderhead clouds increased in size as darkness set in, and lightning continued to light up the night as the storm moved north along the west side of the Warner Mountains.

County counsel wants study to end contract

Modoc County Counsel Vickie Cochran has asked the Board of Supervisors to appoint an impartial committee or person to negotiate the early termination of her contract.

Cochran told Supervisors Tuesday that she is being forced out of office by County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell, whom she said will not listen to her advice and who has made it impossible to do her job. Cochran said she was trying to bring Modoc "into the 21st Century" and accused several departments, including the CAO, of violating the law on a continuing basis.

She said she believes that there are continuing violations of county ordinances, ongoing corruption, forgery, fraud, misuse of government funds, misconduct and violations of labor codes in the following offices: social services, public guardian, public health, public administrator as well as the hospital and CAO's office. She offered no proof of any allegations, citing the "confidentiality" of her position.

Maxwell said there have been investigations into many of her charges and there are ongoing investigations into others. He said he welcomed the independent investigative look into the offices to clear the air.

Cochran complained that she has been treated with disrespect by some members of the board, by department heads and Maxwell and that she has had her legal opinions challenged by department heads and employees. She said she has tried to bring Modoc County into compliance with the law, but has found resistance.

Most departments accused of wrongdoing have not been directly informed of any charges, and no charges or allegations have been filed with the District Attorney, except in the Social Services-Public Guardian area, and that investigation could be completed this week.

Another investigation concerning the Public Guardian (Cochran's daughter) and an elder abuse accusation has been forwarded to the Attorney General's office and resolution of that issue is expected in the near future. Modoc District Attorney Jordan Funk said he and his assistant, Larry Barnes, are finishing their review of the AG report.

The Board did agree to appoint someone to negotiate her contract termination, but as of Wednesday, that issue had not been resolved. In other action Tuesday, the Board heard from Bureau of Land Management manager Tim Burke, that his agency is starting a Land Management Plan for the Alturas Area, the Surprise Valley area and the Eagle Lake Resource Area.

He said the first phase in that process will be a series of public meetings to assess issues.

In some cases, he said, the existing management plans are up to 30 years old. He said the plans will involve 260,000 acres of public land administered by the BLM in Modoc, 120,000 acres east of the Warners and 140,000 acres west of the Warners. There will be a meeting in Alturas August 20, 6 p.m. at the BLM office on 12th Street. A field trip is scheduled in Surprise Valley this Saturday and from Alturas August 23.

Some of the current issues of importance, said Burke, include elk management, juniper management, fire management, off-road vehicle use, land tenure adjustment and recreation management. He expects other issues to come to the forefront as the public expresses its views.

The Board once again put off a decision on the contract for services at the hospital with Dr. Ed Richert and Dr. Owen Panner. Cochran presented her concerns to the Board just before the item was discussed Tuesday, indicating she hadn't had time to get her comments to them sooner. The contract has been in limbo since April.

The Board also set a meeting for August 28, 6 p.m. in the Board chambers to review the Modoc Resource Advisory Committee project. The board will discussing those projects coming out of RAC funds, which the county has control over.

The Board also agreed with Supervisor Dave Bradshaw to look into the Allen Camp Dam project, which had been proposed in the late 1970s in the Big Valley area.

They also discussed the situation and funding problems affecting volunteer fire departments in the county and vowed to work with those agencies and outside agencies to help find solutions, including workers' compensation insurance costs, and mandatory training.

Jason Franks now missing two years

Former Alturas resident Jason Franks has been missing for two years, vanishing on August 10 while on a camping trip with friends near Chiloquin, Or.

Franks, the son of Sheri and Brian Harden of Alturas, was 21 years old at the time. There has been no contact or trace of Franks since he disappeared.

In an effort to maintain or create awareness, the family is holding a balloon release just behind Alturas Elementary School at 10 a.m. Saturday, August 9.

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes, said the investigation is continuing and leads are being followed up, but so far, nothing has been very productive. The family has also asked the Center for Missing Adults for assistance and to help disseminate information. They are a division of National Missing Children Organization. located in Phoenix, Arizona.

Franks was last seen when he went camping with friends north of Klamath, near Chiloquin. His "friends" report that they left Franks alone at the campsite and upon returning, he was missing. His family is extremely concerned for his well-being. He had always remained in contact with the family, and not hearing from him or knowing about his well-being is very difficult.

Anyone with information on Franks is asked to call the Alturas Police Department at 233-2011.

Recall election could cost $20,000, says Clerk

Counties up and down the state are predicting the Oct. 7 Recall Governor Gray Davis special election could cost in excess of $60 million, funds most counties say they just don't have lying around.

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said she feels the recall will probably cost Modoc County about $20,000. "It's not in our budget, so it's going to have to come from county funds," said Madison.

Madison said since Modoc upgraded its voting system after the 2000 election, the machines and process should work fine. She will probably consolidate some precincts and many will be mail-in. Some other large counties, said Madison, are very concerned because they haven't gotten systems completely up and running.

Candidates in the recall election have until August 9 to declare candidacy. The last day to register to vote in the election is Sept. 22. The last day to file for an absentee voter ballot is Sept. 30.

As of this week, about 240 candidates statewide (none in Modoc) have taken out papers as candidates for the recall election and more than 100 others are still considering a run. In that case said Madison, the ballot could be very long.

MJUSD meets today on new boss

The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees is meeting today at 1:30 p.m., to negotiate a mutually agreeable contract with a possible new superintendent.

According to Interim Superintendent Don Demsher, the board has tentatively selected a candidate, and should make a final decision today. Teams from the Modoc Joint Unified School District board spoke with various groups and individuals in the community of the top candidate last week.

The district interviewed three candidates to take over as the new Superintendent out of 11 applicants. Former Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly resigned effective July 1 to take a position in the Sacramento area.

Blue Fire timber sales could be offered by October, 2003

By Anthony E. Larson

Special to The Record

Sales of timber from the Blue Fire two years ago in the Modoc National Forest could begin as early as October, according to Forest Service official, Paul Bailey, a timber program manager in the Alturas office.

The recent notice of decision by forest supervisor, Stan Sylva, to initiate a recovery project is presently in a 45-day appeal period, which began July 17. If no appeals are filed in that period, sales will follow.

Bailey explained that no appeals have been filed to date, but that is not unusual since most are filed in the last few days of the appeal period. If filed, an appeal would halt the entire process, requiring more hearings and further delaying the removal of the dead and downed trees, a prospect that has been postponed for over two years.

Most of the forest in the Blue Fire area will not be treated in any case since about 52 percent was not burned or is untreatable under Forest Service guidelines while another 20 percent is within the protected South Warner wilderness area, and thus off limits to logging.

Only 28 percent of the Blue Fire area, or about 6,000 acres will be logged, according to Bailey. Once begun, operations may continue well into the middle of next year.

"I think it's a real shame to have that timber setting up there for two years," said Dave Bradshaw, Modoc County supervisor, who, along with his counterpart in Lassen County, Brian Dahle, is also working with the Forest Service to reinstate timber harvests from the Sustained Yield Unit in the Modoc National Forest. It was the loss of logs from that unit that was the primary cause of the lumber mill closing in Bieber.

Bradshaw sees some progress toward more logging in the area due to a changing climate in the Forest Service. "I think there is a real ray of hope for people in our area," said Bradshaw. "The new forest supervisor is very attuned to the community."

"I'll believe it when I see it," said Dave Schroeder, who is incredulous where the Forest Service is concerned. Owner of a Janesville based logging company that salvaged the BLM portion of the Blue Fire area over a year ago, Schroeder is intimately familiar with the situation. "All I've heard is talk for the last ten years."

Openly critical of the Forest Service's handling of the Blue Fire salvage operation, Schroeder wonders why the whole fire area was lumped into a single environmental assessment. In his opinion, that was a serious lapse on the part of the Modoc National Forest officials, making the project unwieldy and difficult to document, thus slowing the entire project. Had the project been divided into two, three or more individual areas, each with its own environmental considerations and documentation, Schroeder asserts that approval for the less environmentally sensitive areas would have sailed through, thus allowing prompt logging of many burned areas.

As things stand, Schroeder insists that most of the commercial value of the downed and burned timber from the Blue Fire has been lost. "It's so old," he observes, "I can't imagine more than a small percentage of it would be merchantable, other than for chip material."

Moreover, the loss of income to local governments due to the lack of prompt logging in the aftermath of the Blue Fire is staggering, according to Schroeder. Based on the price of $175 per thousand board feet by the timber harvested from the BLM portion of the Blue Fire, he estimates that logging the Forest Service portion could have netted about $4.4 million for Modoc County coffers. Over a million of that would have gone to the road department and the school system. "Ask the Modoc County school superintendent if he could have used that money," said Schroeder, dryly.

The new Forest Service provision for small, low impact timber sales will have no impact on the Blue Fire salvage project, explained Bailey, noting that it will be most useful for timber salvage after small fires. "We can go treat those areas a little easier," he observed.

Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee meets August 11 and 18

Members of the Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will discuss project proposals for potential funding on the Modoc National Forest, when they meet Monday August 11 and Monday August 18 at the Modoc National Forest Headquarters Office at 800 West 12th Street, Alturas. Each meeting runs from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

The Modoc County RAC is seeking projects from local community members for funding in 2004. Projects must be presented to the RAC no later than August 18 for consideration.

The public is invited to the meetings to voice any comments on projects, and present new projects. Projects should enhance forest ecosystems and improve land heath and water quality.

For information contact any member of the RAC, co-chairman Sean Curtis (530)233-3276 or Mike Bacca (530)335-3681, or Louis Haynes, Modoc National Forest, at 233-8846.

The 15-member RAC is a federally sanctioned group by the Secretary of Agriculture and was formed as a result of the new legislation "Secure Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act of 2000."

The group represents a cross section of county communities, industries, schools, environmentalists, and local government. It is one of 15 RAC's established in California.

Under the legislation, last year, Modoc County received $3,261,814--$2.6 million was distributed to local schools and roads and the remaining $660,000 was split by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors for County Projects and projects on the Modoc National Forest. Projects on the National Forest are reviewed by the local RAC.

Alturas Library to close for week-long maintenance

The Alturas branch of the Modoc County Library will be closed August 11 through August 15, 2003, for annual maintenance. Library staff will be working on special projects throughout the week.

Arrangements will be made for patrons to pick up Interlibrary loans. The Library resumes its summer schedule on Monday, Aug. 18. Please call Cheryl Baker, County Librarian at 233-6340 if you have questions.

Some costs increase at Modoc Fair

Modoc District Fair CEO Traci Green has announced there will be some changes in costs this year for fairgoers. Adult admission is $5 each day, children are $3 and seniors will get in for $2. There will be a $2 gate admission fee on Thursday this year.

While at first glance the slightly higher gate fees may seem daunting, the benefits to attendees are many. Green is especially excited about the new ride bands being offered this year so families may enjoy unlimited carnival rides during certain extended hours.

This year, ride bands will be available on Thursday (5-9), Saturday (11-6) and Sunday (11-6) for only $7 per person each day. These bands make a long day of stomach-churning thrills very affordable for families. Ride coupons will still be available during other fair hours at prices comparable to past years.

Attracting a quality carnival to our remote corner of the state has become harder and more expensive each year. But Green has managed to find "The American Traveling Shows Carnival." This highly recommended carnival will be bringing several new rides appealing to a wider age range.

Though the fair just wouldn't be the fair without the noisy excitement of the carnival, for many the allure goes way beyond the rides. There will be a full schedule of exciting events for everyone to enjoy.

MJUSD schools to open

The first day of school for Modoc Joint Unified School District is Wednesday, August 20, 2003, and it will be a normal school day. If there are any questions please call 233-7201; Modoc High School Ext. 401, Modoc Middle School Ext. 301, Alturas Elementary School Ext. 201, Alternative Education Ext. 309, District Office Ext. 101.

Elementary through high school students welcome to 'Block Party'

A "Back to School Neighborhood Block Party" will be hosted by Christian Life Assembly from 12:30 p.m. until 3:00 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 10 on the church grounds at 225 West B Street, Alturas.

All elementary through high school age students are welcome to attend the free event. Back to school supplies will be given away free, while supplies last, hot dogs, sodas, balloons, free haircuts and many fun activities will be made available free to youths from elementary through high school level. Highlight of the afternoon will be five giant inflatable slides/toys, which include a 24 foot slide, funhouse, jump shot activity, mega obstacle challenge and wave runner water slide. All of the food, activities and supplies are free.

"Last year we gave away school supplies about this same time. This promises to be a fun-packed afternoon for kids of all ages," said Pastor Jerry Chilson, who encourages young people to come out for the afternoon. A check-in table will get kids started with free tickets for a good time. The giant inflatable items are being made available by the Assembly's District office based in Sacramento.

Obituaries:

Alva E. Troy, Jr

Former Modoc resident Alva E. Troy passed away after a brief illness on July 27, 2003 in the Veterans' Hospital at Fresno, CA. He was 82.

He is survived by his wife Doris Troy of Madera CA., daughter Patricia Roberts and son-in-law Richard of El Cajon, CA., two grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, one niece and seven nephews and by his sisters Georgia Smith of Alturas, CA and Helenne McCracken of Susanville, CA. Mr. Troy was preceded in death by his brother William E. Troy, father Alva E. Troy, Sr. and mother Matilda (Mattie) L. Kelly Troy and sister Lillian Frick of Burlingame.

Alva was born on January 2, 1921 in Little River, Kansas. His family moved to Modoc County, CA. in 1929. His father Alva, worked for NCO Railroad and young Alva attended Alturas Grammar and Modoc High Schools. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1942, and served his country in the South Pacific.

After the war, he settled and spent his time with his family in the San Francisco Bay area, where he was a career truck driver. He was active in AA and had just celebrated his 35th anniversary with Alcoholics Anonymous. He was well loved by many for his help and guidance in finding freedom from addictions.

A memorial service will be held in Madera, CA., this August, where Mr. Troy had resided for the last 16 years.

Sports

A $5,000 car wash

On Sunday, August 3, the Modoc High School football team had scheduled a car wash to raise money for game uniforms because of the reduction in the athletic program funds due to budget cutbacks.

For whatever reason, the team decided to cancel the car wash and reschedule it for another day. Imagine head coach Shaun Woods' surprise when he received a phone call from Wendy DelRosa insisting that she wanted her car washed. After a few frantic phone calls to the coaching staff and team members, Shawn showed up with a crew at Holiday Market.

When everyone was finally there, Wendy then handed Coach Woods a check from herself and her brother, Phillip DelRosa for $5,000 to buy game uniforms for the football squad. A stunned Shawn Woods said it was the largest single donation ever given to the Modoc High School Athletic Program.

Wendy told those present that the Alturas Rancheria believes sports are a very important part of our educational system. "Our parents and our people who attended Modoc High School benefited greatly by participating in sports activities. They helped keep us in school and gain the education that is so important in our world today. We also believe in supporting our community and its youth whenever we can. The Tribal members of the Alturas Rancheria are proud to be able to help the Modoc High football team with the purchase of new game uniforms.

Wendy DelRosa is the Chairperson of the Alturas Rancheria Tribal Business Committee and also a pharmacist at the Susanville State Prison. Phillip DelRosa is a member of the same committee and owns a successful trucking firm in Medford, OR. Both are graduates of Modoc High School, with many fond memories of growing up in Alturas.

Modoc athletes need physicals by practice

Modoc High School football players need to get physicals and sports information cards in as soon as possible.

Physicals should be done by August 15. Pick up the cards from coach Shaun Wood at the High School Weight Room Monday through Friday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. or from Lisa Cummings in the Principal's office during the morning. On August 18, both junior varsity and varsity teams will begin practice at 6 p.m.

Soccer players must also have their physicals in by the first day of practice, August 18, 3:30 p.m. at Alturas Elementary School.

Cross country practice for all junior and senior high runners will start on August 20, 3:45 p.m. at the Modoc High School Track. Physicals and insurance information must be in prior to practice. For more information, contact Don Mason at 233-5017 or leave a message at Modoc High School.

Arrowhead hosts Stableford tourney

Arrowhead Golf Course, Alturas, is hosting a two-person Stableford tournament Sunday, August 10 with a tee time of 9 a.m.

The tourney is scored on a point system, certain points for pars, birdies, or eagles and negative points for bogies and so on. Entry fee is $15 per person. Sign up at Arrowhead or call 233-3404.

Coming up on Sept. 5-6-7 is the big Member-Guest tournament. More information will be out soon.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing continues very good at Eagle Lake. Anglers are boasting about fish up to about five pounds in weight. Average sizes are ranging between two and a half and four pounds with most folks catching their limits early morning. The Eagle Nest and Wildcat Point areas are the most productive. Shore fishermen do best from the Eagle Lake Marina Jetty or the Circus Grounds between Merrill Campground and Christie Day Use.

Still-fishing with night crawlers rigged under slip bobbers is working best. Some are also reporting success with Power Bait. Trollers are using down riggers or lead-line set-ups at 25-35 foot depths. Various Needlefish, Rainbow Runners, broken back Rapalas and night crawlers are good bets for trolling.

Folks wishing to camp in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake will find four campgrounds with 325 campsites available. Two group camps are also available. More than 200 sites are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake, call (530)825-3212. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Memorial Sheepdog Trial set for Fair

By Michele Howard

Special to The Record

The annual Mark Waldenbach Sheepdog Trials will be held at the Modoc County Fairgrounds on Thursday, August 14, starting at 7:00 p.m. There will be three classes this year: Open Advanced, Ranch Dog, and Novice. The Open Advanced Class is for a dog and handler team who have competed in open level sheep or cattle dog trials or for anyone who is up for a challenge. The handler will stay in one designated area to command their dog throughout the entire course

The Ranch Dog Class is for a dog and handler team who do not show on a regular basis. The handler will be able to help the dog but must have one foot in a tire by the obstacle until the sheep pass through that particular obstacle

The Novice Class is for dogs that have never been shown; the handler will be able to help the dog through all phases of the course. One major change this year from the past is that the trial will be scored on points and time. Each dog and handler team will try to earn the most points possible, points being earned by the number of sheep that are taken through the obstacles; each team will be allowed five minutes to do this. This type of scoring system makes it especially fun for spectators, as they are able to tally up the scores while each team is running

After all of the teams have run, there will be a trailer loading competition where five lucky people, whose names have been drawn out of a hat, will try to load sheep into a free standing trailer in the middle of the arena. It's an exciting display of stockmanship by dog and handler. The winner of the trailer loading event will receive $100.00

"There will be dogs and handlers coming from Nevada, Oregon and Northern California," said Pam Iveson, of Cedarville, who is organizing the trial along with Pam Hughes, also of Cedarville. Iveson will be providing her Rambouillet sheep for the trial. "It looks to be a great event; it is always a thrill to watch these sheepdogs maneuver sheep that are five times their size through the challenging obstacles."

August 14, 2003

News

Modoc Grand Jury hits Hot Spring Irrigation

The embattled Hot Spring Irrigation District was hit pretty hard by the Modoc County Grand Jury, which just released its report for 2003. Among other things the Grand Jury found that Hot Spring water regulation and release methods have compromised water rights of downstream users, that the district has violated State and County policies and procedures for competitive bidding and contract award, which may also in include violations of the State's Contractor's Board, by a Hot Spring board member, that the district has not conducted an independent audit during the past 10 years, that board members do not comply with appropriate conflict of interest policies and regulations and have not filed timely statements of economic interest.

In addition, the Grand Jury also found that the district bylaws are outdated and do not conform to current statutes and it does not have a complete procedure manual. There have been no contested elections in the district in more than 10 years.

The Grand Jury is recommending that the district advertise any openings on the board and that board members refrain from performing compensated work and contracts for the district. The district should also solicit bids for contracts over $10,000.

The Grand Jury also recommends that the district have an annual independent audit as required by district bylaws and that all board members should complete Form 700 Statement of Economic Interests, and should also update the bylaws.

Information on the district action collected by the Grand Jury has been forwarded to Federal and State agencies with requests for further investigation.

The Grand Jury also dealt with the six formal and two informal complaints concerning the Modoc County Public Guardian/Conservator. The Grand Jury found that placement of individuals into conservatorship was legal, but there was lack of communication with families and institutions and that timely payments were not made for conservatee bills and conservatee records are incomplete.

The Grand Jury also found that the Public Guardian was under the direct supervision of the Director of Social Services. The Grand Jury also stated that the county needs to ensure that the Public Guardian has independent, non-familial legal counsel. The issue involved a conflict in that Tracey Cochran, the Public Guardian, was receiving legal advice from her mother, County Counsel Vickie Cochran.

The Grand Jury also recommends that any late charges incurred are the financial responsibility of the county and not the conservatee and that conservatee assets be inventoried within the time period required by law. Also, the Grand Jury recommends training in public relations for employees of the department.

The full Grand Jury Report is contained in the local issues of this Modoc Record.

Other items covered by the report include a recommendation that the City and County craft public information to define their agreement with respect to planning and economic development activities. It found no conflict in County/City Planner Scott Kessler serving both the city and county needs under a Joint Powers Agreement.

The Grand Jury also recommended more public information concerning the Modoc Medical Center Clinic and its reorganization. It also suggested the next Grand Jury look into the hospital's billing practices.

It gave high marks to the city and county street, road and public works departments, the library system, auditor, Surprise Valley Hospital, Modoc Sheriff's Office, and Devil's Garden Conservation Camp.

Pam Couch was the foreperson of the 2003 Grand Jury and members were: Susan Bunyard, Sharon Crabtree, Eleanor Dorton, Ernest Hawes, Richard Hughes, Todd King, Jim Laacke, Michael Mason, Harold Montague, Peggy Page, Robert V. Pedotti, Mary E. Rose, Carol Sharp, Sophie Sheppard, Gerald Thomas, Jamie Wheeler, Sandra Wilson and Toni Ziegler. .

Jail escapee found

A Modoc County Jail inmate who walked away from a work detail in early July was "captured" in Medford, Oregon last week when he reported to his probation officer.

According to Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Wesley Joe Box, age 23, was detained by Medford Police after they discovered the Modoc warrant for his escape. Box will now face additional charges, including escape, which could lead to a state prison sentence.

Gentry said Box is fighting extradition, and has a court date in Medford today.

Box and a fellow inmate were working on concrete July 2 adjacent to the jail where a new structure is being placed. Sometime about 9:30 a.m., said Gentry, Box told the other inmate and supervisor that he had to go to the restroom. He never came back.

Box was in jail on a stolen vehicle charge. He is from Medford, but spent some time here and has contacts in Modoc.

No criminal charges against Public Guardian

Modoc County District Attorney Jordan Funk has decided not to file criminal charges against Modoc County Public Guardian Tracy Cochran. "I have reviewed the investigation of the California Department of Justice into the alleged elder abuse and failure to report elder abuse by the Modoc County Public Guardian," Funk states. "Criminal charges will not be filed because the case cannot be proved beyond a reasonable doubt against any of the parties, including those who may have rendered legal advice to the Public Guardian, or to those who failed to report the situation, as required by law.

"I will advise the Board of Supervisors at their next scheduled meeting of the facts uncovered by the Department of Justice. I believe appropriate corrective action needs to be taken."

The investigation was requested by the Surprise Valley Health Care District concerning the removal of a patient, by the Public Guardian, from Surprise Valley Hospital's long term care facility.

DA files 12 felony counts against pair

Modoc County District Attorney Jordan Funk filed 12 felony counts Wednesday against Mike and Cameo Brown, alleging grand theft by embezzlement and grand theft of personal property though false pretenses in connection with a series of ranching-related crimes.

According to Funk, the Browns did fraudulently and unlawfully use the property of Leon Schultz, a pasture known as Lower Cottonwood Ranch, where they were caretakers and employees of Schultz to graze other ranchers' cattle without the knowledge of Schultz.

Some of the accusations involve grazing 87 cow/calf pairs, 187 head of cattle, 285 cows and 97 calves, plus taking more than $200,000 from other ranchers under false pretenses of grazing rights on the Schultz property and BLM allotments as well as others.

They are also accused of taking 80 tons of hay from Shultz and $2,488 worth of cattle feed supplement from John LeNeave with no intention of paying. More will be published on this case next week.

Pacific Power breaks off talks with Nor-Cal

Pacific Power announced today that it was breaking off talks with Nor-Cal Electric Authority over plans to sell Pacific Power's California service area to Nor-Cal.

Since 1998, Pacific Power and Nor-Cal have sought to pursue a transaction whereby Pacific Power's northern California service area could be sold to Nor-Cal. Nor-Cal is a joint power authority that was specifically set up to purchase the system and operate it independently.

When the proposed sale was first announced, Pacific Power believed a transaction could be structured that would be good for customers, and be supported by all communities as well as the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), which must approve the sale.

"After five years of significant effort and negotiation with Nor-Cal and stakeholders, there is still uncertainty that a transaction could ever be successfully completed," said Andy MacRitchie, executive vice president, PacifiCorp. "In our opinion, although there have been points of encouragement along the way, we now believe it is unlikely we could successfully complete an appropriate transaction.

"We always knew the transaction would face significant scrutiny from the CPUC," said MacRitchie. Since the initial application to sell was dismissed by the CPUC in 2000, the parties recognized the difficulties of passing the CPUC's stringent customer benefits standards. Further complicating the transaction, both Siskiyou and Modoc Counties have publicly challenged the sale.

Since the proposed transaction was initiated, the company's employees have continued to provide excellent customer service to northern California customers. However, both customers and employees have been in limbo for five years while negotiations continued.

"Our plans are to put this behind us and to continue serving our customers in California as we have for the past 40 years. We believe this approach serves the best interests of our customers," said MacRitchie. "Ending the uncertainty caused by this potential transaction and moving forward positively is important to the company, our employees and customers. We are reinvigorating our activities in California and will be increasing economics development efforts over the next few months. We'll be working with community leaders to identify projects that will enhance community growth and stability."

Pacific Power serves more than 44,000 customers in Yreka, Crescent City, Alturas, Mt. Shasta and surrounding communities.

Modoc RAC workshop August 28

A Modoc Resource Advisory Committee workshop will be held August 28, 6 p.m. in Modoc Supervisors Chambers in the Modoc County Courthouse. The Board of Supervisors will be hearing testimony and decide on Title II and Title III projects that have been recommended and prioritized by the RAC. There is a total of about $650,000 available for those projects. The Modoc Land Use Committee will be meeting August 20, 1 p.m. at the Farm Advisor's Office on Fourth Street to prioritize those projects coming from the RAC. That prioritized list will be presented to the Board of Supervisors.

The public is invited to attend both meetings and suggestions for future projects are encouraged. Those Title II projects, all within RAC boundaries, may include road, trail and infrastructure maintenance or obliteration, soil productivity improvement, forest health improvements, watershed restoration, improvement of fish and wildlife habitat, control of noxious of exotic weeds and re-establishment of native species. Title III (county approved) projects may include search, rescue or emergency services on federal lands, community service work camps on federal lands, easement purchases, forest-related after school programs, fire prevention and county planning and community forestry.

The RAC program is a part of the Secure Schools and Roads Program, which was adopted nationally, spearheaded by rural counties and Modoc's Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh. The program replaces the Timber Receipts program that once was vital to rural counties. The funds from the new project, about $3 million annually, are split between county roads and schools, with the RAC getting its $650,00 for projects in this area.

Modoc Fair opens today for 2003 run

The Modoc District Fair begins its 70th year today and runs through Sunday evening at 5 p.m. Featuring a new carnival, many entertaining shows and performances, the always popular crafts, livestock, and science exhibits and Rancher's Day Events, the fair is one of Modoc County's annual highlights.

Anyone who has visited the fairgrounds at fair time or throughout the year is immediately taken by the beauty surroundings them. Jerry Minto and John Konz maintain the entire 68-acre site that is a serene oasis of manicured lawns and flower beds, as well as a collection of barns and buildings used throughout the year for various events.

The versatile Heather Tufts joins John and Jerry on the grounds also assisting in the office wherever needed.

Without the diligence of Kristen Eelkema who manages the telephones, a few bookkeeping chores and makes sure the T's are crossed on all vendor and concession contracts, the fair would be a much less lively and entertaining place.

For many, the wide ranging exhibits are a fair highlight. Jenny Grove coordinates all the entry processing-a HUGE but satisfying task. In addition, she handles fair event supplies and heads the Modoc County Queen and Court contest.

John McQuarrie and Angie Gladwill are running Rancher's Day events on both Friday and Saturday, August 15-16. John's ability to get the job done is an asset to the Modoc Fair.

Alturas Library to close for week-long maintenance

The Alturas branch of the Modoc County Library will be closed August 11 through August 15, 2003, for annual maintenance. Library staff will be working on special projects throughout the week.

Arrangements will be made for patrons to pick up Interlibrary loans. The Library resumes its summer schedule on Monday, Aug. 18. Please call Cheryl Baker, County Librarian at 233-6340 if you have questions.

Some costs increase at Modoc Fair

Modoc District Fair CEO Traci Green has announced there will be some changes in costs this year for fairgoers. Adult admission is $5 each day, children are $3 and seniors will get in for $2. There will be a $2 gate admission fee on Thursday this year.

While at first glance the slightly higher gate fees may seem daunting, the benefits to attendees are many. Green is especially excited about the new ride bands being offered this year so families may enjoy unlimited carnival rides during certain extended hours.

This year, ride bands will be available on Thursday (5-9), Saturday (11-6) and Sunday (11-6) for only $7 per person each day. These bands make a long day of stomach-churning thrills very affordable for families. Ride coupons will still be available during other fair hours at prices comparable to past years.

Attracting a quality carnival to our remote corner of the state has become harder and more expensive each year. But Green has managed to find "The American Traveling Shows Carnival." This highly recommended carnival will be bringing several new rides appealing to a wider age range.

Though the fair just wouldn't be the fair without the noisy excitement of the carnival, for many the allure goes way beyond the rides. There will be a full schedule of exciting events for everyone to enjoy.

MJUSD schools to open

The first day of school for Modoc Joint Unified School District is Wednesday, August 20, 2003, and it will be a normal school day. If there are any questions please call 233-7201; Modoc High School Ext. 401, Modoc Middle School Ext. 301, Alturas Elementary School Ext. 201, Alternative Education Ext. 309, District Office Ext. 101.

Elementary through high school students welcome to 'Block Party'

A "Back to School Neighborhood Block Party" will be hosted by Christian Life Assembly from 12:30 p.m. until 3:00 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 10 on the church grounds at 225 West B Street, Alturas.

All elementary through high school age students are welcome to attend the free event. Back to school supplies will be given away free, while supplies last, hot dogs, sodas, balloons, free haircuts and many fun activities will be made available free to youths from elementary through high school level. Highlight of the afternoon will be five giant inflatable slides/toys, which include a 24 foot slide, funhouse, jump shot activity, mega obstacle challenge and wave runner water slide. All of the food, activities and supplies are free.

"Last year we gave away school supplies about this same time. This promises to be a fun-packed afternoon for kids of all ages," said Pastor Jerry Chilson, who encourages young people to come out for the afternoon. A check-in table will get kids started with free tickets for a good time. The giant inflatable items are being made available by the Assembly's District office based in Sacramento.

Opinion

by Rick Holloway,Editor

--County mess. .

The mess that is Modoc County government continues to balloon out of control and there's no sign it's going to improve soon. The Board of Supervisors can get it fixed, but it seems unwilling to take any action. The problem is not Chief Administrator Officer Mike Maxwell or Director of Social Services Pauline Cravens, nor is it Supervisors Patricia Cantrall and Dan Macsay. The trouble rests squarely in the hands of Chairman of the Board Mike Dunn and those of County Counsel Vickie Cochran.

On Tuesday, Dunn and Cochran will once again try to ambush Maxwell and Cravens. They have orchestrated a personnel evaluation and have alleged wrongdoing, but have not informed Maxwell or Cravens what the issues are.

While that's immoral, it's unconscionable to also not inform fellow Supervisors. Dunn is keeping whatever he has "on" Maxwell and Cravens a secret from other board members. And that's something the board, as a whole, should not stand for in any way. Dunn doesn't have the authority to bring people in for evaluation without consensus of the board, nor should he. The board can, by three votes, change the direction and mood of this travesty. The board has the power to say no to Dunn and Cochran and regain control of county government.

Think about this -- there are ongoing personnel investigations underway now and investigations have been undertaken on complaints filed by those people involved. My guess is those investigations are not coming up with the answers Cochran and Dunn want, so they're pushing their agendas. We're of the opinion that this could continue indefinitely. If one outside counsel doesn't come up the the "right" answer for Dunn, he or she is replaced. Dunn and Cochran are going to continue until they find legal counsel who will allow them to do what they have planned or the Board stops them. That might be a little difficult. The Board certainly needs to understand that it has a county counsel, Cochran. But it now has at least two other outside attorneys trying to deal with the issues. It's a circus. Someone's going to have to tell me again why we needed a separate county counsel at $160,000 a year. Two of the Board members do not accept county counsel's opinion on face value......... Cochran last week said she was getting no respect from some members of the Board or from some employees. That's probably true, but respect is something you earn, it's not guaranteed just because you graduated from law school. She gave the audience a long list of her background and qualifications last week. But she left one thing out -- she had never worked as counsel for a local government before she came to Modoc. And like anyone, there have been some bumps in her learning curve.

Last Tuesday's meeting was pretty incredible. Cochran came pretty much unglued when Macsay stopped her and Dunn's ambush of Cravens and Maxwell by saying the issue was not agendized correctly. Which it wasn't. Macsay said he'd called the outside counsel for an opinion and that opinion didn't agree with Cochran's. So they went into closed session to call the outside counsel. That session should have been in open session. There's no part of the Brown Act which would permit that discussion with outside counsel on that agenda item in closed session. I believe the public would have learned a great deal had that session been open.

That closed session lasted most of the afternoon. But, since the personnel items didn't resurface after the session, we're assuming the board opted to do it right the next time. Those issues are back on Tuesday's agenda. Another violation of the Brown Act occurred, we believe, when Cochran's legal secretary, sat in and took notes during that closed session. The Brown Act states that "the legislative body (the Board) may by ordinance or resolution designate a clerk or other officer or employee of the local agency who shall attend each closed session of the legislative body and keep and enter in a minute book a record of topics discussed and decisions made at the meeting." The County Clerk is that person. There was no good reason for Cochran's secretary to be in closed meeting, other than for Cochran's benefit. We know some members of the Board objected. Our views on these violations, by the way, come from legal counsel for the California Newspaper Association and Freedom of Information Coalition. We call them when things like this come up. I suggest if Cochran's secretary can sit in, then one of the Board members could have me sit in to take their notes.

We did file a complaint with the District Attorney and Fair Political Practices Commission alleging Dunn has a conflict on discussing or voting on issues pertaining to Cochran's employment. I certainly am not apologizing for that action. While both Dunn and Cochran have said they've been cleared, neither the District Attorney, nor I, have received any final report, and we'll wait on that for judgment.

But let's put the record straight here. The Conflict of Interest Code states: "No public official at any level of state or local government shall make, participate or in any way attempt to use his official position to influence a governmental decision in which he knows or has reason to know he has a financial interest."

A financial interest is further defined as "Any source of income, except gifts or loans by a commercial lending institution made in the regular course of business on terms available to the public without regard to official status, aggregating five hundred dollars ($500) or more in value provided or promised to, received by the public official within 12 months prior to the time when the decision is made."

Our argument is very simple. Cochran purchased $2,400 worth of hay from Dunn as well as Dunn provided pasture for her cattle. To us, that represents a material gain for Dunn. We don't care what their business relationships are, as long as Dunn removes himself from decisions involving Cochran's employment -- which he has not done.

To show how petty Dunn has become, he brought up a nepotism issue involving Maxwell and Maxwell's wife Cassie, who works in the same office, although the supervision of Cassie has been given to Maxwell's assistant. What brought up the issue was the relationship between Cochran and her daughter Tracey, said Dunn, which the board agreed they had to split. Tracey serves as Public Guardian, but cannot be supervised by her mother. In fact, she works for Cravens. The fact is, I believe this whole mess started when all hell broke lose with the Public Guardian's office. Trouble is, the Maxwells have been in this working relationship for about 15 years and past board's have dealt with the issue. Dunn said he just became aware of it as a violation of county codes. That's B.S. He's been on the board for two-and-half years and while Maxwell was thought to be "on his side," he said nothing. This was just a personal attack on the Maxwells and if you don't believe that I've got some really nice ocean front property in Cal Pines I'd be happy to sell you.

Dunn alluded to the issue as something that was never addressed, and he's just dead wrong. Maxwell was promoted to that office, where Cassie was already working, and past board's have made necessary allowances. Bringing it up again just shows the nastiness of Dunn.

From our point of view, Dunn is not out to right the wrong and fetter out corruption in this county. He has a personal agenda and he'll protect people who side with him and go after those who don't.

Both Dunn and Cochran have issued statements, remarkably similar, accusing various departments of criminal activity. They are alleging past and continuing violations of county ordinances, ongoing corruption, forgery, fraud, misuse of government funds, misconduct and violations of labor codes and Memorandums of Understandings. They accuse social services, public guardian, public health, public administrator, as well as the hospital and office of the county administrator.

Personally, if they've got criminal complaints, they need to be filed with the District Attorney for investigation, (they haven't) not carried around in a satchel of secrecy. Actually, one complaint has been investigated by the DA and that report should be out by next week, he said.

But, I tell you this, there's no way, if I'm one of the department heads or employees of those departments, that I take this sitting down. There's no way as a board member would I allow those charges to be spewed about without some concrete evidence laid out on the table. It's time for those departments and supervisors to stand up and be counted.

Obituaries:

Isaac 'Ike' Schwyhart

Isaac "Ike" William Schwyhart, 81, of Cedarville loved living the majority of his life in Surprise Valley and his community appreciated all he did over the years.

The Modoc County Fairgrounds' superb appearance for 32 years can be credited to Mr. Schwyhart, who will be greatly missed by his community and family.

Mr. Schwyhart died August 8, 2003 in a single vehicle accident not far from his Cedarville, CA home, at the end of a day of traveling.

Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted services at graveside on August 13 at 11 a.m. at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Mr. Schwyhart was born in Cedar Creek, Missouri on December 17, 1921. In an interview several years ago, he told the Modoc Record, his greatest ambition was to amass a $50 fortune. At age 17, he worked most of the year cutting cedar posts, for which he earned two cents a post.

"I think I cut enough posts to fence the state of Missouri, but eventually I saved $50 and headed west," he said. After hearing from friends there was a fortune to be made as a lumberjack, he joined friends on a trip that ended up in Klamath Falls, OR and found even experienced loggers were out of work. When the group split up, he hitchhiked to Marysville to pick fruit and by the summer of 1940, he'd saved $80, even while sending money home each month. Hearing of a rodeo in Alturas, he hitched a ride north to Modoc County, where he worked in the hay fields at the Spicer Ranch for $35 a month and ended up working for Jack Conlan in Fort Bidwell.

He enlisted in the Navy in 1942, during World War II and was honorably discharged in 1947, happy to return to Surprise Valley and the Conlan Ranch.

Not long after, he met Betty Madsen in Lakeview, OR. The two were married on New Year's Eve in Ashland, OR in 1948. Shortly after their marriage, the couple moved to Washington to help Betty's parents run their dairy ranch.

It didn't take him long to realize that the move was one of the greatest mistakes of his life. He and Betty moved back to Surprise Valley and he vowed never to move again.

He was soon hired as the maintenance person at the Modoc County Fairgrounds. It wasn't long before the 67 acres of lawns and 100,000 square feet of building were sparkling clean, with flowers blooming everywhere. He raised more than 5,000 flowers a year, specially nurtured to bloom during fair time.

Known as a very congenial man, Schwyhart helped the roping club by announcing and timing their events. "He was always ready to lend a helping hand to neighbors and friends, even up to the day he died. He was such a loving person," described his daughter-in-law Daisy.

Schwyhart retired in 1984, after 32 years with the fair. His son, Bob carries on the tradition of flower displays, as the maintenance person for the Red Bluff Fairgrounds.

Ike was honored as having the best safety record among all employees of the state fair system. He never missed a day of work for an on-the-job injury. He was also an avid squirrel hunter and loved fishing.

Schwyhart was preceded in death by his wife Betty on March 20, 1994, a son Dale and two brothers Jim and John.

He is survived by his son Bob and wife Daisy of Red Bluff; grandson Bobby Schwyhart and wife Jolene of Caldwell, Idaho; granddaughter Shawna Schwyhart of Santa Cruz, CA; great-granddaughter Dakota of Idaho; three sisters Nora Thurman of Warsaw, Mo., Lizzy Riley of Hollister, Mo. and Mary Jones of Jarrettsville, MD.; two brothers Gene of Cedar Creek, Mo. and Bobby of Overland, Mo.

Memorials may be directed to any charity of the donor's choice. Kerr Mortuary, Alturas, was in charge of arrangements.

Norma B. Weigel

Alturas resident Norma Beatrice Weigel passed away July 29, 2003 in Alturas, CA. at the age of 85. A flair for fashion, she was rarely seen in public without a hat to match, worn atop her coifed white hair. Mrs. Weigel was outgoing and active in her community for the 50 plus years she made Modoc County her home.

She enjoyed attending cultural and social functions and outings throughout the county. She had a zest for life, quick wit and cherished her independence.

Born Norma Beatrice Henderson in Victoria, British Columbia on September 20, 1917, she was a star athlete in high school in Vancouver, especially in basketball and loved to ride horses.

She was married to George Weigel for 30 years, until he passed away December 9, 1995. Mrs. Weigel was employed for many years with Boyd's Insurance as an administrative assistant. She was selected to participate on the local Draft Board during the 1960s.

A member of Modoc Sidesaddlers and Modoc Brushpoppers, she rode side saddle in many parades.

Honoring Mrs. Weigel's advance request, no services will be held. She will be greatly missed by her many friends and family members.

She is survived by her sister Bernice Dearing of Bow Island, Alberta, Canada; step-daughter Evelyn Matthews of Carson City, Nevada; step-son Ernest Weigel of Huntley, Montana; step-son Gary Weigel of Carson City, Nevada; step-son Norman Weigel of Thornton, California. She was preceded in death by her husband George and brother Ivan Henderson. Memorials may be made to any charity of the donor's choice.

Eleanor Marie Redding

Alturas resident Eleanor Marie Redding passed away August 8, 2003 at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, CA. She was 72. Mrs. Redding had moved to Alturas nearly 20 years ago, where she was surrounded by her family. Born in Dubuque, Iowa to Earl and Emily Remington on November 8, 1930, she married Charles Alfred Redding on April 10, 1948 in Richmond, CA. This year was their 55th wedding anniversary.

The mother of five children, Mrs. Redding also raised her late daughter, Valerie's children, Jason Marquardt, Tina, Richard and Ronaele Clark, all of Alturas. She was a very caring and loving person who will be missed greatly by her family and friends.

She is survived by her husband Charles of Burney; children Carla Ritchie and Charles E. Redding both of Alturas and Sandra Kincaid of Medford, Oregon; grandchildren Daniel of Mississippi, Tammi Hood of Crescent City, CA, Amanda, Dan, Samantha and Ian of Alturas, CA; son-in-law James Ritchie of Alturas, Ronald Redding, II; great-grandchildren Jordon Marquardt, Ronald Redding, III, Shelly, Aubrianna, Isaiah and Gregory Hood. Her sister Marilyn Nelson, step-sisters Nina Morrison and Mary Berdollt; sisters-in-law Pat Bland and Lorretta Redding, numerous nieces and nephews all of the Bay Area.

Mrs. Redding was preceded in death by her son Ronald Redding and daughter Valerie Marquardt.

Kerr Mortuary will be taking care of arrangements. Private family services are pending. Condolences may be directed to Carla Ritchie, HC4, Box 43018, Alturas, CA 96101.

Melvin Cody Compton Sr.

For the past three years, Melvin Cody Compton, Sr. lived in Alturas, CA. Ten months ago, he left Alturas to visit relatives in Texas, expecting to return to Alturas, but was unable to, due to health reasons. Mr. Compton passed away on August 8, 2003 at the age of 76, at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Temple, Texas.

Born on January 5, 1926 in Lockhart, Texas, he was the youngest of eight children. His parents died in the 60's and his brothers and sisters preceded him in death as did one of his great-granddaughters Catherine C. Compton, II. Three of his four brothers served during World War II, and the fourth was not accepted into the Army because of medical reasons. His sisters worked civil defense jobs during WWII. Compton family members have fought in every war and battle since the first American Revolution. Melvin served in the United States Marine Corps. He fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima. He was shot at by machine gun fire, ten feet from the famous flag raising. A History Channel video of the Battle of Iwo Jima has documented his actions which his family was able to witness. He is seen on film running and hitting the dirt, while serving in two different units at the same time. He refused the Purple Heart Medal saying, "A lot of other good men that didn't live, deserved that medal, and more medals than I did." He later served on the main island of Japan after the war. He was discharged with many medals for fighting for his country. During his adult life, Mr. Compton became and traveled all over the U.S. as an expert welder.

He is survived by his wife, Rita E. Compton of Pasadena, Texas; his five children, 14 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren and follow: Son William F. Compton II, a Viet Nam veteran and wife, Christine of Alturas, CA. and their six children and four grandchildren-grandson Sgt. William F. Compton, III, US Army, and wife Patty, stationed in Virginia, great-grand children Zachary A. and Lauren M. Compton, granddaughter Patricia L. Compton and her two daughters; great grandchildren Melia L. Compton and Daisy Compton of Southern California; granddaughters Brayta A.B.Compton of Tennessee, Terez C. Compton, Jeannette C.Compton and grandson Jerry J. Compton all of Alturas, CA; Daughter Martha L. Freeman and husband Gene their two children and two grandchildren Melane Lockstead and husband Scott and their two children, (great-grand children) Panner and Brianna, Matthew O. Freeman and wife Rachel of Texas. Daughter Catherine C. Hamel and husband Jerry of Texas and their two sons (grandsons) Charles F. Guin, served in Army before the first Gulf War and wife Patty and their two sons (great-grandsons) Steven and Matthew Guin of Massachusetts; grandson Christopher D. Smith of Texas. Daughter Dorthy-Jo Compton and her four children (great-grandchildren) Chandra N. Compton, great-grandson Brandon N. Compton, great-granddaughter Valerie R. Compton of Texas; son Melvin C. Compton, Jr., of Texas.

Services will be held on Friday, August 15 with military honors and burial at the VA cemetery in Houston, Texas

Sports

MHS Football gear passed out Friday

Modoc High School football players should pick up gear Friday from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. at the high school. Gear will be passed out to both varsity and junior varsity players.

Coach Shaun Wood reminds football players to get physicals and sports information cards in as soon as possible.

Physicals should be done by August 15. Pick up the cards from Wood at the High School Weight Room Monday through Friday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. or from Lisa Cummings in the Principal's office during the morning.

On August 18, both junior varsity and varsity teams will begin practice at 6 p.m.

Soccer players must also have their physicals in by the first day of practice, August 18, 3:30 p.m. at Alturas Elementary School.

Cross country practice for all junior and senior high runners will start on August 20, 3:45 p.m. at the Modoc High School Track. Physicals and insurance information must be in prior to practice. For more information, contact Don Mason at 233-5017 or leave a message at Modoc High School.

Arrowhead names tourney winners

With a score of 81, the team of George Widby and Leo Ray won the Arrowhead Stableford tournament last weekend.

In second place was the team of Roger Dorris and Fritz Barclay with a 78, third was Rex and Alan Northrup with a 76 and fourth was Phil and Ivy Smith with a 75.

In Arrowhead's business league, seven teams competed for eight weeks and the winning team was The What Not, with Lillian McKenzie, Jim Barney, Rex, Alan, D.J. and Helen Northrup. Second place went to Modoc Farm Supply with Steve and Landon Brown, Jed Parkinson, Dave and Zach McKirahan and Leo Ray. A dinner and awards night was held August 13. The junior golf camp held July 28-30 had 28 young golfers and they finished with a tournament on the final day. Everyone received a tee prize. Arrowhead thanks everyone who helped with the youth camp and the Evelyn Capik Fund.

Winners of Likely Links Elks tourney

There were 34 golfers and 17 teams competing in the PER Elks Golf Tournament at the Likely Links last Saturday and organizer Steve Riley said things went well.

This year's winners were in the net category were Brian Weed and Jose Madrigal, with second place going to Dave Hoxsey and Dave Hollub, third place to Steve Brown and Les Ray.

First place winners in the Callaway division were Walt VanderHeyden and Dave Peak. Closest to the pin was won by Hollub and the long drive went to Jim Widby.

"Everyone had a great time, thanks to Rich Hamel, Ray and Norma Mahr and their wonderful crew," said Riley. "Everyone was hosted to a great tri-tip dinner and live music and a good time was had by all."

There will be a Likely Men's Club meeting following the two-man scramble tournament on August 17. Members are encouraged to attend.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Most anglers enjoyed another great week of fishing at Eagle Lake. Fish continue to be caught weighing up to five pounds. Overall, the average size are varying between two and a half and three and a half pounds with best results coming early morning. A fairly aggressive evening bite is now being experienced. The Eagles Nest and Wildcat Point areas continue as the most productive. Shore fisherman also enjoyed a fairly strong evening bite from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty Saturday night.

Still-fishing with night crawlers rigged under slip bobbers continues to work best. Some are also reporting success with Power Bait. Trollers are using night crawlers, Rainbow Runners, Thomas Buoyants and Needlefish from down riggers or lead-line set-ups at 20-35 foot depths.

Campers looking forward to Labor Day weekend will find four campgrounds in the pines along the south shore of Eagle Lake with 325 campsites and two ground camps available. More than 200 sites are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake, call (530)825-3212. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Sheep Dog Trials open Fair tonight

The annual Mark Walgenbach Sheep Dog Trials has grown each year, since 1989, with more people bringing their dogs long distances to participate. The event will open at the Modoc County Fairgrounds tonight, August 14, starting at 7:00 p.m.

Three classes are offered this year: Open Advanced, Ranch Dog, and Novice.

Original organizers, Gae and Carl Quigley of Cedarville, are honored to sponsor the Champion Sheep Dog Buckle, again this year.

The Quigleys attended their first sheep dog trials in Dixon, CA and fell in love with the sport. After meeting accomplished sheep dog trainer Rupert Poe, they managed to draw Poe to the Modoc Fair to do an exhibition with his dogs in 1989.

With Poe's help, the Fair held its first "Sheep Dog Trials" the following year with Quigley making the panels for the event and New Holland Corporation donating the funds for the materials and paint. Poe was the announcer. "The following year, Poe passed away and the announcing job was handed to Wes Cook," tells Quigley. "From the beginning, Dige and Wes Cook were involved behind the scenes, as well as Gae and I." The task has now been handed over to Pam Iveson and Pam Hughes of Cedarville. How it works.

The Open Advanced Class is for a dog and handler team who have competed in open level sheep or cattle dog trials or for anyone who is up for a challenge. The handler will stay in one designated area to command their dog throughout the entire course.

The Ranch Dog Class is for a dog and handler team who do not show on a regular basis. The handler will be able to help the dog but must have one foot in a tire by the obstacle until the sheep pass through that particular obstacle.

The Novice Class is for dogs that have never been shown; the handler will be able to help the dog through all phases of the course. One major change this year from the past is that the trial will be scored on points and time. Each dog and handler team will try to earn the most points possible, points being earned by the number of sheep that are taken through the obstacles; each team will be allowed five minutes to do this. This type of scoring system makes it especially fun for spectators, as they are able to tally up the scores while each team is running.

After all of the teams have run, there will be a trailer loading competition where five lucky people, whose names have been drawn out of a hat, will try to load sheep into a free standing trailer in the middle of the arena. It's an exciting display of stockmanship by dog and handler. The winner of the trailer loading event will receive $100.00.

"There will be dogs and handlers coming from Nevada, Oregon and Northern California," said Pam Iveson who will be providing her Rambouillet sheep for the trial. "It looks to be a great event; it is always a thrill to watch these sheep dogs maneuver sheep that are five times their size through the challenging obstacles," say the oganizers.

Demolition Derby is Saturday night

Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. the excitement levels at this year's Modoc District Fair will be seriously revved up! The Demolition Derby will begin with a couple of prize heats then move right on into the crashing and grinding thrills folks of all ages love.

Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for children 6-12. The driver of the last car still running after all the abuse the other drivers dish out will receive $1,000. The top prize, along with prizes of $400, $200 and $100 are some of the most generous purses offered on the Northern California-Southern Oregon demolition derby circuit.

Mike Ray, this year's coordinator, said, for fans it all boils down to "the thrill of the crash." However Ray was quick to point out that in the previous four years, there have been no serious injuries. The safety precautions are stringent so the races are relatively safe despite the condition of the vehicles.

The safety factor is a big deal for Jerry Moore. "It's good fun, but in the end no one gets seriously hurt."

Hopeful participants are scouring the county for old running cars which can be entered right up until the event begins for a $45 fee. Call the fair office (279-2315) or Mike Ray for details at 279-2110.

Phil Parriott said, "What could be more fun than watching people beat up old cars?" He said everyone has had the urge to "take your crummy old car and thrash it." Doing it for cash prizes and in front of an audience greatly increases that appeal

Peggy Page already has her seat picked out. The local participants draw her in. "It's very exciting, especially if you know people in the races." However, Ray reports he is expecting more entries this year than in the past, with many from the growing "derby following" throughout the western states.

After the Demolition Derby make sure to check out the street dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. in the Park Stage area. Featuring the Jeff Palmer band, the lively outdoor party promises to be the perfect end to an exciting evening at the Fair.

If the Demolition Derby isn't enough automotive excitement for you, be sure to check out the Pacific Coast Dirt Late Models races on Friday night at 7 p.m. About 20 cars and some of the best west coast drivers are expected this year. Prices are $8 for adults and $5 for children 5-12.

August 21, 2003

News

DA tells Board DOJ recommended felony charges on PG, county counsel

Modoc County District Attorney Jordan Funk advised the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday that the California Department of Justice concluded its investigation and recommended he file felony elder abuse charges against both Modoc Public Guardian Tracey Cochran and her mother, County Counsel Vickie Cochran.

Funk said he and his assistant Larry Barnes chose not to file those charges, because he said he didn't feel he could prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt. He added that the DOJ will review his decision and could still file charges on its own.

He stressed, in no uncertain terms, that Modoc County has a serious problem with the public guardian and it needs to be corrected soon. He said his decision not to file charges against the Cochrans should in no way be viewed as exonerating them of wrongdoing.

In fact, said Funk, the investigation concluded there was "appalling" conduct by Tracey Cochran. Vickie Cochran was advising her daughter during the case investigated by the DOJ.

The case involved an elderly woman who was moved from Surprise Valley Medical Center "under false pretenses," by Cochran without consultation with nurses or doctors, said Funk. He said the justification for Cochran to move the woman, an Alzheimer's patient, for financial reasons did not measure up to standards or proper procedure.

In addition, he said the removal of an Alzheimer's patient from familiar surroundings placed the patient at risk, and she did, in fact, have problems at the next facility.

Funk said that three public guardians from north state counties were "appalled" that Cochran would have lied to the hospital staff. And in no case should a public guardian move a person without communicating with the hospital staff and doctors.

He said the investigation found that Tracey Cochran believed that Surprise Valley Hospital was overmedicating the patient, essentially putting her opinion in place of a doctor's. The investigation revealed, said Funk, that the SV Hospital was doing what was in the best interest of the patient and the patient actually went downhill under Cochran's guardianship. Funk said the investigation points out that Cochran does not communicate well with the care providers in the area. She comes off as "heavy-handed, disrespectful, arrogant, and is condescending to staff," Funk said. "You have a problem with Public Guardian and you need to deal with it quickly," said Funk.

Concerning Vickie Cochran providing legal advice to Tracey Cochran as Public Guardian, Funk said that should never have happened and a disinterested counsel should have handled those issues. The legal advice offered by Cochran in the Surprise Valley case caused the DOJ to recommend charges be filed against her, said Funk.

In addition to referring the above case, Funk also told the Board that he had investigated charges filed by the Cochrans against Social Services Director Pauline Cravens, and said there was no criminal activity and no charges would be filed.

He said the charges "did not have much substance" and amounted to a "petty game of one-upsmanship" by the Cochrans.

Vickie Cochran attended but did not advise the board during Tuesday's meeting, while Tracey Cochran, who is out on a medical leave, did attend and took notes in the back of the room. An outside counsel, John Kinney, serves as the board's counsel.

Several people at the meeting told the Board that Tracey Cochran had done several things wrong while acting as public guardian to their family members. Some said they were going to sue the county, trying to get proper care of their family members as well as a good accounting of their funds. Funk said he didn't disagree with their comments, and stressed the first step is to get a qualified public guardian on board.

Jail escapee found

A Modoc County Jail inmate who walked away from a work detail in early July was "captured" in Medford, Oregon last week when he reported to his probation officer.

According to Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Wesley Joe Box, age 23, was detained by Medford Police after they discovered the Modoc warrant for his escape. Box will now face additional charges, including escape, which could lead to a state prison sentence.

Gentry said Box is fighting extradition, and has a court date in Medford today.

Box and a fellow inmate were working on concrete July 2 adjacent to the jail where a new structure is being placed. Sometime about 9:30 a.m., said Gentry, Box told the other inmate and supervisor that he had to go to the restroom. He never came back.

Box was in jail on a stolen vehicle charge. He is from Medford, but spent some time here and has contacts in Modoc.

County counsel resigns

Modoc County Counsel Vickie Cochran has apparently resigned her position this week, effective August 31, 2003.

The acceptance of that resignation is on the August 26 Board of Supervisors agenda, along with another item to authorize for copying and payment of Cochran's county files and records.

The Board had hired special counsel for the last meeting and will have to determine which way to go following August 31.

Board hears support for CAO Maxwell, Cravens

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors heard over two hours of public comment Tuesday morning, most supporting County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell and Social Services Director Pauline Cravens, who were scheduled for evaluations later in the day.

The Board also heard from disgruntled family members of conservatees under Public Guardian Tracey Cochran. None of those comments were positive.

Alturas businessman Alan Cain told the board it was "pretty disgusting and reckless" for Chairman Mike Dunn and County Counsel Vickie Cochran to slander Cravens and other department heads in public.

He said Cravens was a hard working, honest person who is doing her job under stressful conditions and without proper support.

Hospital Administrator Teresa Jacques brought a letter from Joe Coffin, an Alturas City Councilman and Hospital Trustee, which supported Maxwell, and calling him an important asset to the community. Several people expressed the opinion that without Maxwell's work, the hospital would not still be operating.

Jacques said she supported Maxwell and cited his ability to look at the big picture in complicated circumstances and provide clarity to the board. She credited Maxwell for working with staff and the state to insure the facility remains viable.

Former Modoc District Attorney Hugh Comisky, who is representing both Maxwell and Cravens, was especially critical of Dunn and Cochran. He said the two of them had taken an administrative matter and turned it into a mess. He said Dunn and Cochran circulating accusations of criminal wrongdoing against departments and people, without proof, could leave them personally liable. He said they should be ashamed.

Comisky pointed out to the Board and public that there are ongoing investigations into personnel issues, many of these issues under consideration for the evaluations. He wondered what the board was doing holding evaluations before the investigation reports were complete and in their hands.

Comisky said Cochran's statement that Maxwell's management style relied on retaliation or "Nazi" type tactics was absurd. Many people who would later testify said Cochran's characterization of Maxwell was inaccurate.v Dr. Owen Panner told the board he was "astonished and disgusted" with the Board's actions. He said he has worked with Maxwell for years and he has never questioned Maxwell's integrity or his interests in what's good for the county. He said Maxwell is dedicated to the people of Modoc County and also voiced support for Cravens, Health Services Director Phil Smith and Jacques.

Former Supervisor Ben Zandstra said Maxwell has demonstrated the highest integrity in everything he does and serves the people of Modoc County with their interests foremost. He said he may have had disagreements with Maxwell, but that Maxwell always listened to other views.

Ray Mandel, said Maxwell's integrity and management style should not be in question. He said he was in an adversary position with the county, (involved in a lawsuit against Modoc), and Maxwell treated all of the people involved with respect and dignity. Mandel said Maxwell's integrity and ability was beyond reproach.

Former Supervisor Ron McIntyre said that without Mike Maxwell, the county would not have a hospital. He said Maxwell understood the value of the facility and fought to keep it open. He also said that in tough budget times, Maxwell was the person who fought to have budget cuts made at department levels to avoid employee layoffs. The county, under Maxwell's guidance, said McIntyre, has been able to avoid the layoffs that other counties have had to make.

Former Supervisor Nancy Huffman chastised the Board for not working as a team. She said no one has handled issues better than Maxwell and that he offered solid advice to the board. He also never had an ax to grind, she said, and presented issues to the board, with options available to them. Agriculture Commissioner Joe Moreo told the Board that Maxwell came into a sticky situation in that office and solved it within a week. He said Maxwell has exceptional management abilities and has the best interests of the county in mind.

Moreo said the current situation at the board level has caused serious erosion in trust of county government, even at the employee level. Probation Officer Leo Fernandez said he has good working relationships with both Maxwell and Cravens. He said he has never questioned either's integrity.

Emma Johnson, nurse and hospital trustee, said that if not for Mike Maxwell, the county would not have a hospital. She said that Maxwell is always on top of the budget process and offers solid advice and options. She said Maxwell's interest has always been in public service, without regard for personal gain. She also questioned Vickie Cochran's work on the proposed contract between the county and doctors Owen Panner and Ed Richert, saying she brought her opinions in late at the last meeting and they were just her opinions.

Sheriff Bruce Mix said he'd been employed in the county for 35 years, and said the successful people he's dealt with in county government had no private agenda. Those with private agendas or personal axes to grind, don't last, he said. He said Maxwell has no private agenda and that he has never questioned his motivation or his dedication or honesty. He said Maxwell's working knowledge of county government and budgeting is invaluable. Several people whose agencies work with Social Services complimented the work of Cravens and said she always works in the best interests of her department and the county and that she is respected in the north state. They said they have found her to be efficient, honest, hard working and fair. Following the public session in the morning, the board went into closed session in the afternoon, but did not get through all of the closed session items. They took no action on Craven's evaluation and held Maxwell's evaluation over to Sept. 2.

They added an emergency item to allow Cravens to secure counsel other than Cochran for legal advice on social services department cases.

Barclay named judge in Modoc

Last Friday, California Governor Gray Davis appointed Francis "Fritz" Barclay to the Modoc County Superior Court

Barclay, age 49, is the son of retired Modoc Superior Court Judge Robert A. Barclay and currently has a law practice in Alturas and serves as the City Attorney in Alturas

He is a past president of the Modoc Bar Association and has maintained a general practice for the past 16 years consisting of family law, trust and estate planning, business and real estate litigation, juvenile dependency and delinquency cases, criminal defense and municipal law.

Previously, Barclay practiced law with the firms of Thornton, Taylor and Downs in San Francisco; Bolling, Walter and Gawthrop in Sacramento; and in the Law Office of John Baker in Alturas before opening his own practice in 1990.

Barclay said he looks forward to joining Judge Larry Dier in the Modoc Courts. In the meantime, he is in the process of closing his private practice and after satisfying obligations to existing clients, he hopes to take his oath of office in approximately 30 days.

Barclay is filling the vacancy left by the untimely death of Judge John Baker.

Case against local couple involves thousands

A case filed last week in Modoc Superior Court against Mike and Cameo Brown involves more than $200,000 stemming from several acts alleged to be grand theft by embezzlement, or grand theft, or grand theft of personal property by false pretenses. There are 12 felony charges and a warrant has been issued for their arrest.

Count one alleges that the Browns used property of Leon Schultz, on or about February 17, 2003, when they were employees of Schultz, and without his knowledge grazed approximately 87 cow/calf pairs belonging to Ron Butler and Bill Evans on that property.

Count two alleges that on or about February 1 through February 5, 2002, the Browns used the same pasture to graze approximately 187 head of cattle belonging to Phillip Singhose, without Schultz's knowledge or consent. Count three alleges that from about November 15 through January 5, the Browns grazed approximately 265 cows and 97 calves belonging to Bob Keller and Keller ranches, LLC, on Schultz's property without his consent or knowledge.

Count four alleges that on about Sept. 20 through January 1, 2003, the Browns grazed cattle belonging to Reed Carter on Schultz's property without his consent or knowledge.

Count five alleges that on or about Oct. 30, 2002 through November 5, 2002, the Browns took $20,400 from Reed Carter representing that Cameo Brown owned the grazing rights to Schultz's property and could graze Carter's cattle on the place. Those claims were false.

Count six states that the Browns took $9,000 from Mike Church, stating they had grazing rights to Schultz' property and grazing rights on certain BLM pastures and lands known as the "Bull Creek Allotment," when those claims were false

Count seven alleges that on or about January 1, 2002 through January 15, 2003, Mike Brown took 80 tons of hay from Schultz without paying. Count eight alleges that on or about February 22, 2002 though January 10, 2003, the Browns took $58,000 from Bob Lee, stating they had the right to graze cattle on Schultz's ranch and that they could purchase hay belonging to Schultz to feed Lee's cattle.

Count nine alleges that on or about December 10, 2002, Mike Brown took $70,000 from Bob Lee by falsely representing to Lee that he was a lessee of "Duck Lake" ranch and could sublease the grazing rights to that ranch to Bob Lee.

Count 10 alleges that on or about November 1, 2002 through December 30, 2002, Mike Brown took $20,400 from Talal Jammal by falsely representing to Jammal that he owned Schultz's property, leased property in Cedarville and owned two hay barns full of hay sufficient to feed 164 cows and some calves, when those representations were false.

Count 11 alleges that on or about February 17, 2002, the Browns grazed cattle on the Schultz property without the consent of Schultz, while they were employed by Schultz.

Count 12 alleges that on or about December 18, 2002, Mike Brown took delivery of liquid cattle feed supplement valued at $2,488.75 from John LeNeave by falsely promising to pay when he did not intend to pay.

BLM to host public meeting, tour to discuss land use planning

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will host a public meeting and field tour in Alturas to gather public comments and ideas on development of new land use plans for public land in Northeast California and Northwest Nevada.

Anyone interested can provide comments during the field tour, scheduled for Saturday, August 23, from 10 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Tour participants will meet in the parking lot of the Alturas Lake Field Office. They should dress for field conditions and bring a lunch and water.

The meeting and tour are part "public scoping," an early phase of the land use planning process in which members of the public can share ideas about the issues that should be addressed in the BLM's staff and a planning consultant will use ideas gathered during scoping, along with alternatives which also will be open to public review and comment.

When the planning process is completed in the fall of 2005, new resource management plans will be in place for the three million acres managed by the BLM's Alturas, Eagle Lake, and Surprise Valley Field offices. The land use plans provide broad overall guidance for land management, and are intended to provide direction for up to 20 years.

Other scoping meetings will be held Wednesday, August 27, at the BLM office in Redding; and Thursday, August 28 at the BLM Nevada State Office in Reno. All meetings begin at 6 p.m.

More information is available from BLM Public Affairs Officer Jeff Fontana at (530)252-5332.

Alturas Library to close for week-long maintenance

The Alturas branch of the Modoc County Library will be closed August 11 through August 15, 2003, for annual maintenance. Library staff will be working on special projects throughout the week.

Arrangements will be made for patrons to pick up Interlibrary loans. The Library resumes its summer schedule on Monday, Aug. 18. Please call Cheryl Baker, County Librarian at 233-6340 if you have questions.

CHP will target safety belt and DUI violators over Labor Day

California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers will be focusing on the two biggest holiday killers--lack of safety belts and DUI--during the upcoming Labor Day Weekend.

"Over half the people killed in CHP jurisdiction over the recent July 4 weekend were not wearing safety belts," said Lt. Pat Arvizu, commander of the Alturas Area office. "That's a simple precaution every traveler can take to increase his or her safety on the highway."

The July 4 weekend had 45 fatalities in all jurisdictions statewide. "I want Labor Day to be a safer weekend than July 4. All available officers will be on the road looking for safety belt violators and DUI drivers," Lt. Arvizu said. "California's safety belt compliance rate (90%) is among the highest in the nation, but we can do better. Everyone knows it's the law--there's no good reason not to buckle up," Arvizu said.

People going to Labor Day parties also should remember to designate a driver. "Even a small amount of alcohol can impair your driving ability. Decide before you arrive at the barbecue who will be the designated driver," he/she said. "Plan ahead so you and your family and friends can celebrate the end of summer and arrive home safely."

Obituaries:

David Arlen Jones

David Arlen Jones of Thom's Creek Estates, Modoc County, passed away at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, CA on August 11, 2003, at the age of 48 years.

The 23-year resident of Modoc, had graduated from Long Beach Polytechnic High School in Long Beach, CA and entered the U.S. Army as a young man. Known as "Davey" to his family, he enjoyed tinkering on cars and was mechanically inclined. He was born on January 24, 1955 in Long Beach, California.

Private family services were held Saturday, August 16 at Thom's Creek. Mr. Jones is survived by his mother Ethel M. Kawagoe of Alturas, CA; stepfather Frank Kawagoe of Alturas; sister Dawn E. Myers of Alturas; brothers Michael Jones of Anaheim, Larry Jones of Alturas and Paul Jones of Alturas; step-brother Randy Kawagoe of Alturas; three nephews Harry Stanford, William Regis and Michael Jones and niece Elaine Jones, all of Klamath Falls, Oregon; 10 great-nephews and seven great-nieces. Memorial contributions may be directed to the American Cancer Society, Redding Field Office, 3290 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA 96002. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Ellis W. Lacy

Alturas resident Ellis W. Lacy passed away in Alturas, CA. on August 7, 2003 at the age of 91.

Born in Phoenix, Oregon on February 23, 1912, he completed the eighth grade and entered into military service joining the U.S. Army during World War II. Mr. Lacy's duty was in the Pacific arena as a Private First Class. During his 45 years in Modoc County, he worked in lumber mills including the White Pine and Calendor Mills in Alturas, CA. He enjoyed fishing and craft hobbies as well as his daily walks. His wife Ruby preceded him in death.

He is survived by his sister Lorraine C. Ball of Montague, CA and brother Virgil Lacy of Medford, Oregon. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

George Bernard Basaras, Jr

Long-time Surprise Valley resident George Bernard Basaras, Jr., passed away August 16, 2003 at the Surprise Valley Hospital in Cedarville. He was 57 years of age.

Born in Alturas, California on May 1, 1946, to George, Sr. and Anna (Fox) Basaras, George, Jr. grew up and lived his entire life in Cedarville, CA. He graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1964. During his life, he worked for various sheep ranches, along with his father. At one time, he was involved with the Cedarville Fire Department as a volunteer firefighter.

"George had a good heart and would help anyone who asked for help," describes his sister Catherine "Kay" Thurston of Alturas. He was a good son, brother, uncle and friend.

George was preceded in death by his parents, George and Anna, and his sister Bernice. He is survived by his sister Catherine "Kay" Thurston and her husband Bob of Alturas; nieces Bernice Norris and family of Klamath Falls, Oregon; Susan Samsel and family of Klamath Falls, OR; nephew Tom Thurston of Las Vegas, Nevada and a very special friend, Terry Williams of Cedarville.

Catholic and private graveside services were held in Cedarville on Wednesday, August 20. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

William ‘Bill' Harold Toney

Former Lake City, Calif. resident William "Bill" Harold Toney of Phoenix, Oregon passed away Thursday, July 17, 2003 at his home. He was 80. A funeral mass was held Wednesday at Our Lady of the Mountain Catholic Church in Ashland, Oregon. Entombment followed at Resthaven Mausoleum Ashland's Mountain View Cemetery.

Mr. Toney was born September 25, 1922 in Lake City, California to Harry James Toney and the former Josephine Elizabeth Quirk. On May 27, 1941, in Reno, Nevada, he married the former Edna Mary Darst. They moved to Ashland in 1955 from Lakeview, Oregon. Mr. Toney worked for the city of Ashland as sexton of the Mountain View Cemetery. He retired in 1986. His wife preceded him in death on Nov. 8, 1998.

Mr. Toney was a member of Our Lady of the Mountain Catholic Church. He enjoyed hunting and traveling in recreational vehicles.

He is survived by eight sons, David of Ashland, OR; Larry of Phoenix, OR.; Harry Toney, Dayton; Mike, Springfield; Pat and Ron, Molala; Jeff of Milwaukie and Tom of Denver; five daughters, Cindy Ramp, Medford; Julie Brazil, La Pine; Julienne Dow, Las Vegas; Louis Meredith, Myrtle Beach, S.C.; Mary Viglione, Denver; four brothers, Ervin of Ashland; Kesner of Fort Bidwell, CA; John of Sacramento; Jimmy Odbert of Redding; four sisters, Kathleen Baker and Virginia Grove of Cedarville, CA.; Mildred Johnstone, Red Bluff and Carolyn Joines, Las Vegas; 37 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren.

Litwiller-Simonsen Funeral Home in Ashland, was in charge of arrangements.

Sports

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing at Eagle Lake continues to be excellent. Fishermen report catching Eagle Lake Trout weighing up to five pounds. Average sizes vary between two and a half and three and a half pounds.

Best results are still being experienced in early morning. The evening bite has also been fairly strong. The Eagles Nest and Wildcat Point areas continue as the most productive. Some are reporting success from trolling Night Crawlers in mid lake areas. Shore fishermen continue to enjoy moderate success in the evenings from the Eagle Lake Marina Jetty. Trolling using night crawlers, Rainbow Runners, and Needlefish from down riggers or lead-line set-ups seem to be working best at this time. Productive depths continue to range from 20-35 feet. Some anglers report running shallow depths in early morning or late evening. Still-fishing is working best with Night Crawlers under slip bobbers.

For families looking for one last weekend outing, the Eagle Lake Recreation Area is planning its annual "Family Fun Days" for Labor Day weekend. Games and activities are being planned for all ages. Labor Day weekend campers will find four campgrounds in the pines along the south shore of Eagle Lake with 325 campsites and two group camps available. For camping information at Eagle Lake call (530)825-3212. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Likely hosts tournaments

There were two tournaments held at Likely Links this past week. Friday, August 15, was the Cowboy Open Four-Man Scramble with six teams. First and second place was decided with a shoot off. First went to Walt Nicholson, Jerry Tapp, Brian Weed of Likely and Micah Eppler of Alturas with a score of 70.

Second went to Bryan Cain, Ken Smith of Alturas, Darel Ellis of New Pine Creek and Josue Madrigal of Likely.

Third went to John Benner, Bob Walthers of Cedarville, Jose Madrigal and Shane McGarva of Likely with a score of 72. Closest to the Pin was won by Jose Madrigal and Longest Drive went to Tim Martinez of Alturas.

Sunday, August 17, the Men's Club held a Two-Man Scramble Fund Raiser with four teams competing. First went to Darrel Brewer and Steve Schafer of Alturas with a 76 score. Second went to Jose Madrigal and Dewayne Matthews of Likely with a 77 score. Closest to the Pin was won by Dewayne Matthews and longest drive went to Steve Schafer. The participants of both tournaments enjoyed the newly paved driveway from the Jess Valley Road to the Clubhouse.

Advance reservations required for Modoc Refuge Junior Waterfowl Hunt

Junior hunters will have the opportunity to hunt waterfowl at Modoc National Wildlife Refuge this fall on the weekend two weeks prior to the opening weekend for the Northern California Waterfowl Zone. Advance reservations are required and applications will be accepted by mail through September 12, 2003.

Only hunters prossessing a valid California Hunting License may apply. Up to four hunters may apply together as a party. Junior hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult (18 years or older) with no more than two junior hunters per adult.

The procedure for submitting applications is as follows: 1) Use only standard Postal Service postcards (3-1/2 X 5-1/2 inches) 2) Type or print clearly.

3) Give the name, address and hunting license number for each person (up to four) requesting permits. Zip codes must be correct.

4) Hunters must specify that the application is for the Junior Waterfowl Hunt.

5) A parent or legal guardian must sign for each applicant. 6) Mail postcard to: Refuge Manager, Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 1610, Alturas, CA., 96101. Only cards postmarked by September 12, 2003 will be accepted.

Any persons whose name appears on more than one application will be excluded from the drawing, as will applications which are late, illegible or incomplete.

All refuge hunting regulations remain unchanged. A total of 50 hunters will be issued a permit. Complete regulations and permits will be mailed to those hunters who are selected from the drawing. Unsuccessful hunters will not be notified. No standby lists will be maintained and "no shows" will not be refilled.

Hunters may contact the Refuge Manager at the address above or call (530)233-3572 for further information.

Junior Pheasant Hunt deadline

Ash Creek Wildlife Area 2003 Junior Pheasant Hunt will be held Saturday, Sept. 13.

To be included in the drawing for one of 75 permits, mail the following information to the address below. Applications must be received no later than 3 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22. Drawing will be held at that time, and permits will be mailed to successful applicants.

Include name and complete mailing address; your telephone number; your 2003 Junior California Hunting License number; your choice of Morning (8 a.m. to 12 noon) or Afternoon ( 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. ) hunt period. Applications must be received at Ash Creek Wildlife Area, P.O. Box 37, Bieber, CA 96009. Call (530) 294-5824 or 398-4627 if you have any questions.

Ash Creek Wildlife Area 2003 Junior Pheasant Hunt will be held Saturday, Sept. 13.

To be included in the drawing for one of 75 permits, mail the following information to the address below. Applications must be received no later than 3 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22. Drawing will be held at that time, and permits will be mailed to successful applicants.

Include name and complete mailing address; your telephone number; your 2003 Junior California Hunting License number; your choice of Morning (8 a.m. to 12 noon) or Afternoon ( 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. ) hunt period. Applications must be received at Ash Creek Wildlife Area, P.O. Box 37, Bieber, CA 96009. Call (530) 294-5824 or 398-4627 if you have any questions.

August 28, 2003

News

Supervisors aim for better personnel relations

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday opened a fresh new method of dealing with employee issues and are looking for more open communication. The new suggestions come after a difficult and contentious period for Modoc County

Supervisors David Bradshaw and Dan Macsay presented their personnel proposals for consideration, which were generally supported by the board

Bradshaw said the Board needs to take a more proactive leadership role and dispel the perceptions of favoritism. He also said the Board needs to work as a group regarding personnel matters and improve communications among departments. One of the first steps, said Bradshaw, was to set up a meeting with Department Heads

"We need to let Department Heads know they have an ‘open door' policy with the Board and that fair and equal expectations will be applied to all employees," Bradshaw said. "Job performance and not personalities will be evaluated. Each department head and employee will know what is expected of them." Bradshaw said he felt personnel evaluations should be used as a tool of management, not as a disciplinary action. The Board also needs to set up written expectations, after upcoming meetings, for each Department Head, that are clear and concise. A review system for Department Heads would be developed.

Bradshaw and Macsay also pointed out that all personnel problems will be solved in a "timely and professional" manner and that those issues will be held in strictest confidence.

"We need to say what we expect of you as Department Heads," said Bradshaw. "We need your cooperation and assistance to help pull this county back together. We would like you to communicate by face-to-face interaction as much as possible, rather than memorandums and ask that we all work as a team to service the public to the best of our ability. We ask that you search for solutions to a problem rather than pass them on to someone else."

The board plans to have a review of all Department Head job descriptions and update those duties with department heads. "We would like to meet with each Department Head to get a copy of their job description and provide updates as possible," said Bradshaw. "Has the job summary changed? Have your duties increased, changed or some gone away? Have the qualifications changed? What about skills and demands?"

County Planner Scott Kessler, who was in attendance Tuesday on other matters, told the board it would be beneficial to Department Heads and employees if the Board developed a strategy and short and long term goals. He said employees are more than willing to work hard to accomplish tasks, but working for the county sometimes is very difficult because there is no overall strategy or stated goals. The Board agreed that setting those strategies would be a good start.

Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell told the Board he and the Department Heads would look forward to the increased communication and would be more than willing to provide the job descriptions and anything else the board felt was necessary. The CAO is being asked to coordinate the project and he told the Board much of what it has asked for is available within a short time frame.

While Bradshaw and Macsay set a time line of about 30 days for receipt of job descriptions and meeting with department heads, they agreed it might take longer than that. What was important, they said, was to get started now.

New MJU superintendent hits ground running

Forget about any honeymoon or adjustment periods. When new Modoc Joint Unified School District Superintendent Douglas Squellati started work, school also started

"While you sometimes get more time to adjust, this has worked out just fine," said a fairly relaxed and openly friendly Squellati at his desk Wednesday. "I had worked with Don Demsher before (MJU interim Superintendent) and everything was in good shape when I started."

Squellati comes to Modoc from Red Bluff, where he spent four years in administration, the last year as interim superintendent in a 2,300 student K-8 district. That district had some major budget difficulties they had to work through

He's pleased to come to a smaller district, and also one where the financial picture isn't as bleak. He knows full well that the challenge coming up will be the financial picture from the state and maintaining the district operating budget

"This is a stable district in terms of financial resources," he said. "There is no immediate crisis, but everyone is worried about the state. The most important goals are to make sure we maintain good progress and continue to build curriculum and programs. There are a lot of successful things going on here and we need to make sure our instructional programs are competitive and that our staff is highly trained."

He understands that test scores are important but states simply that: "Good teachers will produce good test scores."

Squellati has 30 years in the educational field. In that time, he's proud that he's only been involved at three different places. He said he expects to stay in Modoc and get involved in the community

He was born and raised in Richmond, California, obtained his Bachelor's Degree at Sonoma State and his Master's Degree at San Francisco State

He taught school for 14 years, in physical education, life science, general math and science. He also coached for 10 years, having played college baseball. He's been a head baseball and wrestling coach and has coached football and track........ He and wife Jayne, who will be moving to Modoc soon, said they are looking forward to their time in Modoc. "We've found the people to be wonderful -- very friendly, helpful and very positive," he said........ He also said he was pleased that he has had Demsher's help to meet the staff, school board, the community and get his feet on the ground.

BLM sets out to update all its land management plans

By Anthony Larson

Special to the Record

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) officials have begun the process of updating the primary plans that set guidelines and address concerns for forest management in Northeastern California and Northwestern Nevada.

Called Resource Management Plans (RMP), they will replace several existing management plans, some outdated by as much as 30 years, in the Alturas, Surprise and Eagle Lake field offices. Once completed, each plan will be the overarching document that governs forestry on public BLM lands in each field office for many years to come.

"We're updating our land use plans, which are the basic, guiding documents for our management here," says Tim Burke, manager of the BLM Alturas field office. "It gives overall guidance. Specifically, it talks about permissible uses and use constraints over the whole area."

Beginning in August, all three BLM field offices initiated the first step in the two-year process. Called "public scoping," managers hold a series of meetings and field trips to "gather information from the public as to what issues they want to see analyzed in the plan," according to Burke. These scoping meetings, which will run through September, will be co-hosted by members of various Resource Advisory Councils (RAC). Bureau officials will also meet with Native American tribes, county governments, as well as state and federal government agencies to collect more information.

Tony Fox, an Ash Valley rancher, attended a scoping meeting at Alturas field office. "My main interest is twofold. I'm interested in the land exchange process, and also interested in … juniper encroachment. We'd like to see the BLM getting rid of the juniper so that the feed would improve.

"The plan should be reactive to community needs," Fox continues. "We're in a very remote area. Our community need is grazing land and to stop the desiccation that's going on as a result of the juniper encroachment. The stuff just sucks up water."

Patricia Cantrall, Modoc County supervisor, is pleased to participate in the creation of a new RMP. "I do feel that it's a very good idea," she explains. "The tour of the Surprise resource area was absolutely wonderful. We covered almost 388 miles. It's a heck of an area to manage. We didn't cover but a fraction of it. But what they are trying to do is wonderful."

A major concern is with calls to restrict access to some of what is now open ground. "I don't want to see anything closed," says Cantrall, who bristles at the suggestion of some planners that large tracts of BLM land in these areas should be put off limits to pubic access as part of the new plan. "We are very proud to protect our land and resources for the people," says Cantrall, quoting Paul Martinet of CalTrans, "not from the people."

Ken McGarva, a Likely rancher and RAC member is also pleased, but has some reservations. "It will be a good product when it's done. It's going to take a long time to do it," he observes. "I think they're at a point where they need it."

The juniper issue is a high priority with McGarva. "I think the juniper thing is one of the bigger issues that's going to be, we hope, incorporated into the land plan because it's affecting so many things. We've got places where the juniper is so thick there's nothing but dead, barren ground."

McGarva is also concerned about grazing standards and guidelines that restrict ranchers' placement of cattle on public lands. Grazing allotments, granted to ranchers by the BLM that allows them to graze their cattle on public lands, are vital to most ranchers. Without them, many ranchers will be in trouble. "I don't know how long we can survive," says McGarva. "Restrictions that were put on the riparian areas is making it damn near impossible for us run out (cattle on) government ground."

However, he is pessimistic that the new plan will provide any relief for ranchers. "I don't think any of that will change," says McGarva, shaking his head. "No, I don't think so. Like the riparian management, they've become aware that the riparian areas are so sensitive to some of the endangered species—be it flowers or animals or bugs or whatever."

Even off-road vehicles come under McGarva's scrutiny. "We hate to see the land tore up with off-road vehicles. Whether they should be designated to a certain area or penalized for being in the wrong places are things that will probably come out of this process."

"Having been here for five years, I'm kind of aware of a lot of what the concerns are. But, I think it's important for people to come and express them so as to make sure we don't overlook something," urges Burke. "Every comment we get, we're going to consider in our plan."

In the past, BLM officials were constrained by several different land use plans, which was not only confusing but made some operations more difficult. "In fact," says Burke, "I think that altogether, including the various plans and amendments to plans, we actually have 18 different documents we have to operate under for this whole area."

The suggestion was made at the outset by upper management that one plan should be created for all three areas, due to geographic similarities. Managers from the three field offices countered with a suggestion of their own. "We thought that if we did one plan over this whole area that it would have to be so general that it would probably be of very little use in actual, on-the-ground management," explains Burke. Field office managers proposed one plan for each field office, understanding that all three managers have "similar management issues and similar resources to manage."

Burke continues, "Because of the similarities through the area, we're going to go through this planning process all together and go through the same (environmental) assessment. That way, we will have consistent plans, plans that do the best for managing the public land and for the public."

The area involved is about 3 million acres of public land in a 13 million acre area, extending from Dorris in the north to Sierraville in the south, from Burney on the west to Black Rock/High Rock Natural Conservation Area in Nevada in the east. "So, it's really quite a large area," says Burke. About one million acres are in Washoe and Humboldt Counties, Nevada, a million acres in Lassen County, 260 thousand acres in Modoc County, 50 thousand acres in Shasta County, 40 thousand in Siskiyou County, with limited acreage in Plumas, Sierra and Nevada Counties.

Dated land use plans are not exclusive to local field offices. "It's kind of a problem all over the bureau," admits Burke. Hence, the U.S. Congress allocated funds for this specific purpose, Northeastern California being designated a high priority for updating due to its aging and outdated RMPs.

The three field offices have spent the past two years standardizing and digitizing data from the forest, computerizing the information so that data exchanges between field offices will be in a standard format. "It will mean the same thing between the three field offices. With that kind of database, we figured that we could complete these three plans, but actually analyze them in one environmental impact statement, which will then … lead to better consistency between our plans if they've all been analyzed the same. It will also save money for the public, too," Burke points out. "So, that's the approach we've decided to take."

Burke is hopeful that the new plan will assist efforts to properly manage juniper stands, which directly affect upland ecosystem health, one of the main issues presently raised in meetings with local farmers and ranchers. "The juniper is an important natural component of the ecosystem here. There's no denying that," notes Burke. "Primarily because of the removal of fire as an active force in the ecosystem, (this) has allowed the juniper to expand its range quite a bit."

Planning for the MRP is done in accord with a number of criteria to ensure that all aspects of forest management and land use are taken into consideration. A few of the issues are wild and scenic river areas, upland ecosystem management, riparian areas and wetlands management, prescribed fire management, vehicular access and recreation opportunities.

"Again, we will probably continue taking comments even past the September date on an informal basis," notes Burke. "Primarily because of the removal of fire as an active force in the ecosystem, (this) has allowed the juniper to expand its range quite a bit."

Planning for the MRP is done in accord witha number of criteria to ensure that all aspects of forest management and land use are taken into consideration. A few of the issues are wild and scenic river areas, upland ecosystem management, riparian areas and wetlands management, prescribed fire management, vehicular access and recreation opportunities.

"Again, we will probably continue taking comments even past the September date on an informal basis," notes Burke.

Rather than expanding BLM staff to execute the new plan, the development of the new MRPs will be let to an independent resource consultant. The first draft should be completed by September or October of 2004, followed by a 90-day public comment period. The final environmental impact statement would be available by the fall of 2005.

"It's a long process we're going into," admits Burke. "Actually, it's shorter than has been done in the past. If we can get all these plans completed in a two year period, I think we'd be pretty successful."

Modoc property values up by 3.77% for 2003-04

There has been an increase in property values in Modoc County over the last year, according to Modoc County Assessor Josie Johnson.

Johnson told the Board of Supervisors Tuesday that overall the increase in the assessment roll was 3.77 percent. That took into account a 3.26 percent increase in secured property, a 5.18 percent decrease in unsecured property and a 7.10 percent increase in the utility rolls.

The secured rolls went up from $602,685,099 last year to $622,335,768 for 2003-2004. The unsecured roll went down from $22,909,097 last year to $21,723,468 this year. In total, the county saw the values increase from $625,594,196 last year to $644,059,236 this year.

The utility roll (appraised by the state) went up in value from last year's $152,946,218 to this year's $163,806,501.

Johnson told Supervisors that the high-end residential and rural residential properties (above $100,000) continued to reflect an increase in values and agricultural sales were stable. There was also a continuing large volume of sales in California Pines, reflecting some value increases. Johnson also said the 6,000 parcels reflect a decline in value, about 21.8 percent of the roll.

She said her office had been busy, showing a 24.8 percent increase in documents recorded and a 27.4 percent increase in parcels requiring reappraisal. She also said because of the volume of work, not all appraisals have been completed and a roll correction is in progress.

Last year was the first time Williamson Act values were an impact since Modoc just recently approved Williamson Act contracts for agricultural land. Basically, under the act, agricultural lands are assessed at a lower rate as long as they sign a contract guaranteeing at least 10 years of agricultural use.

Johnson told the board that the impact of the Williamson Act properties showed a 42.2 percent decrease in value of the contracted parcels. The state provides a subvention to replace those lost property tax dollars to the county, amounting to $58,618. Johnson said the county would end up being ahead, by a small amount, with the addition of the subventions.

Johnson and County Planner Scott Kessler pointed out that there could be between 23-25 new Williamson Act contracts for this next fiscal year.

The loss in property tax from the Williamson Act contracts could have affected special districts around the county, including fire districts. The Board had agreed that those districts would be made whole and that state subvention funds would go to keep their budgets at their previous levels. On Tuesday the board agreed to make sure that happens.

In other action Tuesday, the Board voted to accept the resignation of County Counsel Vickie Cochran, effective August 31. The Board opted to study whether the county should pay for Cochran's county files and records. That issue will come back to the board for resolution.

The Board also opted to draft a letter to Senator John Doolittle and U.S. Representative Wally Herger concerning the reopening of the Allen Camp Dam project.

That project, which involves a dam on the Pit River near Stone Coal was funded at about $64 million in 1978, but was halted before construction ever started.

The issue this time around is pretty much the same as the in the late 1970s, and it involves water storage.

The board also received a report involving Hogsback Quarry on Cedar Pass. County Planner Scott Kessler told them the project was on hold until funding came from the project proponents, as agreed, to pay for information and studies required.

Burglars steal tools from local business

Burglars broke into the workshop at North State Homes sometime between the evening of August 20 and the morning of August 21 and stole about $3,000 worth of tools and equipment, according to Alturas Police.

The burglars forced their way through a back door and cut a lock to gain entry. The case is under investigation.

City police turned three juveniles, ages 15-16, over to the Probation Department after one of the juveniles allegedly stole his parents' 1997 GMC pickup in a runaway attempt.

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes said the pickup was taken from an Alturas home about 2 a.m. Friday. He said it had apparently traveled to Susanville and back. The Police Department, Sheriff's Office and California Highway Patrol participated in the search and the vehicle was located about 1 p.m. Friday on Centerville Road near the Alamo Restaurant. It was recovered there and the three juveniles were detained. The pickup had only minor damage.

Obituaries:

Terri Ann Martinez

A beloved lifelong Modoc County resident, Terri Ann Martinez, went to be with her Lord on August 24, 2003 at her home in Alturas, California. She was 44 years of age.

This lovely lady was born Terri Ann Cockrell on September 1, 1958 in Cedarville, California to Jim Cockrell of Lake City, California and Karen McDonald of Alturas, California. Terri graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1976. She married the love of her life, Tim Martinez, on July 15, 1978 in Cedarville, California. Tim and Terri shared 25 years of marriage together and have three children; Tom, Reed, and Taren.

Terri was able to spend her last few years as a homemaker which she thoroughly enjoyed as she was such a devoted wife, mother, daughter, sister and friend. She loved her family, friends, and Modoc County. Her passion for agricultural and family issues kept her busy working hard to promote positive change for the citizens of her rural community.

Terri is survived by her husband Tim; children Tom, Reed and Taren of Alturas; parents Jim Cockrell and Karen McDonald; brothers Rob Cockrell and his wife Sheri of Yerrington, Nevada and Dean Cockrell and his wife Margie of Lake City; sisters Jessie Ferry and husband Rod of Lakeview, Oregon and Jaime Sullivan of Eugene, Oregon. She has many nieces and nephews all of whom will treasure their memories of their sweet Aunt Terri.

Graveside services were conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra on Wednesday, August 27 at the Lake City Cemetery overlooking her childhood home. Many family and friends celebrated Terri's life at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville.

Donations can be made to the Terri Martinez "People Helping People" trust fund at Plumas Bank, 510 N Main.

Dick Roberts

Dick Roberts of Modesto passed away on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 at Doctors Medical Center, Modesto, CA, after a long illness.

Dick was a native of Wallingford, Connecticut born on June 5, 1932. He moved to Sacramento as a young boy where he helped his father build the family home. He later acquired a passion for model railroading from his father, a blacksmith for the Southern Pacific Railroad.

Following high school, Dick pursued another interest--car racing. He enjoyed racing modified hard tops and midgets.

Dick's business career began with the Campbell Soup Company in Sacramento. In the 1960's he went to work for Servomation and became the District Operations Manager for the Northern California region. Seventeen years later, he achieved his dream of operating his own corner neighborhood store. He owned and managed Pop-N-Cork Liquors in Turlock from 1978 to 1996 and established enduring friendships with his customers.

He won numerous awards for his model railroad and circus collections throughout the western U.S. His passion for his hobbies was demonstrated by the thousands of hours devoted to perfecting his miniature displays. His talents were featured in a recent Modesto Bee column.

Dick was a member of Trinity United Presbyterian Church.

He is survived by his wife, Dolores Roberts of Modesto; children, Rick Roberts and wife, Cynda, of Anchorage, Alaska, Kathy Dewberry and husband Bill, of Springdale, Arkansas, and Susan Roberts of Oklahoma City; seven grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. He was the brother in law of Raymond Mong formerly of Adin, Charlie and Josie Johnson of Alturas, Penny Rice of Torrance, Barbara Rice of Colusa, and J.C. and Naomi Caldwell of West Sacramento.

A memorial service was held Sunday, August 23, at Trinity United Presbyterian Church, Modesto.

Remembrances may be made to the American Heart Association, 1212 West Robinhood Drive, Suite 5D, Stockton, CA., 95207.

John Floyd Cole

John Floyd Cole passed away August 23, 2003 from a long battle with cancer. He was 56.

Graveside services will be held on Friday August 29, at the Fort Bidwell Cemetery at 10:00 a.m. A potluck fellowship will be held at Golden's in Cedarville, following the service.

He was born in Alturas,CA on May 6, 1947 to W.R. (Bob) and Esther Cole. Johnny lived and grew up in Fort Bidwell. He graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1965 and Shasta Junior College in 1967.

He married Connie Belding in 1968 and they had one daughter; Jonnie Annette (Muffet) Cole. They lived in the Reno area for a year while Johnny took flying lessons at Stead Air Base.

Johnny spent over half of his life on the family ranch in Fort Bidwell working and running the ranch. He purchased the ranch from his parents in 1974. After the death of his mother Esther in 1975, Johnny later decided to sell the ranch to Cockrell's, Inc. in 1977. He moved his family to Chicago, Illinois and worked for Turner Construction as a field accountant with his longtime friend Jerry MacDonald.

Johnny did not like the big city and after a year in Illinois Johnny and family moved back to Fort Bidwell and he managed the ranch for Cockrell's, Inc. In the 1980's he left Cockrell's, Inc. and went to work for L. Shultz Trucking as Leon's right hand man, managing the cattle, managing hay and bartending until he was no long able to do so.

Johnny took flying lessons in Reno, Nevada. When he made his first solo flight to Elko, the Elko Control Tower directed him to land. They had him on their radar and cleared him to land. Johnny was flying over the deserted Carlin Airport and landed on the rundown deserted runway. He got out of the plane and had to throw rocks off the runway to be able to take off. After communicating with the Elko Control Tower, he found out they were watching another airplane on the radar and had mistakenly directed Johnny to land. So being Johnny, he circled up out of the abandoned airport and headed back to Stead. He took this in stride as he did many things in his life.

Johnny was always willing to help anyone and went to many brandings. He was always there to help where ever he was needed. He had an exceptionally dry sense of humor that his close friends will never forget. He was an intelligent, sharp-witted man and an avid reader. His collection of books would fill a library. Johnny was at all times, his own man. What he did, he did in "Cole fashion."

Johnny's parents and daughter "Muffet" preceded him in death.

John is survived by Connie and her families, Uncle Floyd Smith and Aunt Betty of Alturas, Calif. and their families and special dear friend Linda Kemble and family. His many friends and family will dearly miss him.

In memory of John, donations can be sent to the Hugh Currin House, 2601 Daggett Avenue, Klamath Falls, OR. 97601 or to the Fort Bidwell Cemetery District.

Sports

Braves will scrimmage Friday night at home

Modoc's Braves are going to have an intersquad scrimmage Friday night at the Modoc High School Football Field. The junior varsity will start at 4 p.m. and the varsity will follow.

Modoc coach Shaun Wood sees a lot of talent on this year's varsity team, albeit fewer numbers than he'd like to have. "Talent wise, we're nails," said Wood. "But, we are going to have to stay away from injuries." Modoc has 22 varsity players out this season with one more expected to join this week. The junior varsity team is packed with 33 players.

Modoc opens the regular season at Lakeview September 5 and opens at home against Lost River Sept. 12.

They have a smaller Shasta Cascade League this year with just Modoc, Mt. Shasta, Burney, Etna and Weed involved. Wood figures Modoc, Mt. Shasta and Weed will be tough and Etna and Burney will be weaker.

The Braves bring back a solid group of players with some good newcomers from last year's junior varsity squad.

Wood said his line will be very strong and includes seniors Scott McMaster, Cory Bell, Rich Culp, David Toaetolu and juniors Brad Bell, Mark Main, Joey Catania, Kody Dunn, Eddy Velasco and Rigo Ibarra.

Senior Shiloh Pierce and sophomore Travis Wood will be sharing quarterback duties and will be joined by a solid group of backs in Luke Hammerness, Pierce will also run the ball, Jason Jones and Chris Brown.

Modoc has also a host of receivers in Kyle Madison, Nick Lowe, Cam Wheeler, Richie Duran, Jaafar Mirholi, Jacob Hughes, Marty Stevens, K.C. Poindexter, and Wood.

Wood hasn't cemented his starting lineups yet and is looking forward to seeing all 22 players in action this Friday night.

"We have a bunch of good players and will be excited to see how they perform Friday night against each other," said Wood. "But overall, we expect a very good season."

Department of Fish and Game Big Game Regulations Summary flyers now available

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) has released the 2003-2004 Big Game Mammal Hunting Regulations in the form of a double sided, legal sized flyer. Due to budget reductions only the most commonly referenced hunting regulations and information will be included.

The condensed format will provide open season dates for deer and bear, along with selected hunting provisions. Hunters are reminded, however that they must comply with all other applicable state and federal regulations, including method of take and shooting hours.

The summary flyer can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/fg_comm/2003/mammalflyer.pdf. Anyone wishing to view the full regulations can log onto DFG's website at. www.dfg.ca.gov/fg_comm/regs.html.

DFG will print 300,000 copies of the flyer which will be available at DFG offices and license agents, at the Internet link mentioned above, or by requesting a copy at (916)227-2245.

Other regulations due out this year, including small mammal, upland game, and waterfowl, will be provided in a similarly condensed format. Alternate communication format is available upon request. If reasonable accommodation is needed, call the Fish and Game Commission, (916) 653-4899, fg@dfg.ca.gov or the California Relay Service for the deaf or hearing impaired from TDD phones at (800)597-9823.

Modoc Fair Junior Rodeo Results

Tie Down Calf Roping: 1st: Roger Nonella; 2nd: Craig Giacomelli; 3rd: Alex Vigil

Junior Steer Riding: 1st: Roy Johnson; 2nd: Tim Verling

Senior Pole Bending: 1st: Jessica Hemphill; 2nd: Blaire Bidwell.

Junior Breakaway Roping: 1st: Blane Sites; 2nd: Alex Vigil; 3rd: Kendra Hemphill

Junior Pole Bending: 1st: Katy Fitzgerald; 2nd: Tera Stickland; 3rd: Amanda Masters. Senior Breakaway Roping: 1st: Jenna Ferguson; 2nd: Mandy Fleming; 3rd: Blaire Bidwell

Saddle Bronc: 1st: Jesse Hickey

Senior Bareback: 1st: Jeremy Price

Pee Wee Pole Bending: 1st: Emily Vigil

Junior/Senior Ribbon Roping: 1st: Jessica Vigil/Alex Vigil; 2nd: Niki Poindexter/Adam Evans; 3rd: Blaire Bidwell/Roger Nonella

Junior/Senior Team Roping: 1st: Blane Sites/Jaime Gill; 2nd: Roy Johnson/Craig Giacomelli; 3rd: Adam Evans/Joel Ruiz

Pee Wee Goat Tying: 1st: Landon Heryford

Senior Goat Tying: 1st: Jessica Hemphill; 2nd: Blaire Bidwell; 3rd: Josey Kelley

Junior Goat Tying: 1st: Katy Fitzgerald; 2nd: Kendra Hemphill; 3rd: Tera Strickland

Pee Wee Sheep Roping: 1st: Joyce Remstedt. Senior Bull Riding: 1st: Chris Hargrove; 2nd: Kyle Deese

Junior Barrel Racing: 1st: Dakota Baker; 2nd: Jessica Vigil; 3rd: Tera Strickland

Senior Girls Barrel Racing: 1st: Lynn Kemen; 2nd: Blaire Bidwell; 3rd: Josey Kelley

Junior All-Around Boy: Roy Johnson; Junior All-Around Girl: Katy Fitzgerald; Senior All-Around Girl: Blaire Bidwell; Senior All-Around Boy: Roger Nonella.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Anglers experienced great fishing at Eagle lake this past week. Average sizes continue to vary between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 pounds. Saturday and Sunday produced many Eagle Lake Trout exceeding four pounds with some now coming in weighing up to 5 1/2 pounds. Fish are being caught throughout the day, but best results are still being experienced in the early morning hours. Reports indicate that the best action is coming from the Eagles Nest and Wildcat Point areas. Many report success from mid-lake areas and from the open water near Merrill Campground. Shore fishermen report moderate success from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty and the Circus Grounds between Merrill and Christie Campgrounds.

Trolling at 20-30 feet using Night Crawlers, Rainbow Runners, Rapalas and Needlefish from down riggers or lead-line set-ups is working best. Many are adding Dodgers or Wiggle Fins to enhance action. Still fishing is working best using Night Crawlers or Power Bait under slip bobbers. Some are adding Smelly Jelly as well.

Many games and special activities are planned for folks all ages over the Labor Day weekend as the Eagle Lake Recreation Area presents its annual "Family Fun Days" Labor Day weekend campers will find four campgrounds in the pines along the south shore of Eagle Lake with 325 campsites and two group camps available. More than 200 sites are available on first-come first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake call (530)825-3212. For reservations call, toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

September 4, 2003

News

County approves hospital contract

A contract between Doctors Ed Richert and Owen Panner to act as independent contractors at the Modoc Medical Center Clinic was approved by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday morning.

The vote was 3-2 with Supervisors Pat Cantrall, David Bradshaw and Willy Hagge voting to approve and Supervisors Dan Macsay and Mike Dunn voting no.

That contract had been held up for months as the contract language was reworked. Acting County Counsel John Kenny said the current contract was adaptable.

Both Panner and Richert have been operating in good faith at the clinic, without a contract since May. They had been in private practice in Modoc for years, and the contract was deemed good for both the hospital as well as the doctors.

A third full time physician, Dr. Debra Clyde, and family Nurse Practitioner have also joined the clinic staff. The new arrangement has allowed the hospital to maintain continuity of service with the three on-site doctors, rather than having to go to the former fly-in doctor service.

Hospital Administrator Teresa Jacques said, "It's been very beneficial, I think that it allows the physicians more continuity, they work with each other every day. There's more continuity for patients as the doctors work well with each other and know how they practice. There are still some bumps, but we're trying to get those taken care of one by one. I feel this was a very good move for the community, the doctors and facility."

The Board also went forward with a performance standards/job description for department heads project that was initiated at the last meeting. The intent is to get a fair and balanced system, with accountability, in place. The Board also heard from Kenny that it did not have to pay for copying of former County Counsel Vickie Cochran's files and records. He told the board those items belonged to the county. Cochran resigned as of August 31. District Attorney Jordan Funk will assume the duties of County Counsel on an interim basis. Kenny will remain to consult. The Board will be looking at a variety of options to replace county counsel.

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison's request to hire extra help for the Oct. 7 Recall election was approved. She will decide just how to go about finding the help she's going to need.

Chairman Mike Dunn pretty much refused to specify any allegations he made publicly against county department heads in a broadcast statement and in a letter that was circulated around Alturas.

Dunn had charged that: "There are continuing violations of county ordinances, ongoing corruption, forgery, fraud, misuse of government funds, misconduct and violations of labor codes and MOU's. I believe this is happening in the following offices: social services, public guardian, public health, public administrator as well as the hospital and the county administrator."

When pressed Tuesday by a department head, as well as other board members, to cite the charges specifically so they could be addressed, Dunn declined and presented no proof of any allegation. Four of the board members offered apologies to department heads and departments. Dunn did not.

Board wants study of Allen Camp project

The Board of Supervisors Tuesday opted to continue a study of the Allen Camp Dam project, in the Stone Coal Valley area, by drafting a letter to congressional representatives.

The Allen Camp Dam was proposed in the 1970s and actually was on track for funding and construction in December 1978. At that time, construction was set to begin in 1981 with a completion date of 1986. The estimated cost of construction was $64,220,000.

The project included a 103-foot high earthfill dam creating a 90,000 acre foot reservoir, water diversion and drainage facilities located in Stone Coal Valley west of Adin Pass and north of Lookout.

On Tuesday, County Geologist Dr. James Slosson told the Board that the original site of the dam, in his opinion, rested on an earthquake fault. The board also heard from Dr. Thomas Groase on the new mapping and geology project for Modoc County.

The primary function of the Allen Camp Dam project was irrigation, with flood control and recreation also considered. The current board is looking at a need for water storage on the Pit River.

From 1978 to 1980, Congress appropriated $438,000 for the study and pre-construction work. .

In June, 1981, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation concluded that the Allen Camp Dam was not economically feasible at the time and the project was placed on the inactive list.

By that time the total construction cost had risen to $105 million for the project and was simply not cost effective.

The current board wants to take another look at the project, and see if changes can be made or if circumstances have changed to make the project more attractive from a cost-benefit analysis.

Migratory Bird festival and Balloonfest full of activities, education

By Lynda Demsher

Special to the Record

The Alturas Balloonfest and Migratory Bird Festival, scheduled September 12-14 this year, offers a variety of ways to check out Modoc's wildlife resources.

Events begin Friday, Sept. 12, with a 6 p.m. balloonists' reception at Main Street Coffee in Alturas. The public is invited to meet and greet these skilled aviators who provide Alturas with one of its more colorful events. Cost to attend will be $5 per person.

A 6:30 a.m. pancake breakfast begins the Balloonfest both Saturday and Sunday, with the lighter-than-air crafts lifing off both days at 7:30 a.m. at Sharp's Field, corner of 4th and Josephine Streets in Alturas. Balloon rides will be available to those who want to see what the birds can see of the countryside.

A very special ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Modoc Wildlife Refuge marks the national system's 100th year of existence, with the burial of a time capsule containing a number of items sure to be of interest to a future generation of wildlife conservationists. The public is encouraged to participate in this historic event.

At 9:30 a.m. the informational booths and an Arts and Crafts Faire open at the Veterans' Memorial Park in Alturas. The booths will provide information on a variety of topics related to wildlife management and conservation, agriculture, and even taxidermy. The Arts and Crafts Faire provides a place to appreciate and buy local creations.

Workshops scheduled for Saturday include insturction in wildlife photography, a look at the archeology of Modoc County, hands-on fly tying experience, duck calling instruction (including free duck calls) in anticipation of special contests for kids and adults, bird banding, and a special raptors presentation by Turtle Bay Discovery Park of Redding. At 11:45 a.m. the Klamath Basin Hunter/Retriever Group will provide a look at the stages of training a dog goes through to become an invaluable hunting companion.

After a lunchtime barbecue, the dedication of the Emigrant Trails Scenic Byway takes place center stage at 1:15 p.m., providing another link in the scenic and historical designations in northeastern California. An information booth "at the stagecoach" in the park will provide an in-depth look at how the Byway was established and what it means to Modoc County. This year's give-a-way will be a tub full of Modoc specialties donated by Alturas area and Surprise Valley merchants and associations. A colorful bird house, jewelry, herbal lotions, wild rice, a sample of honey and jellies, and a Surprise Valley cookbook are just some of the items that will go to a lucky ticket-holder at the conclusion of Saturday's events at 4:30 p.m. Sunday features the free showing of the Oscar-nominated "Winged Migration" at 3 p.m. at the Niles Theater in Alturas. A preview of what is being called "a breathtaking aviary spectacle" is available at sonyclassics.com. Prior to the movie, activities scheduled at the Modoc Wildlife Refuge Sunday include a bird banding demonstration, wildlife photography tour and bicycle bird identification tour. The River Center on Henderson Street in Alturas will also be open for tours from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sunday. For more information, call the Alturas Chamber, (530) 233-4434 or the Migratory Bird Festival Committee at (530) 233-5085.

Modoc Migratory Bird Festival Schedule

Saturday, September 13:

9:00 a.m

Wildlife Refuge Centennial Dedication at Refuge

9:30 a.m

Exhibits/Vendors open at Park

10:00 a.m

Fly Tying--Paul Bailey (main tent)

11:00 a.m

Wildlife Photography--Dave Menke (main tent)

11:45 a.m

Retriever Demonstration (train park)

12:30 p.m.

Archeology of Modoc--Gerry Gates (main tent)

1:15 p.m

Dedication Emigrant Trails Byway

2:00 p.m.

Turtle Bay

2:45 p.m

Bird Banding--Shannon Ludwig (main tent)

3:30 p.m

Bird Calling 101

4:00 p.m

Bird Calling Contest

4:30 p.m

Announce contest winners and raffle winner

Festival closes

Sunday, September 14:

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Bird Banding at Refuge

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m

Wildlife Photography at Refuge

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

River Center open for tours

10:30 a.m. - ?

Bike Tour at Refuge

3:00 p.m.

Winged Migration at Niles Theater

Fire restrictions lifted on the Modoc Forest

At midnight on September 5, 2003 fire restrictions on the Modoc National Forest that were implemented on August 2, will be lifted.

The restrictions lifted include building, maintaining or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except in designated recreation sites. Smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building or within designated recreation sites. Operating an internal combustion engine off National Forest System Roads or outside of the designated recreation sites. Possessing or using a motorized vehicle off National Forest System Roads or outside of designated recreation sites.

Check with local fire officials for information relating to debris burning and restrictions in areas other than the Modoc National Forest.

The Modoc National Forest would like to stress that the forest is still dry. Re-instatement of fire restrictions is weather dependent, and caution should be used at all activities on the forest to prevent wildland fires.

'A Day to Remember' commemorates Sept. 11

A commemoration ceremony to honor the victims of September 11, will be publicly observed on the park patio behind Veterans' Memorial Hall, So. Main St., Alturas on Thursday, Sept. 11 at 11 a.m.

The American Legion Post #163 and the Alturas Rotary Club will co-host the public "Day to Remember."

The commemoration ceremony honors the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, Pentagon, airline flight takeovers, as well as American military service personnel who have died in the battle against terrorism, while other members of the service continue to fight.

"We must not forget all of those who gave their lives for this country," says American Legion local Post Commander James Conant.

"Everyone in Alturas is invited to join together in this uniting in a 'Day to Remember.'"

The ceremony will begin by recognizing emergency service personnel who have remained strong throughout the entire ordeal on the attack of America and who have upheld the honor of patriotism.

"This ceremony will not only honor those who have died, but also those who live and continue to fight for the freedom of this great nation," said Conant. September 11 has been designated by Public Law 107-99 as Patriot Day. For further information contact James Conant at 233-1210. In case of inclement weather, the service will be held inside the Veterans' Hall, So. Main St., Alturas.

Tulelake--Butte Valley Fair schedule of events

Looking for a fun weekend, take a drive north to Tulelake.

Thursday, September 4: 7-9 a.m.--Cut flowers received, 8 a.m.--Gymkhana sign-up, classes sponsored by Hemphill Ranch, GH Ranch, Harbert family, Fleming Ranch, Merle's Custom Butchering, Kerr Ranch, noon to 10 p.m.--All exhibits buildings open, 1 p.m.-- Flower show judging open to public, 1 p.m.-- Lost River Band, stage 2, 3-3:45 p.m.--Comedian Sean McMahon, stage 1, 3-9 p.m. POP at midway, redeem by 7 p.m., 4-4:45 p.m.--Magician Frank Thurston, stage 1, 6-6:45 p.m. Magician Frank Thurston, stage 1, 7-10 p.m.-- Dog trials, grandstand.

Friday, September 5: 8:30 a.m. Horse show in arena, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.--All exhibit buildings open, 10 a.m.-- Livestock judging contest in sale barn, 11-11:45 a.m. Comedian Sean McMahon, stage 2, Noon to 12:45 p.m.--Lost River Band, 12:30 p.m.--Beef sheep and swine showmanship, 1-1:45 p.m. Hypnotist Tammy Barton, stage 1, 1-1:45 p.m. Comedian Sean McMahon, stage 2, 1-10 p.m. midway open, 2-2:45 p.m.--Magician Frank Thurston, stage 1, 2 p.m.--Lost River Band, 3-3:45 p.m.--Comedian Sean McMahon, 4-4:45 p.m.-- Magician Frank Thurston, stage 1, 5-5:45 p.m.-- Little onion catch and potato shoot, stage 2, 5-5:45 p.m.--Hypnotist Tammy Barton, stage 1, 6-6:45 p.m.--Dixeland Hot Shots, stage 1, 6:30 p.m.-- Mutton Busting (10-A only) grandstands, 7 p.m.--Goat Milk Out at sheep barn, 8 p.m.--Bad Bulls tour, tickets $12.50 grandstand chairs, $10 general admission, age five and under free with paying adult.

Saturday, September 6: 7-9 a.m.--Cut flowers received, 8 a.m.--Livestock judging, 9 a.m.--Horse show in dirt arena, goat judging in front of sheep barn; rabbit judging in new sale barn, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.--All exhibit buildings open, 10-10:45 a.m.--Hypnotist Tammy Barton, stage 1, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.--Horseshow pitching, $5 entry fee, 11 a.m. Open swine showmanship, swine barn, noon to 10 p.m.--Midway open, noon --Parade on Main Street, 1 p.m.--Judging for flower show, open to public, 1-1:45 p.m.--Comedian Sean McMahon, stage 1, 1-1:45 p.m.--Klamath Dance and Exercise, stage 2, 1-5 p.m.--Classic car show, grandstands, 1:30 p.m.--Open beef and sheep showmanship, 1:30 p.m.--Swing judging resumes, swine barn, 1:30-5 p.m. Classic Civil War Society, behind Home Ec Building.

Local artisans open new wood craft show

The Art Center will host a Friday night reception on September 5 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. to open the new annual Wood Artisans Craftsmanship Show at 317 So. Main St., Alturas. The public is invited to attend.

The September show and sale is an exhibit of the works created by area wood artisans. Orders for some of the objects will be taken, as per agreement with the artisan.

A non-profit organization, the Art Center receives a commission on all sales and orders. Coordinator for the show, Pat Schluter, may be reached by calling (530) 233-3556 or 233-5207, evenings. The Art Center, staffed by volunteers, is open Saturdays from 12 noon to 4 p.m. and Tuesday through Friday, 12 noon to 4 p.m. Telephone: (530) 233-2574.

Off the Record - By Rick Holloway, Editor

On the recall. . .

T his recall effort against Governor Gray Davis is a complete circus, with the California Republican Party as its ringmaster. Sorry, you guys, you're way out of line.

While I've seen several news stories saying the ballot is very complicated and voters may have some difficulty understanding the process . . . get real. Let's make it simple. Just go into the voting booth on Oct. 7 and vote "no" on the recall. It's that simple . . . you don't have to do anything else. And you can walk out of the booth knowing you took a stand to save Democracy . . . at least fair Democracy.

Look, the Republicans in this thing are making a mockery out of the system. Their leading candidate, Arnold, chose not to participate in the debate held yesterday. So, he and his staff are going to take notes on other candidate's positions without having to reveal his own. Jeez, you think maybe he wants a script?

Of course he does. The only debate he's signed up for is one where the questions are given to him a week in advance. I don't mean to sound cynical here (yes, I do) but that's not a debate. His staff will get to write down his positions, jot down the inflections, and underline the "catch" words. It's way past ridiculous.

And honestly, the Republicans jumping up and down about California's $8 billion deficit is more than slightly hypocritical since George W is nearing $500 billion in the red. He inherited a huge surplus and it's going up a billion a week.

Davis is not wholly responsible for what's wrong or right in California. We can blame ourselves (the voters) for much of what ails the state, whether we like to admit it or not. And you might take notice that the federal economic mess has raised havoc with almost all of the states.

The reality is Davis was elected in a fair election by the people of the state and he deserves to finish his term. We shouldn't be using recall except in cases where criminal malfeasance is concerned. You shouldn't get any "do overs" because you just don't like the results. I borrowed that from comedian Bill Maher. Heck, as a Democract, I'd certainly have opted for a "do over" of the 2000 national election in that case. I'm content, however, to wait until 2004.

But, the recall is going to happen and the campaigns are geared up and running. At least pay some attention to reality this time around and know how to separate the nonsense from reality. Just a hint -- "The Terminator" is a fictional character.

Obituaries:

Dennis Boyle

Former Modoc County resident Dennis Boyle of McCloud entered the Lord's presence on August 28, 2003 in Redding, CA.

Dennis is survived by his wife of 40 years, Sybil, his son Mike Boyle of Alturas and his daughters Kasey and Molly Boyle of Redding and Mt. Shasta. Dennis also leaves daughter and son-in-law Kelly and Philippe Hammerness of Likely and grandsons Luke, Bill and Tyler Hammerness and Leslie Cummings and his brother, Jerry Boyle of Ft. Bidwell and Redding, CA.

Dennis was born to Walter and Joan Boyle of Palo Cedro, CA on November 25, 1938. Dennis was a community minded person and served as Master of the Millville Grange #443 in Palo Cedro. He served on the North Cow Creek School Board and on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board, Alturas. Dennis was a land developer, rancher and cattleman. In recent years, he was able to help a group of ranchers in Venezuela with a herd improvement program working with Beefmasters from the United States. Dennis was an avid sports fan and was involved with many sports programs over the years. He was great at critique and many kids were able to improve in their abilities, due to his sound teaching and practice of fundamentals. In most recent years, Dennis could be seen regularly walking the sidelines at football games, in the gym bleachers watching wrestling or basketball, or at the baseball park cheering for his grandsons. He was their number one fan.

Dennis'ready smile and optimistic attitude will be remembered by many. A man of many friends, he will be missed.

A Celebration of Dennis' Life will be held today, Sept. 4 at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph's Catholic Church. A fellowship luncheon will follow. Pastor Jerry Boyle, Dennis' brother, will conduct the Protestant memorial service. Condolences and remembrances may be sent to: Sybil Boyle, at P.O. Box 718, McCloud, CA 96057. Allen and Dahl of Redding was in charge of arrangements.

Sports

Modoc opens at Lakeview Friday

Lakeview will be the site of Modoc's football opener this week, but the junior varsity game will be shortened.

According to Modoc Coach Shaun Wood, the Lakeview team is short players so the JV game will be just one half. The varsity game will go the full time. The junior varsity game starts at 5 p.m. and the varsity game should start just after 6 p.m.

Modoc scrimmaged against itself Friday afternoon and Wood saw some things he liked and got to settle his starting lineup, with other players scheduled to see plenty of playing time.

Running back Jason Jones will miss the opening part of the season because of a broken leg suffered during physical education class last week. K.C. Poindexter is nursing an Achilles injury and Chris Brown and Jacob Hughes may not be available.

"We'll be down to 20 varsity players, but we'll be fine, we just have to avoid injuries," said Wood. "Overall, I was very pleased with Friday's scrimmage. A lot of players came through and we had some solid performances."

Much like the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Modoc's defense may be the strong point this season. Eight of the 11 starters are returning from last year's team.

"I don't expect us to give up a lot of points and our front is very strong," said Wood. ‘I'm looking forward to seeing how well they perform on Friday." That defensive front is made up of Scott McMaster, Brad Bell, Cory Bell and Marty Stevens. The linebackers are also strong with Rich Culp and David Toaetolu in the middle and Nick Lowe and Luke Hammerness on the outside. Kyle Madison and Cam Wheeler will hold down the corners and Shiloh Pierce is at safety.

Also seeing time on defense will be Jaafar Mirholi, Richie Duran, Joey Catania, Mark Main, Brian Walters, Kody Dunn and Rigo Ibarra. The starting offense has many of the same players, which is not unusual. Brad Bell is at center, Culp and Catania at guards, McMaster and Cory Bell at tackles and Stevens at tight end. Madison holds down the wideout spot and Lowe is the other receiver. Pierce will hold down the fullback slot and Hammerness goes to tailback. Travis Wood will handle the quarterback duties. Wheeler, Eddie Velasco, Duran and Main will also see time on offense.

The Braves' first home game is against Lost River Sept. 12. Junior varsity starts at 5 p.m. with the varsity to follow.

Plenty of players for Braves JV football

There's no lack of players out for the Modoc junior varsity football team -- three full teams showed up. For non-football types, that equals 33.

Coach Eric Burrows said his team has a good crop of returners and some very promising freshman players. He expects the Braves to be very strong. Last year the jayvees tied for the Shasta Cascade League title with Mt. Shasta.

Burrows said the team has good size and ability on the line with the following players out: Tim Cruse, Ian Jacques, Taylor Dunn, Grant Hall, Bud Groff, Lenny Gladu, Josh Manuel, Brett Ratliff, Carl Greene, Robert Sheld, Alan Botello and Preston Dennis.

He has Bill Hammerness at quarterback with Justin Mason, Jesse Harrer, Jake Gray, Nick Hawes, and Willy Mohr in the backfield. Receivers are: Sean Wolfe, Sheridan Crutcher, Michael Gaskey, Devin Urroz, Shane Pierce, Brian Weed, Jerad Cox, Andrea Sheld, Jesse Quevas, Kaid Kunert, Brandon Anderson, Dustin Philpott, Liam Iverson, and Hank Raabe. Jake Smith is out due to injury.

"We're about where we expected, with the defense advanced and the offense a little behind," said Burrows. "We're looking forward to Friday and especially to the home opener."

Cross country team slim, but should do well

There aren't a lot of runners out for the Modoc Cross Country team this season, but there is talent. The Braves open the season at the Fall River Invitational Sept. 10.

According to new coach Don Mason, several runners should finish high in the north section. Leading the way is Scott Joyce who has had solid workouts this season. Mason said he should be in the top tier of section runners.

Freshman Brett Joyce and sophomore Mark Main also are improving with each practice. Main is also playing football.

On the girls' side, sophomore Jennifer Joyce and freshman Danielle Moriarity lead the team. Joyce had a successful freshman season and Mason feels she has a shot at qualifying for the state meet. Moriarity did very well at the junior high level last year and Mason feels she will be aggressive and successful this season. Freshman Crystal Cohen rounds out the girls team and is improving daily.

Mason is concerned with the lack of runners this year and invites anyone wishing to join the team to contact him at Modoc Middle School, or contact Bill Perkins at Modoc High School.

Givan pitches in NAFA

Ernie Givan of Alturas pitched for the Sargent and Sons (of Arcata) fastpitch softball team in the North American Fastpitch Association World Series in Chippewa Valley, Wisconsin, August 14-17.

The team finished tied for eighth in their bracket, which made them 12th overall out of 80 teams. There were over 1,200 players from the United States and Canada involved.

Givan pitched two complete games and won both. The first game was against the EAS Knights from Colorado, which Sargent and Sons won 11-2. Givan gave up four hits and one earned run.

He won the second game, against the Athletics from Indiana, and threw a two-hit shut-out, winning 1-0.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

A five pound, seven ounce Eagle Lake trout caught by Glen Salie of Folsom topped the list over the weekend at Eagle Lake. Fishing at Eagle Lake continues strong. Average sizes are varying between two and a half and three and a half pounds. Anglers continue to report fish exceeding four pounds.

Best results are still being experienced in the early morning hours, although many report catching fish throughout the day, especially in the evening hours. Some of the best action was coming from the boats in front of the Eagle Lake Marina jetty along with near Wildcat Point and Eagles Nest. Many fisherman report success from mid-lake areas and from the open water near Merrill Campground.

Shore fisherman report best results from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty and the Circus Grounds between Merrill and Christie Campgrounds. For boaters trolling at 20-35 feet using Night Crawlers, Rainbow Runners, Rapalas, Trolling Flies, and Needlefish from down riggers or lead-line set-ups is working best. Use of Dodgers or Wiggle Fins to enhance action continues popular. Use night crawlers or power bait for shore fishing. For campers, September and October are designated as Senior Citizen months at the Eagle Lake Recreation Area. All campsites are available on first-come, first-serve basis and there are no longer any stay limits for the remainder of the camping season. Seniors with Federal Golden Age Passports can enjoy their stay for half price. Passports are available at Forest Service Ranger Stations and National Park Visitor Centers. For Eagle Lake camping information, call (530)825-3212. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

September 11, 2003

News

Fire destroys most of SV High School shop

A dehydrator used to process fruit in the Surprise Valley High School greenhouse is cited as a link to a fire that destroyed the Agriculture Shop and buildings. No one was hurt and the fire did not get into the main classroom portion of the high school.

The fire started about 12:20 p.m. Monday and when firemen from the Cedarville Volunteer Fire Department arrived, the greenhouse was completely engulfed and flames and heat were entering the agriculture shop area, according to CFD Chief Dan Ross. It took firemen about an hour to contain the fire.

Ross said the fire burned into the attic storage area and was burning between the walls of the shop. The greenhouse was a total loss and the shop sustained major damage. School officials said the Ag department may be a total loss.

According to Kathie Laxague, administrative secretary, students were ushered out of class Monday afternoon, but school resumed on schedule Tuesday morning. Laxague said the bells were not working, so a cow bell was used to signal class beginnings and endings Tuesday and Wednesday morning.

The bells were repaired as of 10 a.m. Wednesday morning and school was running on schedule. There are 65 students at SVHS.

The agriculture classes were moved into the student lounge area and a "classroom" was set up for long time Ag Instructor Clayton Oilar. Ross said his department would like to thank the Bureau of Land Management fire crew and all those who helped in the salvage operation. He credited a lot of volunteer help in keeping the fire contained to the shop area.

One major concern was the acetylene tanks in the Ag shop used in welding instruction. None of them exploded.

Kids found safe after 'runaway' Tuesday

Two Alturas children, one age 11 and one age 12, were found safe Tuesday after spending a wet and cold Monday night in an abandoned trailer north of Alturas.

According to Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes, the pair was last seen Monday evening about 7 p.m. heading to the Munch Box or to the Chevron. The families said neither child had left a note or packed any belongings so when they didn't come home, the families were very nervous, said Barnes. His office put out a bulletin and had posters out identifying the youngsters. They were discovered mid-morning Tuesday on U.S. 395 walking towards town. Barnes said both kids were wet from the rain storm and very hungry. They were reunited with their families Tuesday.

"They put their families through some tough times, but we're glad they turned up safe," said Barnes.

In other police activity, Barnes said officers arrested Nathan Lent, age 20, alleging burglary, prowling and on a parole hold in an incident Saturday about 5 a.m. at K.C. Tierney's car lot.

Barnes said people noticed two individuals going through motor homes on the lot, and when police arrived, they noticed the back door ajar at the RISE center on North Street.

The officer entered that door, saw one person and tried to apprehend that individual, but he and another person ran out the front door. Lent was nabbed by the officer and a juvenile was picked up later at a local residence. The two also tried to break into the back door at Brown's Pharmacy, said Barnes. The adult was booked into the Modoc County Jail and the juvenile was turned over to probation.

Police report a stolen vehicle belonging to Ron Thomason of Alturas. The vehicle was stolen over the weekend and found Monday parked on Pencil Road. It had been vandalized.

Police also report that several lawn sprinkler heads at Modoc Middle School were broken off. Police suspect they were kicked off.

Big weekend for birds, balloons in Modoc festival

This is a big weekend in Alturas as the Migratory Bird Festival and Balloonfest goes from Saturday through Sunday, and there's never a dull moment.

Things get off to a good start as a 6:30 a.m. pancake breakfast begins the Balloonfest both Saturday and Sunday, with the hot air balloons lifting off both days at 7:30 a.m. at Sharp's Field, corner of 4th and Josephine Streets in Alturas. Balloon rides will be available.

A very special ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Modoc Wildlife Refuge marks the national refuge system's 100th year of existence, with the burial of a time capsule containing a number of items sure to be of interest to a future generation of wildlife conservationists. The public is encouraged to participate in this historic event.

At 9:30 a.m. the informational booths and an Arts and Crafts Faire open at the Veterans' Memorial Park in Alturas. The 28 booths will provide information on a variety of topics related to wildlife management and conservation, agriculture, and even taxidermy. The Arts and Crafts Faire provides a place to appreciate and buy local creations.

Workshops scheduled for Saturday include instruction in wildlife photography, a look at the archeology of Modoc County, hands-on fly tying experience, duck calling instruction (including free duck calls) in anticipation of special contests for kids and adults, bird banding, and a special raptors presentation by Turtle Bay Discovery Park of Redding.

There are several activities for children during the bird festival and Saturday has events from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Veteran's Park. These include the face painting booth and "fun fotos" at the Kid's Korral. In addition, the Boy Scouts will be helping children build their very own bird houses and opportunities to create wildlife art will be available for all ages.

Two opportunities to learn the hows and whys of bird banding will be offered during the festival. A workshop to go over bird banding practices is on Saturday at 2:45 p.m. and the park and on Sunday, participants will get an opportunity for hands-on experience banding birds at the refuge from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.

Children and adults will also be encouraged to pick up a free duck call at the festival and learn from a pro during a workshop at 3:30 p.m. Champion duck caller Brett Crowe will present the workshop and then folks can test their new skills, and win a prize, during a duck calling contest at 4 p.m.

At 11:45 a.m. the Klamath Basin Hunter/Retriever Group will provide a look at the stages of training a dog goes through to become an invaluable hunting companion.

After a lunchtime barbecue, the dedication of the Emigrant Trails Scenic Byway takes place center stage at 1:15 p.m., providing another link in the scenic and historical designations in northeastern California. Surprise Valley's Leis Vermillion, will bring one of his restored wagons to Veterans Park on Water Street. The wagon gives people a first-hand look at how pioneers traversed the Emigrant trail. It wasn't easy, or fast.

An information booth in the park will provide an in-depth look at how the Byway was established and what it means to Modoc County.

Sunday features the free showing of the Oscar-nominated "Winged Migration" at 3 p.m. at the Niles Theater in Alturas. A preview of what is being called "a breathtaking aviary spectacle" is available at sonyclassics.com. Prior to the movie, activities scheduled at the Modoc Wildlife Refuge Sunday include a bird banding demonstration, wildlife photography tour and bicycle bird identification tour.

The River Center on Henderson Street in Alturas will also be open for tours from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sunday. For more information, call the Alturas Chamber, (530) 233-4434 or the Migratory Bird Festival Committee at (530) 233-5085.

Modoc Migratory Bird Festival Schedule

Saturday, September 13:

9:00 a.m

Wildlife Refuge Centennial Dedication at Refuge

9:30 a.m

Exhibits/Vendors open at Park

10:00 a.m

Fly Tying--Paul Bailey (main tent)

11:00 a.m

Wildlife Photography--Dave Menke (main tent)

11:45 a.m

Retriever Demonstration (train park)

12:30 p.m.

Archeology of Modoc--Gerry Gates (main tent)

1:15 p.m

Dedication Emigrant Trails Byway

2:00 p.m.

Turtle Bay

2:45 p.m

Bird Banding--Shannon Ludwig (main tent)

3:30 p.m

Bird Calling 101

4:00 p.m

Bird Calling Contest

4:30 p.m

Announce contest winners and raffle winner

Festival closes

Sunday, September 14:

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Bird Banding at Refuge

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m

Wildlife Photography at Refuge

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

River Center open for tours

10:30 a.m. - ?

Bike Tour at Refuge

3:00 p.m.

Winged Migration at Niles Theater

USFS: Dome fires contained

The Dome Fire Complex, incuding the 544-acre Yellow Fire and the 313-acre Timber Fire, was contained as of Monday evening and controlled as of Wednesday.

Colder weather and a brief light rain helped cool the fires down. Eight hand crews, eight engines, three water tenders, and two fallers will be completing mop up actions 500 feet from the control line into the interior of the fires and initiate rehabilitation of the control lines.

Crews and equipment released from the complex are being assigned to other fires or sent to the home units. The progress made by the hard work of crews as well as the higher than expected humidity is helping with the containment and control of fires. Higher temeratures are expected to return this Thursday and Friday.

The lightning storms of Sept. 4 caused 47 fires on the Modoc National Forest. There were 16 fires in the Dome Complex and 31 other fires on the forest. Modoc Natonal Forest crews are continuing to manage those fires.

National Stewardship meeting to be held in Cedarville

Presentations, panel discussions and a field trip, all focusing on the benefits of community-based decision making, will highlight the national meeting of the Experimental Stewardship Program, set for Wednesday, September 17 through Friday, September 19, at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville.

The Cedarville-based Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Steering Committee is hosting this year's event. Members of the nation's other two steering committees, the Challis Committee from Idaho and the East Pioneer Committee from Dillon, Montana, are expected to attend the session along with others interested in the Experimental Stewardship Program. Sessions begin the afternoon of September 17 with a series of presentations and an after-dinner panel discussion. On Thursday, participants will tour parts of Modoc County to view community-based natural resource projects. "The conference wraps up with a Friday morning workshop titled "Tools for Community Based Decision Making."

Registration is required to participate. Information on registration and fees is available from the Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Field Office in Cedarville, (530)279-6101, or from the Modoc County Farm Advisor's Office in Alturas, (530)233-6400.

"We decided to focus on community-based decision making for the national meeting this year because of the great promise it holds for finding solutions to natural resource management issues and meeting community needs," said Owen Billingsley, manager of the BLM's Surprise Field Office in Cedarville. "This form of decision making brings all interested parties together to discuss resource issues before decisions are made. The process allows participants to find solutions that conserve lands and resources and sustain local economies."

Speakers for the Wednesday afternoon and evening sessions include Craig Foster of the Oregon Department of Fish and Game, Richard Vigil of the National Resources Conservation Service, Kent McAdo of the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and BLM California State Director Mike Pool. Also scheduled to speak are Bob Skinner of the Oregon Cattlemen's Association, Chuck Bell of the NRCS, natural resources consultant Cindy Deas, and representatives from the Forest Service and an environmental organization.

The Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship group is one of three such organizations authorized by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangelands Improvement Act. The local group represents broad interests including livestock operators, environmental groups, recreation and sporting organizations, California and Nevada wildlife agencies, federal resource agencies and local government. They provide advice to the BLM's Surprise Field Office and the Forest Service's Warner Mountain Ranger District on a variety of natural resource issues.

BLM Advisory Council to discuss grazing management

Potential changes in Bureau of Land Management livestock grazing policies will be the subject of a public meeting to be hosted by the BLM's Northeast California Resource Advisory Council on Friday, September 26, at the BLM Eagle Lake Field Office, 2950 Riverside Dr., Susanville.

The session begins at 9 a.m. in the Conference Room of the BLM office. After an overview presentation and council discussions, public comments on the grazing management concepts will be accepted at 1 p.m.

Following the grazing management discussions, the council will hear updates on development of new land use plans for northeast California field office jurisdivtions, and hear a report on BLM's development of a national sage grouse conservation strategy.

The BLM announced last spring that it would consider both regulatory and non-regulatory changes to its grazing policies. The ideas under consideration seek to provide more management flexibility and promote innovative partnerships so that resource managers, ranchers, conservationists and others can achieve healthier western rangelands. BLM Director Kathleen Clarke has asked the agency's citizen Resource Advisory Councils across the west to review and comment on the concepts under consideration, and to hold public meetings to solicit public opinions. The BLM will use input from the advisory council public meetings in determining its next steps on any non-regulatory policy change. The policy changes under consideration comprise what the BLM is calling its "Sustaining Working Landscapes" initiative. By "working landscapes" the BLM means landscapes on the public lands that are economically productive and environmentally healthy. The Northeast California Resource Advisory Council is a 15-member board of northern California residents who represent a broad diversity of public lands interests. Members represent livestock permit holders, timber interests, recreation users, environmental groups, off-highway vehicle interests, local government, tribal interests and the public at large. They provide advice to the Secretary of the Interior, working closely with managers of the BLM's Alturas, Eagle Lake and Surprise field offices, and the BLM California State Director.

For more information on the meeting, contact BLM Public Affairs Officer Jeff Fontana at (530)252-5332.

Off the Record - By Rick Holloway, Editor

On the recall. . .

T his recall effort against Governor Gray Davis is a complete circus, with the California Republican Party as its ringmaster. Sorry, you guys, you're way out of line.

While I've seen several news stories saying the ballot is very complicated and voters may have some difficulty understanding the process . . . get real. Let's make it simple. Just go into the voting booth on Oct. 7 and vote "no" on the recall. It's that simple . . . you don't have to do anything else. And you can walk out of the booth knowing you took a stand to save Democracy . . . at least fair Democracy.

Look, the Republicans in this thing are making a mockery out of the system. Their leading candidate, Arnold, chose not to participate in the debate held yesterday. So, he and his staff are going to take notes on other candidate's positions without having to reveal his own. Jeez, you think maybe he wants a script?

Of course he does. The only debate he's signed up for is one where the questions are given to him a week in advance. I don't mean to sound cynical here (yes, I do) but that's not a debate. His staff will get to write down his positions, jot down the inflections, and underline the "catch" words. It's way past ridiculous.

And honestly, the Republicans jumping up and down about California's $8 billion deficit is more than slightly hypocritical since George W is nearing $500 billion in the red. He inherited a huge surplus and it's going up a billion a week.

Davis is not wholly responsible for what's wrong or right in California. We can blame ourselves (the voters) for much of what ails the state, whether we like to admit it or not. And you might take notice that the federal economic mess has raised havoc with almost all of the states.

The reality is Davis was elected in a fair election by the people of the state and he deserves to finish his term. We shouldn't be using recall except in cases where criminal malfeasance is concerned. You shouldn't get any "do overs" because you just don't like the results. I borrowed that from comedian Bill Maher. Heck, as a Democract, I'd certainly have opted for a "do over" of the 2000 national election in that case. I'm content, however, to wait until 2004.

But, the recall is going to happen and the campaigns are geared up and running. At least pay some attention to reality this time around and know how to separate the nonsense from reality. Just a hint -- "The Terminator" is a fictional character.

Obituaries:

Gordon Leland Doss

Life-time Modoc resident Gordon Leland Doss passed away August 24, 2003 in Alturas, CA. Mr. Doss would have been 87 today, September 11. He served his community well and contributed greatly to the safety of his country as a pilot during war time.

Mr. Doss was recognized for "perfect service, dedication and pride" as a Star Route Carrier with the U.S. Postal Service for 50 years. Postmasters from as far back as World War II, supervisors, directors and the Postmaster from Reno honored Gordon by attending his retirement dinner in Fort Bidwell July 30, 1988.

Gordon Leland Doss was born the eldest of three children on Sept. 11, 1916 in Reno, Nev., while his father Leland, was working the SP railroad shops. The family returned to their Ft. Bidwell home, where Gordon was reared and graduated from Ft. Bidwell High School. His mother, the former Verda Lunsford, was from a Modoc pioneer family.

Gordon always loved driving from the time he was 11. He got started hauling freight for his father and in 1934 amassed enough to buy a $50 four-cylinder Star from B.N. Bock. Gordon met his wife Fern Ash, the first day back to school in Fort Bidwell in the seventh grade and vowed she was the one he'd marry. He and Fern were married in Reno on June 7, 1936. For a time, Gordon tried his hand at selling used cars in Alturas, driving a gas truck hauling from Bieber and in 1938, he went back to work for his father and also landed a mail contract of his own. He drove the Eagleville-Ft. Bidwell route, with 16 hour days, six days a week and Sundays spent working on keeping the equipment going. The route was switched in 1946, to the Fort Bidwell to Nubieber route, for which Gordon was responsible for 22 years. His last 22 years were doing the Fort Bidwell to Tulelake route. When a Civil Pilot Training course was offered in Alturas, Gordon enrolled and attended the ground school classes for two to three hours a night, making for long work days. In 1942, he had completed the training with 75 hours of flying and wanted to be a fighter pilot. He hitchhiked to McClellan Field in Sacramento to take and pass a flight officer training test and returned to Alturas to volunteer for the draft. He was sent to Maxwell Field, Alabama and later Georgia where he hoped to become a P-38 fighter pilot with the Army Air Corps. Because of his height, he was too tall to fit into the cockpit and was sent to bomber school. Commissioned a 1st Lt. he flew in the left pilot's seat. His crew called him "Pappy" as the eldest, at 26, as well as the tallest. Gordon was assigned to the 8th Air Force (490th Bomber Group, 849th Squadron, which also had the highest number of casualties during the war) and headed for England by way of Brazil and North Africa. His squadron was based at Eye Field, England and he landed there April 1, 1944. Thirty days later, he was on his first of 25 bombing missions.

While assigned to the Air Transport Command at Palm Springs when he returned, Gordon had the distinction of bringing the largest airplane to ever land on the tiny Alturas municipal airstrip --a C-47, on June 6, 1944, when his father was ill and his family called him to come home. His last mission was in a new B-17 on Sept. 25, 1944, somewhere over Germany, when flak repeatedly hit the plane, knocking out all the controls, except the rudder. Gordon told the Record in a 1981 story, he made it back "in a kind of glide all the way to England and when he landed, the whole airplane just about fell apart."

While Gordon was a bomber pilot for three years, his wife Fern operated the freight and carrier route business. He was a hero to his younger brother Mick, who was 17 years Gordon's junior. From the time he was a young man, Gordon loved history and seeking out artifacts. He had always enjoyed restoring antiques, such as gas lamps and had quite a collection of rare items, he'd collected over the years. He also enjoyed hunting and was a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post.

He is survived by his brother Mick and wife Joanne Doss of Alturas, CA; sister Dixie Peterson of Klamath Falls, OR; sister-in-law Jane Stevens of Alturas, CA. and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife Fern and brother-in-law Charles Stevens and his parents. A private inurnment was held at the Ft. Bidwell Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3327 in Alturas. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Harold L. 'Hal' Pearcy

Harold L. "Hal" Pearcy, a former Alturas resident and State Building Inspector for Public Instruction, passed away August 27, 2003 in Ventura, CA. Not one to stand on ceremony, at Mr. Pearcy's advance request, no services will be held.

Born on a farm in Kanarado, Kansas on May 31, 1915, and educated in Belleville, Kansas, he moved to California with his father Glenn Pearcy to work in the construction industry.

It was in California where he met his wife of 63 years, Katharine Riley, at her mother's rooming house. The couple married November 8, 1940 in Los Angeles, CA. and moved to Tulare where Hal was to be a civilian-military flight instructor at Rankin Air Field, where he trained fighter pilots for World War II.

He returned to Southern California to start their own plastering contracting business. Hal took a partner and moved the business to Lancaster in the early 1950s. Named "Get Plastered With Pearcy and Casey," it was the major construction company during the building boom in the Antelope Valley.

Hal was very active in Rotary in Lancaster and donated countless hours of service to their causes. He was a lifetime achievement member of Rotary and AOPA member.

He loved boating and water-skiing, motorcycles and flying, keeping his pilot license until the age of 70. He provided his family with many recreational opportunities, including horses for his daughters Jeanne and Carol.

Mr. Pearcy became a state building inspector for public construction, supervising the Antelope Valley Hospital and College additions, the College of the Siskiyous additions and improvement projects at Alturas Elementary and Modoc Middle Schools in the mid-1980s. He donated many hours of inspections to Red Cross buildings.

Hal was a frequent patron of the Beacon Restaurant in Alturas, when he joined fellow-construction pals, the late Frogs Ballard and Glenn Jobe for coffee. He was known as "the Grandpa" to daughter Carol's many child care charges. Hal enjoyed amateur video-taping and visiting with his family and friends. His contagious smile and sense of humor will be remembered by all who knew him. He was a beloved husband, father and grandpa.

He is survived by his wife Katharine of Ventura; daughters, Jeanne Pearcy, Alturas, CA; daughter Carol and husband Bill Studt, Ventura, CA; sisters Margaret Balleweg, Canoga Park, CA and Glenna Joe Ucker, Encinitas, CA; grandsons Jeff Studt and wife Nikki of Ventura; Ryan and wife Rainy Studt of San Diego; granddaughter Lacy Ann Studt, Thousand Oaks, CA; nephews, George, Joe, and David Balleweg and Karl Pearcy; nieces Julie Balleweg, Joyce Ucker and many grand nephews and nieces.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Glenn J. and Lena (Skeers) Pearcy; sisters Florence Douglas and Lena Mae Hartwell; brother Louis Pearcy, an infant twin sister; nephew Ken Pearcy, niece Patty Wittry. Memorials may be made to any charity of the donor's choosing or to provide a service project for a friend.

Roy Swain

Roy Swain of Adin, Calif. passed away at Fall River Mills, Calif. on September 6, 2003. Mr. Swain would have celebrated his 97th birthday, having been born on September 26, 1906 in Susanville, Calif.

Always a hard and energetic worker, Mr. Swain was a buckaroo in his early days and worked on the George and Elmer Williams, Corporation and J.D. Flournoy ranches in Modoc County. He mined for gold at the Hayden Hill Gold Mine near Adin in 1944 and went to work for Edgerton Brothers Lumber Company in Adin.

In later years, he was employed with the County of Modoc as the maintenance person, taking beautiful care of Adin's pristine park for 14 years, during the 1970 and 80s, until he retired. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons.

Mr. Swain was married on January 16, 1935 in Reno, NV. to Edith Smith Gordon. The two shared 53 years of marriage together, until her death in 1988. He was also preceded in death by his daughter Roselea Nelson in 2003. Pastor Destry Campbell conducted a graveside service at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10 at the Adin Cemetery, Adin, Calif.

Mr. Swain is survived by his son-in-law Glenn Nelson of Adin; granddaughter Susan Cull and husband Perry of Redding; grandson Alan Nelson and wife Kathie of Adin; granddaughter Kris Dodgen and husband Bryan of Adin; nine great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. Memorial donations to the Adin Ambulance fund, at P.O. Box 102, Adin, CA 96006, will be appreciated. Kerr Mortuary was in charge of arrangements.

Ardis E. Doyle

Former Alturas resident Ardis E. Doyle of Sacramento, passed away September 2, 2003. A native of California, she was born June 17, 1919 in San Francisco, Calif.

The family resided for several years in Alturas, where Ardis' husband Richard "Dick" Doyle was manager for Bronson and Doyle John Deere Tractor Co., until their move to Sacramento in 1956. She still leaves friends in Alturas. Her husband preceded her in death.

Ardis was the loving mother of Sharon D. Yuke of Sacramento, and Dustin F. Doyle of Roseville and loving grandmother of Robyn Richardson, Ryan Richardson, Matt Doyle, Marc Doyle and Eric Doyle.

She will be deeply missed by her family and friends. Memorial services will be held at East Lawn Mortuary, 5757 Greenback Ln., Sacramento, Sept. 13, 2003 at 2 p.m.

Remembrances may be made to The Ronald McDonald House Charities, Eagle Lake Memorial Fund, 2555 49th St., Sacramento, CA 95817.

Ruth French Zimmerman

Ruth French (McLaughlin) Zimmerman passed away at Methodist Hospital in Sacramento, California on August 19, 2003 at the age of 87. She will best be remembered as a very loving person with an accepting nature and a gentle spirit. She gave unconditional love to not only all of her family members but to everyone she knew.

Ruth was born in Alturas, California in 1915 to Gertrude Payne and Robert French. The youngest of three children, Ruth was brought up in the newspaper business as her parents published the Alturas Plain Dealer. She was able to run a linotype machine at the age of 10 and used her knowledge of publishing in various careers her entire life. She was also a very successful athlete at Modoc High School and maintained that love for sports her entire life.

Ruth graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1937 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Public Speaking; the first member of her family to graduate from college. She moved to Sacramento and became a proofreader for several newspapers and publishing companies. In 1949, she married Kenneth McLaughlin and had her only child, Dan McLaughlin of South Lake Tahoe. She and Ken divorced early and Ruth raised Dan as a single mother in an era when women could not get equal jobs or equal pay to men.

In 1963, she married her soul mate, Ernest Zimmerman and supported his business, the Zimmerman Reading Clinic until his retirement in 1981. They remained devoted to each other until Ernie's death in 1983. She was also real close to her sister Dorris Scroggin of Medford, Oregon during her life.

Ruth can be best described as having a pioneering spirit. She believed that a stranger was just a friend she hadn't met yet. She believed in herself and her abilities and passed that strength of character to her family and friends. She never judged a person on reputation but made her own opinions on what she observed. She judged people on who they were, not what other people thought they were. Ruth's never say die attitude was best shown in how she survived two major operations to live a very normal life. She had a Thyroid operation and in 1956 she became one of the first persons in the State of California to have an Illiostomy. A supposed debilitating operation, Ruth not only lived a normal life afterwards, she also traveled the state showing others facing the same operation, how to cope. She was truly an inspiration to all who knew her.

She was past president of the Ostomy Association, member of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and very active later in life in the Widowed Persons Society and an avid Pinochle player.

Ruth's true love in life was to follow the athletic careers of her son and grandchildren. She would regularly travel to South Lake Tahoe to watch the Sports Concern Softball team that Dan played on. She became the surrogate mother for all the players. She also made frequent trips to South Lake Tahoe to watch her grandson Shawn's Little League, Babe Ruth, high school baseball and volleyball games as well as granddaughter Shaylene's ASA softball, basketball and volleyball games. She was a particular fan of the volleyball teams her son Dan has coached over the years, regularly attending their matches in the Sacramento and Bay Areas.

In later years, in Sacramento she enjoyed luncheon meetings with other 'old Modocers' and also attended the annual Modoc Picnic in Sacramento. "She and her parents made a difference in many public projects," states grade and high school classmate and friend Laura M. Putnam of Sacramento.

Ruth is survived by her son Dan McLaughlin, daughter in-law Sue McLaughlin, grandson and granddaughter Shawn and Shaylene McLaughlin, all of South Lake Tahoe, California; niece Susan French of Davis, California; nephews Mike French and his children Jessica and Kimberly of Overland Park, Kansas and Terry Scroggin and his children Jenny, Joanna and Terra of Klamath Falls, Oregon; step daughters Charlotte Moellenbeck and Joanne Pottenger of Santa Fe, New Mexico; step grandchildren Dennis Pottenger and Janice Rush of Sacramento, California, Mike Pottenger of Los Angeles, California, Albert Moellenbeck of Omaha, Nebraska, Mary Kuehner of St. Louis, Missouri, Cheryl Tallman of Petoskey, Michigan and Joan Ahlers of Los Alamos, New Mexico.

A Celebration of Life was held at Mt. Vernon Mortuary, 8201 Greenback Lane, Fair Oaks, CA. at 2:00 p.m. Friday, August 29. In lieu of flowers, the family would like donations to be given to the United Ostomy Association, Inc., 19772 MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 200, Irvine, CA. 92612-2405.

Dawn Elaine Myers

Thomas Creek resident Dawn Elaine Myers passed away at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif. on September 1, 2003 due to cancer. Mrs. Myers was 49.

Born Dawn Elaine Jones in Long Beach, Calif. on September 22, 1953, she graduated from Poly High in Long Beach and Long Beach City College. She was trained and had worked as a certified nurse assistant (CNA) and also as a doctor's representative. A talented painter, Mrs. Myers also enjoyed crochet work as a hobby.

She married Robin Myers in Las Vegas, Nev. on December 23, 1988. He preceded his wife in death on Feb. 24, 1997. Mrs. Myers had made Modoc County her home for the past 14 years.

She is survived by her mother Ethel M. Kawagoe of Alturas; stepfather Frank Kawagoe of Alturas; brothers Micheal Lee Jones of Anaheim, Larry D. Jones of Alturas and Paul L. Jones of Alturas, CA; step-brother Randy Kawagoe, one niece Elaine Jones, nephews Harry Stanford, Michael Lee Jones, William Regis, all of Alturas; 10 great-nephews and seven great- nieces. Her husband's family resides in Las Vegas, NV.

A private family service will be held at the family home in Thomas Creek. Memorials may be directed to the American Cancer Society, Redding Field Office, 3290 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA 96002. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Sports

Braves blank Lakeview, Lost River here Friday

Modoc's Braves had little trouble with the Lakeview Honkers Friday night in Lakeview, coming home with a 20-0 win. This Friday night, Modoc faces Lost River in the home opener with the junior varsity to start at 5 p.m. and the varsity to follow.

Lost River is coming into Modoc off a 26-14 win over a weak Etna team. Braves coach Shaun Wood said the Lost River squad looks down from last year and figures his team is up.

"Last year they had a line about the same as ours, but this year, I think we'll be able to dominate," said Wood. "They have a couple of good backs and they did very well on special teams against Etna. Overall, I believe we'll be able to move the ball on them and our defense is solid."

That defense held Lakeview to 28 yards on 28 carries Friday night. Meanwhile against Lakeview, Modoc's Luke Hammerness blasted out for 194 yards on 25 carries and also scored a pair of touchdowns.

"Luke had a great night," said Wood. "They took away the middle on us, but that just opened up the outside and we took advantage. We also pounded at the middle all night."

The Braves started with Hammerness going over from two yards out in the first period and he broke a 31-yard touchdown run before the second period started. The Braves did not convert either point after and led 12-0. Neither team scored in the second period and Modoc added a touchdown in the third on an eight-yard run by Shiloh Pierce. Travis Wood ran in the conversion to put the Braves up 20-0. Neither team scored again.

In total, Modoc picked up 293 yards rushing on 50 plays and Wood completed 4-11 passes for 78 yards. Wood had two balls picked off by Ryan Nash, who was the Oregon state 100 meter champion last year.

Pierce carried the ball 15 times for 39 yards, Wood rushed seven times for 32 yards, and Nick Lowell packed it twice for 26. Kyle Madison caught one ball for 35 yards, Hammerness one for 21 yards, Marty Stevens one for 12 yards and Lowell one for 10 yards.

Modoc did an Oakland Raider imitation, though, committing 10 penalties for 77 yards while Lakeview was flagged just four times for 35 yards. David Toaetolu led the defense with 12 tackles, Rich Culp added 10 and Cory Bell had eight. Bell also picked up two sacks. Cam Wheeler picked off a Lakeview pass.

In other league action Friday night, Mt. Shasta trounced Weed, 32-7, and Big Valley whipped Burney, 52-0.

Braves volleyball defeats Henley

Modoc's varsity volleyball team beat Henley in the second match of the Henley tournament Sept. 6, the first time the Braves have topped Henley in six years.

Modoc lost the opening match to the host team, but came back strong. The Braves lost to Klamath Union, they beat Lost River and played well against Chiloquin.

Modoc goes to the Lakeview Tournament Sept. 13 and will meet Klamath Union again.

"I have five returning varsity players -- a solid foundation with good leadership, and a team that enjoys playing together," said coach Kim Schmidt. "I am looking forward to a great year with these girls and believe they'll get solid community support. They are all working very hard." Coming back are Erica Stevens, Jamie Fain, Allison Campagna, Emily Pence and Kari Bushey. Coming back from injury is Kristen Taylor. Up from last year's junior varsity are Brittany Berchtold, Mallorie Hetherwick and Brittney Bartram.

The Braves' first outing was a scrimmage against Surprise Valley, where the scores were: 22-25, 25-16, 25-13, and 25-21. Taylor served 97 percent with eight aces and had six kills. Stevens led the Braves with 14 kills, Campagna added five and Pence had three.

In the Henley tourney, Taylor led the team with 15 kills, Stevens had 11, Campagna five and one block, Pence seven kills and one block, Berchtold two kills, one block, Fain had four kills. Fain was injured in the tourney and missed two matches.

Braves JV tie at Lakeview in half

It was only half a game, but Modoc Coach Eric Burrows felt he saw what he needed at Lakeview Friday night. The score ended in a 6-6 tie. The Braves open against Lost River Friday, 5 p.m., at home.

"The offense was a little better than I expected and the defense was about where I thought it would be," said Burrows. "We didn't contain on the outside and they broke some plays. We'll be cleaning that up this week." Lost River is always tough and Burrows expects the Raiders to come in well coached and physical.

"I expect them to be as tough as last year," said Burrows. "They just beat Etna 33-0, so they're obviously good. But, I think we'll be all right. We know what we have to work on in practice."

Modoc scored its touchdown against Lakeview on a 53-yard scamper by Willy Mohr. Mohr carried the ball six times for 65 yards. Jesse Harrer had an excellent night, packing the ball eight times for 103 yards.

Burrows was very pleased with the offense in the first quarter when it ran up 167 yards. That didn't last through the second though, as the Braves managed just 10 yards in that quarter. Mental mistakes and conditioning took a toll.

Coaches were pleased with the defense, and cited the play of Josh Manwill, Harrer, Jake Gray and Jared Cox as key.

Modoc also gets three solid players back for this game: Ian Jacques, Justin Mason and Sean Wolfe.

Modoc's cross country team runs

Modoc's Cross Country team competed in a big meet at Yreka last weekend, with some of the top runners in the north state and southern Oregon.

The highest placer for the Braves was Scott Joyce, who finished 18th in varsity boys race at 17:48 over the 5,000 meter course. The winner was Kevin Pellegrino of Klamath Union, who clocked a 16:02. Modoc's Mark Main was 106th at 23:50.

In the junior varsity girls race, Modoc's Jennifer Joyce was 27th at 19:36 over the 4,000 meters and Danielle Moriarity was 36th at 20:11.

Modoc's Brett Joyce was 35th in the junior varsity boys at 20:37 over 4,000 meters.

Wheelers win 2003 Arrowhead tourney

The team of Jerry Wheeler and Doran Wheeler shot a low gross of 187 to win that division in the Arrowhead Men's Club Member-Guest Golf Tournament last weekend.

There was a tie in the low net division at 196, between the teams of George Widby and Bob Brooks and Greg Valencia and Rex Northrup.

Third place at 199 went to Darrel Brewer and Dean Winfree, fourth at 200 went to Kyle Weber and Bob Gale and fifth with a 202 went to David Hoxsey and Donn Marshall.

The long drive on Saturday went to Greg Valencia and Jose Madrigal and on Sunday the closest to the pin honor went to Kyle Weber.

In the Friday "Horse Race" there were 10 teams. First place went to Fritz Barclay and Steve Buffum, second to Jerry and Doran Wheeler and third to Alan North and Rex Northrup.

There was good weather for both days and participants enjoyed a steak dinner at the Alturas Elks Lodge Saturday evening.

Spyglass qualifying rounds will be played Sept. 27 and 28.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Eagle Lake Trout continue to be caught in the over five pound category. Anglers continue to experience good catches with most averaging between two and three and a half pounds. Some report that it is taking a little longer to make limits with the recent change in the weather. Best results continue to come in the early morning hours, with many catching fish throughout the day and evening. The area just in front of the Eagle Lake Marina jetty spreading North to Eagles Nest is producing the best results. Anglers should also give attention to open water.

Shore fishermen continue to report best results from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty and the Circus Grounds between Merrill and Christie Campgrounds. Trolling at 20-30 feet using trolling flies enhanced with wiggle fins seem to be a hot item. Use of night crawlers, needlefish and broken back Repals also seems to be working well. Most shore fishermen report using night crawlers or power bait for shore fishing. Many like to add marshmallows or power bait to the worm to float it up from the bottom. For campers, September and October are designated as Senior Citizen months at the Eagle Lake Recreation Area. All campsites are available on a first-come, first-serve basis and there are no longer any stay limits for the remainder of the camping season. Seniors with Federal Golden Age Passports can enjoy their stay for half price. Passports are available at Forest Service Ranger Stations and National Park Visitors Centers. For Eagle lake camping information, call (530)825-3212. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

September 18, 2003

News

County survives $.5 mil budget hit from state

Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix minced no words about the state legislature during Tuesday's budget hearing at the Board of Supervisors meeting.

"We are on our own, we have no effective representation in Sacramento," Mix said. "To expect anything from them is a false hope."

County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell echoed Mix's statements, saying: "If there was a choice between recalling the Governor or the legislature, I would go with recalling the legislature, hands down." Both officials were angered, justifiably, by the state's last minute cut of the $500,000 Rural Sheriffs' funding. That cut had Maxwell, Mix, Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens, CAO assistant Lynn Buffington working through the weekend and late at night to make necessary adjustments to a budget that was adopted Tuesday. Board Budget committee members Pat Cantrall and Mike Dunn also participated.

The "stab in the back" by the legislature to all counties came, said Mix, after deals had been made and he had assumed honor was honor. He said deals made in this legislature are meaningless.

Maxwell presented the revised budget Tuesday morning, calling it very tight, but workable and it avoided layoffs of employees. The board agreed to maintain a freeze on hiring and fixed asset purchases, but relaxed the travel freeze.

"This is not a great budget, but it's a workable budget," Maxwell said. "I would also call it a work in progress and would advise that we maintain vigilance in the hiring of people. There just isn't a lot extra."

Maxwell said the entire budget is actually down by $2,385,526 overall. The Board adopted the $38,905,413 budget for 2003-04 unanimously, recognizing they may have to bring some items back for adjustment later in the year. The budget contains just $75,000 in contingency funds.

The general fund portion of the budget (funds the board actually has spending control over) amounts to $8,419,323, while non-general funds amount to $20,765,028. Enterprise funds account for $9,631,891 and special districts $89,263.

Maxwell and the board pointed out that department heads last year worked diligently to save money and a fund balance of $678,873 made things much better.

Still, there will be positions unfilled, including an executive secretary of Administrative Services, a Sheriff's Sergeant, a 911 Emergency Dispatcher and an account technician with the Planning Department.

Mix said the Sheriff's Department will adjust to make sure things continue to work. But, he said, there may be prioritizing of calls and some slower response depending on the severity of the incident. In addition, current staff will be filling in in other areas. Mix said the county needs to work together as a team, and his department will do what it can. He also said other departments need to work in the same fashion.

Maxwell said the budget also includes on-going expenditures of $70,991 adding an appraiser in the Assessor's Office, an Assistant DA under extra help in the District Attorney's Office, increase the county's Resource Analyst from half-time to full time and increase the hours worked by the Veteran's Service Officer by one hour per day. Some of those costs are offset by other funding sources.

The following is a breakdown of the General Fund areas: Sheriff $1,230,584; 911 Emergency $322,617; Grand Jury $18,000; Public Defender $150,156; Recreation $114,767; Museum $53,219; Recorder $171,595; Coroner $8,925; Office of Emergency Services $83,696; Economic Development $41,654; Planning Commissioner $327,514; Farm Advisor $60,670; Farm Advisor, Tulelake $21,489; Building and Grounds $293,732; Capital Projects $143,102; Ag Commissioner $416,279; General Relief $72,000; Indigent burials $5,000; Inmate Health Costs $25,000; Indigent Defense $50,543; County Jail $660,548; Probation $330,229; Central Photo $8,500; Bonds and Insurance $72,403; Public Works $157,779; Data Processing $33,000; Information Tech $116,868; County Counsel $169,012; District Attorney $320,153; Victim Witness $72,934; Statutory Rape grant $25,591; ADA grant $177,214; Court Wards $219,844; Auditor $266,346; Treasurer $83,200; Assessor $401,040; Tax Collector $184,060; Board of Supervisors $206,194; County Clerk $80,012; Administrative Services $250,167; Veterans' Service $24,508; Airports $9,600; Senior Citizens $16,000 and Vital Statistics $800.

The non-general fund budgets are: Roads $6,177,423; CalWorks $700,000; Public Health $1,860,466; Mental Health $1,524,338; Substance Abuse $1,093,076; Welfare $4,405,270; Family Support $549,194; Special Aviation $261,920; Emergency Services Grants $341,181; all other $245,340.

In addition, there is a Mello Roos fund from the Library at $485,855 and an enterprise fund at the hospital in the amount of $8,506,871 and in waste management at $854,303.

Of the total budget $35,538,673, property tax makes up just $2,162,865.

Rec center may get new life

A proposal to form a recreation district and build a new recreation center in Alturas could get a major lift if the Modoc County Board of Supervisors steps in to help with grant funding.

On Tuesday, the Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee, led by Mike Mason, asked the county to earmark its portion of a state Parks and Recreation grant of about $1.2 million to the project.

While the Board offered no assurance it would retain the funding, it did agree to go forward with a draft of a Joint Powers Agreement and further study the issue.

What's planned is a new facility, housing a gym and an indoor Olympic size swimming pool near Modoc Middle School. The property is owned by the City of Alturas and the City has offered the property. In addition, the City is leaning toward using its share of the Parks and Recreation Grant, about $220,000 for the project.

Mason said the combined grant funds from the city and county would allow the committee to build the structure, and if more funding comes through, build the facility to a higher standard.

A big part of the committee's proposal to have the city and county retain those Park and Recreation funds through November 2004, when an election would be held to form a Parks and Recreation District within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

Mason told the Board, the district vote would include the formation of the district as well as a second question asking for an annual $25 assessment per property owner in the district. He said having the building funds available would help insure people knew the project was feasible and might encourage a positive vote.

Supervisors Dan Macsay of Surprise Valley and David Bradshaw of Lookout, didn't see the rationale of spending county grant funds on something which might only benefit Alturas residents.

Mason said the facility would be a benefit to the entire county and would be open for use by all county residents. In addition, he said, some county funding now used to maintain parks within the area of the MJUSD boundaries could be freed up to use on the outlying parks.

Mason told the board the committee is now working on a feasibility study and will come back with projections and estimates of what it will cost to run the facility and district and well as the revenue it would produce. He said the facility would be multiple use and include the pool, gym, be used for physical therapy and rehabilitation services year round and would provide winter recreation for residents of the county. It would also improve the overall quality of life for all Modoc residents, he said.

Rick Hironymous, County Public Works, presented the board with a list of other uses for that $1.2 million. He said some of the funds would be used for maintenance and improvements to parks in the county and for renovations to the courthouse. The grant funds are restricted and can not be placed in the county general fund.

Committee members suggested that if the funding is used for general maintenance, it's a one time use and it would be gone, offering nothing for the future. Funding the recreation facility, they said, could generate income for the county on a long term basis.

Mason said securing the City and County Parks and Recreation grant funding would move the project from a hopeful stage to a reality stage and would greatly enhance the possibility of obtaining more grant funding. The committee was formed in 1999 and while the project has been stalled, it has never been abandoned. The allocation of Parks and Recreation funding would be a major boost to the project, said Mason, and would create renewed enthusiasm and hope.

The issue will be coming back to the board for further discussion. In addition to Mason, committee members are: Carol Harbaugh, Joe Catania, Lori Catania, Gavin Kleiman, Roy Ferry, Ardie Ferry, Eleanor Dorton, Carol Callaghan, Debbie Mason, Dr. Ed Richert, Bernice Miller, Rhonda Haslip, Teresa Jacques, Ann Francis, Dave Jacquot, Kip Lybarger and Emily Martin.

Recall? It continues on course for Oct. 7

Will there be a Recall Election in California Oct. 7? Who knows, but Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison is moving forward.

Even though the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has put the issue on hold because of punch card ballots in several counties (not Modoc), all county officials are still going ahead.

No one knows what the next appeal will decide or if the issue will go to the U.S. Supreme Court. But as it is now, everything is operating as though the election will be held on Oct. 7. The other option is that it could be postponed until March.

Madison advises voters in mail-in precincts not to mail in requests for absentee ballots they may get in the mail. Those voters can mail their ballots in now, however, and they must be received by election day. Those voters do not need an absentee ballot and should have received their actual ballots in the mail.

The last day to register to vote, or make changes in voter registration for the election is Sept. 22. The last day to file for an absentee voter ballot is Sept. 30. Voters may also vote absentee now at the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

There are two questions concerning the recall: first, whether to recall current Governor Gray Davis; and the second, to vote for a replacement out of 135 candidates, should the Governor be recalled.

Canby man accused of Shasta murder

A former resident of Canby, Clifton Garret Sherer, age 21, has been arrested on suspicion of murder in Shasta County.

Sherer, who now resides at Shasta Lake, is accused in the murder of a Round Mountain woman, Sandra Lynn Metz, age 41, last Thursday. According to the Redding Record Searchlight, Metz's daughter Meghan Powell, age 16, was arrested alleging conspiracy to commit murder, as well as Jack Morris, 18, of Igo on suspicion of murder and conspiracy, and Calvin Hodge, 18, also of Igo, alleging accessory after the fact and receiving stolen property.

Another 16-year-old girl, Danielle Rodriguez, of Redding was also arrested in the case alleging murder and conspiracy.

According to the Searchlight, Metz was shot, apparently as part of a planned burglary at her Highway 299 home. The woman's truck, several weapons, jewelry and other items were taken from the house.

The actual shooting is alleged to have been done by Morris, but Sherer was with him when they went to the home, according to reports, and both could face the death penalty.

Sherer is a 1999 graduate of Modoc High School in Alturas.

Modoc jobless rate drops to 6.1 percent

The unemployment rate in Modoc dropped to 6.1 percent in August, down from 7.0 percent the previous month.

That compares to 5.6 percent in August, 2002. Interestingly, the labor force in 2002 was 4,200 and the labor force reported for August, 2003, was up to 4,530.

Modoc ranks 26th out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment rate. Lassen County had a jobless rate of 4.9 percent, ranking it 14th and Siskiyou had an 8.0 percent rate, ranking it 43rd.

The highest unemployment rate in the state is in Imperial County at 22.9 percent and the lowest is in San Luis Obispo at 3.2 percent.

Help out the river at 'Pit River Clean-Up Day'

All helping hands will be welcomed at Modoc's second annual "Pit River Clean Up Day" on Saturday, Sept. 20 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Meet at the River Center, 136 Henderson St., Alturas.

The River Center will supply gloves, collection bags and refreshments. All a person needs to do is show up at the River Center. Prizes to be awarded for the most unusual pieces of trash collected.

The local "Clean Up" is held in conjunction with the California Coastal Commission's clean up days which have involved half a million volunteers since 1985 and have removed more than 7.5 million pounds of debris from waterways.

The River Center is a project sponsored by the Central Modoc Resource Conservation District in cooperation with the Modoc County Office of Education.

For more information contact Bev at 233-4512 or Paula at 233-5085.

Obituaries

Lois Adele Bailey

Respected, long-time Modoc rancher and active community volunteer Lois Adele Bailey, passed away unexpectedly Thursday, September 11, 2003.

Looking forward to and preparing to compete in a weekend bowling competition in Medford, OR., Mrs. Bailey, 76, passed away at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, CA., not long after suffering from a stroke that same morning at her home.

The ever-active Mrs. Bailey, known as "granny" to her grand and great-grandchildren, in addition to the many children who called her their "adopted" mom and grandma, she always had a freezer full of homemade cookies, a pantry filled with home canned delights and was ever baking or canning and freezing the fruits of her labor from her annual garden, something she'd done for as long as she could remember.

Proud of her family and happy with her life, she chose not to be idle, whether volunteering at the Modoc Senior Citizens Center to distribute USDA commodities or enjoy lunch and a game of bunco or pinochle with friends. She was proud to be a member of the "600 Club" scratch series of bowlers and was a member and past officer of the Alturas Bowling Association, team bowling since 1973. She was well known for her baking and decorating special cakes for weddings, showers and parties, with a photo album to document her creations.

Born in Tidewater, Oregon to Grace (Brooks) and LeRoy Dunn on October 6, 1926, she spent most of her life in Modoc County, with the exception of a few years, when her family moved to Ukiah.

Lois met Cliff Bailey on a dairy ranch in Modoc, where her mother was the ranch house cook. At age 16 and still in high school she and Cliff were married October 26, 1942 in Carson City, Nevada. Lois had the rare distinction of receiving two diplomas, one from Surprise Valley High where she had attended part of her senior year, while Cliff was working in the Valley and one from Modoc High where she graduated when they returned to Alturas. In 1944, they purchased the "old Page place" on Parker Creek, their home and the hub of their family ever since.

In 1946, Lois gave birth to their eldest son, Gordon and in 1949, their youngest son Roy was born. The family moved to Marysville in the Spring of 1956 for three years, then returned to Alturas. Nothing slowed Lois down, not even her two heart surgeries in later years. She played softball on women's league teams as catcher and was "pretty good with a bat." She was a member of the Side Saddlers women's riding group, sponsored by Modoc Auction Yard, riding in numerous shows, parades, rodeos until the 1970s, for which the group won a "rack of trophies," with Cliff patiently hauling the horses. Lois and Cliff started a square dancing group in the early 1950s, first at their home, until there were too many squares to accommodate. The group often traveled to dance.

In addition to their cattle and alfalfa ranch business on Parker Creek, Lois worked on the Election Board for a number of years starting in the 1960s until her precinct closed. She worked at such local businesses as Fitzpatrick's and Ebby's Stationery Store, Modoc Auction Yard, Cleo's and Woodward's Grocery stores, and her brother Gene Dunn's meat business "Dunn's Custom Meats," until he retired. For three years she worked as a custodian at Modoc High School, where her sons were enrolled.

Lois had been a member of Grange 406 and continued to document and report weather statistics from her home to the Weather Service in Red Bluff. A wonderful hostess and good friend to many, Lois was always willing to help get a job done. On some Thursday mornings she could be found at the Modoc Record helping to get the advertising slicks inserted for distribution. She was a hard, honest worker and also good at delegating during the many large family gatherings at their home.

A partner to her husband, Lois rode, "raked alot of hay and helped buckaroo" as needed and enjoyed traveling, recalling an exciting helicopter flight over and into the Grand Canyon, a few years ago.

Lois and Cliff were honored for their 60 years of marriage in 2002 with a grand party and chosen as Modoc District Fair Grand Marshals in 1997. Lois was preceded in death by her sister Vivian Paddock and brother Gene Dunn, both of Alturas and her parents. She will be greatly missed by her family and host of long-time friends.

She is survived by her husband Cliff Bailey of Alturas; sons Gordon Bailey of Alturas and Roy Bailey of Alturas; brothers Lyle and wife Mattie Dunn of Alturas; Warren and wife Lucille Dunn of Modesto, CA; aunt Ruth Brooks of Post Falls, Idaho; six grandchildren: Mindi Clendenen of Indiana, Fred Bailey of Alturas, Kenny Bailey of Redding, Brenda Masters of Hat Creek, CA; Jessica Burns and Heather McMaster of Alturas, numerous nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra on Friday, Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. at the Federated Church in Alturas. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Because of Lois' devotion to helping the local senior citizens center, the family suggests any memorials be directed to the Modoc Senior Citizens Center, 906 West Fourth St., Alturas, CA 96101.

Larry Martin Stafford

Former Alturas business owner Larry Martin Stafford died unexpectedly at his home Sunday evening, September 14, 2003, from a massive heart attack. He was 47.

Mr. Stafford was the owner/operator of Village Video in Alturas with his wife Colena, for a number of years. Prior to purchasing and relocating the video sales and rental business, he had worked at the business with the previous owner.

Mr. Stafford added a video game arcade to the new and larger storefront, which was popular with youths and families. A well-liked person among all ages, he enjoyed bringing in the newest games for his customers to enjoy. He loved to laugh, make practical jokes and enjoyed visiting with his customers.

A fan of the Miami Dolphins, he enjoyed watching football, playing chess, games and also enjoyed the great outdoors and fishing.

He was a loving husband, father, son and brother and a friend to many. Always with a smile on his face, he had an easy going, outgoing nature and kind spirit and was good with people of all ages.

Born April 22, 1956 in Illinois, Larry graduated from Madera High School, Madera, CA. and earned his Technician certificates in Electronics and Office Equipment Repair in Sacramento. He served in the U.S. Army as a Pvt. 1st Class from 1974 to 1976. He married Colena Ashby in Reno, NV., on his birthday, April 22 in 1981. The Staffords have made their home in Modoc County for the past 34 years, where they have reared their two daughters. Suffering from severe back problems, Larry retired at an early age and closed Village Video about a year and a half ago.

He is survived by his wife Colena of Alturas; daughters Crystal Stafford, age 20 of Alturas and Wendy Stafford, age 23 of Chico; mother Barbara McNeeley of Alturas; sister Becki Ruiz of Alturas; brothers Bob Stafford of Oregon and John Stafford of Madera; sister Jennifer Rosen of Firebaugh, CA; brothers Dan and Dave Rosen of Idaho; sister Melissa Meng of Madera; mother-in-law Dee Ashby of Alturas and numerous other relatives.

He was preceded in death by his father Fred Arthur Stafford in 1979. Family and close friends will gather for a memorial graveside service at the Alturas Cemetery on Friday, Sept. 19 at 2:00 p.m., followed by a reception at Faith Baptist Church, 810 West Carlos, Alturas. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. The Veterans groups and Chaplain Dick Greene will conduct the memorial service.

Memorials may be directed to the Larry Stafford Memorial Fund in care of Colena Stafford at Plumas Bank, 510 North Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

Barbara Scofield

Former Alturas resident Barbara Scofield of Wessington Springs, South Dakota, died Sunday, September 7, 2003. She was 62.

Barbara was born June 26, 1941 in Gardena, CA., to Joe and Agnes (Cvikel) Dolezal. She attended schools in the Gardena area. After graduating from high school, she married Texus V. Scofield in Gardena, CA. on February 7, 1959. They lived in various places during college and worked for the government. They arrived in Modoc County in 1965. When they retired in 1985, they relocated to Wessington Springs, SD. Texus preceded her in death on April 10, 1992.

Barbara raised mini donkeys for 25 years in addition to working several different jobs. She enjoyed raising and caring for her animals, riding horses and moving cattle on the Devil's Garden and Warner Mountains, snow skiing, attended auctions and refinished antiques. She was an active outdoors woman, who was also a lifelong supporter of 4-H and FFA. An avid supporter and spectator of her children's and grandchildren's sports games, attending every game. She was a member of Legion Auxiliary of Alpena, SD, Elks, a 61-year member of Western Fraternal Life Association and a member of the American Donkey Association. She was a best friend and devoted mom and grandma.

Grateful for having shared her life are her son, Curtis Scofield and friend Karen King of Alturas, CA., her daughter Dawn Luckett and husband Val of Wessington Springs, SD, three grandchildren Mace, Josh and Vance Luckett, Wessington Springs, SD; one brother Dan Dolezal and wife Mary of Big Sandy, Texas and one niece Susan Dolezal of Plano, Texas; her uncle Louie (Dorothy) Cvikel and aunt Albina Brown all of Southern California and many dear friends. She was a very active and busy person who will be missed by many.

In addition to her husband, Barbara was preceded in death by her father in 1993, and her mother in 2000. A memorial service will be held in Modoc, during the latter part of December when her family will be together.

Ruby Helen Goodwin

Former Modoc resident Ruby Helen Goodwin, 94, passed away September 16, 2003 in Sacramento, CA

Ruby was born in the Battlebend district of Alberta, Canada, the daughter of Rose (Fellers) and Percy John Killaly on March 5, 1909. As a child, Ruby and her family walked and rode by ox cart from Battlebend to the Pigeon Lake area south of Edmonton, where her family cleared and homesteaded a section of land. There she met and married her first husband Ray Telford. She had two sons, Ron and Lee, before divorcing.

Ruby married lifelong Modoc resident Howard Pepperdine in Alberta, while he was working on the Alaskan/Canadian highway during WWII. Ruby moved with Howard to Modoc County, CA. in 1947, where she gave birth to her third son, Nolan Pepperdine.

Howard's parents owned a ranch on Shields Creek and Howard and his father started Pepperdine Hunting Camp. Ruby helped manage the family ranch and Pepperdine Deer Camp in the Warner Mountains. After her second husband's death in 1958, Ruby continued to live in Modoc County until 1962, when she married Don Goodwin and moved to Chester, CA. There she worked at several restaurants and served as the head waitress for the Child's Meadows Resort for nearly twenty years and became a naturalized citizen of the United States.

When her husband retired from Collin Pines, Ruby and Don bought a small ranch just outside Red Bluff, CA. There they tended to their many animals and gardens until Don's death in 1994. Ruby lived for a brief time in the City of Red Bluff until she moved to Sacramento. Ruby lived in Sacramento until her death this week.

Ruby was well known for her sewing and baking skills. Her apple pies were specially requested by the Beach Boys singing group in the 70s. She also loved traveling from Broadway shows in New York to Disney World to the Grand Canyon, bowling, quilting and gardening.

Ruby was one of the first women to climb unassisted to the Sulphur Mountain Chalet in the Alberta Rockies, 1945. She was active in Senior Gleaners, Retired Senior Volunteer Program and awarded the Tehama County Certificate of Appreciation for her volunteer services.

She was preceded in death by sons Ron Telfrod and Lee Telford and stepson Carol Pepperdine.

She is survived by her son Nolan Pepperdine; stepsons Milo and Philip Pepperdine; sisters Marie and Irene who reside in Canada; grandchildren Sharon Telford, Mike Telford and Ray Telford and seven great-grandchildren. Ruby will be greatly missed by her family and friends. A memorial service will be held at the home of Nolan and Lisa Pepperdine.

Sports

Braves topple Raiders 26-0, Quincy Trojans up Friday

Modoc's Braves survived an anemic first half to beat the Lost River Raiders 26-0 Friday night. This Friday, the Quincy Trojans come to Alturas.

"We had a little attention-getting talk at halftime against Lost River," said coach Shaun Wood. "They played with better intensity and didn't make the same mental mistakes in the second half. I expect Quincy may be a little tougher than Lost River, so we need to come out ready to play in the first period."

Quincy is coming in with an 0-2 record, losing last weekend to Fernley 32-19. They lost their opening game to a good Chester team.

"I believe we have the horses and skill players to handle them," said Wood. "We will have to control one of their wide receivers, Jason Barreno, who has 12 catches in two games covering 232 yards."

Barreno has yet to score, but Quincy's quarterback is leading the north section in passing, going 31-46 for 371 yards and two touchdowns. That's according to MaxPreps.

Modoc's junior varsity will have a tough game, said Wood, as Quincy brings in a very solid JV squad.

Against Lost River, the Braves came in feeling they would be able to control the game fairly easily. Wood said that confidence was a little shaken when the score stood at 0-0 after one and midway through the second period. Quarterback Travis Wood hit Shiloh Pierce, who made an outstanding catch, for a 17-yard touchdown pass to break the tie. The point-after failed and Modoc led 6-0. That score remained at halftime.

Modoc played better starting the second half and with 2:30 left in the third quarter, Wood took the ball on a keeper for an 18-yard score. Cam Wheeler kicked the point after and Modoc led 13-0.

In the fourth, Luke Hammerness broke a couple of runs and found his way into the endzone from 11 yards out. Wood then hit Kyle Madison, who also made a nice grab, on a 17-yard touchdown pass to put the Braves up 26-0 when Wheeler kicked the point.

Wood had a solid game, hitting nine-of-13 passing for 127 yards and two touchdowns and rushing for 32 yards on seven carries. A sophomore, he also showed strong leadership throughout the game.

Hammerness carried the ball 20 times for 102 yards, Pierce 11 times for 48, Nick Lowell three for 19.

Lost River's Luis Valdez packed the ball 22 times for 85 yards, and then created havoc in Modoc's backfield from his defensive line position.

Madison caught two balls for 46 yards, Marty Stevens caught a pair for 31 yards, Hammerness made an outstanding catch for 19 yards, Pierce, one for 17 and Lowell three for 14.

Modoc'c offense generated 202 yards rushing and 127 in the air for 329 total yards, while the Braves defense limited Lost River to just 108 yards total. In other action last weekend, Esparto beat Etna 45-14; Hamilton City crushed Burney 42-0; Hayfork beat Weed 29-13; and Big Valley beat Fall River 48-0.

Modoc volleyball hosts home tournament

The Modoc Volleyball team is hosting its annual tournament at the Griswold Gym starting Saturday morning 8 a.m.

The Braves are coming off the Lakeview tourney last weekend losing three matches. The first match was a loss to Bonanza, then Klamath Union beat the Braves and finally, St. Mary topped Modoc.

For the tourney, Kristen Taylor served 100 percent and had seven kills and one block. Erica Stevens added 11 kills, and a block, Jamie Fain had four kills, Allison Campagna had five kills and a block and Emily Pence had one kill. Brittney Bartram also served 100 percent.

Brave soccer team gearing for SCL

The Modoc Braves soccer team will begin Shasta Cascade League play Saturday at Etna and on Tuesday will have its home opener in a non-league clash with Surprise Valley, 4 p.m.

The soccer teams play at the Alturas Elementary School field. Fall River comes to Alturas Sept. 25 and Sept. 27 finds Trinity here.

The Braves lost six starters from last year's SCL Championship team, and have started against teams with a combined record of 16-1-1. Some of those games have been pretty tough.

"I still expect us to challenge for a repeat of the SCL title," said coach Jay Carrithers. "We're making steady improvement and the attitude of the team is good."

Modoc opened the season with a win over Henley, 4-1, Sept. 9. Raf Sevilla scored three goals and Jose Rosales added one. John Yeier and Ryan Carrithers played solid defense.

On Sept. 13, the Braves played a doubleheader in Redding. Sevilla scored the lone goal in a 1-3 loss to Redding Christian. In the second game, with three starters sidelined by injury, Cascade scored three goals in two minutes of the second half to win 5-2. Modoc goals were by Rosales and Antonio Mangia.

Carrithers said that good defensive efforts by Yeier, Cory Funk and Carrithers kept the games in check.

On Sept. 16th, Modoc got down to Tulelake 1-3 at the half but dominated the second half to tie 3-3. Rosales scored twice and Sevilla added one. On defense, Mangia, Carrithers, Max Wise, Henry Correa and K.C. Kirkreit stood out.

Brave runners do well in two meets

Modoc's Cross Country team took eight runners to Fall River, came home with seven medals and broke three course records.

Junior Scott Joyce won the varsity boys race setting a new record of 18:48, breaking the old mark by 21 seconds. Mark Main placed sixth. Freshman Danielle Moriarity ran well with the number two ranked runner in the section, and placed second at 26:12, beating the old course record. Jennifer Joyce, a sophomore also beat the old record, coming in at 27:09 placing third.

Crystal Cohen, a freshman competing in her first race, easily won the junior varsity girls division with a time of 18:48. Brett Joyce placed sixth in the boys junior varsity race.

In the junior high division, Casey Cockrell finished fifth. He's a sixth grader running against eighth graders.

"We have only been working out for two weeks and have already reached mid-season form," said coach Don Mason. "I think the kids are starting to believe in themselves and realize the type of workouts I have them doing will really pay off by the time the section meet rolls around in November." The team participated in the Lakeview Invitational last weekend with Scott Joyce taking a second in the varsity boys race at 18:43. Lakeview's Ryan Tague won in 18:25. Mark Main was 45th in 24:27.

Moriarity was seventh in the varsity girls division at 25:00 and Jennifer Joyce was 15th at 26:14. Cohen was sixth in the junior varsity girls race at 28:49.

In the junior high race, Cockrell was 10th at 18:29 and Tim Holloway was 11th at 20:58.

Modoc JV beat Lost River, Quincy next

The Modoc junior varsity football team beat the Lost River Raiders 6-0 Friday night and will have a tough test this week as Quincy comes to town. "Overall I was pleased with our game against Lost River," said coach Eric Burrows. "I felt we did well. We're still making mistakes on little things, but were correcting those. I was very pleased that the defense stepped up when they needed to and we didn't turn the ball over."

The Braves stopped the Lost River team several times on solid stands and had one touchdown pass of about 60 yards called back on a penalty. Quincy will roll into Alturas off a 50-0 drubbing of Fernley last week and a 36-0 whipping of Chester in their opening game.

"They're going to be very tough and we know that," said Burrows. "They like to run off tackle, run tosses and play-action pass. They may run from the ‘I' at times."

Burrows said he doesn't plan to do anything new against Quincy, but will try to shore up some of the areas needing help this week in practice. Quincy beat the Braves handily last year and Burrows hopes to be more competitive this time around, although he concedes the Trojans are one of the best teams they'll see this year.

Last year, Burrows felt his defense played well for two downs each series, but gave up big plays on third and fourth down. This time around, he said, they need to have three solid stops each series.

Spyglass rounds Sept. 27-28

The Arrowhead Men's Club Spyglass qualifying rounds will be held Sept. 27-28 at Arrowhead.

The two-man team entry fee is $30 per person. Golfers are asked to register at the clubhouse or call 233-3404. The event is open to Arrowhead Men's Club members only. Tee time will be at 9 a.m.

The Arrowhead Ladies Club is hosting a luncheon Sept. 25 at the clubhouse for all members and prospective members. The luncheon will be held at 12 noon and members and anyone interesting in joining are welcome.

September 25, 2003

News

Arson suspected in Ballard fires Tuesday night

Arson is suspected in three fires started on the Ballard Road south of Canby Tuesday night. All three fires were contained by Wednesday.

Canby Fire Chief Ron Sherer, who arrived on the scene first, just after midnight, said the first fire was about three acres in size when the department arrived and was fully ablaze in dry logging slash and timber. That fire was about three-and a-half miles up the Ballard Road from Canby. Sherer said they discovered two other starts, one another half mile up the road and a third about a mile further.

The California Department of Forestry, California Pines, Adin and Alturas Rural Fire Departments responded to the fires. CDF was in charge of the operation. Most Departments were on the scene until morning light and some remained throughout the day Wednesday.

The fires were reported by a traveler on Highway 299 who saw the glow in the hills and called the Sheriff's Office.

Fire and law enforcement officials are asking the public to pay attention to any suspicious activity on forest or rural roads. Call the Sheriff's Office at 233-4416 to report any activity that may appear to be considered arson related.

Supervisors consider county counsel replacement issue

Modoc County Supervisors on Tuesday opted to seek more options of replacing the County Counsel position that was vacated last month. While the board still may advertise and hire a full-time county counsel, it wants to look at other options, which may include working with the Modoc County District Attorney's office to share those duties. On Tuesday, the board did approve the County Counsel job description.

Prior to the last County Counsel, lasting about two years, the DA's office handled those responsibilities as part of that office's duties. Modoc is facing a very tight 2003-04 budget. A decision may be made on County Counsel at the next meeting.

The Board also referred a draft ordinance on the conditions of the county taking in private roads back to committee. Apparently some changes made in the ordinance by counsel did not reflect what the committee had originally intended. In addition, the board had some questions and concerns. The committee is asked to come back with a draft that reflects its intent and direction.

The issue of the county taking in private roads has been contentious in the past and the board wants to make it clear and concise as to what has to take place on those roads prior to acceptance.

The county wants the taking of roads into its system to be based upon standards applied equally and fairly across the board, taking away political favors.

Mystery of the missing big flag

The big flag is missing! The big flag is missing! The big flag is missing! Well, at least one of the big flags that flies on Main Street is missing and veteran's organizations are asking for its return.

While a report has been filed with the Alturas Police Department, police say there's no indication of forced entry and they can't really say the flag was stolen.

Gordon Heughen Veteran's of Foreign Wars Commander, said he and Arlie Brown discovered the flag missing from the Vet's Hall on Sunday. Heughen was on his way to repair the flag.

There are still four flags remaining, but the missing one is the newest. The 20x30 foot flags are rotated as repairs are needed. The veterans are asking for the return of the flag, which has a value of about $700.

Court rules that Oct. 7 Recall will go on as planned

The Oct. 7 Recall Election concerning California Governor Gray Davis will go on as planned. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Tuesday overturned the Sept. 15 decision of a three-judge panel for that court which would have moved the election to March.

The decision did little to change things in Modoc or other state counties which continued to process election registration and absentee ballots as if the election was going to be held on Oct. 7.

The 9th Circuit Court threejudge panel had ruled that since six counties still use infamous punch card ballots, the election should be postponed until March when all counties would be using more efficient or fair ballot machines.

Opponents of the Oct. 7 Recall state as many as 40 percent of the state's voters could be disenfranchised by using the punch card ballots, similar to what happened to Florida in the 2000 Presidential Election. Following several weeks of controversy, the U.S. Supreme Court appointed George Bush as president following that mess.

Modoc County does not use punch card ballots and upgraded its voting system following the 2000 election.

The American Civil Liberties Union has decided not to appeal the latest decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. It has not ruled out further court action following the election if widespread voter problems are detected in those counties using punch card ballots.

Madison reminds voters in mail-in precincts not to mail in requests for absentee ballots they may get in the mail. Those voters can mail their official ballots in now, however, and they must be received by election day. Those voters do not need an absentee ballot and should have received their actual ballots in the mail.

Madison stresses that voters need to mail those ballots in prior to election day to insure their vote is counted. She said voters should not try and mail those ballots in on election day, or they may not get to the office in time. To be counted, ballots must be in the Clerk's hands by close of election Oct. 7. The last day to file for an absentee voter ballot is Sept. 30. Voters may also vote absentee now at the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

There are two questions concerning the recall: first, whether to recall current Governor Gray Davis; and the second, to vote for a replacement out of 135 candidates, should the Governor be recalled.

Jail officer arrested on credit card theft

A Modoc County Jail Corrections Officer, Pesa Aitolu, age 22, has been arrested this week alleging credit card theft from one of the inmates. According to Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Aitolu, who has worked for the Sheriff's Department since June 2002, obtained the credit card and made several phone purchases

He'll be charged with a felony on the credit card theft and four misdemeanors. He has been placed on non-paid administrative leave.

Pit River clean-up hauls in a ton

Were you looking for that pink baby slipper, that missing jigsaw puzzle piece, or Troy's homework? Well, we found all that and much more at the second annual Pit River Clean Up Day, held last Saturday.

About 40 folks showed up at the River Center and then headed off along the Pit River. Because we had cleaned this stretch last year, there wasn't a lot of work to do, but as we neared Centerville Road, we had our hands full. Although this area isn't directly connected to the river, with our famous Modoc winds, anything littered on the highway is bound to end up in a waterway sooner or later.

In an hour and a half we had filled the entire back of the flatbed truck that the Modoc Wildlife Refuge Manager, Steve Clay had provided us. Tom Mocilac from CHP helped with traffic control, and then pulling out his truck scales when it was all over. Would you believe close to a ton of garbage?

Our Pit River Clean Up Day is held in conjunction with the California Coastal Commission's Coastal Clean Up Day. This year, over 42,000 people worked at about 650 sites throughout the state. This effort, in turn, is part of the International Ocean Conservancy's research activities. In addition to collecting all the garbage, we tallied certain categories to gather data to try and tackle the problem of waste in our waterways. As an example of how this data is used, when plastic bags kept turning up as a major pollution, pressure was put on manufacturers, who then started making bags out of biodegradable cornstarch.

The turnout was great this year. Special thanks to the Modoc County Office of Education for publicizing the event and to teachers who explained the project to their students, and even offered extra credit, Julie McDonell, Amy Crlenjac and Linda LeNeave brought a large contingent from the Modoc High Natural Resources Academy.

Next year will be Coastal Cleanup's 20th Anniversary, and we're hoping to celebrate here in Modoc County by expanding the number of sites we clean. If you would like to be a site captain next year, or have a good idea of a waterway with public access for us to clean, call Bev McNeilly at (530)233-4512.

New Jess Valley Fire Station cuts response time dramatically

Anthony E. Larson

Special to The Record

A new fire hall has recently been constructed in Jess Valley in order to better protect homes and property in that remote area.

In the aftermath of the Blue Lake Fire that menaced homes in the vicinity two years ago, Jess Valley residents decided to better protect themselves. "It became pretty obvious to all of us after that," says Walt Nicholson, a Jess Valley resident, "that we needed a little better response time. By the time we get a (fire) truck out of Likely up here, we might as well forget it." The result was a 650 square foot building to properly house a fire truck. "This is a second station for us," says the fire chief for the Likely Fire Protection District, Dewayne Matthews, who explained that the average response time for fire equipment and manpower from Likely to Jess Valley is 30 to 45 minutes. "We decided to build a second station here in Jess Valley to cut that response time down to approximately 10 minutes." The fire truck now located in the new station is a 1969 model capable of pumping 1250 gallons per minute. "Even though it's an older truck, it has most of the same basic features of the newer trucks," says Paul Armstrong, assistant fire chief.

The new station will keep the fire truck ready for action in winter as well as the rest of the year, according to Shane McGarva, president of the volunteer fire department. "Our main objective up here was to get a fire truck that was protected and could be left here in the wintertime so that it would lower the homeowners insurance and have a faster response time for the homes up here in Jess Valley."

Since a fire truck must be ready to respond at all times, it is kept fully loaded with water for fighting a fire. To keep that water from freezing in winter, the new fire station was well insulated and a building heater was installed. As an additional precaution, a thermostat was installed that connects to an outside warning light that can be seen from most places in the valley. Should the inside temperature somehow drop to freezing, the light will come on, thus warning volunteers in the valley of the problem. "I can see that light from my house," explains Duane McGarva, a volunteer firefighter. "So, we know that we're getting too cold inside here."

There are additional precautions taken to make the fire truck more responsive. Chief Matthews explains that the fire truck has an air brake system that is dependent upon an on-board compressor. "If it's cold and the air brake system is down, it takes a good five to ten minutes to build up the air," he says. By installing an additional compressor in the station that maintains the truck's air pressure at all times, the truck will be ready at startup. An additional power hookup operates a block heater to keep the fire truck's motor warm and a charging system to keep the batteries at full charge.

"Basically, when this thing needs to roll, it's a matter of starting it up and go," says chief Matthews, proudly.

The Likely district, formed in 1949, will also operate the Jess Valley firehouse.

Residents in the valley can expect to see a significant reduction in their fire insurance rates due to the installation of the new fire station and truck, according to several officials. Other residents, who previously could not get insurance at all, may now be able to obtain it. "Now that we have fire protection up here, I think it's going to assist them in getting it," observes Nicholson.

The majority of the funding for the construction of the $44,000 fire hall and associated equipment came from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development Department. Half of that funding, or $18,000, came as an outright grant, the other half as a ten-year loan. The remainder of the funding came from the department's budget from Modoc County.

Larranaga Construction, based in Alturas, was the project's primary contractor. Individual volunteers contributed considerable personal time and labor, "sweat equity," to defray some of the costs. Rodney Flournoy donated the land for the building, as his family did for the original Likely fire station, giving the fire district a 99-year lease.

Volunteer firefighters cite fire district commissioners Roy Ferry, Rod Weed and Ken McGarva for their support of the project, as well as that of Tom Parnow, who drew up the plans, and Rick Hironymous, the county's public works director who rendered vital assistance. They also single out the contribution of Bob Newman to the fire fighting effort over the years.

"Everybody had something to contribute to it," offers Nicholson, noting that further improvements will follow. "It was a team effort."

"We have about 25 volunteers in the department, active in one way or another," adds Shane McGarva. "There's about 14 that actually do fire suppression."

The grand opening and dedication of the new firehouse will be held on Tuesday, October 14, from 4 to 7 p.m., on County Road 64, 13 miles east of Likely in Jess Valley. "The general public is more than welcome to come out and participate," urges Armstrong. "We're going to be serving some refreshments: cake, ice cream, soda pop and coffee—that sort of thing."

Obituaries:

Dorothy Acosta Cervantes

A celebration of long-time Modoc resident Dorothy Ann Acosta Cervantes' past life and rebirth of her new life will be held at Sacred Heart Parish Hall, Alturas, immediately following her graveside service on Friday, Sept. 26 at 11 a.m. at Alturas Cemetery. The Rev. Patrick Henry of Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Alturas, will conduct the services.

Dorothy passed away of natural causes on September 19, 2003 at Alturas, Calif. She was 79.

A resident of Modoc for the past 63 years, she was born Dorothy Ann Acosta in Anaheim, Calif. on February 6, 1924. She graduated from Modoc High School in Alturas, Calif. A hard worker all her life, when she had time, she loved to hunt and fish. Dorothy looked forward to and regularly attended the monthly Teapot Fellowship luncheon in Alturas, which she thoroughly enjoyed with her friends.

During her life, she was a mill worker, a telephone operator and railroad dispatcher and worked in the housekeeping department at Warnerview Convalescent Hospital in Alturas.

She is survived by her soul mate Henry Martinez of Alturas, Calif.; sisters Mary Acosta, Dunsmuir, Calif., Camilla Alverez of Klamath Falls, Ore., Margaret Ortez of Sherman, Texas; brothers Lawrence Acosta, Ione, Calif., Roy Acosta, Sacramento, Calif., Julian Acosta, Sacramento and numerous nieces and nephews.

Susie Haase Murphey

Long-time Surprise Valley resident Susie Haase Murphey passed away September 21, 2003 at Modoc Medical Center's Skilled Nursing Facility in Alturas, CA. Mrs. Murphey had been a resident at the center for several years and celebrated her 100th birthday there in 2000, with family and friends. Mrs. Murphey was 103.

Born July 7, 1900 in Hollister, CA, she was the daughter of Gustave and Elizabeth Haase. At the age of 15, she moved with her family to "Sunrise," Nevada, a forgotten town between Duck Flat and Gerlach, Nevada.

In 1918, they moved to Surprise Valley, where she met and married Ernest (Bill) Murphey on July 3, 1920. Together they homesteaded land in Little High Rock until 1925, when they moved to Eagleville, California. In 1946, they retired from the ranch and moved to Cedarville, where Mrs. Murphey lived until 1993.

She is survived by her son Laurence E. Murphey of Fountain Valley, Ca.; daughter Kathleen Murphey Benner of Klamath Falls, OR.

She was preceded in death by her husband Ernest Murphey; sister Louisa Tibbitts of Chico, Ca.; brothers William Adolph Haase of Olympia, Wash. and Fredrick Haase of Sacramento, Ca.

Graveside services will be held at the Eagleville Cemetery today, Sept. 25 at 10 a.m. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Margie L. Nield

Margie L. Nield died after a lengthy illness in Alturas, California on September 19, 2003, a day prior to her 82nd birthday.

Born Margie Kuziak on September 20, 1921, in Canada, her family moved to Chico, California when she was an infant. She spent her childhood in Chico and resided there until her marriage to George Nield on June 23, 1940. They shared a marriage of forty years and had four children. They lived throughout Northern California, Oregon and Idaho, but returned most often to Alturas and Modoc, which Marge considered her true home. Mrs. Nield worked at a variety of occupations during her marriage, but primarily as a homemaker. George preceded her in death in 1980.

Mrs. Nield is survived by her children, Georgia Templeton of Susanville, Helen McKee, Susan Bagwell, and James Nield, all of Alturas. Grandchildren, Bob McKee, Debbie Mason, Brian McKee, Dave Nield, Ken Templeton, Trudy Nield, Laura Shinn, Mike Bagwell, Jeff Nield, and several great-grandchildren also mourn her passing. One sister, Ruth Burnett of Jefferson City, Missouri survives. Her sister Louise, and brother William preceded her in death.

At her request, no services are planned.

Diane Marie Stomski

Diane Marie Stomski of Alturas, passed away from cancer on September 13, 2003, with her family at her side at a Redding, Calif. hospital. She was 50.

Born Diane Marie Delangis on October 8, 1952, in Montreal, Canada, her family moved to Hacienda Heights in Southern California, when Diane was just a year old. For over 18 years, she had lived and worked as a hairdresser in Alturas, Calif. and was the owner and operator of Modoc Hair Studio, located in her home.

She is survived by her son Chuck Delangis of Henderson, Nevada; daughter Marlana Stomski, 16, of Empire Farms, Nevada; sister Francine Brissette of Baltimore, Maryland and brother Richard Delangis of West Covina, Calif.

Per Diane's advance request, no services will be held. Friends are welcome to her inurnment at 10 a.m. today, September 25 at Alturas Cemetery, Alturas, Calif. Remembrances may be directed to the American Cancer Society, Redding Field Office, 3290 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA 96002.

Sports

Hammerness leads Braves in Quincy rout

Senior running back Luke Hammerness led the Modoc Braves to a 52-13 rout of the Quincy Trojans Friday night in Alturas. He scored five touchdowns and ran the ball 14 times for 274 yards.

Modoc faces Durham in Durham Oct. 3 and Coach Shaun Wood expects a tougher game. Durham is coming off a 43-0 loss to Truckee, but Wood feels they're a better team than that score shows.

"I think we'll be able to get them and move up to 4-0," said Wood. "We just can't come out flat and have to play solid ball." The Braves have had two easy outings in their first three games, one against Lakeview and the other against Quincy. Lost River was a fairly good team, but so far Modoc hasn't been really challenged. That may not come this week either.

Quincy had no answer for Hammerness or the Modoc passing game as the Braves racked up 608 total yards on offense and the Braves' defense shut off Quincy at 130 yards.

The only area that Modoc didn't fare well on was penalties. Modoc was flagged 12 times for 112 yards, while the refs only tossed lags twice in Quincy's direction for 12 yards.

"Quincy wasn't really that tough, but we played very well," said Modoc coach Shaun Wood, who spent the first quarter relatively tense as the score was knotted at zero. He was much calmer by halftime as Hammerness and the team went on a 12-minute terror. Modoc held a 26-7 lead at the half. In the second period, Hammerness scored from the 16, then from the three, then from the six and finally from the seven. He set up one touchdown on an 89 yard-run from the Quincy 6.

Hammerness would add a 70 yard touchdown on a screen pass from quarterback Travis Wood. Nick Lowell scored three touchdowns for Modoc, one on a 20-yard run, another on a 19-yard run and the final on a 30-yard run.

The Braves ran the ball 44 times for 458 yards. In addition to Hammerness, Lowell carried it seven ties for 87 yards, Shiloh Pierce 11 times for 73 yards and Jaafar Mirholi four for 25 yards.

Wood was 7-of-11 passing for 150 yards. Kyle Madison caught three for 27 yards, Hammerness, one for 70, Lowell one for 22, Pierce one for 18 and Marty Steven one for 13.

According to Maxpreps, Hammerness is the second leading rusher in the north state and Wood is third in passing.

In other action last week, Big Valley beat Westwood 53-0, Fall River beat Burney 18-8, Yreka dropped Mt. Shasta 12-7, and Weed beat Etna 44-7.

Volleyball wins SCL opener

There's always a good way to start Shasta Cascade League play, and the Modoc Braves varsity volleyball team did that with a SCL opening match win at Mt. Shasta Tuesday.

Modoc has another SCL opponent, Weed, here Tuesday.

The Mt. Shasta match was not without intensity. Modoc won the first game 25-12 and the second 25-22. In the third, the Braves struggled and the Bears won 27-29. Modoc came back strong in the final game to win 25-13.

Erica Stevens led the Braves with eight kills, Emily Pence added seven kills and two blocks, Kristen Taylor had five kills, Allison Campagna added four, Jamie Fain had two and Brittany Berchtold had one.

On Saturday the Braves placed third in their tournament at the Griswold Gym in Alturas. .

Coach Kim Schmidt is pleased overall with the team's progress and tenacity.

Modoc opened with a win over Chester 25-7, 25-18. Campagna served 13 in a row with seven aces.

Modoc faced a solid Portola team in the next round, winning the first game 25-21 by dropping the second game 21-25. After the seeding Modoc had to face Portola again to get into the title game. With Modoc and Portola evenly matched, it went the distance. Modoc lost the first game 22-25, came back to win the second 25-22, but lost the final game 11-15.

The Braves met Westwood for third place and won 25-23 and 25-21, shaking off the loss to Portola.

Taylor led the Braves in the tourney with 22 kills, Stevens added 12, Pence had nine and four blocks, Campagna had eight kills, Fain had seven, Berchtold had seven, Brittney Bartram had one and Mallorie Hetherwick served 100 percent.

Taylor and Berchtold were named to the All-Tourney team.

Etna trips Modoc soccer

The Etna Lions tripped up the Modoc Braves soccer team Saturday, winning 2-1 in a disappointing loss for Modoc.

Coach Jay Carrithers said he had some issues with the officials, but that Modoc had several chances to score, and didn't capitalize.

K.C. Kirkreit played well at goal, giving up only two and deflecting several shots. Modoc's lone goal came at the 10-minute mark as Jose Rosales knocked it in.

On Tuesday, the Braves shut out the Surprise Valley Hornets at home 2-0. Rafael Sevilla scored the first goal off an assist from Keith Montague. In the second half Modoc controlled the game and Rosales dribbled through the middle of the Hornet defense for a score.

Solid defensive efforts were turned in by Ryan Carrithers, John Yeier and Clint Nardoni. Kirkreit posted the shut out at goal.

The Braves meet Fall River at home today, 4 p.m. and have Trinity at home Saturday at 1:30 p.m. The games are at the Alturas Elementary School field.

SV splits pair of hot games

The Surprise Valley Hornet soccer team split a double header Saturday, under blazing heat in McArthur.

According to coach Alan Hopkins, the Hornets beat Liberty Christian 4-0 in the opening game. In the first half, Alex Melgar score the first goal off an assist from Beto Rangel. In the second half, Rangel scored on a penalty kick, Kevin Konz scored and Melgar scored his second of the day.

Goalkeeper Sergio Rangel got his first shutout of the season.

Fall River beat the Hornets in the second game 4-2. Surprise Valley led in the first half, with Konz scoring two goals. The second half heat caught up with the Hornets and they ended up losing the game. SV is now 1-1-1. They meet Tulelake there on Thursday.

Brave JV volleyball on a good roll

Modoc's junior varsity volleyball team won its first Shasta Cascade League game Tuesday against Mt. Shasta, 25-18, 25-21 and 19-17. They meet Weed here Tuesday.

On Saturday, the girls won the championship of their tournament, beating a tough Quincy squad.

Modoc only lost one of nine games in three matches Saturday. In the championship match, Modoc lost a close first game 23-25, but came back in a nail-biter to win the second game 27-25. They played with confidence in the third and deciding game, winning it 15-8.

According to coach Wendy Lowrey, the girls have come together as a team and are playing "great" volleyball. She said the team is talented and plays very hard.

Hannah Hays led the team with 18 kills and four blocks, Megan Thompson added seven kills and had 13 aces, Jessi Harden had five kills and two blocks, Savannah Hess had two kills and one block, Stacy Parnow added two kills and served well and Lauren Bushey had two kills, set well and was a consistent server. Whitney Baker had five kills and played well at the net.

Tacie Richardson had two kills and had an outstanding day serving, setting and passing. Alysha Northrup passed and served well. Kelly Campagna, Marlana Bartram and Vanessa Rosenthal each played well.

Hays was named the MVP of the tournament and Bushey was named to the All-tourney team.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing has picked up again after the passing of the full moon. Fishermen are catching fish averaging between two and three and a half pounds each. Trout weighing between five and six pounds were weighed in at Eagle Lake Marina Saturday and Sunday. For best results try the early morning hours. The area just in front of the Eagle Lake Marina jetty spreading North to Eagle Nests continues to produce the best results for trolling. Trollers report success anywhere from the top lining to 30 feet. Trolling with night crawlers, plastic grubs, Needlefish, and trolling flies seem to be working best.

Fishing has improved slightly from the Eagle Lake Marina Jetty this past week. It's not unusual to see many fish in close to the shore, especially along the front of the jetty. The trout seem to be coming close following the minnows. Most anglers continue to report using night crawlers from the shore while others are starting to use jigs under bobbers.

All south shore campsites are available on first-come first-serve basis and there are no longer any stay limits for the remainder of the camping season. Seniors with Federal Golden Age Passports can enjoy their stay for half price. Passports are available at Forest Service Ranger Stations and National Park Visitor Centers. For Eagle Lake camping information, call (530)825-3212. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

October 2, 2003

News

Absentee ballots about normal for Oct. 7 Recall

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said the number of absentee ballots for the Oct. 7 Recall Election are about average.

Madison said so far 499 permanent absentee requests have been submitted along with 355 others and 12 from the military. That's about the same as a regular election. She said 223 have been returned voted.

Madison reminds voters that all absentee and mail-in ballots must be into her office no later than close of election Oct. 7.

While there has been some concern expressed throughout the state that the absentee ballot requires more than a 37 cent stamp, Madison said that's not a problem. She said voters simply need to remember to put the .37 cent stamp on the ballot before mailing it to her office.

She also said that voters who are going to the polls on Oct. 7 should read and study their sample ballot carefully to determine where their candidates' name happens to be. The names were selected at random and are not alphabetical.

She also reminds voters that there are two parts to the recall. First voters must vote "yes" or "no" on whether to recall Governor Gray Davis. Then they can vote for only one of the 135 candidates running to replace Davis. Voting for more than one of those candidates will invalidate that part of the ballot.

Polls will open promptly at 7 a.m. Oct. 7 and will close at 8 p.m. Voters should check on the back of their absentee ballot for their polling place. Much of the county is voting by mail-in ballot for this election. Those precincts going to the polls are: Cedarville, Alturas A at the Senior Center, Alturas B at Modoc High School, Alturas C at CDF on 8th Street, Alturas D at City Hall, Hot Springs at City Hall, North Fork at Surprise Valley Electric, California Pines at the Lodge and Newell at the Newell Elementary School.

And while it seemed registration was going up, Madison said the final voter tally actually is pretty close to last election at 5,259. The breakdown in voter registration is as follows: Republican 2,551; Democrat 1,801; Declined to State 662; American Independent 154; Green 26; Libertarian 41; Natural Law 3; Peace and Freedom 7; and 14 miscellaneous.

Modoc County upgraded its voting system following the 2000 election and does not use the notorious punch card ballots.

Mail-in voters can mail their official ballots in now, however, and they must be received by election day. Those voters do not need an absentee ballot and should have received their actual ballots in the mail.

Voters may also vote absentee now at the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

MMC nurse arrested on child porn charge

A Modoc Medical Center nurse, Henry "Ed" Lindland, age 49, was arrested Thursday by Federal Bureau of Investigation agents alleging possession of child pornography.

The FBI reports that Lindland was arrested at his Lake City home. He was transported to the Sacramento County Jail and the case will be prosecuted in the U.S. District Court in Sacramento. His bail was set at $50,000.

The FBI states it collected sufficient evidence to charge Lindland. In addition to FBI and U.S. Postal Service agents, a Modoc County Deputy Sheriff aided with the arrest.

Little building in city

There was not much building activity within the City of Alturas during September.

According to the City Building Department, there were 12 building permits issued worth an estimated $22,761. Five of the permits were for re-roofing and two were for heating units.

The Modoc County Building Department issued 17 permits valued at $310,580 in September. One new home in the California Pines subdivision was on that permit list. There were also six barn or storage buildings.

2 KF men convicted of removing artifacts

On August 26, two Klamath Falls men pled guilty in U.S. Magistrate Court to removing prehistoric artifacts from the Modoc National Forest.

David Bentley and Michael Tworek were fined $250 plus $750 restitution to the Modoc National Forest for a total of $1,000 each.

Bentley and Tworek were cited for gathering artifacts on a large archaeological site during the Memorial Day weekend. Both men will be on probation for one year.

According to Gerry Gates, Modoc National Forest Archaeologist, "This may have resulted in a significant loss of information about activity areas within the site. This type of damage is equivalent to ripping the pages out of a book. It results in making it more difficult to understand the story that was written on and in the ground."

The pair removed over 800 artifacts and obsidian flakes from the site. The best advice for visitors to the Modoc National Forest is if you see something look at it enjoy it and put it back down. All historic and pre-historic archaeological materials including arrowheads, flakes, bottles, ect. are protected on federal lands under the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the older Antiquities Act of 1906.

CDF plans prescribed burn

With cooler weather and some moisture expected in October, CDF in the Lassen-Modoc Unit is planning to conduct a prescribed burn in the Webb Butte area of Modoc County, approximately five miles west of County Road 91, off the Loveness Logging Road. The Unit will burn 90 acres of piles immediately after the first rain and then broadcast burn 915 acres of dead brush over a three day period. The purpose of the burn is to reduce brush and fuel loading that was the result of the 1977 Scarface Fire, a wildfire that burned 90,000 acres of commercial timber land. Since 1990 the Unit has treated 18,292 acres which have been replanted to ponderosa pine by the land owner. The prescribed burn is being conducted under the CDF Vegetation Management Program with an approved burn plan and smoke management plan filed with the Modoc County Air Pollution Control District.

The public in the area are urged to be alert to the presence of the CDF fire equipment and avoid the project area. For further information please contact the CDF Fire Station at Bieber by calling (530)294-5251.

Obituaries:

Ronald Frank Floyd

Former Alturas, Ca. resident Ronald Floyd, 64, passed away in Othello, Washington on September 18, 2003. Ronald was born May 28, 1939 in Toppenish, Washington to Frank and Thelma (Woods) Floyd.

Ronald graduated from Modoc High School in 1959. He married the love of his life, Rita Sykes, on June 18, 1965 in Alturas, Ca.

Shortly after their marriage, they moved to Othello, Washington. Ronald was a mechanic all of his working life. He enjoyed fixing everything for his family and friends. He loved to garden, especially on the grounds of the Nazarene Church and his rose gardens. He enjoyed driving, listening to Southern Gospel music and most of all, he enjoyed loving and teasing his grandchildren.

Survivors include: his wife Rita, two daughters, Terry Mayada and her husband Jeff of Kennewick, Washington; and Cheryl McCort and her husband Brad of Moses Lake, Wash.; his mother Thelma of Othello, Wash.; brothers, Jack of Sedro Wooley, Wash. and Stan of Othello, Wash.; sisters Barbara Rouse of Bonanza, Or., and Linda Dilly of Othello, Wash. and six grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his father, one brother Dwayne Floyd and infant daughter Ronna Lee Floyd.

Funeral services were held on September 23, 2003 at the Nazarene Church of Othello, Wash.

Sports

 

Modoc heads to Durham in football

Modoc's Braves take an unbeaten record to Durham Friday night in what coach Shaun Wood hopes to be a tune-up before league play starts the week after at Weed.

The Braves will be going into the contest with three wins and Durham will be coming off two consecutive losses, the latest one to Sutter, 35-16, last Friday night.

Modoc has not played a very good team yet, (Lost River was the toughest), Durham may not be that strong either. In addition, the Shasta Cascade League (only five teams this year) looks to be very weak this season with only Mt. Shasta appearing to be a challenge.

Mt. Shasta is 1-2, but two of their losses have come against bigger schools in Yreka and Del Norte. Del Norte beat them 7-0 Friday night. Weed is 1-3 and lost to Hamilton City 27-0 Friday night.

Both Burney and Etna are 0-4 this season and have not really been close in any ball game. Burney had a bye last Friday and Etna lost to Yreka 44-0.

The team to watch this year is the Big Valley Cardinals. The Cards are 4-0, which isn't really a surprise for coach Matt Hunsaker's charges, but how they got there is pretty impressive.

They beat Burney 52-0. then Fall River 48-0, then Westwood 53-0 and finally Bishop Quinn last Friday 50-0. They have scored 203 points in four games and their defense has not allowed a single point

The Cardinals have Hayfork Friday night and they will head to what could be a challenging game against Mt. Shasta at Mt. Shasta Oct. 10.

What's up in sports

Area high school teams are out in force this week. The schedule is as follows:

• Football, Modoc is at Durham Friday night

• Volleyball, Modoc is at Burney Oct. 2 and at Fall River Oct. 9

• Soccer, Modoc is at Liberty Christian Oct. 2, at Trinity Oct. 4 and at Fall River Oct. 7

• Cross Country, Modoc is at West Valley Oct. 11

• Surprise Valley Soccer is at Redding Christian Oct. 4 and has Tulelake at home Oct. 7

• Surprise Valley Volleyball is at Butte Valley Oct. 2 and has Tulelake at home Oct. 7 and is at Happy Camp, Oct. 9.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing continues good at Eagle Lake. We are hearing reports of trout being caught near the Tules near Spaulding near the Youth Camp. The hot spot for the week has been close in to the shoreline near Eagles Nest. Fish are averaging between two and four pounds each. The largest fish weighed in at Eagle Lake Marina last week was on Sunday at five pounds 12 ounces and was caught trolling a night crawler behind a flasher in open water. Early morning hours are working best. Trollers are reporting best results using night crawlers, Rainbow Runners and Trolling Flies.

Shore fishing has also been excellent from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty this past week. The trout are feeding on minnows and are working close to many of the shorelines where deeper water can be accessed. Night Crawlers and Power Bait are working best.

All south shore campsites are currently available on a first come first serve basis and there are no longer any stay limits for the remainder of camp season. Seniors with Federal Golden Age Passports can enjoy their stay for half price. Passports are available at Forest Service Ranger Stations and National Park Visitor Center. For Eagle Lake camping information, call (530)825-3212. For current information on fishing conditions call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454

October 9, 2003

News

Modoc votes to recall Davis

Not surprisingly, Modoc County voters cast ballots to recall Governor Gray Davis and also voted for Arnold Schwarzenegger as a replacement. Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison reported that 73.8 percent of Modoc voters were in favor of the recall, 2,460; while 26.13 percent were against, 870.

Schwarzenegger picked up 60.35 percent of Modoc's vote, 1,852, while Lt., Governor Cruz Bustamante received 14.37 percent, 441 votes, and Republican Tom McClintock got 19.84 percent, 609 votes.

Statewide, the Governor was recalled by about 54.5 percent of the vote and Schwarzenegger was the top candidate to replace him with about 50 percent of the votes. The vote tally is unofficial and not final, but final numbers are not expected to change the results. Bustamante received 33 percent of the vote, McClintock got 14 percent and Peter Camejo received three percent. In addition, both propositions on the ballot, Prop. 53 and Prop. 54, failed to pass muster. Prop. 53 failed by 64 percent to 36 percent. It would have forced one percent of the state budget into infrastructure improvements, roads, bridges and sewage plants.

Prop. 54 failed by exactly the same percentage, 64 percent against and 36 percent in favor. It would have banned the state from using race, ethnicity or national origin to classify in public education, contracting and employment

Madison was mildly surprised that the voter turnout in Modoc was below average, at 64.8 percent. Actually the recall vote was less than the 2002 governor's election when 67.94 percent of voters went to the polls. There was no increase or spike in voter turnout, while statewide, the voter turnout was high.

The voters in Lookout were the most dissatisfied with Davis, voting 87.12 percent for the recall. Eagleville voters were upset with the governor by the tune of 85.71 percent and Newell voters favored the recall by 82.29 percent. Hot Spring voters supported the recall by 82.56 percent. Adin voters said "yes" to the recall by 78.21 percent. Alturas D had the highest percent against the recall at 38.30 percent and Alturas C was next at 35.37 percent. "I really have to thank my staff, the precinct workers, volunteers and everyone who helped with this election," said Madison. Modoc was the first county to report results to the state. "We had great support from the volunteers and the high school students who helped at the polls. The county maintenance staff did a great job setting up the equipment and the Sheriff's Office was right on time to pick up the ballots. It all went very well because of everyone's effort."

Alturas 2nd grade class dumps Davis, opts for Arnold

California Governor Gray Davis didn't fare well in a mock recall election Tuesday morning in Bonnie Slinkard and Linda Irvin's second grade class at Alturas Elementary School. It was a sign of things to come. There were two issues on the second graders' ballot, the first, like the state recall was whether to recall Davis. The second part of the second graders' ballot featured just Cruz Bustamante and Arnold Schwarzenegger as replacements.

The 18 students present voted serious at the desks, each keeping his ballot private as Slinkard had instructed. It took about five minutes for the kids to vote, then fold the ballots neatly and hand them in to Irvin.

When Irvin was done tabulating the ballots, the vote was to recall Davis 18-0. Schwarzenegger was the favored replacement by 16-2.

When asked, most of the kids didn't really have an answer as to why they voted to recall Davis, but were excited to vote for the movie star, Schwarzenegger.

Slinkard and Irvin had spent parts of class last Friday and Monday discussing the recall election. She said the students "understood a lot more than I thought. They were very perceptive."

One voiced the opinion that "You shouldn't vote for someone just because they're famous. You should vote for who you think will do the best job." One girl who voted for Bustamante said Schwarzenegger is a movie star who would not be able to devote time to being governor. "He'd be off making movies," she said, "instead of running the state." And besides, she said, he makes "movies we can't watch anyway." She had also said that she voted to recall Davis because she didn't get to know him very well.

One student said she voted to recall the governor and voted for Schwarzenegger, because "Mom wanted me to."

Most of the class felt they should learn more about the governor by taking a field trip to visit him, or by writing him letters, or email, or by watching the news and finally reading newspapers.

Second arrest clears Cal Pines burglaries

Modoc County Sheriff's Deputy Vern Seevers has arrested Lawna Desoto, age 59, a California Pines resident, in connection with a string of burglaries occurring over nearly a year in the Cal Pines area.

Desoto is charged with four counts of burglary and eight counts of possession of stolen property. She was booked into the Modoc County Jail and released on a District Attorney Cite Letter Oct. 2.

Seevers said the department has recovered much of the stolen property, which he estimated amounted at $15,000 to $20,000 in value, through this investigation. Seevers said he recovered one collector's plate that had been auctioned over eBay by Desoto. It was received from New Hampshire. Most of what was stolen from Cal Pines residences were household items, said Seevers, including furniture, wall hangings and pictures and collectors items.

In July, it took a 24-foot U-Haul truck to bring back the stolen items from at least four residences in the Unit 3 and 4 Hill Units. At that time Seevers arrested Karen Halus, age 43, of Magalia, Ca. in Butte County for possession of stolen property with assistance from the Butte County Sheriff's Department.

According to Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Halus was in the California Pines area visiting friends over about a two-month period. During that period, he said, the woman allegedly entered vacation homes by using a crowbar to pry open doors or windows. She allegedly removed items from the homes, often taking the brackets off the walls. Items recovered included televisions, VCRs, radios, household decorations, drapes, pictures and wall art.

At least four homes were burglarized, according to Gentry. Seevers located a couple of those homes while on patrol and homeowners contacted the Sheriff's Office to report other burglaries.

Alturas Police arrest 5 juveniles on drugs

Alturas Police arrested five juveniles Wednesday on charges of being under the influence of one or more controlled substances.

Chief of Police Ken Barnes said the first juvenile was arrested walking barefoot on 5th Street about 7 a.m. Barnes said the juvenile was yelling and screaming. He was reported by people in the area and he appeared to be hallucinating.

The four other juveniles were arrested throughout the day with the last one picked up about 2:30 p.m. Barnes said all five were turned over to probation and transported to Juvenile Hall.

Barnes said the drugs involved included methamphetamines, marijuana and he has one tentative positive of PCP use. The juveniles, aged 14-17, apparently were at an all night party at one of the kid's homes.

Modoc National Forest Begins Fall and Winter burning

The Modoc National Forest is planning prescribed burning projects this Fall and Winter in a number of locations forestwide. Burning is expected to begin in the next couple of weeks and continue through the winter months. "Fall burning projects are primarily natural fuels underburning designed to reduce small diameter fuels and brush and raise canopy base heights," said Larry Haight, east zone fuel's is Battalion Chief, that's the distance from the ground to the lowest branches of a tree. "These types of prescribed fire projects greatly reduce both the size of wildfires and the severity of these fires by eliminating ground and ladder fuels. The projects do have the potential to produce smoke columns visible throughout Modoc County. Proposed projects in the Warner Mountains are located: north of Fandango Valley (63 acres), Sugarhill (1,000 acres), Joseph Creek area north of Cedar Pass (92 acres). The only project planned on the Devil's Garden is located near the Oregon Border at Fourmile (400 acres). Projects in Big Valley area include COTOP near Longbell (393 acres), Hayden Hill (370 acres) and Johnson Creek burn.

Winter pile burning projects are scattered across the Forest, said Haight. Pile burning generally does not begin until considerable precipitation has occurres and usually required at least a small amount of snow present in order to prevent fire from escaping around the piles.

For questions regarding the prescribed burning program on the Modoc National Forest please contact any of the following individuals: Keith Bryan-Adin, phone 299-8447, Ron Rhodes for projects on the Big Valley and Doublehead Ranger Districts, phone 299-8427; or Larry Haight for projects on the Devil's Garden and Warner Mountain Ranger Districts, phone 233-8814.

Obituaries:

Derril Marion Hess

Alturas resident Derril Marion Hess, 89, passed away from natural causes on October 2, 2003, in Murray, Utah. He had been staying with his daughter, Diana Jones, in West Jordan, Utah for several months. She had been caring for Derril and his wife during his last illnesses.

Born February 11, 1914, near Canby, Ca., Derril graduated from Chico State College in 1935 with a teaching degree. He played football and basketball and boxed for Chico State. Because of the Depression, he could not find a teaching job. He returned to Modoc County and worked in the logging industry for Loveness Logging and in construction during World War II. After the war, he returned to Canby, and in 1946 started working for Cal Trans as a mechanic. Derril retired in 1972 and then worked for the Forest Service on Blue Mountain Lookout for nine years, with his wife. He loved to fish, camp, hunt and watch sports. He coached Little League and was a Scout Master in Canby in the late 40's and mid 50's. He also served as a Board member for Arlington Elementary School, Canby.

Derril married Minerva C. Scott on October 8, 1935 in Minden, NV. They would have celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary yesterday.

He is survived by the love of his life Minerva Hess of Alturas, sons Ernest Hess and wife Marilyn and Butch Hess and wife Sandra of Alturas, Ca.; daughters Diana and husband Paul Jones of West Jordan, Utah; Carla and husband Jay Cross of Discovery Bay, Ca.; Janice and husband Chuck Bishop of Quincy, Ca. and Kathy and husband Leland Ward of Palo Cedro, Ca. He is also survived by his sister, Oleita Wentzel of Alturas, a brother, Richard Hess and wife Lynn of Estacada, Ore., and 18 grandchildren and 37 great grandchildren.

Services were held at 10 a.m. today, October 9 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Alturas, with burial at the Alturas Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to a charity of the donor's choice.

Robert Dustin Jose Oliver

Graveside services for Robert Dustin Jose Oliver will be conducted by Pastor Curtis Barber on Friday, October 10 at 2 p.m. at the Alturas Cemetery. Robert Dustin José Oliver, 22, of Alturas, Ca., was born into this world October 27, 1980. He moved onto the next, October 3, 2003.

Robert was born to Russell and Lita Oliver in Ely, Nevada. A talented young man, he had made his mark on the world early in life. He was in such a hurry, he didn't wait for the doctor and had to be delivered by the nurse. The family then moved to Alturas, Ca. where he lived, loved and laughed for the 21 years that followed.

Robert graduated from Modoc High School, Alturas in 1999. It was there he met his friend and companion for the next seven years, April Orosco, who became his wife on September 7, 2002.

Growing up, Robert's interests included cars, trucks and art. He played football, wearing jersey '69' for Modoc High. By the time he was 18, he had restored a 1973 Pontiac Ventura, the "Grey Squirrel." A strapping young man with artistic talents, Robert had many fans of his amazing, but painful artwork.

"There are really no words to describe Robert, and those who knew him will forever smile in memory of a much loved and cherished soul," say family members.

Robert had been employed with Northstate Homes in Alturas. He accepted a position for promotion at Sierra Pacific Industries in Susanville on August 4, 2003, and was relocating to Susanville with his wife. An accident at the mill claimed him.

He was preceded in death by his grandmother Jackie Duran and uncle Desi Duran.

He is survived by his wife, April Oliver of Alturas, Ca.; his parents, Russell and Lita Oliver, Alturas, Ca.; sister Sharon Oliver, Alturas; grandparents Al Duran of Alturas, D.M. Merle and Jeavene Oliver of Prescott, Ariz. and many other loving family members and friends.

Kerr Mortuary in Alturas is taking care of arrangements. Interment will be at the Alturas Cemetery. Condolences and memorials may be directed to April Oliver at 330 S. Danhauser, Alturas, Ca. 96101.

Minnie Elizabeth Smith

Graveside services for Minnie Elizabeth Smith, 91, of Red Bluff, Ca. will be at 2 p.m. on Thursday, October 9, at Oak Hill Cemetery, with Rev. Susan E. Plucker of St. Peter's Episcopal Church officiating.

Mrs. Smith died October 7, 2003, at her daughter's residence. Born May 26, 1912 in Red Bluff, Ca., she attended local schools and lived in Tehama County for many years. She then moved to Plumas and Modoc Counties where she was a homemaker and her husband worked for the County Road Department.

Mrs. Smith was preceded in death by her husband Albert Smith, her son Harlan Smith, and grandson Wayne Smith. Her survivors include two daughters, Crystal Stone of Red Bluff and Audrey Stradley of Sacramento; four grandchildren: Cheryl Lance and Sandra Lingenfelter of Red Bluff, Susan McGaughran of Bozeman, Montana, and Becky Roden of Oregon. Arrangements are being handled by Hoyt-Cole Chapel of the Flowers, Red Bluff.

Sports

Durham no match for Braves, Weed game opens SCL

Durham proved not to be a match for the Modoc Braves' defense Friday night in Durham, and Weed may suffer the same fate this week at Weed. Modoc topped Durham 16-0, in a game where coach Shaun Wood said penalty flags against Modoc were flying. Modoc was flagged 13 times and Durham only three.

The Weed game will open the Shasta Cascade League for Modoc, with the Braves carrying the number one ranking for Division III schools into the contest. Willows is ranked second and Pierce third.

Last Friday the Weed Cougars beat Happy Camp 25-8. Wood said the Cougar team has some talent, but lost a couple of key plays this week. "I just don't think their line is going to be able to stand up to ours," said Wood. "Our defensive line and backers are playing excellent football right now, and they're getting better with each game. I was never worried Durham would be able to score on us."

The game was tight in the first half, as only a safety by Scott McMaster put any points on the board. He tackled the Durham quarterback in the endzone for the two points.

While Modoc had trouble scoring in the first half, the defense was incredible. The Braves held Durham to 32 yards total offense for the game, 20 yards on the ground and 12 in the air.

"Durham couldn't do anything against us and the quarterback was under intense pressure all night," said Wood. He credited Cory Bell, Rich Culp, McMaster, Brad Bell, Marty Stevens, Nick Lowell, Luke Hammerness, Joey Catania and David Toaetolu with putting up a brick wall against Durham. In the second half, the Braves got on the board when Travis Wood took the ball over from just inside the one in the third period. Cam Wheeler ran in the point and the Braves led 10-0. In the fourth quarter, Hammerness scored from the four. The point after failed and Modoc led 16-0.

Modoc gained 240 yards on 42 rushes and limited Durham to 20 yards on 36 carries. Modoc's passing game fell well short, in the negative area actually, as Wood was one 1-for-5 passing with minus five yards and had one interception. Durham, meanwhile, completed just one pass for 12 yards and Brave defenders had one pick nullified by penalty and dropped three others.

Hammerness led all rushers with 132 yards on 19 carries, with Shiloh Pierce getting 74 on 11, and Chris Brown 12 on one.

The Braves are now 4-0 on the season and on Oct. 17 will come home to meet Etna in the Homecoming game.

Results last week are: Big Valley 21-Hayfork 7; Trinity 70-Etna 6; Mt. Shasta 31-Klamath Union 28; Los Molinas 26-Burney 6.

Braves get pair of SCL volleyball wins

The Modoc Braves varsity volleyball team got a pair of Shasta Cascade League wins this past week, over Weed and Burney.

Modoc faces Fall River today and Etna Saturday in away games. The Braves played tough against Weed, and had to come back after struggling in the first match to a 20-25 loss. They found their rhythm in the second and third games, winning 25-18 and 25-14, but faltered in the fourth game 19-25. They won the deciding fifth match 15-12.

"The girls played awesome defense and our passing was the best so far this year," said coach Kim Schmidt. "It was a big win for the girls since it went five games. The girls should be proud of the way they played."

Kristen Taylor had 16 kills and served 100 percent. Erica Stevens had 10 kills, served 100 percent and had a block. Emily Pence had seven kills, Hannah Hays four kills, one block and Allison Campagna had three kills and one block. Brittany Berchtold had three kills and Jamie Fain had one. In the Burney match, the Braves' passing game wasn't as good and Burney covered the floor well, making things tough.

The Braves won the match after losing the first game 18-25. They won the following three in close games: 25-23, 25-19 and 25-20.

Pence had six kills, Stevens and Taylor added five each, Berchtold added three and a block while Campagna and Hays had a kill and a block each. "We dug up the ball well and had great net play," said Schmidt. "The girls are playing tough this year and are hoping to grab the top place in our league. If we keep playing the way we are, I believe we have a good chance." Modoc and Etna are now tied at 3-0 in SCL play, with Trinity and Burney at 1-1, Fall River 1-2, Mt. Shasta 0-3 and Weed 0-2.

Braves tie Fall River in rematch

Modoc's Braves soccer avenged an earlier 4-3 loss to Fall River Tuesday by holding the league-leading Bulldogs to a 2-2 tie at Fall River.

According to coach Jay Carrithers, the Braves adjusted their defense to take care of Fall River's and the league's leading scorer Dieter Salters. They held him to two goals. Modoc got a goal each from Danny Guitron and Max Wise.

The Braves are now 3-2-1 in the Shasta Cascade League and are in the hunt for a playoff berth. They face Etna here Saturday, 1:30 p.m. and finish the regular season at home against Liberty Tuesday, 4 p.m.

In the first game against Fall River, Rafael Sevilla scored all three Modoc goals.

The Braves beat Trinity 7-2 with everyone getting plenty of playing time. Sevilla scored three goals, Ross Montague, Guitron, John Yeier and Henry Correa each added a goal.

On Oct. 2 , the Braves beat Liberty Christian 2-1 with Guitron getting both Brave goals.

In another win against Trinity 5-0, Antonio Mungia scored twice with Jose Rosales, Sevilla and K.C. Kirkreit each adding a goal.

Modoc JV football drops one to Durham, 21-0

Modoc's junior varsity football team came out flat in the first half and allowed Durham to get up on them 21-0. Modoc heads to Weed Friday night. The Braves played much better in the second half, shutting out Durham on defense, but couldn't get the offense moving.

"I was very pleased with how we played in the second half," said coach Eric Burrows. "The effort was excellent. We're still trying to get comfortable with the offense and the blocking schemes. But, overall the effort was better against Durham."

Burrows credited the play of Sean Wolfe, Willie Mohr, Brian Weed and Jessie Quevas against Durham.

Burrows said Weed will be a test, but feels his team should be able to compete well against the Cougars.

JV volleyball splits in SCL

Modoc's junior varsity volleyball team split in league play this last week beating Weed and losing to Burney. They travel to Fall River today and Etna Saturday.

Against Weed, the Braves won the fist game 25-12, lost the second 13-25 and came back to win the final game 15-7.

Jesse Harden had six kills and three blocks, Alysha Northrup had three kills, Savannah Hess and Whitney Baker had one kill. Lowrey said the passing was the best she'd seen this year.

The Braves lost the Burney match after winning the opening game 25-17, but lost the next two: 20-25 and 6-15.

October 16, 2003

News

New aquatic center facing tough sell at county level

The idea of Modoc County putting its $1.4 million in Proposition 40 funding (restricted for parks and recreation) into a reserve account for the construction of a Modoc Aquatic and Health Center in Alturas is going to be a tough sell.

The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday had more questions than answers for spokesman Mike Mason and the issue will be coming back to the board for more discussion.

Supervisor David Bradshaw of District 5 said he wasn't inclined to support the facility at this moment and Supervisor Dan Macsay of District 1 also was not wholly supportive.

Both Supervisors who represent Alturas, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge, were relatively cool to the thought of putting the entire $1.4 million into a reserve account for the facility. Dunn pointed out that Rick Hironymous, of Public Works, has earmarked those funds for projects throughout the county. Pat Cantrall, who also represents Alturas at the county level was not in attendance. She has expressed support for the project in the past. Supervisors were presented with a Memorandum of Understanding, MOU, Tuesday and all felt they needed to study the document before making any decisions. The Prop. 40 money is restricted to specific uses and can not be used for general fund purposes.

Mason also appeared before the Alturas City Council Tuesday evening to ask that its share of the Prop. 40 funds, about $220,000 be earmarked for the center. The council also felt the request was premature and offered no funding.

The MOU, said Mason, is an agreement between the county, city and Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee, MARC, aimed at the construction, maintenance and operation of an indoor swimming pool, gymnasium and recreation center through the formation of a recreational district within the city and county.

Basically, the MARC is now going through the variety of hoops to establish a special recreation district that will pretty much line up with the Modoc Joint Unified School District boundaries.

The issue of forming the district and a possible assessment of $25 per landowner will go to a vote of the people in the proposed district. That vote is tentatively scheduled for November, 2004.

What's planned is a new facility, housing a gym and an indoor Olympic size swimming pool near Modoc Middle School. The property is owned by the City of Alturas and the City has offered the property.

Mason said the combined grant funds from the city and county would allow the committee to build the structure, and would also indicate the community's willingness to put up its funding. That, in itself would help obtain other grant funding, he said, as well as give a boost to getting the issue passed by the voters in 2004.

The committee's proposal is to have the city and county retain those Park and Recreation funds through November 2004 ballot measure.

Mason told the Board, the district vote would include the formation of the district as well as a second question asking for an annual $25 assessment per property owner in the district. He said having the building funds available would help insure people knew the project was feasible. He told Hagge that if the vote didn't pass at that time, the MARC committee would not drop the issue, but would be looking a different options to get the facility up and operating.

Mason explained that the facility would be a benefit to the entire county and would be open for use by all county residents. In addition, he said, some county funding now used to maintain parks within the area of the MJUSD boundaries might be freed up to use on the outlying parks.

The committee is now working on a feasibility study and will come back with projections and estimates of what it will cost to run the facility and district as well as the revenue it would produce.

He said the facility would be multiple use and would be used for physical therapy and rehabilitation services year round and would provide winter recreation for residents of the county.

Hironymous has said some of the funds would be used for maintenance and improvements to parks in the county and for renovations to the courthouse. The MARC committee was formed in 1999 and while the project has been stalled, it has never been abandoned. The allocation of Parks and Recreation funding would be a major boost to the project, Mason has offered, and would create renewed enthusiasm and hope.

The issue will be coming back to the board for further discussion. In addition to Mason, committee members are: Carol Harbaugh, Joe Catania, Lori Catania, Gavin Kleiman, Roy Ferry, Ardie Ferry, Eleanor Dorton, Carol Callaghan, Debbie Mason, Dr. Ed Richert, Bernice Miller, Rhonda Haslip, Teresa Jacques, Ann Francis, Dave Jacquot, Kip Lybarger, Dave Mason and Emilie Martin.

Modoc jobless rate falls to 5.4 percent

The unemployment rate in Modoc County fell to 5.4 percent for September, down from August's 61 percent, but higher than last year's 5.1 percent. According to the Employment Development Department, the civilian labor force was 4,690 for September and of those, 260 had filed unemployment claims.

The state unemployment rate for September was at 6.1 percent and the federal level was at 5.8 percent.

Modoc was 19th out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen County, at 4.2 percent was ranked 10th and Siskiyou County at 7.4 percent was ranked 42nd. The highest unemployment is in Imperial County at 22 perecnt and the lowest in San Luis Obispo at 3.0 percent.

County opts to look for county counsel

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to begin recruitment of a new county counsel, setting the salary between $78,000 to $85,000 per year.

Since the resignation of former County Counsel Vickie Cochran, the board has been utilizing outside counsel as well as Modoc District Attorney Jordan Funk's office.

The vote to recruit and set a salary was passed by a 3-2 vote, with Supervisors Mike Dunn, Willy Hagge and David Bradshaw voting in favor and Supervisors Dan Macsay and Patricia Cantrall voting against.

Rabies: Rare but Deadly

Rabies is an infectious viral disease that affects the central nervous system. It is usually spread to humans via the bite of an infected animal, but can occasionally be spread when the saliva of a rabid animal gets into a fresh scratch or break in the skin or comes in contact with the eyes, mouth, or nose

Although most human cases results from bites of rabid bats, other mammals can be infected including domestic animals, and wild animals such as skunks and foxes

The occurrence of rabies in humans is rare. The latest case involved a resident of Trinity County who was bitten on the finger by an infected bat while in bed. He died six weeks later in mid September 2003

Although rare and in most cases preventable, rabies still pose a risk to people, pets and wild animals. The California Rabies Prevention and Control Program requires vaccination and licensing of dogs. Vaccination of all cats is strongly advised

If a person has been exposed to rabies or thinks he/she has been exposed to rabies, the following steps should be taken:

• Wash the wound thoroughly with soap and warm water;

• Immediately consult medical attention;

• Notify Animal Control (if in Alturas) or the Sheriff's Department. • The doctor will determine if anti-rabies treatment is necessary

Although symptoms in animals will vary with species and stage of the disease, abnormal behavior is the most obvious sign that something is wrong with the animal. Warning signs include:

• Wild animals that seem unusually tame, unafraid, or approach people--healthy wild animals generally avoid contact with people;

• Normally nocturnal animals, those active at night such as skunks, foxes or bats, that are active during daylight;

• Pets that have difficulty walking, eating, drinking, have personality changes, or voice tone changes;

• Signs of excitement or viciousness in a normally quiet animal; • Bats that are unable to fly or have been caught by a domestic cat or dog;

• Cattle that "strain" for a long period of time or "bellow" (vocalize) excessively

To prevent the spread of rabies:

• Be a responsible pet owner. Keep vaccinations up to date for all cats and dogs. Keep your pet under control at all times, especially in areas where they may find rabid wild life.

• Avoid contact with unfamiliar animals. Do not handle, feed, or attract wild animals. Never adopt or bring wild animals into your home. Do not leave pet food outside. Teach children animal safety. Bat-proof your home to prevent bats from entering areas where they may come in contact with people or pets.

More information regarding rabies is available from Modoc County Public or Environmental Health Department, 233-6310.

Xi Zeta, agencies team up to present Halloween Carnival

Children in fifth grade and younger, will enjoy the afternoon Halloween Carnival on Saturday, October 25 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on the lawn of the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 at North Main St., Alturas.

A costume contest will be held at 2:15 p.m., giving youngsters a chance to wear their costumes more than once this season.

Numerous activities are planned for this year's return event, including: pin the nose on the pumpkin, decorating Halloween bags, pumpkin painting, face painting, a cupcake walk, dime toss, lollipop pick, fishing booth, spider pickup and a chance to win a Halloween basket filled with treats.

Activities will range from 25 cents each to $2. Hot dogs and beverages will be available.

This year's event is sponsored by Xi Zeta Kappa, "Families Matter," Delta Omega, Health Education About Tobacco (H.E.A.T.) and the Modoc County Crisis Center.

Proceeds go toward a scholarship fund to assist a Modoc High School graduate..

Obituaries:

Alan James 'A.J.' Johnson

Today, Thursday, October 16 at 11 a.m. at the Cedarville Community Church, the family and friends of Alan James 'A.J.' Johnson will gather to pay tribute to c d with accomplishments. Mr. Johnson passed away on October 12, 2003, at his Cedarville, Ca. home. He was 73. The Rev. Ben Zandstra will conduct the Memorial Service

Born on April 3, 1930 in Brampton, North Dakota, his grandparents worked hard to provide for him and passed on values which would guide him in his journey through life. He stood for things larger than himself, even when standing for something that might cost him his agreeable way of life. He loved his country and what it stands for: freedom, brotherhood, and divine respect for any single life. He worked hard to succeed. For him this meant serving his country with the uniform of the United States Marine Corps. With his fellow countrymen he served America through war and peace. Along the way he met the love of his life, Emma Lu Mason, while in high school in Silver City, New Mexico. They married September 3, 1949 in St. Louis, Mo. and had 54 years together. They had four beautiful daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

Mr. Johnson loved his years of rodeo, being a team roper and a Gold Card member of the PRCA since 1960

The Weatherby Gun Association gave special tribute to A.J. for his outstanding contribution to the development of the Youth Program. He obtained ranches upon which to hunt and expert instruction of their youth in the proper handling of firearms. He was an Honorary member of the Weatherby Gun Collectors Club

A retired Marine, A.J. served from 1947 to 1968. He served two tours of duty in Korea. After he was critically wounded, shot six times by a sniper in Korea, he was left to die, but his love for his wife and strong will to live made him a survivor, and required 13 months in the hospital. He returned to active duty until 1968, when he retired

He developed lung cancer and was a survivor. He was at Ground Zero when the atom bomb was being tested. As a result of his wounds and cancer, he had pain everyday without complaint. When he was asked how he was doing, he'd say "I'm just fine. If I was any better I would be a twin. Got both beet on the floor this morning. It is great to be alive." In his later years, he offered support and encouragement to those who were battling cancer. During his lifetime, A.J. was also a hydrologist at Camp Pendleton and was a Range Technician from 1976 until 1986 with the Bureau of Land Management in Cedarville. He had made Modoc County his home for the past 27 years, where he enjoyed hunting, fishing, team roping and was known as a "Dead eye squirrel shooter."

Among his meritorious awards were: rifle expert, Purple Heart and Presidential Citation Unit, one star; two star, Good Conduct; three star, American Defense Ribbon; three star Korean Service Ribbon; United Nations Ribbon; Korean Presidential Citation and Bronze Star "V" for valor. A.J. had recorded two hundred twenty thousand one hundred and ninety-four squirrel kills, thus earning him the title "Dead eye squirrel shooter" in the Valley

In December of 2001, he was honored by his Bureau of Land Management co-workers, with a surprise banquet to honor him with his Korean War Medal and special awards. His friends came from far to honor him. A.J. was very honored by this special act

He was preceded in death by his daughter Laura Hill, grandparents, parents and sister LaYvonne

He is survived by his wife Emma Lu Johnson of Cedarville, Ca.; daughters Karlene Johnson of Cedarville; Theresa Meyette of Phoenix, Ariz.; and Christine Fernane and husband James of San Diego; brothers John Johnson and wife Mabel of Cedarville; Tim McLaughlin and wife Rosemary of Spokane, Wash.; sister Ardith Egelston and husband Fred of South Dakota; grandchildren Byron Johnson and wife Christine of Oceanside, Ca,; Alana Schultz and husband Sam of Cedarville; April Bonilla and husband Xavier of Cedarville; Daniel Hill and Michelle Hill of Cedarville, Jesse Fernane of Florida, Michael Fernane and Kayleigh Palumbo of San Diego and William of Fresno; great-grandchildren Daylan, Sierra, Logan, Madison, Yessenia, April and numerous nieces and nephews

Memorial contributions may be made to the Cedarville Community Church, the American Cancer Society or to a charity of the donor's choice. Inurnment will be at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Ernest Eaton

Ernest G. Eaton, age 78, died July 29, 2003 at his home in West Richland, Wash. A long-time resident of Lake City, Eaton lived in Washington since moving there from Cedarville in 2001. A Memorial Service will be held Monday, October 20, at 10:00 a.m. at the Lake City, Calif. Cemetery

Jim Knauss

Jim Knauss passed away Oct. 11, 2003 in Davis, Ca. A service will be held at a future date.

Sports

Braves blank Weed, Etna next victim at Homecoming

Modoc's Braves destroyed the Weed Cougars 48-0 Friday night at Weed and face a relatively weak Etna Lions team here Friday night for Homecoming. The junior varsity game starts at 5:30 pm. and the varsity game will follow. Modoc coach Shaun Wood didn't expect much from Weed, but stressed his defense completely shut down what was once the league-leading passing game. And a lot of that, he said, can be credited to his front eight on defense.

"We just didn't give them time to throw, and although we only picked up a couple of sacks, their quarterback didn't complete a pass and was hurried," said Wood.

Meanwhile, Brave sophomore quarterback Travis Wood picked the Weed defense apart and took over the section lead in passing. He was 11-of-14 for 197 yards against Weed with three touchdowns.

Wood, the coach's son, was coming off his worst game of the season against Durham last week, but more than made amends for that performance. He and the offense should have little trouble against Etna.

"I was very pleased with how he played, and a lot of the credit goes to the line and our receivers," said Wood. "He had seven or eight seconds to set up and throw. They did a great job, and he responded very well."

Modoc's Luke Hammerness, who is now leading the north section in rushing and scoring with 815 yards and 66 points, carried the ball 13 times for 113 yards at Weed.

Nick Lowell had a great game for the Braves as he caught six passes for 127 yards and scored two touchdowns.

Wood credited the defensive play of starters Cory and Brad Bell, Scott McMasters, Marty Stevens, Rich Culp, Daniel Toaetolu, Lowell and Hammerness as well as reserves Kody Dunn, Eddie Velasco, Mark Main, Brian Walters and Rigo Ibarra.

He was also very pleased with his offensive line of Brad Bell, Cory Bell, Joey Catania, McMasters and Stevens.

Modoc got on the board early in the game when Hammerness scored on a 30-yard run. Cam Wheeler added the point and before the first period ended Lowell had snared a 24-yard touchdown pass from Wood. Wheeler kicked the point and Modoc led 14-0. In the second period, Hammerness scored on a four-yard run and the kick failed. Lowell then grabbed a 35-yard pass from Wood and Wheeler added the point. The Braves' final score in the first half came on a seven-yard pass from Wood to Stevens. The Braves led 33-0 going into the halftime talks.

The Braves would score early in the third period on a Shiloh Pierce five-yard run. Lowell ran in the two-point conversion. Modoc's final score came from Jaafar Mirlohi on a four-yard run and Wheeler added the point for the 48-0 win.

Modoc amassed 376 yards total offense while limiting the Cougars to 108, all on the ground. The Braves were flagged nine times for 96 yards while Weed was penalized twice for 10 yards.

Pierce had 33 yards rushing on eight carries, Chris Brown had 17 on three. Weed's Zach Thomas had 60 yards on 11 carries and Brock McCrea added 47 on 17.

In addition to Lowell, Stevens caught two passes for 23 yards, Pierce one for 26, Mirholi one for 17 and Kyle Madison one for four.

The Braves are firmly ranked number one in north section for Division III, and are on top of the Shasta Cascade League at 1-0 and 5-0 overall. They have scored 162 points, while remarkably only giving up 13 points. Other scores for the weekend were: Big Valley 27-Mt. Shasta 24; Quincy 21-Trinity 20; and Etna 33-Burney 32.

Braves lose pair in SCL volleyball loop

It was a week the Modoc Braves volleyball team would just as soon forget, losing a pair of Shasta Cascade League games. They get the chance for better memories Thursday when Mt. Shasta comes to Alturas and Saturday when Trinity comes to town.

The Braves struggled with their serving in both matches, losing to Fall River 13-25, 25-23, 12-25 and 20-25 and to Etna 7-25, 15-25 and 20-25.

According to coach Kim Schmidt, the Brave serving also reflected on their passing, which turned into frustration for the hitters. Schmidt is looking forward to the rematch when the Bulldogs come to Alturas Nov. 4.

Against Fall River, Kristen Taylor had eight kills and served 100 percent, Erica Stevens had six kills, Brittany Berchtold added two and Emily Pence had a pair and a block. Kari Bushey, Jamie Fain and Allison Campagna each had a kill and Brittany Bartram served 100 percent.

Etna's match proved to be a long day for the Braves as the league-leading Lions probably outpysched Modoc early. Schmidt said Etna proved to be very strong, but she said they are not unbeatable. Modoc lost Campagna to injury in the warm-ups.

With the serving off a little, and the low ceiling at the Etna Gym, things just didn't work the way Schmidt had hoped they would. But Etna has to come to Modoc Oct. 25, and there could be a turnaround.

Hannah Hays stepped in and played well for Modoc and Jaime Fain had a huge block on Etna's star player, which sent that girl to the bench for the rest of the game. Pence also had a block that shook the Etna confidence. Taylor had four kills, Hays added three and a block, Stevens had a pair of kills, Pence had a kill and a block, Fain had a kill and block, Berchtold had a kill and Bartram served 100 percent.

Soccer in Quincy for 1st round of playoffs

Modoc's soccer team had a big up and then a let down this week in Shasta Cascade League play, and is in Quincy today in the first round of the section playoffs.

Coach Jay Carrithers said the team played great against previously unbeaten Etna, winning 3-0. Rafael Sevilla and Micah Eppler each scored on breakaways and Jose Rosales scored on a header. Goalie K.C. Kirkreit also stopped a penalty kick to preserve the shutout.

But the Braves then lost to Liberty Christian 3-1, giving them the eighth seed in the playoffs and sending them on the road to Quincy. Antonio Mungia scored the only goal in that game. Modoc finished the season 4-3-1 in SCL play and 6-5-2 overall.

Cheyenne King heads to 49'ers 'Punt, Pass and Kick'

Cheyenne King of Alturas will compete at the Punt, Pass and Kick competition in San Francisco on November 2. King was the winner in the 8 to 9 year-old girls' age group in Redding during the second level of competition, October 12.

Sarah Catania of Alturas won second place in the 12 to 13 year-old girls' group.

Top Redding winners advance to compete against others at the 49'ers versus Rams football game in San Francisco on November 2.

The turnout of youth competitors was good this year with 37 participants showing up to try their skills in Alturas during the Punt, Pass and Kick sponsored by Pepsi and Sunrise Rotary Club Sept. 21. Those winners advanced to Redding. Joe Catania, DVM of Alturas, organized the event.

October 23, 2003

News

Local juveniles out of control?

For the past few weeks, the Alturas Police Department has been kept busy by juvenile crime, much busier than normal.

Chief of Police Ken Barnes said while it may not be at epidemic state, there needs to be some action taken by the schools and parents. "A lot of kids seem to be out-of-control," Barnes said this week. "We're going to be dealing with schools and hopefully coming up with a program to slow the current trends down."

Basically, said Barnes, juveniles are being arrested for a variety of crimes. Leading the list is alcohol abuse, he said, and that's followed closely by marijuana use, other drug use, fighting, and vandalism.

Recently, he reports, a juvenile pulled a knife on another juvenile at Veteran's Park. A pair of juveniles were also picked up recently after a fight caused some broken windows and cuts to both of them.

Barnes said he doesn't favor closing the Modoc High School campus completely, but feels there could be something done about kids driving at lunchtime. He'll address that issue with the school administration. Barnes said he would still favor random drug testing at the high school.

"We also may want to look at creating a 'Drug-free' zone for several blocks around the high school," said Barnes. "That would add an enhancement to the punishment of kids who are caught using drugs or alcohol within that zone. Actually, we might want to make the entire city a drug free zone." Barnes said his, and Officer Tex Dowdy's, research shows that the problems with juvenile crime seem to be on the increase across the nation. "We are definitely seeing an upwards trend here," said Barnes.

Quirk of fate brings WWII Navy vets together

Irony and coincidence are part of nearly everyone's life. Yet, sometimes the twists and turns are truly remarkable, as in the case of Snooks, Andy and Debbie.

Charles "Snooks" Bishop, a long-time resident of Alturas and a self-described cowboy who recently turned 83, lost his wife, Kay, to a prolonged illness after her year-and-a-half stay in a nursing home—a tragedy, to be sure.

As it turns out, the night he rushed Kay to the hospital with a ruptured ulcer was when Snooks met the woman who would one day become his second wife, Debbie.

But, as ironies go, that was to be a rather mild one, too.

Debbie Houtfma, 47, a nurse and the mother of two, had been living in distant Florida. Looking to distance herself from an unhappy marriage and divorce, she found an opening for a nurse in a hospital located in a tiny town in Northern California, clear across the country. "They needed a nurse right away at this hospital," says Debbie. "I thought it would be a good place to go."

That was a fateful decision on her part, since it would put her on a path she could never have imagined in her wildest dreams.

"The first night that I met Snooks, I was working at the hospital," recalls Debbie. She struck up a conversation with Snooks, who is well known to his friends and neighbors as easygoing and talkative.

"Here come Deb," says Snooks of that worrisome night in the hospital, noting that she was trying to give comfort to the husband of a seriously ill patient. "She's that kind."

Debbie offered him cup of coffee, and they visited. In the course of the conversation, she learned that he was a veteran of World War II. "Oh, I was in the Navy," responded Snooks to Debbie's question about his service.

"So was my dad," declared Debbie, offhandedly. "In fact, my dad was on the last aircraft carrier to be sunk in World War II. It was the USS …" "Bismark Sea," interjected Snooks, finishing her sentence.

Debbie was stunned. "I couldn't believe my ears … that he knew the name," she says. "And then he told me the story. He said, 'Yea, we picked up the survivors on that ship.' I just couldn't believe it. I thought it was really cool. I called home the next day, and I said, 'Dad, you'll never guess.'" "Dad" is Andrew "Andy" Mouw, 80, of Iowa, one of only 321 survivors out of 947 souls on board when the small aircraft carrier he served on sank off Iwo Jima in the Pacific in February 1945. "I thought that was really something else," says Andy of his surprise upon learning of the coincidence.

"It just goes to prove that the world is a pretty small place, actually," observes Snooks, philosophically.

The full irony of that chance encounter became clearer to all three of them as time passed, because after Kay's death, the friendship between Debbie and Snooks eventually blossomed into a May-December romance that resulted in their marriage last Saturday, October 18.

"We were the best of friends," reflects Snooks, who taught Debbie to ride horseback. "(It was) something to pass the time for me and her both. She'd just gone through a divorce. She needed somebody to lean on, and so did I." "It's a little … 'unusual' is the word," says Andy, diplomatically and in jest, "bein' I'm 80 and my future son-in-law is 83."

"I know that nothing happens by accident," observes Debbie. "I just think that's all part of a perfect plan. I really think that I was supposed to meet him."

Of course, the family gathering occasioned by the wedding is a perfect opportunity for the two veterans to reminisce about the events of that fateful day when their paths first crossed.

Both have a bright recollection of the remarkable events almost 58 years ago. "I can see it like yesterday," reflects Andy, thoughtfully.

Snooks tended the guns on the USS Dickens, an attack-transport ship. His ship not only hauled men, equipment and supplies, it had a sizable infirmary on board. "We had six doctors and twenty-five corpsmen on there. We were a hospital ship," explains Snooks.

Andy was the commander's orderly on the USS Bismark Sea, a Liberty ship converted to operate as a small aircraft carrier. "It was an escort carrier, one of 'Kaiser's coffins' they called them. I found out three years ago they never expected any of those to come back," explains Andy.

Both ships were part of a task force supporting the invasion of Iwo Jima in the Pacific to rout the Japanese.

In the ensuing battle, two Japanese Kamikaze or "suicide" aircraft slammed into the Bismark Sea, setting off an uncontrollable fire. Snooks recalls that the same two Kamikaze planes that hit the Bismark Sea narrowly missed the Dickens because they were flying so low. "We were lucky they didn't hit us!" he exclaims, pointing to that irony.

Snooks' ship was only about a mile away from the Bismark Sea when the second impact occurred, setting off a major explosion. "When it blew up, you could feel the explosion," he remarks.

Andy was on his ship's bridge when the impacts occurred. The first Kamikaze hit the side of the ship, just below the flight deck, crippling the ship. The second dropped through the opening in the flight deck for the hangar elevator, falling directly into the heart of the ship. "This plane came straight down," says Andy.

Soon, all efforts to save the ship were halted by the exploding ammunition she had in her hold. Andy explains, "When that second one hit, it didn't take only a few minutes. The old man said, 'Abandon ship!'"

The events of Andy's remarkable survival that perilous night were filled with many more ironic moments.

As he and a buddy had planned well beforehand, Andy promptly made his way to the bow of the ship amidst the clamor of fellow shipmates and the cacophony of exploding munitions in the ship's hold. His buddy jumped 42 feet to the water below—something they had done many times before in calmer moments. Andy, however, hesitated with the thought that his flotation device might not work. He elected, instead, to shimmy down a rope, a "monkey line" with many other sailors—a fateful decision because his life vest, indeed, failed to inflate when he tried later.

Andy explains, "All of a sudden, everybody was gone … and I'm the only one left on this line." Once again, his life had been spared. Had he gone in the water then, without a life vest, he would most certainly have drowned. Dangling alone in the darkness—sometimes above the water, sometimes in it—desperation gripped him. He tried, unsuccessfully, to take a life jacket off a dead body that floated by.

Then, miraculously, out of the gloom, came a small, 3-man raft with many sailors already clinging to it for dear life. It was Andy's ticket off his perch. He dropped to the water, swam to the raft and politely asked if he can hold on as well. "My parents taught me to be polite," he says, smiling.

Munitions and fuel continued to explode as the ship plowed past the survivor-laden raft and into the black night, yet none of the shrapnel hit them or their tiny life raft. Andy had been spared yet again.

The Bismark Sea sank soon after that, a mere 90 minutes after the Kamikaze attack.

Three wounded rode in the raft; the rest were in the cold water. "There was 23 of us hangin' on to that sucker," Andy reflects.

The rest of his survival story includes harrowing moments of sheer terror, horror, heroism and super-human endurance during the hours they floated in the ocean before being taken aboard a ship.

When some sailors in the water tried signaling their location with flashlights, a Japanese fighter strafed them. Still clinging to the raft with one hand, "I got underneath the water," explains Andy. "I knew I could lose a hand, but if I had my head up there they'd blow your head off."

In the cold water, fighting swells for over six hours, just holding on was a struggle. "One guy was so tired, he couldn't hang on no more." So, Andy and another shipmate held him, one on each side.

"It was about 2 o'clock (a.m.) before we got picked up." As the rescue ship moved in, Andy was too weak to swim for it. "Actually, I was the last one off. I just waited until they got real close." He was so weak from his ordeal that rescuers had to pull him out of the water. "They come down and got me."

Snooks recalls that they took survivors from the water well into the next day. "We must have had two or three hundred of 'em, I guess."

There is one, last irony. Though they were both on the same ship for many days while the Dickens took its shipload of survivors to Guam, neither Snooks nor Andy can recall meeting one another over that time. Their friendship, based in their shared experience, had to wait over 50 years until present events played out.

They have a good sense of humor about the ultimate irony of it all. Jokingly, Snooks, who is Andy's senior by three years, asks, "Can I call you 'Dad'?"

"Only if I can call you 'Son!'" is Andy's chuckled reply.

A man booked for theft following Jam

An Alturas man, Jack L. Goltz, age 51, was booked into the Modoc Jail alleging grand theft involving $3,500 in cash from the Likely Saloon. According to Undersheriff Mark Gentry, the missing cash was receipts from the annual Likely Jam held Oct. 18 at the saloon. The money has not been recovered and the cash is under continuing investigation.

Goltz has been released on his own recognizance.

In another case, William Cantrall, age 33, of Newell was arrested alleging assault with a deadly weapon, making criminal threats and spousal battery Oct. 20. The incident occurred in the Newell area. He was booked into the Modoc County Jail.

It's all 'treats' at Halloween Carnival in Alturas Saturday

Come in costume or street clothes, but come to have fun at the Halloween Carnival this Saturday, October 25 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on the lawn of the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 on North Main Street, Alturas.

Children in fifth grade and younger, will enjoy the afternoon carnival. A costume contest will be held at 2:15 p.m., giving youngsters a chance to wear their costumes more than once this season.

Numerous games and activities are planned for this year's return event. Among them will be pin the nose on the pumpkin, decorating Halloween bags, pumpkin painting, face painting, a cupcake walk, dime toss, lollipop pick, fishing booth, spider pickup and a chance to win a Halloween basket filled with treats.

Activities will range from 25 cents each to $2. Hot dogs and beverages will be available.

This year's event is sponsored by Xi Zeta Kappa, "Families Matter," Delta Omega, Health Education About Tobacco (H.E.A.T.) and the Modoc County Crisis Center.

Proceeds will go toward a scholarship fund to assist a Modoc High School graduate.

Street Secrets: parents need to be aware

There's a rhythm on the streets, sometimes good and sometimes bad, but one's thing's certain, parents need to be aware of the beat..

"Red Ribbon Week," the last week in October, will kick off with a locally sponsored program held in the Modoc High School Social Hall on Wednesday, October 29, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

The program, entitled "Secrets on the Streets," invites all parents of Modoc School District children to learn about the issues that afflict the children of the community. High school-age kids are often involved in drugs, alcohol, and sexual practices, among other things.

"Red Ribbon Week" encourages parents to talk with their kids about drugs, alcohol and to be careful as to whom they allow their children to interact with. Guest speakers Juan Granados, MSW and Michon Eben, MSW will discuss thsoe topics.

Granados has worked in Indian Country for the past 15 years to provide services related to the prevention of domestic and family violence, substance abuse education, conflict resolution and mediation, and violence prevention for both gang-involved and high school youth.

In addition to many other programs, he has developed summer camps for at-risk youth to teach them life skills, relationship building and leadership skills, and he served as the Juvenile Drug Court Coordinator in Los Angeles, at the first Court of its kind. Throughout the years, Granados has been active in local communities, organizing programs which promote prevention and mentoring for gang-involved youth and their families.

Eben is a graduate of the University of Nevada, Reno, and continues to do work in that area, providing workshops on Teen Pregnancy Prevention, Health, Cultural Leadership and Violence Prevention, while training others along the way.

In past years, Eben has also been involved as a Youth Activities Coordinator for Local Indians for Education, Inc. in Shasta Lake, CA., a Youth Prevention Coordinator for the Reno/Sparks Indian Colony and as a Tobacco Control Community Liaison/Executive Producer for the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California.

He also has experience with family counseling and child welfare and is the co-founder of the Annual Young Women's Leadership Conference in Redding.

"Secrets on the Street" is sponsored by RISE, Modoc High School, Modoc County Alcohol & Drug Services, Alturas Elks #1756, Modoc County Tobacco Education and Modoc County Public Health.

Refreshments will be served.

Obituaries:

Nyla Anita Rose

A memorial service to celebrate the life of Nyla Anita Rose was held at 10:00 a.m. Sunday, October 5, 2003 at the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Cedarville. Pastor Craig Klatt of Camino officiated and Pastor Bruce Blum of the Cedarville Seventh-day Adventist Church, read her life sketch. She was 86.

Mrs. Rose passed away Sunday, September 21, 2003, in Fall River Mills following complications after hip surgery.

The oldest of four children, Nyla was born on August 5, 1917 in Napa, CA., to James and Ruth Pieratt and grew up on their farm in Capell Valley, near Napa. She graduated from Napa High School in 1935.

Nyla met Ken Rose and they married in Carson City, Nev., in 1938. Their first home was in Napa where her first four boys were born. With the loss of her dad in 1949, they moved to Pleasant Grove to help her mother and brothers with the family farm. After the farm was sold, her mother joined them in 1953 in their move to Angwin. In 1957, now a family of eight, they moved back to Napa where she and her husband completed their largest building project, the Silverado Garden Apartments on Silverado Trail.

In 1972, she and her mother began operating a guest care-facility adjacent to their home in Napa. She prided herself in the excellent care given her guests. Her later years were spent in Yuba City and Cedarville where she unselfishly cared for her Aunt Ollie and her mother.

She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Ken Rose; five sons--Dallen and wife Virginia of Fair Oaks; Ken and wife Leanna of Cedarville; Gary of Yuba City; Greg and wife Rosalie of Middletown; and Mike and wife Jan of Yuba City; sister, Velda Stevenson and husband Steve of Napa; brother, Glenn Pieratt and wife Mary of Yuma, Ariz.; 12 grandchildren--Steve Rose and wife Carol of Strathmore; Diane McSherry and husband Richard of Citrus Heights; Jeff Rose and wife Karen of Carmichael; Curtis Rose and wife Kimberly of Cedarville; Suzanne Brandt and husband Curtis of Sparks, Nev.; Kitsy Rose of Atlanta, GA., Scott Rose of Sacramento; Rebecca Brenner and husband .

Chris of Sacramento; Lisa Bohlman and husband Jeff of Sacramento; Chris Rose and wife Sabrina of Angwin; Julie Stevenson and husband Matt of Yuba.

City; and Mike Rose of Yuba City; seven great-grandchildren--Angela, Kim, Eric, Carissa, Julie, Desiree, and Claire and six nieces and four nephews.

Interment, officiated by Pastor Bruce Blum and with family members present, was at the Cedarville Cemetery on September 24, 2003.

James H. 'Mike' Duncan

Graveside services for James Henry "Mike" Duncan will be held at the Lookout Cemetery on Saturday, October 25 at 11:00 a.m. Mr. Duncan, a resident of Lookout since 1945, passed away at Mayers Memorial Hospital in Fall River Mills, Ca. at the age of 90, on October 21, 2003.

Born September 29, 1913 in Los Molinos, Ca., James was the seventh child of 11. He was reared to do hard work and worked from a very young age, helping move and gather livestock, pigs, turkeys, milk cows and other livestock the family would move when they moved ranches or took stock to auction. He was also reared with a great value of family. In his younger years he used a team of mules and a scraper and worked on the building of Shasta Dam and the ditches in the Churn Creek area. In April 1943, he married Marion Supan. In 1945, they purchased a ranch in Lookout, Ca. and moved there with two small children. Two more children were born to them in Lookout.

Mr. Duncan ran cattle, and some sheep and farmed for years with a team of horses. The family still has many of the harnesses he used. He enjoyed training horses and mules and seemed to have a way with them. He was a good, honest, caring son, brother, husband and father who didn't mind pulling a prank or two. He was always willing to help anyone who needed help and will be missed by many. Mr. Duncan was a member of the Farm Bureau for over 30 years and a 20-year member of the Grange. His wife preceded him in death in 1982, as did his parents Arthur and Bessie Duncan; brothers Howard, Ray, Frank and sisters, Zelma, Melba, Erma, Eveyln and Helen.

He is survived by his sons Michael Duncan of Lookout, Ca.; David and wife Sheri Duncan of Pittville, Ca.; daughters Sandra and husband Ron Sutton, Sparks, Nev., Linda and husband JC Moore of Lookout; brother Glen and wife Bea Duncan, Ocala, Florida; sister Dorothy Hall, Fair Oaks, Ca.; sister-in-law Thelma Duncan, Corning, Ca.; 14 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren, one great-great granchild.

Memorial contributions may be directed to the Lookout Park in Lookout. Kerr Mortuary, Alturas is taking care of arrangements.

Leslie Earle Dyke

Leslie Earle Dyke passed away in Coeur d' Alene, Idaho on July 16, 2003. He was 94.

He was born on October 2, 1908 near Cedarville, CA., and was raised there. He married his first wife, Ethyl A. Brown in 1933 and moved to Watsonville a year later. That's where he became a barber, and even after retirement was still making house calls to home-bound residents.

He moved to Coeur d' Alene, Idaho in 1999 so his daughter Pat could look after him. He lived there until his death.

Earle was an avid golfer, starting around 1939. At the age of 88, he reached a golfer's life long goal of scoring his age.

During WWII, he joined the U.S. Navy (not drafted) and served at Farragut Naval Training Center in Idaho.

Earle was a member of the American Legion for over 50 years, an active member of the United Presbyterian Church of Watsonville for 68 years, a member of the SIRS (Sons in Retirement), and had also been an active member of the YMCA in the past.

He was preceded in death by his first wife Ethyl in 1972. Later that year he married Olga Beck Enemark, who passed away in 1992.

Besides his daughter Pat, he also leaves a son, Don, of Pleasanton, a stepson, David Enemark, of Woodland, five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be sent to Hospice of N. Idaho, 9493 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID., 83835. Graveside service was July 22 at Pajaro Valley Memorial Park, Watsonville. Arrangements handled by Mehl's Colonial Chapel.

Mary Eloise York

Former Alturas resident Mary Eloise York passed away in Tucson, Arizona on October 15, 2003. She was 74. Mrs. York had made her home in St. David, Arizona for the past 22 years.

Born to J.P. Graham and Maryterese Denson on March 12, 1929 in Houston, Texas, she was described as a "wonderful person," active in church wherever the family relocated. The church was her life. She sang in the choir and taught Bible Study. She played the piano and led prayer meetings. She received awards and recognitions for her painting and egg shell decorating.

A homemaker and mother, she also worked as a secretary for many different companies and owned a poodle parlor. The York family enjoyed camping and fishing every summer.

She is survived by her husband Jack of St. David, Arizona; three sons, Bob York of Douglas, Ariz.; Jody and wife Sara York of Sacramento, Ca.; Mike and wife Dondia York of Los Angeles, Ca.; two daughters, Patty and husband Jeff Welsh of Durango, Colo., Rachel and husband Wayne Rausch of Moscow, Idaho; a brother, Ralph and wife Betty Graham of San Angelo, Texas; sister Beulah and husband Tom McCray of Tucson, Ariz. and eight grandchildren.

Pastors A.B. Blair and Kirk Sorensen officiated services at the First Baptist Church in Benson, Ariz. on Monday, Oct. 20. Interment was at the St. David Cemetery in St. David, Ariz. Pallbearers were Larry Kreps, Ron Graves, Jody York, Michael York, Sr., Michael York, Jr., Jeff Welsh, Honorary bearer, Robert York.

Richardson's Remembrance Center in Benson, Ariz. was in charge of arrangements.

Roy Delbert Cauldwell

Adin resident, Roy Delbert Cauldwell, 75, passed away of natural causes at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Ca. on October 16, 2003.

Services were held Tuesday, October 21 at 10:30 a.m. at the Adin Community Church with graveside service following at the Adin Cemetery. Pastors Harold Luke and Larry Woodard officiated.

Mr. Cauldwell had been a resident of Modoc County for the past 58 years, moving from Long Beach, Ca. He was employed with Big Valley Joint Unified School District for 25 years as a bus mechanic and was active in his community. He loved working with the youth at the Adin Community Bible Church, where he was a member.

He was born on January 26, 1928 in Compton, Ca. and was a veteran of World War II, serving with the U.S. Coast Guard and with the U.S. Navy in the Korean War. On March 25, 1961, he was married to his wife Colleen in the Adin Community Bible Church.

His wife, Colleen Cauldwell of Adin survives him, as do his daughters, Valerie Weaver of Emmett, Idaho and Ieleen Pharis of Paulden, Arizona; sisters Doris Bernhard of Nampa, Idaho; Mildred Strech of Lakewood, Ca. and Lorrain Kloth of Seaside, Ca. and five grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be directed to the Adin Community Bible Church Youth Fund, P.O. Box 191 Adin, CA 96006 or Big Valley High Alumni Scholarship Fund, Big Valley High School, Bieber, Ca 96009.

Sports

Braves beat Etna 73-6, Burns could be tougher

Modoc Braves beat the Etna Lions 73-6 Friday night for Homecoming, more than cementing their claim as the number one ranked team in division three.

Actually, the Braves have yet to face a challenge this season. That may come Friday night as Burns, Oregon sends its squad to test the Modoc turf. Modoc coach Shaun Wood is actually hoping for a good opponent. So far, it's been too easy. Modoc's junior varsity travels to Burns tonight and the varsity game is in Alturas Friday night with kickoff at 7 p.m.

He said Burns has a solid running back and quarterback who gets rid of the ball quickly. "They're going to air it out and I expect them to score," said Wood. "The key for us is how we'll be able to handle their defense. I feel good going into this game, but I suspect this will be one of our tougher games."

Wood doesn't mind the competition, and hopes it will serve to hone some of the skills. Winning 73-6 doesn't do a lot to sharpen concentration or execution.

Burns will be coming into Modoc getting some of their top players back. Last Friday night, they beat LeGrande 52-7. They will throw the ball and Wood said the Braves will be ready. Modoc's defensive line and linebackers have been harassing quarterbacks all season, forcing major turnovers. The Burns signal caller, said Wood, will be harder to pressure because he gets rid of the ball in a hurry.

The Braves have scored 234 points and given up just 19 this season in six games. That's incredible by itself. Friday's game against Etna found nine players scoring, on offense and defense. Modoc was not trying to run up the score. On the third series, Wood put in an entire second team offense, and they marched right down the field for a touchdown. They did it twice more before the night was over.

The Braves started quickly against Etna, taking their first possession to the 20, where Travis Wood took the ball in. Modoc held and within minutes Wood hit Marty Stevens with a pass for a 16-yard touchdown. Cam Wheeler added the point and Modoc led 13-0.

The Braves switched everyone around on the next series and moved the ball down the field nicely. Joey Catania capped it off with a one-yard touchdown run, Wheeler added the points and Modoc led 20-0 when the first period ended.

The scoring slowed in the second period, but as the quarter wound down, Luke Hammerness broke free, led by Scott McMasters for a 31-yard touchdown run. Modoc led 26-0. On the next series, Modoc's Rich Culp picked off a Lion pass and rambled 41 yards for a touchdown. Wheeler added the point and Modoc led 33-0 at halftime.

Wood expected the Lions to sit back, run the ball and keep the clock moving in the second half. But, they came out and put the ball in the air, stopping the clock often and giving Modoc more room to score. Which they did. In the third period, Shiloh Pierce caught a Wood pass for a 70 yard touchdown. David Toaetolu got the second score on the 30-yard touchdown run and Wheeler added the point. Nick Lowell then took the ball in from the 46 and Wheeler kicked the point.

Etna got on the board in the third period when Chris Weedon caught a 6-yard TD pass from Kevin Hicks. Modoc added another score when Lowell picked off a Lion pass and took it 46 yards.

The Braves would score twice in the final period, once when Catania ran the ball in from the 43 and finally when Hammerness broke a 70-yard touchdown run. Wheeler added the points and the final score of 73-6. Hammerness, who leads the league in rushing with 1003 yards, packed the ball just nine times for 188 yards against Etna. Catania carried it four times for 49 yards, Lowell once for 46, Toaetolu once for 30, Jacob Hughes twice for 20 Jaafar Mirholi five-for-14.

Wood was 5-for-11 passing with 159 yards and two touchdowns. Stevens caught two for 62 yards, Pierce one for 70, Lowell one for 14, Casey Poindexter one for 11 and Kyle Madison one for 10 yards.

The Braves rushed the ball 32 times for 276 yards and had 170 passing for 446 total. They limited Etna to 163 yards offense. The Braves punted just once. Modoc defense picked off five Etna passes, two by Culp, two by Lowell and one by Madison.

In other action Friday night, Williams beat Burney 34-6, Mt. Shasta dropped Weed 27-0 and Durham beat Trinity 28-20.

Quincy knocks Braves out

Quincy's Trojans knocked the Modoc Braves soccer team out of the playoff pitcture with a 3-0 win last weekend.

The Trojans played well and rough, said Modoc Coach Jay Carrithers. He felt his defense did a good job against the top ranked Quincy squad, but the offense couldn't get going. Quincy went on to win the section title.

Carrithers credited the defensive play of Ryan Carrithers, John Yeier, Max Wise and Henry Correa against Quincy.

Braves beat Bears, lose one to Wolves

Modoc's varsity volleyball team played well and beat the Mt. Shasta Bears last week, 25-15; 25-19; 22-25; and 25-20. They lost to Trinity Saturday.

The girls travel to Weed today, then have Etna here Saturday and Burney comes to town Tuesday.

Against Mt. Shasta the girls played "awesome" said coach Kim Schmidt. "The girls were full of energy and the big crowd helped fuel them," she said. Erica Stevens led with 11 kills, Emily Pence had eight kills, Hannah Hays added seven kills and two blocks, Kristen Taylor and Brittany Berchtold had three kills each and Brittney Bartram served 100 percent. Kari Bushey served six aces.

The Braves faced Trinity Saturday and ran into a solid team. Modoc's passing struggled the entire game, said Schmidt, but they get the Wolves again Nov. 1 and will be looking to rebound.

Pence had five kills and a block, Taylor had four kills. Berchtold added four kills, Stevens had three kills, Jamie Fain and Hays one kill. Mallorie Hetherwick served 100 percent.

"I am very pleased with the girls who came off the bench and played great," said Schmidt. "I am really proud of the girls for standing up for what they believe and giving their support to coach Lowrey and myself. It shows what great kids they are and what great adults they will become."

The Modoc junior varsity team beat Mt. Shasta 21-25; 25-12 and 15-7. Jessi Harden had three blocks and seven kills, Savannah Hess had four kills, Megan Thompson and Alysha Northrup added three kills.

On Saturday, the girls lost to Trinity. They played hard, but lost in two games, 13-25 and 20-25.

Braves JV drops Etna 30-0

Modoc's once struggling junior varsity football team erased all that nonsense Friday night by beating Etna 30-0 in the Homecoming preliminary.

The Braves are even at 1-1 in the Shasta Cascade League and travel to Burns for a game Thursday night. Coach Eric Burrows knows Burns will be tough, but expects his team to compete well.

The Braves held Etna to 125 yards total offense while Modoc piled up 284 yards on the ground and 55 in the air.

Quarterback Bill Hammerness three for 55 yards, with two touchdowns, one to Shawn Wolfe and the other to Brian Weed. Justin Mason had 171 yards on 17 carries, Willie Mohr added 79 yards on 13 carries, Jared Cox had 19 yards on three carries, Hammerness had 19 yards on six carries and Bud Groff on seven yards on one carry.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Eagle Lake fishermen found things challenging Friday and Saturday last week with things picking up somewhat on Sunday. Shore fishing seems to be the best with most anglers fishing from the Eagle Lake Marina jetty using night crawlers, power bait or jigs under bobbers. Fish are still to averaging between two and four pounds each. There has not been much news from the north end of the lake.

For boaters, still-fishing continues to be working best using night crawlers under slip bobbers. Best results last week were being reported from the Pelican Point area with many also working the Eagles Nest area. There have been mixed reports of marginal success in the Tules near Spaulding. South shore camping is now limited to Merrill Campground with all sites available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For Eagle Lake camping information, call (530)825-3212. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

October 31, 2003

News

Modoc schools API scores are up in all cases

Schools in Modoc County showed improvement on the 2003 Academic Performance Index (API) tests which were released Oct. 22.

"I feel good about the results, considering the test and the process," said Carol Harbaugh, Modoc County Superintendent of Schools. "The schools exceeded their growth targets, and showed good improvement."

Harbaugh and other local administrators express the same concern about the testing. Schools only get credit if they improve on these increased scores, not on whether they're doing well. The target score for the state is 800. None of the local schools met that mark, nor did most schools in the state.

The Modoc Joint Unified School District average score was 706, up 23 points from last year's 683. Surprise Valley Joint Unified School District's score was 750 up from 701; and the Tulelake Basin score was 690, up from 649. All regular schools in the MJUSD and SVUSD showed comparable improvement at the state level and met or exceeded their goals and are eligible for awards. Just what those awards are is not known.

Modoc High School scored 658, up from 633. Their target growth was eight points and they increased by 25.

Alturas Elementary School went from 725 last year to 752 this year. That's a 27-point improvement and the growth target was four points.

Modoc Middle School had an API score of 722, up from 713. Their target growth was four points. It's important to note, said Harbaugh, the higher your initial score is, the more difficult it is to show improvement each year. The small schools in the MJUSD did well, but the state cautions the small number of students can sway scores. South Fork Elementary scored 780, up from 651, showing the greatest improvement of all schools at 129 points. Stateline went up to 686 from 646, a 40-point improvement and Arlington went up from 658 to 673, a 15-point gain.

Surprise Valley High School went up 49 points, from 693 last year to 742 and Surprise Valley Elementary went up from 728 to 759, a 31-point increase. Tulelake High School improved by 21 points, going up from 662 to 683. and Tulelake Basin Elementary went up from 637 to 706, a 69-point improvement.

Newell Elementary showed a 60-point increase in API scores, from 677 to 737.

The API Growth Report reflects the schools' performances on students' assessments that are a part of the California Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) program, plus results from the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). It is called the cornerstone of the statewide accountability system for public schools, ordered under the state Public Schools Accountability Action 1999. The API is a numeric index that ranges from a low of 200 to a high of 1000.

According to the results, the 2002-03 statewide median API score for elementary schools was 729; for middle schools was 685; and for high schools was 668.

Only 26 percent of the state's elementary schools, 14 percent of middle schools and 7.0 percent of high schools reached the target score of 800. The good news is the percentage of elementary schools in the state meeting their indivdiual target was 82 percent, while 69 percent of middle schools and 67 percent of high schools met their targets. Additionally, 92 percent of the state's elementary schools increased their API, as did 88 percent of middle schools and 89 percent of high schools.

Harbaugh said the higher results in the elementary schools levels reflect the fact that those students have been in the program through much of their school careers, while middle school and high school students started in 1999.

Blue Fire timber sale fizzles; value is main question

No bids were made last Friday for the first two of seven planned timber salvage sales offered by the Forest Service.

The two-year delay in bringing them to market is the likely reason. "The value of all the timber is less than it would have been, say, a year ago," observed Paul Bailey, the timber program manager who oversees timber sales in Modoc National Forest, saying that the pine is now "blue stained." Blue stain is a fungus that invades the sapwood of dead trees that turns the wood "sort of blue-black." It is a cosmetic defect rather than a true quality defect. Nevertheless, it renders the logs less valuable since standard lumber grading rules limit the amount of blue stain permitted on structural lumber.

The first two offerings were called the Blue Fire Helicopter sale, listed at 12,928 cubic feet of sawlogs and 8,070 cubic feet of non-sawlogs, and the Parsnip sale, listed at 5,319 cubic feet of sawlogs and 3,514 cubic feet of non-sawlogs.

Bailey admitted to some surprise at the outcome of the first two sales. "I was pretty certain nobody was going to bid with the helicopter sale," he said. "That's what we said we were going to do, so we had to run that up the flag pole anyway—at least try to get those fuels off those hillsides."

However, he was clearly surprised when there were no bidders for the Parsnip sale, the more profitable for loggers of the two sales. "It reflects the marketability of lumber," he observed, candidly.

Bailey expects to use the first two sales as an indicator of how to proceed with the other five. "We need to adjust the other ones to see what the market is."

The apparent lack of interest among logging contractors in the first offering may indicate that even the most profitable of the sales from the Blue Fire area may not attract buyers because of that lack of "marketability." Of the seven projected sales of salvage timber from the Blue Fire area, two were prepared with partial helicopter units. That is, the logs are carried off by helicopter to a collection point rather than being dragged by tractor across the forest floor, as will be the case in the other five sales.

But helicopter extraction is only commercially viable if the timber is high quality. So, Forest Service timber sales are structured so that the high cost to the contractor of helicopter logging in one area is offset by the more profitable tractor logging in another portion. "It's all a matter of value," explained Bailey. "If you have enough value on the tractor side to offset the loss on the helicopter side, you have a viable sale. But, when the whole value of your timber is decreased, then it becomes really iffy."

Since there were no offers, the sale will be restructured by dropping the more costly helicopter units, and then offered once again in a form more profitable to loggers. "We make the offer," Bailey said of the two helicopter sales. "If that don't fly, we go back to plan B and look at maybe dropping those off."

But dropping the units designated for helicopter harvest means that dead wood will be allowed to remain in the forest. "The helicopter units were … mainly to log the steeper ground and along some of those streams where we don't want equipment working," said Bailey. "(That's) essentially on that slope above Blue Lake, on the other side. It's rocky and steep. … (You don't want) a bunch of skid trails and roads dug into the hillside."

Thus, about 700 acres of forest that were designated for helicopter logging only will probably go untouched since the poor value of the logs does not justify the more costly helicopter removal. "They're not accessible any other way. We would just go ahead and plant through that, then … just put trees in there," explained Bailey. "We'll have a heavier fuel loading in there in the future—something we may have to deal with."

According to Bailey, the delay in setting out the sales was environmental restrictions. "The thing that killed us is the fact that it took a couple of years there to do an environmental analysis. That reduces your options on the other end because your product slips."

He frankly admits that legal appeals are their concern. It slows the process and draws it out to the point that the timber loses its value. "That's the catch 22. It takes so long to address all the issues—your operational techniques, so to speak—that by the time you get that perfected, the patient's dead."

Bailey expects that logging in the Blue Lake burn area will begin soon after the sales and continue through the winter.

Nominations open for March primary

Nominations are opening for the March primary election in Modoc County which will include two Superior Court Judges and Supervisors in Districts 2, 3, and 4.

Both Modoc Superior Court Judges, Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay will have to run for re-election. The nomination period for judges is Oct. 27 through Nov. 5.

The County Supervisor seats of Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge are also open for 2004. The nomination period is from Nov. 10 through Dec. 5.

Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

Harbaugh to retire July, 2004

Modoc County Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh, who has been involved in Modoc education for 25 years, 14 as County Superintendent, will retire in July, 2004.

Harbaugh said she has announced her intentions to the County Board of Education, which will discuss its options for a replacement at their next meeting. The Board could call for a special election, promote an assistant, or advertise for a replacement.

Harbaugh's term doesn't expire until 2006 and any replacement would serve until that time and then would have to run for re-election.

Harbaugh came to Modoc from Twentynine Palms, when her husband, Dean, was transferred to Alturas as Lieutenant with the California Highway Patrol in 1978-79. Dean retired a few years ago.

Harbaugh also served as the principal teacher at Likely's South Fork Elementary, has served as Modoc High and Modoc Junior High School Principals, MJUSD Business Manager, Assistant Superintendent, and the principal for the outlying schools. She has been in education for a total of 31 years.

She was also the Chief Executive Officer for TEACH, Inc. from 1993 through 2000. Harbaugh was named the Association of California School Administrators Region I Superintendent of the Year for 2003 and also in 1991.

Fall turning to winter today

Get out the down coats, shut off outdoor water faucets, winterize the house and stay inside. In short, that's what the National Weather Service is advising for today and through the weekend as fall ends and winter grips the area.

A strong cold front hit Wednesday and dropped unseasonably warm temperatures 20 to 30 degrees. Basically, highs will be in the 30's and 40's and lows are expected into the teens. In addition, light snow is forecast for elevations as low as 3,000 feet today with one to two inches possible in the mountains.

Starting tomorrow, and lasting through the weekend, low temperatures could fall into the 20's with lows in the teens in this area.

"Be prepared for the transition from record warm to unseasonably cold weather," the NWS advises. "Those planning outdoor activities in the mountains should be prepared for winter-like weather.

It's been a wonderful Indian summer in Modoc, but it looks like it's coming to a close. The record high for October in Alturas was 93 degrees, on Oct. 15, 1961, which still stands. The warmest day so far this month was Oct. 1 at 91 degrees. It has been in the high 80's several days.

County agrees to reserve funds for pool until election

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors voted 3-2 Tuesday to reserve $800,000 of its Proposition 40, Parks and Recreation grant funds, for the proposed Modoc Aquatic and Health Center in Alturas.

The funds are contingent upon a vote of the people in the Modoc Joint Unified School District boundaries approving the project. That vote is propose to take place in the November, 2004 election. There will be two questions to vote on: whether to form a recreation district, and the second, more volatile question, will be whether to pass an assessment of $25 per property owner to help fund the facility and district.

If the issue passes the voters, the $800,000 would be released by the county. If it doesn't pass, the funds could be used for other projects. The county had about $1.4 million in Prop. 40 funding, and will use the remainder of that funding for county-wide projects. The funds can only be used on parks and recreation type projects.

The City of Alturas is also considering earmarking its share of Prop. 40 funding, about $220,000, to the aquatic project.

Voting in favor of reserving the funds were Supervisors Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge, while Supervisors Dan Macsay and David Bradshaw voted against.

The Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee is now going through the variety of hoops to establish a special recreation district that will pretty much line up with the MJUSD boundaries.

What's planned is a new facility, housing a gym and an indoor Olympic size swimming pool near Modoc Middle School. The property is owned by the City of Alturas and the City has offered the property.

Mike Mason has said the combined grant funds from the city and county would allow the committee to build the structure, and would also indicate the community's willingness to put up its funding. That would help obtain other grant funding, he said, as well as give a boost to getting the issue passed by the voters in 2004. The tax issue must pass by a two-thirds majority.

Mason said having the building funds available would help insure people knew the project was feasible. If the vote doesn't pass in November, the MARC committee will not drop the issue, but would be looking at different options to get the facility up and operating.

The committee believes the facility would be a benefit to the entire county and would be open for use by all county residents. In addition, he said, some county funding now used to maintain parks within the area of the MJUSD boundaries might be freed up to use on the outlying parks. The committee is now working on a feasibility study and will come back with projections and estimates of what it will cost to run the facility and district as well as the revenue it would produce.

He said the facility would be multiple use and would be used for physical therapy and rehabilitation services year round and would provide winter recreation for residents of the county.

The MARC committee was formed in 1999 and while the project has been stalled, it has never been abandoned. The allocation of Parks and Recreation funding would be a major boost to the project, Mason has offered, and would create renewed enthusiasm and hope.

The issue will be coming back to the board for further discussion. In addition to Mason, committee members are: Carol Harbaugh, Joe Catania, Lori Catania, Gavin Kleiman, Roy Ferry, Ardie Ferry, Eleanor Dorton, Carol Callaghan, Debbie Mason, Dr. Ed Richert, Bernice Miller, Rhonda Haslip, Teresa Jacques, Ann Francis, Dave Jacquot, Kip Lybarger, Dave Mason and Emilie Martin.

NCBA, R-CALF leaders will share stage at Modoc Cattlemen's dinner

Competition between the nation's two largest cattlemen's organizations for the hearts and minds of American Cattlemen will venture into new territory Saturday night, November 1, when the leaders of the National Cattlemen's Beef Association and R-CALF USA face-off at Modoc County Cattlemen Association's annual Fall Dinner in Alturas.

"This is the first event of its kind in the country, and both associations are sending top leaders for the event. There is a lot of interest because the two national organizations have different views on many issues important, to the cattle producer," Dennis Smith, President of Modoc Cattlemen noted. Other highlights of the evening will be the presentation of Modoc County Cattleman of the year, a Modoc Cattleman's Lifetime Achievement Award, and a presentation by Modoc CattleWomen of "Cattlewoman of the Year." The evening events will be preceded by an afternoon meeting of Modoc Cattlemen Association members who will participate in the first ever Modoc Cattlemen Policy Conference and the election of MCCA officers and directors.

At the conference, cattlemen will adopt policies that the MCCA leadership will then support on the sate and national level. There will also be proposed amendments to the bylaws.

At Saturday night's historic program, Bill Bullard, Chief Executive Officer of R-CALF will speak for his cattlemen's organization and Jim McAdams, Vice President of NCBA, will represent his organization. Both will speak and answer questions.

Under the format, both organizations speak and then both will answer questions at the end.

"Modoc County Cattlemen appreciate getting to bring this important and interesting event to the industry. We are looking forward to hearing from two articulate well informed speakers with different views on many of the big issues," said Smith.

The dinner takes place at the Brass Rail Restaurant in Alturas starting with a hosted social hour at 6 p.m. followed by the famous Brass Rail steak dinner at 7 p.m. Dinner is $18 and includes tax and tip. All cattlemen, association members and interested persons are invited to attend, however advance reservations are needed.

Smith said there has already been a good number of out of town reservations made including writers from several agricultural publications. Call in reservations at 530-279-2697 by 12 noon Friday, October 31.

Northern California Crews Assisting with South State Fires

More than 400 firefighters and support personnel from Susanville Interagency Fire Center agencies have been dispatched to Southern California to assist in the battle against widespread, deadly wildfires.

SIFC officials said 21 fire engines, 16 hand crews, two helicopters and four bulldozers are on the fire lines in various locations. The personnel and equipment are from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection's Lassen-Modoc Unit, the Lassen National Forest, Bureau of Land Management and Lassen Volcanic National Park.

"We have our stations covered locally, but we are at resource drawdown," said SIFC's Larry Ault. "We sent all the resources we could to Southern California, and to a 1,700 acre fire at Whitmore, south of Shingletown." In Southern California, the SIFC crews are joining more than 10,000 firefighters battling wildfires that have scorched more than 500,000 acres, destroyed more than 2,100 homes and killed 20 people.

Obituaries:

Jim Knauss

James Wayne Knauss, a resident of Modoc County for most of his life, passed away October 11, 2003, at U.C. Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, Ca.

Jim fell ill in late August and waged a valiant battle against non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He was born October 17, 1946.

A memorial gathering of Jim's family and friends will occur Saturday, November 29 at 2:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Alturas, Ca. A full biography will follow.

Delbert Dean Vaughn

Delbert Dean Vaughn, a Surprise Valley native, passed away October 26, 2003 at Surprise Valley Hospital, Cedarville, Ca. A memorial service is pending. Mr. Vaughn was born in Lake City, Ca. on April 8, 1927. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. The Record will publish Mr. Vaughn's obituary at a later date

Rose Survivor list made complete

The Record apologizes for omitting a section of survivors' names in the obituary published for Nyla Anita Rose, who passed away September 21, 2003 in Fall River Mills, Ca.

Mrs. Rose is survived by her husband of 65 years, Ken Rose; five sons--Dallen and wife Virginia of Fair Oaks; Ken and wife Leanna of Cedarville; Gary of Yuba City; Greg and wife Rosalie of Middletown; and Mike and wife Jan of Yuba City; sister, Velda Stevenson and husband Steve of Napa; brother, Glenn Pieratt and wife Mary of Yuma, Ariz.; 12 grandchildren--Steve Rose and wife Carol of Strathmore; Diane McSherry and husband Richard of Citrus Heights; Jeff Rose and wife Karen of Carmichael; Curtis Rose and wife Kimberly of Cedarville; Suzanne Brandt and husband Curtis of Sparks, Nev.; Kitsy Rose of Atlanta, GA., Scott Rose of Sacramento; Rebecca Brenner and husband .

Chris of Sacramento; Lisa Bohlman and husband Jeff of Sacramento; Chris Rose and wife Sabrina of Angwin; Julie Stevenson and husband Matt of Yuba City; and Mike Rose of Yuba City; seven great-grandchildren--Angela, Kim, Eric, Carissa, Julie, Desiree, and Claire and six nieces and four nephews.

Sports

Modoc comes back in fourth to beat Burns in wild game

Modoc's Braves came back with about three minutes left in the fourth period to beat Burns 27-26 Friday night in a wild game. Modoc remains unbeaten on the season at 7-0.

The Burney Raiders have canceled their varsity football program for lack of players and Friday night's game here has been canceled. The Burney junior varsity will play Modoc's junior varsity Thursday night at 5:30 p.m. in Alturas.

The Braves will face the Mt. Shasta Bears for the outright Shasta Cascade League title Nov. 7 in Mt. Shasta for the last regular season game. "I have to tell you, the Burns game was the best game I've ever been around, as a player or coach," said Modoc coach Shaun Wood. "It was exciting, it was intense and our kids responded really well. I would also like to thank the fans for their incredible support and noise levels. It was unbelievable."

The Braves started slowly, and gave the coach a little heartburn early. Burns went up 7-0 after breaking a 51-yard draw and then scored again in the first period on a 10-yard run to lead 14-0 with over five minutes left in the quarter.

"We came out really flat and they jumped us," said Wood. "I found myself hoping we weren't going to get blown out. But we settled down and started playing our game. It was a great game."

Modoc got on the board early in the second quarter when Shiloh Pierce took the ball in from the six. But Burns answered again on a 35-yard pass for a touchdown to lead 20-6.

The Braves would cut into that lead on a Travis Wood run. Luke Hammerness ran in the two-point conversion and the Braves trailed 20-14 at halftime.

Neither team scored in the third period and Burns added a touchdown on a one-yard run in the fourth. The conversion try failed and Burns led 26-14. Modoc's Marty Stevens pulled in a six-yard Wood pass for a score in the fourth and Cam Wheeler added the point after to cut the Burns lead to 26-21. That point after would prove pivotal.

Modoc started its final drive deep in its own territory with about six minutes left in the game and moved the ball to the Burns 14. Hammerness got the call and took the ball over to give Modoc its only lead of the night, 27-26, when the conversion failed. Burns got the ball back with three minutes left, making Wood nervous. Wheeler picked off a Burns pass, which eased the nerves.

"I knew we were going to score on our last drive," said Wood. "I was just hoping we wouldn't score too soon and give them a lot of time. Three minutes was too much, and they were a dangerous team. But we held them off."

Wood said the score shouldn't have been that close, since a couple of touchdowns got called back and inadvertent whistles erased other scoring opportunities. In addition, Wood said, the Braves blew a couple of scoring chances themselves.

Modoc ran the ball 63 times for 344 yards and passed for 156 yards for a 500 yard night. Burns' touted passing game went for 253 yards and they rushed 25 times for 174 yards, a 417 yard night. Wheeler and Pierce each picked off a pass.

Luke Hammerness led the Braves with 197 yards on 25 carries, while Pierce was 103 yards on 22 carries. Nick Lowell carried it six times for 29 yards.

Wood was 10-of-14 passing with two interceptions for 156 yards. Pierce caught a pair for 85 yards, Kyle Madison caught two for 26 yards, and Stevens caught two for 31 yards.

The Braves did a good job on the Burns quarterback, with Scott McMasters and Cory Bell each getting three sacks.

In other action last weekend, Weed beat Etna 27-8; Mt. Shasta beat Bishop Quinn 41-26; Willows beat Durham 12-7; Trinity beat Live Oak 40-0, Quincy beat Colusa 48-21 and Big Valley won by forfeit.

According to MaxPreps, Hammerness leads the SCL's runners with 1,200 yards and Wood leads in passing with 867 yards. Hammerness leads in scoring with 86 points and Lowell is third with 44 points. The SCL sack leaders are all Braves: Stevens 11, McMasters 10, and Bell with 7. Rich Culp is second in tackles with 91.

The current SCL standings are Modoc 2-0 (7-0), Mt. Shasta 1-0 (4-3), Weed, 1-2 (3-5); Etna 1-2 (1-7) and Burney 0-1 (0-7).

Brave volleyball tops unbeaten Etna Lions

In what had to be the best match Modoc's varsity volleyball team has played all season, the Braves beat the previously unbeaten Etna Lions in five games Saturday at the Griswold Gym.

"I have never seen the girls play so hard," said coach Kim Schmidt. "Our passing and hitting were on all night. We served 96 percent as a team, only missing four serves all night. No matter what Etna hit at us, we seemed to pass it up."

It took five games for the Braves to pull out the win, but it was an intense series. The scores were 15-25, 25-17, 17-25, 26-24 and 18-16 in a very tight final game.

"I am so proud of the girls," said Schmidt.

Kristen Taylor and Erica Stevens had nine kills each, Emily Pence added five kills and three blocks, Hannah Hays had two kills and a block, Brittany Berchtold and Jamie Fain two kills each, Allison Campagna added one kill and Brittney Bartram served 100 percent.

Last Thursday the Braves beat Weed 26-24, 25-17, 25-27 and 25-18. Taylor had 12 kills, Stevens added eight, Pence had five, Campagna two, Fain two and Hays one. Bartram again served 100 percent.

Modoc lost to Burney Tuesday night, 25-15, 25-10, 24-26, 15-25 and 14-16. Taylor had 10 kills, Berchtold added five, Pence had three, Hays had three, and Bartram, Campagna and Mallorie Hetherwick each served 100 percent.

The Braves travel to Trinity Saturday and have their finial regular season game at home against Fall River Tuesday.

The junior varsity girls have won their last three games, against Weed, Etna and Burney.

In the Weed game, Modoc won 25-17, 25-20 and 15-12. Lauren Bushey, Savannah Hess, Tacie Richardson, Marlana Bartram and Vanessa Rosenthal served 100 percent. Jessi Harden had four kills, one block, Stacey Parnow had two kills, Hess had four kills, Megan Thompson, Bushey and Richardson each had a kill.

The girls beat Etna in three games, 13-25, 26-24 and 16-14. Harden had seven kills and two blocks, Thompson had three kills, Alysha Northrup had two kills, Parnow, Whitney Baker, Bartram each had a kill. Kelly Campagna and Rosenthal had a couple of great saves and assists. Tuesday the Braves beat Burney 17-25, 25-13 and 15-11.

"The girls are doing great and, hopefully, they will finish the year as strong as they have been playing," said coach Wendi Lowrey. "All the girls have worked hard at improving their skills and it has made a difference out on the court."

Modoc goes to Trinity Saturday and has Fall River at home Tuesday.

Modoc JV drops Burns 26-12; Burney here

Modoc's junior varsity football team, on track for the last two weeks, beat Burns 36-12 in Burns Thursday. This week, in a change, the Braves will play Burney tonight at Ed Carver Stadium. Game time is 5:30 p.m. Friday night's varsity game was canceled because Burney ran out of players.

JV coach Eric Burrows said Burney has a solid junior varsity and he expects them to be tough. He's hoping some illnesses hitting several of his players will subside by Thursday.

Against Burns, Willie Mohr carried the ball 10 times for 58 yards and one touchdown; Bill Hammerness carried it five times for 47 yards and two touchdowns; he was also three-of-10 passing for 35 yards and one touchdown; Brian Weed caught all three passes for 35 yards and a TD and he also returned an interception for a touchdown; Justin Mason carried the ball 16 times for 99 yards; Jared Cox eight times for 65 yards and Jesse Harer six times for 29 yards.

Burrows said the team has come together and the effort has been excellent on both sides of the ball.

Likely Links final golf winners

First place in the Likely Links End of Season tournament went to Darel Ellis and Jose Madrigal, with a score of 59.

John Wall and Steve Brown took second place with a 61 and third to Bob Brooks and Gary McClellan with a 64.

The longest drive winner was Micah Eppler and the closest to the pin went to Gary McClellan.

 

November 6, 2003

News

Tough to get Hot Spring vote issue on County Super's agenda

An effort to get the Modoc County Board of Supervisors to address the voting eligibility and process of the Hot Spring Irrigation District has proven to be cumbersome at best.

On September 2, Paul Minasian, an attorney representing Lawrence and Sandi Ray, sent a letter requesting the Supervisors address the voting issue, which has also been brought up by the Modoc County Grand Jury. He received no action, nor response to that letter, so on Oct. 14 sent the Board another letter with the same request. He has still heard nothing and the issue has not appeared on the Board's agenda.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, she forwarded the agenda request to Chairman of the Board Mike Dunn. The request has apparently been sent to the Board's acting legal counsel for his advice. What complicates, or muddies the issue, is the fact that the chairman of the embattled Hot Spring Irrigation District, Willy Hagge, is also a member of the Board of Supervisors.

Hagge's holding of both offices has also been under question since he was first elected to the Board in 2000. As of this moment, Minasian has also filed for a decision with the State Attorney General asking that Hagge be removed from the Supervisor position because of his conflict holding the Hot Spring office. That issue is under review and no decision has yet been made. The Grand Jury also questioned the incompatible issue and it may come up again should Hagge opt to run for re-election in 2004.

What Minasian is asking for, regarding election issues in the district, is that the Board make a request to the state Assemblyman and Senator that legislation be introduced to conform the Hot Spring Irrigation District to the voting scheme used in many other irrigation districts where most landowners have moved from the land to locations outside the boundaries of the district.

He is asking that legislation be introduced that will allow all landowners in the district voting rights.

"We supplied you with copy of legislation which had been adopted in regard to 12 other California irrigation districts to allow persons who own land but do not happen to live within the boundaries of the District to be eligible to serve on the Board and to be able to vote on the basis or one vote per acre of land or dollar of assessed value under the County Assessment Roll procedure," Minasian states. "We have not heard from you and are sure that you have other important business. We must insist, however, that you take a position on this matter. If you are not in favor of persons who own land and pay the bills of a public district having a say and being eligible as members of the governing board, we would appreciate your stating such by roll call vote."

Minasian cautions the Board that the issue will not go away. The Board is waiting on its legal opinion.

"To those persons who are denied eligibility to serve on the Board of Directors or to vote, the presence of Willy Hagge, a member of the Board of Supervisors, simply leads to the darkest suspicion," states Minasian. Hot Spring will get added notoriety in the near future as a reporter and photographer from the Associate Press were in Modoc recently to do an article on the district and its troubles. The story has not yet been published, but could hit a number of AP-serviced newspapers and other media outlets.

It was darn cold on November 1

It turned out darn cold Saturday to start the month of November. In Canby, the low was seven degrees and in Alturas, the mercury slid to 9 degrees. About three inches of snow fell in the Alturas area, and about the same amount hit Canby over the week. Forecasters are calling for more winter-like weather through the remainder of this weekend and into Monday. Snow levels should be higher than last week through Sunday, but could drop to Alturas levels Monday.

In the month of October, there was no precipitation received in the Alturas area, keeping the water picture on the bleak side.

November started a little better with .35 inches of precipitation measured in the first week and more on the way. Forecasters are looking for more than a half inch to fall by Monday.

The record low of November was -5 degrees on Nov. 25, 1993.

Nominations open for March primary

Nominations are open for the March primary election in Modoc County which will include two Superior Court Judges, Supervisors in Districts 2, 3, and 4 and three City Council positions.

Both Modoc Superior Court Judges, Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay, will have to run for re-election. The nomination period for judges is Oct. 27 through Nov. 5. Barclay, who was just appointed to the position, has taken out his nomination papers as has Dier, who is completing a four-year term.

The County Supervisor seats of Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge are also open for 2004. The nomination period is from Nov. 10 through Dec. 5. Each seat is for a four-year term.

Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

In addition, three city council seats and the City Clerk are up for election on March 2, 2004. All positions are for four-year terms. Those council seats opening are now held by Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs. November 10 is the first day to take out papers and filing closes on Dec. 5, 1 p.m. Take out nomination papers from Alturas City Hall.

October building continues

Building in the month of October showed just nine permits issued in the City of Alturas, worth an estimated $26,708. The City collected $360.63 in fees.

Of the nine permits, three were for Monitor stoves. There were 12 City building permits issued worth an estimated $22,761 in September. Five of the permits were for re-roofing and two were for heating units.

October building in the county was up as 20 permits were issued valued at $425,756. The Modoc County Building Department issued 17 permits valued at $310,580 in September.

In the October permits were six storage or garage buildings, two manufactured homes and one new house. The county collected $2,929.39 in fees.

White chosen 'CattleWoman of Year'

JoAnn White was named Modoc County "CattleWoman of the Year" 2003, during the surprise announcement at the annual Fall Dinner meeting of the Modoc County Cattlemen's Association November 1.

Before a packed house at the Brass Rail restaurant, Sharon Crabtree, outgoing 2002 Cattlewoman of the Year, presented the perpetual silver engraved bowl to the new honoree.

Since her return to Modoc County, White has been active in the Modoc County CattleWomen and served as the 2002 Chairperson for the new Modoc County Beef Princess event, which is to become an annual event. The daughter of Joe and Ruby Stevenson, White grew up on the family's working Surprise Valley ranch, with five siblings. To this day, she remains close to her parents and helps out on the ranch whenever she can.

White lived in Redding for 20 years, before returning to Modoc County. She has been active in FFA and 4-H as a youth and as an adult community leader of the Igo-Ono 4-H Club. A mother of three daughters, Emmy, Amber and Tiffany, she earned her Bachelor's degree in 2000 from Simpson College in Business Administration and Human Resource Management. White worked in Silviculture with the Shasta Trinity National Forest, U.S. Forest Service for 15 years, working in public lands administration and contract preparation. She also worked in commercial and multi-unit property management in Redding for three years, prior to returning to Modoc with her real estate sales license and her husband Monte, who also works with the U.S. Forest Service.

She has become a successful realtor associate with United Country Stevenson Realty in Alturas, along with working for the Forest Service in the summer months. From 1980 to 1997, she worked in all phases of ranching from bookkeeping to hay contracting and operated the baler and swather. At home in Alturas, JoAnn enjoys singing and playing guitar at the Monday night Country Jams. She also plays trumpet and piano.

White has also served as a livestock and sheep carcass judge and is a member of the Modoc County CattleWomen's Association and Surprise Valley Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary.

Fatal accident claims man on Adin Mountain

A Fairview, Montana man, Andres Sandoval-Flores, age 22, was killed Nov. 5, in a 7:25 a.m. accident on Eastbound State Route 299 west of Adin Summit.

According to the California Highway Patrol, the driver was driving a 2003 Ford F-450 crew cab flatbed truck with a loading boom. As he approached Adin Summit, for unknown reasons he allowed the vehicle to leave the south edge of the road and go onto a dirt shoulder. He tried to steer the truck back on to the road, overcorrected and lost control. The Ford rotated about 160 degrees, re-entered the road, crossed the asphalt, hit the dirt shoulder rolled onto its right side and struck a large pine tee.

The impact caused the cab to be crushed to the hood level and below. The driver was dead at the scene.

Obituaries:

James Wayne Knauss

James Wayne Knauss, a resident of Modoc County for most of his life, passed away October 11, 2003 at U.C. Davis Medical Center in Sacramento after falling ill in late August and waging a valiant battle against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Jim had just retired this past December, after more than 22 years of service with the Modoc County Assessor's Office.

Jim was born October 17, 1946 in Morrison, Illinois to James Clifford Knauss and Hilda Lucretia Churchill. The family moved to Modoc County when Jim was nine years old. He attended elementary school and high school in Alturas, graduating from Modoc Union High School in 1965. Following high school, Jim attended the College of the Siskiyous in Weed for one year before enlisting in the Army on December 8, 1966. He achieved the rank of sergeant, serving three years, which included two tours of duty in Vietnam, where he was exposed to Agent Orange, the presumed cause of the cancer that brought about his illness and untimely death.

Jim served in the 1st Battalion (Mechanized) 50th Infantry 173rd Airborne Brigade. He was awarded numerous medals for meritorious achievement, including the Army Commendation Medal, the Air Medal and the Bronze Star Medal. Jim was also awarded the 'Maeng Ho' (fierce tiger) crest of the 6th Republic of Korea (ROK) Tiger Division, making him an honorary member of the Korean force.

Following Jim's honorable discharge from the Army in July, 1969, he began working for Carlsberg Financial Corporation as a salesman at California Pines. While with Carlsberg, he studied for and earned his real estate license. He later was promoted to sales manager at Virginia City Highlands in Reno, Nevada and eventually to project manager at Lake Millerton Recreational Park in Fresno, Ca. Carlsberg Financial Corporation offered Jim the position of Sales Manager and Assistant Project Manager at California Pines in 1976, which he accepted, and Jim came back to Modoc, this time for good.

At every opportunity, Jim, along with friends and co-workers from Cal Pines, would gather at the lake at the end of the work day to water ski, often skiing after dark, by the light of a full moon. Also, at this time in Jim's life, he enjoyed racing dirt bikes and was involved in many desert racing competitions.

It was during this second stint with Carlsberg Financial Corporation that Jim met his future wife, Kathy Lynn Dees of Alturas. They were wed on April 8, 1978. Jim soon turned his love from dirt bikes to horses, and it was Kathy and her father who introduced them. Before long, Jim, who perfected all he did, was team roping and branding. In 1978, Jim, with friends Ken Phillips and Larry Boulade, built the Alturas Roping Arena, located across from the Alturas 4-H grounds. He was a charter member of the Alturas Roping Club and won the champion heeling buckles in 1985, 1988 and 1990. Jim enjoyed branding at Violet and Charlie Jackson's ranch for many years and looked forward to spring branding at Ron and Lynne Schluter's with their family and friends.

Jim and Kathy, along with the other directors and wives, marked trail each year for the annual Modoc Tribe Ride. Jim was the MTR President in 1992 and 1993 and attended his 26th Ride this past August. He was a member of the Modoc County Sheriff's Posse as well, and was Captain of the Modoc Sheriff's Posse in 1990. Jim served as the Sheriff's Posse Horse Show Chairman for many years.

Jim began his employment with the County of Modoc in March of 1979. Jim achieved the status of an Advanced Certified Property Tax Appraiser in April of 1985. He attained the position of Senior Appraiser (supervising appraiser) within the office until his retirement in December 2002. Jim also was a Past-President of the Northern California Appraisers Council, which included 10 northern counties. Jim served from January through June 1986, as the Director of Emergency Services for Modoc County. During that time, Modoc County experienced one of the worst floods in its history.

Jim and Kathy gave birth to one daughter, Amber Dawn, on September 25, 1981. Their daughter was one of Jim's greatest joys in life. He was thrilled when she won a very competitive contest for Miss Modoc Fair Queen in 1999 and proudly attended her graduation ceremony at U.C. Santa Barbara on June 14, 2003, just prior to the onset of his illness. His retirement, brief as it was, enabled him to travel to Santa Barbara and visit Amber frequently. Jim loved hunting and never missed the annual California Pines 3-Shot Honker Hunt. Jim had the great pleasure of hunting with such famous personalities as Roy Rogers, Slim Pickins, test pilot Chuck Yeager, astronauts Joe Allen, Joe Engle, Ron Evans, and artist-sculptor Doug Van Howd, to name a few. Opening weekend of pheasant season always found Jim at his brother-in-law, Gary Davis' homestead family farm in Pleasant Grove. He was a member of a bird hunting club in Chico and spent many weekends with his brother-in-law Scott Wineland and nephew Trevor. Jim was an experienced big game hunter (deer and elk) but, he had a passion for chukar hunting with his dog, Bear.

Jim became quite a wild game gourmet cook and loved to have friends over to dine after perfecting a new recipe. He was famous for his smoked venison and elk jerky. His cooking talent, however, was not limited to wild game, and since Jim refused to eat leftovers, guests were usually delighted when they found Jim insisting on sending them home with the remaining portions.

Jim is survived by his wife Kathy of Alturas and daughter Amber of Santa Barbara and his faithful German Wirehair, Bear, son of Baron. He also leaves a sister, Jane Davis of Sahuarita, Ariz.; brother-in-law, Gary Davis of Pleasant Grove, CA.; nephew Joe Davis of Pleasant Grove; and niece Carolyn Coker and husband, Jason and their infant son Jacob of Magalia, Ca.; aunt Virginia Griffith of Decatur, IL.; and aunt and uncle Jean and Clyde Booher and family of Decatur, IL.; mother and father-in-law, Emmie and Joe Dees of Alturas, Ca.; sister-in-law Linda Wineland of Chico; brother-in-law Scott Wineland of Chico; niece and nephew Shelley and Trevor Wineland, Chico, Ca.; brother-in-law Eric Dees and wife, Sarah and niece Jennifer Dees of Santaquin, UT.

A memorial gathering of family and friends will occur Saturday, November 29, 2003 at 2:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Alturas, CA.

Ronald Ray Rosendahl

Veteran Modoc National Forest Fire Dispatcher Ronald Ray Rosendahl of Alturas passed away in Alturas, Ca. of natural causes on Sunday, November 2, 2003.

Mr. Rosendahl, 56, had retired a few years ago, from the forest service position he held for many years. With his many years of experience, calm and guiding nature, he was called on to train many dispatchers over the years at the Forest Supervisor's Office in Alturas.

Born March 4, 1947, Mr. Rosendahl graduated from Modoc High School, Alturas, with the Class of 1966. No services have been set.

Gertrude Fay Curtis

A memorial service for well-known, long-time Alturas resident Gertrude Fay Curtis, will be conducted by Pastor Dewey Potter at the Alturas Church of Christ at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 8.

Mrs. Curtis was an active member of the Alturas Church of Christ where she served as treasurer. She had retired from the Department of Forestry in 1985 and continued to keep active as a member of TOPS for several years, helping to create many of the items the local group donated such as lap blankets for convalescent hospital residents, as service projects to aid others.

Born Gertrude Fay Gillespie in Redwood Falls, Minnesota on March 11, 1924, she received her education in Redwood Falls and in Alturas, Ca. She married Arthur Curtis in Redwood Falls, Minn. on September 25, 1941. Their marriage sustained 43 years, until his death November 7, 1984. Fay, as she was known to her many friends, had made Modoc County her home for the past 57 years.

She is survived by her brothers Arthur Gillespie of Redwood Falls, Minn; Melvin Gillespie of Granite Falls, Minn.; sister Norma Blank of Morton, Minn.; sons Stephen Curtis of Oregon City, Ore., Rodger Curtis of Gresham, Ore.; daughters Linda Loomis of Oregon City, Ore. and Annette McGillvray of Portland, Ore. She also had 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren, whom she loved to visit, and her pet dog little "Tiger." Mrs. Curtis passed away of cancer on November 1, 2003 in Oregon City, Ore. She was 79.

Interment will be at the Alturas Cemetery. Memorial donations may be directed to Alturas Church of Christ. Allen Douglas Propst.

Memorial services are pending for Allen Douglas Propst of Alturas. Mr. Propst passed away November 4, 2003, in Alturas, Ca. Mr. Propst, 76, was born in Merino, Colorado on December 1, 1926.

Merril Vern Minto

Merril Minto, age 76, died at his Eagleville home on Saturday, November 1, 2003, of complications from lung cancer.

Funeral services will be held today, Thursday, November 6, 2003 at 11 a.m. at the Eagleville Church, with graveside services following at the Eagleville Cemetery. A community potluck will be served following the service at the Community Hall.

Merril was born October 31, 1927 at the family ranch in Eagleville, Calif. His parents were Edyth H. and Robert W. Minto. He died at home on the same property that has been in the Minto Family since 1867.

Merril grew up in Surprise Valley, Modoc County, at the base of the Warner Mountains, now a wilderness area. He and his siblings learned at an early age to work hard on the family ranch, but found time to hunt, fish, camp and explore.

Merril was a natural mechanic and overhauled his first harvester engine at the age of twelve. He graduated eighth grade from Eagleville grammar school, one of five students, and from Surprise Valley High School with a class of seventeen. After graduation, he worked as an auto mechanic and in the woods, near Auburn, Calif., logging. He was drafted into the Army November 10, 1950 and served in Korea as a mechanic and truck driver in the motor pool. He was honorably discharged August 10, 1952.

After his military service, he moved to Chico and started a career of farming and custom harvesting. He met and married his wife, Sharlene Waters, June 26, 1954. They lived in Chico for over 45 years while raising their family.

Merril was a master mechanic, and he never met an engine that he did not love. He collected old tractors and used his skill to repair and keep them running. He had been a member of two tractor clubs, whose purpose was to restore antique farm machinery. He has restored a 1947 Jeepster and has been working on a 1919 Model T. A 1930 Buick Marquette was last year's Christmas gift from his family. He said, "I never got a car for Christmas before!" He recently built a 1972 C.J. 5 Jeep, which he assembled from a pile of parts. He enjoyed taking it often to Lost Lake fishing and also exploring the Applegate Immigrant Trail through High Rock Canyon in Nevada.

Merril supported the Butte County 4-H program in which his four children participated. He was a past member of the North Valley Volunteer Firemen. Merril aided many fund-raising dinners for 4-H, churches and schools by providing his time and his Chicken Bar-B-Que barrels. The largest dinner was for Rosedale School, Chico, serving 600 people.

He supported the Chico High School Ski Team for many years by being a chaperone and providing transportation to ski races all over Northern California. Merril was a skilled skier and taught his four children, as well a many other young people, to ski and enjoy the sport.

Never a licensed pilot, he did love flying. Throughout his lifetime, Merril enjoyed camping, hunting and fishing. He like snowmobiling in the South Warner Mountains with his family.

In 1969, Merril and his father-in-law, Carl Waters, Sr. developed the Mountain View Mobile Home Park on the Esplanade in Chico. Merril and his wife Sharlene joined a Good Sam group, and since 1980, they traveled extensively with their pickup and fifth wheel.

Retiring in 1992, Merril divided his time between Chico and Eagleville, until he became a permanent Surprise Valley resident four years ago. Merril has been active in community life in Surprise Valley. He has participated in the Fair parade each year, and the Eagleville Barbecue. He has been an active member of the Eagleville coffee group, which gathered every morning.

One of Merril's favorite times of year was Christmas. He took great pleasure in decorating his yard with Christmas lights. Merril's most recent love was caring for his three Alpacas.

Merril and Sharlene celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary by hosting an excursion, for 40 of their relatives and friends, on the Shasta Sunset Dinner Train in McCloud, Calif.

He is survived by his wife, of forty-nine years, Sharlene; four children: daughter Deveny Bywaters and husband Kurt of Lake Oswego, Ore., daughter Tanis Minto of Petaluma, Calif., daughter Danelle Grove and husband John of Orland, Calif., son Kerry Minto of Portland, Ore.; six grandchildren: Collin, Cody and Grant Bywaters and Megan, Kristin and Trace Grove. Also surviving him is brother Robert Minto and wife Eldora of Durham, Calif.; sister Marlene Eicher and husband Bob of Dayton, Calif.; and brother Keith and wife Caroline of Mariposa, Calif.; and fifteen nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by his parents Edyth and Robert and brothers Vrle, Wally and Harlan.

Memorials may be made to the Eagleville Community Church Building Association Steeple Fund in care of Angie Benner, Secretary, Post Office Box 654, Eagleville, Calif. 96110

Kerr Mortuary of Alturas is handling the arrangements.

Ernest G. Eaton

On a beautiful day, Ernest G. Eaton, age 78, returned to Lake City and the land he loved, for the last time. On July 29, 2003, Eaton passed away at the home of his son and daughter-in-law, Morgan and Laurie Eaton in West Richland, Wash.

A memorial service was held in his honor on October 20 at the Lake City Cemetery. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra officiated, with the Rev. Steven Frock of Hamlin, Iowa and nephew of Eaton, giving his eulogy.

A lifelong outdoorsman, Eaton had retired as District Conservationist from the Surprise Valley District of the U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service. Eaton was born in Seligman, Arizona on February 6, 1925 and grew up in various places in Arizona where his father worked on the railroad and as a hard rock miner. Eaton enjoyed horses from his youth.

He joined the Army Air Force in World War II and spent time in Italy as an Intelligence Specialist. He attended Arizona State University and Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo, where he graduated in 1953 with a bachelor's degree in Agriculture. He spent most of his summers working as a guide and packer at the Grand Canyon with the mule parties and working on ranches.

Eaton married his wife Barbara during his senior year in college and together they lived in various places in Arizona and California. Later, he worked on purebred Hereford ranches and was a packer for parties at Kings Canyon Park in California.

In 1961, he went to work for the Soil Conservation Service and was the District Conservationist in Cedarville from 1976 until he retired in 1985. He was very active in the Stewardship Program and the Resource Conservation District activities.

While living on their ranch on Soldier Creek, near Lake City, the couple raised Quarter Horses and sheep. After his retirement from the Soil Conservation Service, Eaton was a Brand Inspector for Nevada. His greatest interest was always in horses and ranching. He shod, trained and bred horses. He was also very proud of his two studs, Joey Moore and Fiddle. His love of horses was reciprocated; when Eaton contracted Parkinson's disease, his aging stud Fiddle became ill. Although two states apart, when Eaton died several years later, Fiddle sensed his passing and also died.

Eaton is survived by his wife Barbara, son Morgan and daughter-inlaw Laurie Eaton, daughter Renata Earles and son-in-law Marty, grandchildren Korban and Mira Earles, sister Elda Frock and her husband Marion, brother John Vernon Eaton and Phyllis of Kentucky and brother Lawrence Eaton of Phoenix, Ariz.

Eaton was preceded in death by his parents John Eaton of Bagdad, Ariz. and Dollie Frock of Phoenix, AZ.

Sports

Modoc heads to Bear country for title game

It probably doesn't get any better than this -- the final game of the season for the Modoc Braves and Mt. Shasta Bears will determine the 2003 Shasta Cascade League football championship.

The Braves have to travel to Mt. Shasta Friday night and will put their unbeaten 8-0 record on the line as well as seeding in the North Section play-offs. Currently, the seeding in the playoff picture finds Willows number 1, Pierce number 2, Modoc number 3 and Mt. Shasta number four, followed by Durham and Quincy.

A win Friday night for the Braves will insure at least one home game in the playoffs. The perfect scenario, said Modoc coach Shaun Wood, would be to have Willows knocked off by someone. But the Braves first have to take care of business at Mt. Shasta.

"I think we'll be fine," Wood said this week. "I think they're a solid team, but I don't think they match up well against us. While I believe their defensive line is better than their offensive line, overall, I feel our defense is stronger. We'll be doing some things to strengthen defense and our offense has been scoring all year."

Oddly, Modoc's defense has not given up a single point on the road this year. And the bulk of the 45 points given up came against Burns, with 26. "We're certainly not taking anything for granted," said Wood. "We respect the Mt. Shasta squad, but we feel we have a pretty good scouting report and can handle what they do."

The weather forecast is predicting cold and snow for Friday night, but Wood said his team figures that to be an advantage. Besides all that, they practiced in cold and heavy snow Monday and Tuesday this week. Modoc had last Friday off as the Burney Raiders canceled their varsity season. Mt. Shasta beat the weak Etna Lions 62-0 Friday night. In competition in league, the Bears' and Braves' results look like this: Modoc 72-Etna 6, Mt. Shasta 62-Etna 0; Modoc 48-Weed 0, Mt. Shasta 27-Weed 0. The Braves are 8-0 and the Bears are 5-3, with both being 3-0 in the SCL. Modoc has scored 262 points while giving up only 45; while the Bears have scored 226 points and given up 107.

Modoc has a decided advantage on defense and coach Shaun Wood also believes his offense will fare well against the Bears. Wood feels his strengths going into the game are a tough, proud defense, a well-rounded offense and the offensive and defensive lines.

Results of last week's action are as follows: Willows 42-Trinity 19, Big Valley 49-Tulelake 0, Mt. Shasta 62-Etna 0.

Game time for the junior varsity in Mt. Shasta Friday night is 5:30 p.m. and the varsity game will follow around 7:30 p.m.

Local girl wins 49'er PP&K championship

Nine-year-old Cheyenne King was all decked out in her new San Francisco 49'er jersey and beaming this week after she won the Pepsi Punt, Pass and Kick NFL Team competition Sunday in San Francisco.

King, who entered the competition for the first time this year in the 8-9 year old category, was honored and presented a plaque during halftime of the 49'er-St. Louis Rams game Sunday. The win may qualify her for the next level during a playoff game in January. She'll know that probability in December.

She had competed and won earlier Sunday at Kegar Stadium against six girls from throughout the region, including Utah, Reno, Santa Barbara, Fremont and more. She punted the ball 61.6 feet, passed it 44.1 feet and kicked it 43.10 for a total of 149.5 points.

King, a fourth grader in Mrs. Karen Baty's class at Alturas Elementary School, credits her practice with friends Courtney Holloway and Kurt Scofield for getting over the top. She was accompanied to San Francisco by her mother, Karen King and Scofield.

To qualify for the NFL Team competition in San Francisco, King had to win the local competition in Alturas and then the sectional competition in Redding.

The youngster said she wasn't nervous during the competition, but was pretty overwhelmed during halftime of the 49'er game, with about 67,000 football fans looking on.

Overall, though, she thought the whole deal was pretty cool. She's also liking the 49'ers these days.

Burney beats Modoc 28-14

Burney's tough junior varsity football team beat the Modoc Braves 28-14 Thursday night in Alturas, thanks to two long kick returns in the third period. There was no varsity game as Burney did not have enough players. The Braves finish the season Friday night against a good Mt. Shasta Bears team there, and coach Eric Burrows is looking for a good game.

"They're good and they have two good, fast running backs," said Burrows. "We need to keep them bottled up. It's a game we can definitely win."x Burrows said the Burney JV team was solid and played well. Modoc didn't play its best game of the season, but the score was 8-8 at halftime. The Raiders' kick returns set up quick scores in the third period.

Modoc scored on a 45-yard pass to Sean Wolfe and on a seven-yard pass to Brian Weed. Quarterback Bill Hammerness was 3-for-10 passing for 98 yards, two TDs and two interceptions. Justin Mason ran the ball 11 times for 81 yards, Willy Mohr, six for 18 yards, and Jesse Harer three for 23 yards.

Braves drop last two games

Modoc's varsity volleyball team dropped its final two matches of the season, to Trinity and to Fall River. They now wait for playoff seeding for a game Nov. 13.

Against Trinity Saturday, the Braves took the Wolves to five games, but lost the fifth and deciding game 13-15. Kristen Taylor had seven kills, Hannah Hays had six and two blocks, Emily Pence had four kills and two blocks, Erica Stevens had three kills, Brittany Berchtold had two kills and a block and Allison Campagna had two kills. Mallorie Hetherwick and Brittney Bartram each served 100 percent and Kari Bushey had six aces.

The Braves lost the opening game to Fall River Tuedsay, won the next game then dropped the final two for the loss. Taylor had six kills, Stevens had seven, Pence had five, Hays had three and a block, Campagna had one kill and two blocks, Jamie Fain had one kill and one block, Berchtold had a kill. Bartram again served 100 percent.

Eagle Lake yields huge lake trout

With the advent of cold weather, fishing improved significantly this past week at Eagle Lake. The big news of the week was a nine pound, five ounce trout caught by Patrick Henry of Redding, CA., which was verified and weighed in at Eagle Lake Marina. He was not specific as to exactly where he caught the fish other than he was fishing shallow at the south end of the lake. This was Henry's first fish that he had ever caught at Eagle Lake. Henry was fishing shallow in a boat with night crawlers under a bobber. Whether from shore or boat, the best production has been from using night crawlers under bobbers. Some report using power bait and some are trolling with trolling flies

South shore camping is now limited to Merrill Campground. Due to winter conditions, all restrooms are closed with only portable restroom facilities available. Eagle Lake Marina is now closed for the season, but the Gallatin Boat Ramp remains open. Services continue to be available in Spaulding and at Mariner's Resort at the North Shore of Eagle Lake.

November 13, 2003

News

Candidates take out papers for local elections

Candidates are taking out papers intending to run for county and city positions in the March elections.

Nominations are open for the March primary election in Modoc County which will include two Superior Court Judges, Supervisors in Districts 2, 3, and 4, three City Council positions and the City Clerk.

Both Modoc Superior Court Judges, Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay, will have filed for re-election and are not challenged. That nomination period has closed.

The County Supervisor seats of Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge are also open for 2004. The nomination period is from now through Dec. 5. Each seat is for a four-year term.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless have taken out papers to run against Dunn. She has received calls from other individuals interested in running in that race as well as for the seat held by Hagge.

Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. All incumbents have filed for re-election to their city council seats. Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Potential challengers for City Council are John Schreiber and Steve Iverson, who have taken out nomination papers. Individuals interested in the city races may pick up papers at City Hall.

November 10 is the first day to take out papers and filing closes on Dec. 5, 1 p.m. Take out nomination papers from Alturas City Hall.

The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

Steve Nelson is honored as MCCA Cattleman of Year

The prestigious honor of Modoc County Cattlemen's Association "Cattleman of the Year" was bestowed on Modoc rancher Steve Nelson of Alturas.

The award was presented during the MCCA's annual fall dinner meeting at the Brass Rail, Nov. 1.

Nelson and his wife Linda have ranched near Alturas for 26 years. He has served as a director of the MCCA since 1989 and served as vice-president in 1995 and 1996, and as president in 1997 and 1998.

"Steve is a hard working, soft-spoken individual and a treasured friend among those who know him," said Dennis Smith, current MCCA Preisdent. "He is always in there helping on every successful MCCA project. He's a veteran of many battles over federal grazing issues and other challenges facing cattle producers.

The Nelson family-owned ranch is a cow/calf operation where they graze on both Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands. Nelson was born in the Healdsburg area and worked with his family raising pears, prunes and other crops. It was his dream to get into the ranching business and the family purchased the present property in 1977. Steve and Linda have known each other since grade school and started dating in high school. They have been married for 31 years and have two grown children, Steven and Ginny.

Bob Coombs, local manager for Farm Credit and MCCA's Recorder, presented Nelson the traditional silver belt buckle before a packed house. The buckle was sponsored by Intermountain Farm Credit.

The coveted "Lifetime Achievement Award" was presented to lifetime Modoc'er Floyd Sweeney the same night in recognition of his work in and around Modoc County ranching throughout his life.

Nelson presented the award. Kim Blake helped with the presentation by filling in on Sweeney's work history, including the many ranches he worked on as a young man before his long association with Walter Sphar trucking driving livestock trucks. He has been to every ranch in Modoc several times. Blake added a few jokes and comments, at Sweeney's expense, which helped highlight his lifetime and the evening.

Beware, this is the scam's best season

While there is always someone perpetrating a scam, the holiday season seems to be the most active time for fraudulent activities.

Local law enforcement is advising people to be careful with anyone asking for donations from an entity you don't know or haven't dealt with in the past. Scammers, this time of year, tend to take advantage of people's generosity. People are often more rushed and more susceptible.

Probably the scams to be most wary about are phone calls from organizations that sound legitimate but that people haven't donated to before.

Local organizations are generally well known and a quick phone call to the head of the organization can insure there is a fundraising effort going on at the time.

Merchants are also advised that this is the time of year when more bad checks and counterfeit bills show up. Merchants should make a point to train employees to check the check writer's identification.

DFG purchase of Quail Valley Ranch raising local concerns

Rumors that the California Department of Fish & Game (DFG) might want to acquire the Quail Valley Ranch near Lookout were confirmed last week when the possibility was discussed in a Modoc County Board of Supervisors meeting.

"Any time any property goes up for sale around the Fish & Game refuge, the state generally takes a look at it," says Ed Parish, owner of Quail Valley Ranch. "And that's what they're doing here.

"Yes, we're talking to Fish & Game; they're talking to us," confirms Parish. "But in my analysis of all the hoops that have to be jumped through—including the funding—it just seems like … on a ten-step ladder, we're at about step two or three. And I just wonder if it's worth getting the community all excited about the state buying land."

Located adjacent to Highway 87 between Adin and Lookout, the Quail Valley Ranch is thought to be some of the best agricultural land in Big Valley. It adjoins the Ash Creek Wildlife Area (ACWA), over 14,000 acres in the heart of Big Valley dedicated to wildlife habitat that is presently owned by DFG.

"What they're telling me is if they (DFG) got interested in the property, it would be for youth summer camps, for junior hunting programs and ranching for wildlife experiments. That could be extraordinarily beneficial to the county and the community," observes Parish, defending the idea of selling to DFG.

"Before we would consider trying to purchase that property, we have to have a really good plan in place that addresses a lot of different issues … because it is a valuable piece of property," says John Siperek, wildlife program manager in the Redding regional office of the DFG. "We're really at the concept level right now.

"Our next step," continues Siperek, "is to see if we can even put something together that's feasible. If we think we can get the right formula that may work from our perspective, and also, if we think it may work from the county's perspective, the next step would be to go to the committee and talk to them about a plan, a proposal."

"This is really preliminary," insists Parish, speaking of the possible sale. "There are concerns by the county that have to be addressed. There are a million hoops to jump through to get something like this done. I don't see it as imminent at all, at this point."

Imminent or not, the mere suggestion of the possibility that DFG might wish to acquire Quail Valley has many Big Valley residents agitated because it raises a number of sensitive issues for them.

"Well, everybody I've talked to feels that way," observes Carl Parks, owner of Big Valley Realty in Bieber. "We haven't had a meeting on it or anything like that—except, like, in the Lion's Club, the Sportsman's Club, the VFW and the Chamber of Commerce. They all feel that way."

Opponents of the pending purchase of Quail Valley cite two issues: loss of tax income to the county and the DFG's seeming inability to properly manage the ACWA property it already holds.

In a recent letter to assemblyman Doug LaMalfa of the California Legislature, the president of the Big Valley Chamber of Commerce, Roger Cruikshank, insisted that DFG "is mismanaging the Ash Creek Wildlife Area by not having an adequate workforce to complete projects and handle the noxious weed problem. … Instead of purchasing more property, the Department of Fish and Game should pay their in-lieu of taxes and hire (more) game wardens."

"We feel that they just don't manage the refuge as well as a private person manages their property," adds Parks.

Siperek counters, on behalf of DFG, tacitly acknowledging management problems. "We are trying to provide some additional assistance, recognizing the staffing level that we have." He points to a recently inaugurated flexible staffing plan to put one additional worker in the ACWS on an 'as needed' basis. "We're also trying, in these times that are very challenging … to do the best we can and manage these areas with the staff resources we have. … As much as we can, we're floating people. It's not the best situation, but it helps. At least temporarily, it will help us compensate for a need that we have in this area."

Cruikshank cites the other primary issue he sees. "They should be paying their in-lieu of taxes to Modoc and Lassen County instead of acquiring more land. That's our argument."

"Mainly because they're behind in their in-lieu of taxes payments," observes Parks. "In both Modoc and Lassen County they're way behind, and that hurts our economy."

"You know, private citizens, they lose their property if they don't pay their taxes," says Cruikshank, noting the irony of the state's payment default. "It's putting quite a bit of stress on Modoc County and Lassen County. I think, in Lassen County now, they owe something around half-a-million dollars in lieu of taxes."

Chairman of the Modoc County Land Use Commission, Sean Curtis, expresses concern that considerable funds have been set aside by the state for land purchase, such as Quail Valley, while very little is appropriated for management of acquired lands, such as the Ash Creek Wildlife area. Curtis points out that present state budget woes promise to curtail already meager public land management funds, further diminishing the state's caretaking efforts on public land holdings that already suffer from a lack of manpower. Meanwhile, DFG's land acquisition continues unabated, with utter disregard for the substandard management problems it confronts. "The kind of economic times you're in has no bearing on it (acquisition efforts) at all," he says.

Further, Curtis explains that the system is geared to acquisition, with little thought of funding for good management. The Wildlife Conservation Board, the body that approves DFG acquisitions, is a "single mission group," geared toward acquisition without regard for management. "That's the way they were designed," says Curtis.

"There really isn't a real strong recognition by lots of people that this ground isn't static. It requires management. It requires money to be expended on to keep it in the condition that created the reason why you wanted to buy it in the first place. If you just don't do anything it deteriorates," Curtis says, pointing at Ash Creek as an example. "It's probably better off staying in private hands if you don't have the management money." "I guess, in my position, I'm just going to have to keep an open mind and listen to what comes to pass," says Dave Bradshaw, Modoc County supervisor. "I'm sure I'll learn a lot more about it before we have any action to take. It's my expectation they would come to the board before there would be any movement … from the Fish and Game."

Articulating the opinion of many in the area, Parks says, "It wouldn't bother me if the DFG bought a portion of it (Quail Valley Ranch) there next to them (at ACWA). But to buy that property that's quite a ways from the rest of the refuge and down on the river, I think that should be kept in private hands."

Big MCCA Feeder Sale set for Saturday, November 15

With recent rains throughout Northern California the demand for feeder calves is expected to be excellent for the Modoc Cattlemen's Association's Fall Feeder Sale, starting at 12 noon Saturday, November 15 at the Modoc Auction Yard in Alturas.

Cattlemen are expecting 2,000 head which would be one of the larger runs of cattle for the year.

Working together, Modoc Auction Yard and Modoc County Cattlemen's Association plan for a repeat of last year's successful Feeder Sale and have lots of things going on in conjunction with the sale.

Modoc businesses have donated hundreds of dollars worth of gift certificates that will be raffled off during the sale and the Modoc County CattleWomen will be putting on a free lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jerry and Carmen Kresge do their part in putting on an excellent sale and getting buyers to this auction, one of the biggest of the year. Modoc Cattlemen's role is to help get as many cattle as possible to the sale. "They kind of go hand in hand," according to Kresge, owner of the Modoc Auction Yard. "A large number of good cattle will always bring in more buyers for a sale like this."

On November 4, the Modoc County Board of Supervisors passed a declaration making Saturday, November 15, Modoc County Ranchers' Day" in recognition of the importance of ranching on the economy of Modoc County and the importance of the annual Fall Feeder Sale.

For information about the sale call Jerry or Carmen Kresge at 233-3442 or 233-3561 or call MCCA at 279-2697.

TEACH Wish Tree registration opens

Families who live in Modoc and are struggling financially can take heart if they pay a visit to the TEACH office for a little help, starting today. The annual community TEACH Wish Tree opens today and will be accepting registration from 8 a.m. to 12 noon Monday through Friday.

Through community donations, Christmas gifts are provided for infants and children up to 12-years-old, who are registered on the Wish Tree. Registration will be accepted between 8 a.m. and 12 noon, Monday through Friday at the TEACH office, located at 112 East Second Street, Alturas. Proof of income and proof that the child lives with the person who is registering the child, are required at time of registration.

All tags are numbered to keep the child's identity confidential to Wish Tree Christmas gift providers. Wishes are limited to no more than $30.

Anyone who would like to provide a gift for a Wish Tree child, may select any ornament from the Wish Tree. Stop by the TEACH office lobby at 112 East Second Street, Alturas or call the office at (530) 233-3111, regarding donations toward the Wish Tree.

Drama Club breathes life into 'Murder' at the Banquet'

Modoc High's Drama Club is alive and well and ready to give great performances when the curtain opens Friday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. and again at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 15, for two special performances in Oxley Hall, Modoc High.

An entertaining glimpse into the International Association of Mystery Solvers will be offered, as they gather for their first annual Hall of Fame Induction banquet where murder, mayhem and comedy will be served in "Murder at the Banquet."

Under the direction of MHS Teacher and Drama Club Coach Miran Reynolds, this murder-mystery was written by Robert LaVohn. The cast and backstage crew know their roles well and the set, props, costumes and lights are ready.

Cast and Crew:

Freshman through seniors are involved in this performance. The cast includes Sarah Currer, Jessica Strain, Marya Gates, Tiffany Ford, Michael Lanham, Niles Reynolds, Seth Hartman, Tony Hartman, Meghan Binning, Terez Compton; Devon Glenn on the curtain and Cassi Warren on the lights.

The play should last about an hour with a 10-minute intermission. Tickets will be available at the door: $4 for adults; $3 for students over 12; and $2 for those under 12.

Sage Stage cuts Cedarville service

Due to low ridership, the Sage Stage announces that weekday service between Cedarville and Alturas will be canceled beginning Monday, November 17, 2003. The last day of operation is Friday, November 14, for the route with two round-trips every weekday.

The service had been subsidized by T.E.A.C.H., Inc. Executive Director Carol Callaghan said, "T.E.A.C.H. joined the Sage Stage in funding service to benefit our clients and programs, and to offer public transportation between Alturas and Cedarville. However, recent budget cuts caused drastic changes in T.E.A.C.H. resources, causing an end to the transportation subsidy for this route." Transportation Manager Pam Couch added, "Without financial support, ridership between the Valley and Alturas is a transportation need that is just not reasonable to meet with current public transportation funding."

Couch continued, "Most folks don't understand that fares pay for only ten percent of the costs of rural public transportation, ninety percent is funded through a combination of local transportation funding and federal grants. While Sage Stage ridership and services have grown considerably since start-up in 1999 with special pilot projects and grants, we can maintain only services that the community uses and supports over the long run." The Sage Stage will continue to operate all other services on reservation basis - just call 233-3883 to schedule your trip. "It takes two" for intercity trips, which means minimum two fare-paying passengers per trip.

Intercity travel options from Alturas still include trips to Klamath Falls on Wednesday and Saturday ($12); to Redding on Tuesday and Friday ($18); and to Reno on Monday and Thursday ($24). Seniors, disabled persons and youth with valid ID pay half fare.

Couch reminds everyone, "The bus will not operate on Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year's days. However, the Sage Stage will operate on the day before and after those holidays. Schedule your holiday trip soon, so you won't be disappointed."

Obituaries:

Allen Douglas Propst

Allen Douglas Propst passed away November 4, 2003, in Alturas, Ca., after a short illness. A memorial service will be held at the Federated Church in Alturas, Saturday, November 15, at 3 p.m., with fellowship to follow at the Propst residence.

Mr. Propst, 76, was born in Merino, Colorado, December 1, 1926, to Allen Earl and LuluBelle Rand Propst.

He grew up in the middle of the Great Depression in a pioneer Colorado family that left a legacy of honor and integrity.

His grandfather, T.K. Propst, and his father Allen Propst, were part of a family cattle ranching and banking operation who faced a crisis that tried their souls. The national banking collapse of 1929 ruined their bank and their bank manager committed suicide rather than face the prospect of plunging the whole enterprise into bankruptcy. T.K. and his sons and daughters determined that taking bankruptcy was not an option and that none of their neighbors and friends who had entrusted them with their savings, would lose a dime of their deposits. The whole family joined together to mortgage everything they owned - land, cattle, personal homes, automobiles and all their properties - in order to borrow the money to pay their depositors to the last cent. The family stuck together, worked hard and fully repaid that debt of honor. It was a lesson in integrity that was seared into the minds and hearts of the Propst family and Doug, who was raised on the historic family ranch with his many cousins, working hard, but having fun, too.

Doug served in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific arena as a gunners mate, third class, during World War II. He used his GI bill to attend Colorado A & M (now Colorado State University), and graduated with a degree in Animal Husbandry.

Doug married Joan Shaw in 1950. They went to work on the Win-Del ranch in Ennis, Montana until the opportunity came to move to Santa Catalina Island, Ca., where they lived for 40 years.

Doug had a life-long love of the outdoors. He loved to take his family and island guests for jeep rides, just to go check things. He spent many enjoyable times with family and friends at Ben Weston beach, hiking and riding all over the island.

He worked hard as President and general manager of the Catalina Conservancy, to restore Catalina to its native state. Doug and Joan ceaselessly labored to study, research and rebuild their beloved island. In 1975, the Wrigley family, recognizing the great natural values of the island, established the Santa Catalina Conservancy in order to permanently protect this island jewel for all future generations.

Through his tenure, Doug was able to work with many world-renowned scientists who came to study Catalina, and so became very knowledgeable about Catalina's native plants and animals. Doug led the Conservancy as Chairman and CEO for nearly 20 years before his retirement in 1993, when he and Joan moved to their Modoc County ranch to be closer to their family in Alturas, Ca.

After retirement, Doug continued to use his knowledge of range conservation to make significant contributions to the Warner Mountain Range Project. He served on the technical review team that developed a range-wide grazing management plan for the Warner Mountains.

Doug was talented in many ways. He used his photography skills to document Catalina Island, its wild flowers and native plants. His photos have been published and displayed. Doug was well known for his slide shows, educating about Catalina.

Doug was a writer of clever verse and illustrations, whenever there was a need for such. He also had considerable talent in woodworking. He built many useful things, the best of which were beautifully turned wood pen and pencil sets he made of whatever wood his family and friends brought him.

He was involved in many organizations including Alturas Noon Rotary Club, where he enjoyed working with Roger Dorris on developing the Little League Ball Park. He was a past president of the Avalon Rotary Club, the Los Angeles County Soil Conservation District and the Catalina Museum Society. In 1970, Doug was named Range Man of the Year by the Society for Range Management. While at Colorado A & M, Doug was a founding member of the Farm House Fraternity. He has been recognized many times by various groups and organizations, for his conservation work.

Mr. Propst leaves Joan, his wife of 53 years; daughters, Susi Younger, and son-in-law Jay Younger of Alturas, Barbara Moklestad, Alturas, Robin Paine, and son-in-law Ernie Paine, Yerington, Nevada; granddaughters Jessica Younger, Reno, Nevada, Elizabeth Younger, Alturas, Ruby Paine, and grandson, Douglas Paine, Yerington, Nevada. His sister, Emma Lou Carr, preceded him in death.

Donations may be made in Doug's memory, to The Catalina Island Conservancy Education Fund, P.O. Box 2739, Avalon, California 90704.

Ronald Ray Rosendahl

Lifelong Modoc resident Ron Rosendahl, 56, passed away in Alturas, Ca. on November 2, 2003 of natural causes.

Born to Betty and "Bud" Floyd Rosendahl in Alturas, Ca. on March 4, 1947, Ron spent all of his time in the area and graduated with the Class of 1966 from Modoc High School.

During this time he was employed at Wilson Ranches. Right after high school graduation, he was hired by Modoc National Forest's Helitack Crew, later to become Dispatcher for the Interagency Division.

Ron was an avid hunter, fisherman and bowler, involved in the local bowling league for many years. He loved to get involved in activities, especially involving his niece and nephew. They spent many years at local fish derbies, duck and goose and deer hunting in the Warner Mountains. Ron always made time to spend with family and friends and will always be remembered as the caring person that he was.

After he retired from the U.S. Forest Service Interagency Dispatch Center, where he patiently trained novice dispatchers on several occasions over the years, he put many hours into creating his collection of some 200 aeronautic models.

He was preceded in death by his parents, sister Cathy and two infant sisters.

He is survived by his niece Dana, her husband Mark and their children Candra, Caitlin, Kyle and Kasey all of Coos Bay, Ore., nephew Jason of Sacramento, uncles Don Rosendahl of Cedarville, Ca. and Harold Rosendahl of Alturas, Ca. and cousins.

Memorial services are pending at this time. Correspondence may be sent to the family at 1936 LawnRidge Loop, Coos Bay, Ore. 97420.

Delbert Dean Vaughn

Delbert Dean Vaughn, 76, passed away November 26, 2003 at Surprise Valley Hospital in Cedarville, Ca.

Born April 8, 1927 in Lake City, Ca., he is survived by six sisters, Arlene Newman, Arthada Schoonover and Jean Stimson of the Anderson, Ca. area; Lois Cain of Alturas, Ca.; Carol Jochim of Likely, Ca.; one son, John, address unknown, five step-children, addresses unknown and numerous grandchildren.

He served two years in the Army in Richland, Washington and was discharged with the rank of Corporal in 1954. After leaving the Army, he worked in the lumber mill in Cedarville, then moved to Cottonwood and worked in various mills. While living there, he was a member of the Lions Club, a volunteer fireman and a Boy Scout leader. He moved to Christmas Valley, OR. in 1977 and worked on a ranch until 1980, when he moved back to Cedarville to care for his mother. He remained her caregiver until her death in 2000. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clifford and Virgie Vaughn.

A memorial service will be held in the Community Church in Cedarville at 11 a.m. Monday, November 17. Following the service, a fellowship will follow in the church's Fellowship Hall.

In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charity of your choice.

Larry Keith Daniels

Alturas resident Larry Keith Daniels, 59, passed away from kidney failure on November 10, 2003 in Alturas, Ca.

Mr. Daniels had lived in Modoc County for the past two years and had worked as a journeyman-millwright. A member of the BPOE Elks Lodge, he also enjoyed hunting.

A veteran of the Vietnam War, he served with the U.S. Navy until his discharge as an E-5 on July 31, 1968. Mr. Daniels was a graduate of Riverdale High in Riverdale, Ca.

He married Brenda Lee Lackey in Caruthers, Ca. on March 1, 1963. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Brenda Daniels of Alturas, Ca.; two daughters Schillene Torres of Lockwood, Ca. and Jolene Daniels of Alturas, Ca.; two brothers, Jim Daniels of Clovis, Ca. and Jack Daniels of Fresno, Ca. and two grandchildren.

Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. No date for services have been set at this time.

Sports

Braves whip MS Bears for SCL title

It wasn't the offensive juggernaut Modoc's Braves were accustomed to, but they beat the Mt. Shasta Bears 12-7 Friday night in Mt. Shasta to win the Shasta Cascade League championship and secure a bye in the first round of the North Section Division III football playoffs.

Modoc finished the regular season with a perfect 9-0 record and ended up the number two seed in the playoffs, behind a strong Willows team.

Modoc will be idle this Friday and will meet the winner of Friday's Quincy-Pierce game on Nov. 21 in Alturas in the second round. Quincy is ranked number six and Pierce is number three. Mt. Shasta, number five, meets Durham, number four, this Friday and Willows will face the winner of that game.

In Division Six, Big Valley will meet Champion Christian Friday in Big Valley.

"I'd like to see Pierce, but it really doesn't matter," said Modoc Coach Shaun Wood. "Quincy has become a much better team than they were when we beat them here early in the season. Their passing game has really improved. But, we'd like to see Pierce have to come to Modoc."

Modoc and Mt. Shasta had to contend with rain, falling at a 45 degree angle, during the game Friday night, making passing difficult. Modoc's Travis Wood completed just one of six passes for five yards and Mt. Shasta's quarterback missed all three passes and had one picked off by Shiloh Pierce. Modoc fumbled the ball five times, losing four and the Bears coughed it up four times, losing all four.

The Bears got on the board first when Tyler Eastman took the ball in from the one on the first series. The Bears had run the opening kickoff back to the Modoc 30. They moved the ball to the 20 and two penalties on Modoc gave them a first and 10 inside the five.

"That was their only score of the night and we held them out from about the five as time ran out," said Wood. "It was a messy night for football, but our defense played extremely well. We also lost starters Kyle Madison and Luke Hammerness to injury and David Toaetolu was out. It was a real team win for us, the guys who filled in did a great job."

In the first quarter, Modoc fought back and Luke Hammerness scored on a 16-yard run. The point-after failed and Modoc trailed 7-6 when the first period ended. Nether team could score in the second period, and at half the 7-6 score stood.

The third period was equally anemic for both clubs and ended at 7-6. The Braves scored on an 11-yard run with about eight minutes left in the game to take a 12-7 lead when the conversion failed. The Braves were able to hold off three scoring drives by the Bears in the final minutes to secure the win.

"We had a lot of players play well, especially on defense," said Wood. "Cam Wheeler had an excellent night at corner and we had to move other players into different positions, including K.C. Poindexter, Joey Catania, Jacob Hughes, Jaafar Mirholi and Shiloh Pierce."

Modoc's Rich Culp had 20 individual tackles against Mt. Shasta. The rain kept most of the statistics low. Hammerness carried the ball 18 times for 72 yards, Pierce nine for 21, Wood six for 20, Nick Lowell three for 20 and Joey Catania three for 11.

The Braves had 149 net yards offense and the Bears had 132. The Bears picked up 11 first downs to Modoc's seven.

Hammerness ended the regular seasons as the top rusher in league with 1,272 yards and Wood was the top passer with 872 yards. Hammerness also led in scoring with 92 points and Rich Culp led in tackles with 112. The sack leaders in league were all Braves with Marty Stevens getting 11, Scott McMasters 10, and Cory Bell, seven.

Bears trip Brave JV by 19-14

Modoc's junior varsity Braves moved the ball to the Mt. Shasta 10 with time running out in the game, but couldn't get the ball into the endzone and lost 19-14 on a wet Friday night.

Modoc had spotted the Bears a 19-0 first period lead, but fought back to trail just 19-6 at halftime. They cut the score to 19-14 in the third period and almost pulled it out in the fourth.

"We came up just short in the fourth period," said coach Eric Burrows. "Offensively, we moved the ball well the entire game. In the first half, we just didn't tackle well and weren't wrapping up or getting pads on their runners. In the second half, the defense stepped it up and played very well." Burrows said the team didn't give up after getting down 19 points and fought their way back into the game, with a chance to win it at the end. Modoc scored its two touchdowns on the ground, one from Justin Mason and the other from Bill Hammerness. Hammerness also completed four of 12 passes: three to Brian Weed and one to Sheridan Crutcher.

Mason packed the ball 17 times for 120 yards, Willie Mohr packed it 13 times for 80 yards.

"They had a couple of fast backs and they out-quicked us some of defense," said Burrows. "Overall, though, we played well and the second half comeback gave us a chance."

Braves dominate SCL honors

Modoc's Braves, who went unbeaten for the season and in the Shasta Cascade League, dominated the football All-League selections.

The Most Valuable Players honor went to running back Luke Hammerness, while the Most Valuable Lineman went to Scott McMasters. Coach Shaun Wood was named Coach of the Year.

Named to the All-League team from the Braves were: Cory Bell, Marty Stevens, Rich Culp, Nick Lowell, Shiloh Pierce and Travis Wood. David Toaetolu received an Honorable Mention.

Other players Wood said he felt deserved All-League honors were: Kyle Madison, Brad Bell, Joey Catania and Cam Wheeler. Those players are all juniors.

Braves do well in small schools run

The Modoc Braves fared fairly well at the North Section Small Schools Cross Country Championships held at West Valley Nov. 5.

Modoc's Scott Joyce ran third with a time of 17:22 over the 3.1 mile course. The winner was Etna's Andrew Pierce with a time of 16:17. Second went to Mt. Shasta's Austin Fritzke in 16:47. Modoc's Ryan Carrithers placed ninth with a time of 19:19. There were 40 runners in the race.

Modoc's Danielle Moriarity, a freshman, took third in the varsity girls race in a time of 22:26. The winner was Kaytie Fritzke, a Mt. Shasta freshman, who ran 19:51. Second place went to Mt. Shasta's Miranda McCann in 21:34. Modoc's Jennifer Joyce took 10th in 24:27 and Crystal Cohen was 14th in 28:36. There were 16 runners in the race.

Modoc coach Don Mason was pleased with the team's performance as many of them were recovering from a flu bug. He feels his runners will do well in the North Section All-Schools meet Nov. 13, also at West Valley. He expects some of them to qualify for the State meet in Fresno Nov. 27.

Hemphill wins All-Around

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill won the All-Around Cowgirl honor at the Nov. 8-9 California High School Rodeo in Redding.

Hemphill tied for first in the girls cutting event, was second in pole bending, teamed up with Chad Bidwell for fifth in team roping, was fifth in breakaway roping and seventh in barrel racing.

Alturas' Michael Sphar won the bull riding event and Jason Boneck of Surprise Valley was second. Sphar won easily with 137 points on two bulls.

November 20, 2003

News

New headgate construction ongoing at Big Sage reservoir

Construction of a new headgate system on the dam at Big Sage Reservoir, begun early in October, is moving quickly toward projected completion at the end of this month.

"It makes us feel good that we have that ability now to insure that our reservoir will be functional for a long time," says Hot Spring Irrigation District Presidnet Willy Hagge of the project.

Present plans are to lower the new two-ton, stainless steel valve into its re-designed and newly constructed location in the headgate next Monday, November 24. Workers are presently making the final preparations for that placement.

When the new valve is in place, only a few more steps remain until the entire renovation is completed. "Once the headgate is hung, you're crossing a major threshold as far as completing the project," says Hagge. Construction costs are estimated at about $75,000. "I think we're going to come real, real close to staying inside that budget, or perhaps a small overrun," projects Hagge.

Golden Harvest, a Washington state-based company that specializes in headgate fabrication, built the two-ton, 12-foot high, stainless steel valve that will be delivered on site and installed next week. This remarkable component alone cost $30,000.

Headgate flow capacity is estimated at about 90 cubic feet per minute. Designed to be "throttled"—operate partially opened without incurring damage—the impressively large valve is capable of withstanding prodigious water flows and extreme pressures. "This headgate was designed specifically to be able to throttle it," observes Hagge, "so that we can make the intricate adjustments."

Typically, varying water demands in the irrigation system requires adjustment of the headgate three to five times each month during periods of peak use. This provides adequate flows to downstream users while conserving water by sending only what users can take. Thus, the headgate at Big Sage Reservoir becomes the lynch pin of the entire Hot Springs system, metering out just enough water to meet the needs of district members as well as downstream users.

Originally planned for a year ago, the construction of the new headgate was delayed until this fall in hopes of taking advantage of ongoing dry conditions.

It was mandatory that the renovations take place during a narrow window of opportunity between the end of the irrigation season and the onset of the rainy season, when water levels are typically at their lowest. Construction could not begin until the headgate was free of water because its water intake is located near the lowest point in the reservoir.

Presently at about 1,000 acre-feet, "quite low," according to Hagge, the water level at the reservoir is nearly ideal for the project. "Last year, of course, we just had enough water … to get us through the irrigation season. And so, we drew it down to almost nothing this last fall."

The typical solution for such projects is to build a large, expensive cofferdam to temporarily hold back the water and allow workmen access to the headgate, well below the water line, during renovation. Ironically, the present low water level has given relatively easy access to the headgate intake and made a cofferdam unnecessary.

The original headgate system was installed when the earthen dam that created Big Sage Reservoir was built in 1921, using only Fresno scrapers towed by 2-mule teams to create the enormous earthwork fill. The original builders then faced the dam with tons of carefully placed volcanic rock. A tall cement tower was erected above the headgate to house the adjustment mechanism well above the projected water line, where a wheel was installed that could be turned to raise and lower the headgate valve far below.

Since then, Big Sage Reservoir has been the main source of supplemental water for the irrigation district to maintain water flows in the Pit River that would otherwise naturally diminish with the runoff. At its full capacity of 77,000 acre-feet, the reservoir holds enough water to supplement flows for four years, according to Hagge, who says, "It has a tremendous amount of reserve built into it."

When the state determined that the old tower was on the verge of failure, a decision had to be made. "The state dam inspector had been looking at our tower for a number of years," Hagge relates.

Engineers determined that the tower needed to be replaced; repair was not an option. Research into building a new tower revealed that the cost would be prohibitive. It would also make headgate replacement more difficult, if not impossible.

A modern, hydraulically operated valve that could be adjusted from a station on the top of the dam was the best solution, according to Hagge, making a tower unnecessary and upgrading the technology of the headgate. "The board simply decided to go with the new headgate and take the old tower down."

The project required demolition of the old cement tower that housed the original headgate and removal of the deteriorating, hand-operated, two-ton valve, followed by renovations to prepare the structure for the new valve and its operating components. Contractor for the project is Darrill Ponti Construction.

Contrasting the new valve with the old one, Hagge observes that opening the old headgate was a major undertaking. "You could never do it with one individual. You always had to have a minimum of two. … This is a valve that took some muscles to open and close."

Operating the new headgate will be "much easier, much less time consuming and physically … less demanding," says Hagge, explaining that the new gate will be operated by a hydraulic system, powered by a gasoline engine, that will supply the muscle to open and close the hefty valve. This and other improvements made by the irrigation district in recent years have not only significantly enhanced water conservation, but have also decreased water delivery delays from seven days to two, according to Hagge. "We were able to effectively manage our irrigation district better for our members and to supply them with a more secure supply of water in a more timely manner."

Races shaping up in local city, county elections

Nominations are open for the March primary election in Modoc County which includes County Supervisors in Districts 2, 3, and 4, three City Council positions and the City Clerk.

The County Supervisor seats of Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge are also open for 2004. The nomination period is from now through Dec. 5. Each seat is for a four-year term.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless have taken out papers to run against Dunn. She has received calls from other individuals interested in running in that race as well as for the seat held by Hagge. This week, Cantrall has taken out papers to file to re-election.

Hagge is expected to run for re-election and is still facing court cases concerning a potential conflict with holding both an office on the Hot Spring Irrigation Board and on the Board of Supervisors. A decision in that case has not yet been made.

Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. All city incumbents have filed for re-election to their council seats. Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Potential challengers for City Council are John Schreiber, Steve Iverson and Tommy Lawrence. Individuals interested in the city races may pick up papers at City Hall.

The filing closes on Dec. 5. Take out nomination papers from Alturas City Hall.

Both Modoc Superior Court Judges, Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay, have filed for re-election and are not challenged. That nomination period has closed. The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

Woman dies in Sage Hen accident

A 20-year-old woman was killed Nov. 15 in a single-vehicle accident on Sage Hen Summit.

The California Highway Patrol reports the deceased as Roxanne Nichols, Lemond, Ca., who was a passenger in a 1993 Saturn driven by Annie Maloeernisse, 20, of Santa Cruz.

The report states that Maloeernisse was northbound at about 65 m.p.h. and let off the gas to slow down as the snow started falling harder. Because the rear tires were bald, the rear end of the car lost traction and began to slide. She lost control, the car went off the west edge of the highway going up a dirt embankment and then overturning and landing in the southbound lane.

The CHP said that Nichols, who was not wearing the lap portion of her seatbelt was ejected from the car onto the road and the car landed on top of her. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

Maloeernisse, who was seatbelted, sustained minor leg injuries and 10-month old Kaylee Bartle, who was secured in her car seat was not hurt. Maloeernisse and Bartle were transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, treated and released.

There were no injuries in a single-vehicle accident Nov. 14, 5:30 a.m. on US 395 north of Davis Creek.

The CHP reports that James Gordon, 47, New Pine Creek, was southbound on US 395 at about 65 m.p.h. when he took is eyes off the road to adjust the radio. The 1993 Ford ran off the road and rolled over. He was wearing his seatbelt.

Suspect cleared in Likely Saloon theft

An Alturas man, Jack L. Goltz, age 51, was cleared this week from charges alleging grand theft involving over $3,000 in cash from the Likely Saloon. According to Assistant District Attorney Larry Barnes, Goltz volunteered to take a polygraph test, which he passed. The charges were dismissed in Modoc Superior Court Tuesday.

According to Undersheriff Mark Gentry, the investigation into the case is continuing but there are no suspects. The missing cash was receipts from the annual Likely Jam held Oct. 18 at the saloon.

The bank bag with the cash was later located Oct. 29 by the owner of the Saloon inside the bar near the trash can.

Futterman selected for international Honor Band

Nathaniel Futterman of Alturas and Modoc High School will be heading to Seattle on November 21, to join over 600 other high school musicians from across the nation and the world for this year's 25th Anniversary of Western International Band Conference.

WIBC has brought several thousand of the world's best high school musicians together for the past two and a half decades to make music with the some of the finest band directors from around the world.

Nat auditioned earlier this fall and heard of his selection to play in the first trumpet section of the Phoenix Band at WBIC. This is one of four bands of 165 members at this year's convention.

The honor bands will rehearse all weekend with this year's five guest directors, who are from England, Australia and the USA. They will then perform on Monday, November 24 at the Doubletree Hotel and Conference Center in Seattle, Washington.

Modoc High School Band Director, Jay Jones, is pleased that Nat was able to audition and be selected for this wonderful opportunity. "Nat will be able to add his talents along with many other high school musicians to have a musical experience he will never forget," said Jones. "Nathaniel will also receive student leadership training from one of the best in the field, Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser."

On Tuesday, November 18, Nat received a certificate of recognition from the Board of Education, Modoc Joint Unified School District.

Modoc High School Music Director, Jay Jones will accompany him to Seattle this coming Friday. Nat's trip is covered under MJUSD's unrestricted Lottery funding. Nat is musically talented on several instruments.

Art Show, reception opens

Enjoy the opening of a new and special Watercolor Show at the Art Center's gallery in Alturas, this Saturday, Nov. 22.

The public is invited to the opening reception from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. with refreshments offered.

The show will feature the works of students in Art 11 and Art 150 classes of Lassen College Modoc Outreach.

The paintings will be on display for 10 days only. The gallery also features holiday gift giving ideas and items at this time. Stop by the show at 317 South Main St., Alturas.

The featured watercolor artists from Art 11 will be: Richard Cotta, Christine Evangelisti, Jennifer Fraley, Amber Hassler, Tamara Romesha. Art 150: Diana Anderson, Christopher Calhoun, Doris Harris, Sue Inzer, Marcia Martin, Marie Roberts, Georgia Smith and Fae Stanley.

Obituaries:

Dorothy Kerr Woody

Dorothy Kerr Woody died November 13, 2003, at the age of 86, in the Colusa Hospital in Colusa, California.

Dorothy was born in Ft. Bidwell, Ca. on May 23, 1917, to John Frank and Frankie Smith Kerr. Dorothy married Ellsworth Woody on December 26, 1938 in Davis Creek, Ca. She had lived in Williams, Ca. since 1949. She is survived by her husband of 64 years, Ellsworth of Williams, Ca.; two daughters, Lana DeStefani of Roseville, Ca. and Christie Ponciano of Williams; five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren; two nephews, John Kerr of Alturas, Ca. and Jim Kerr of Corning, Ca. She was preceded in death by grandson, Rick Ponciano.

A service will be held graveside at the Alturas Cemetery at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 21, 2003. Dr. Ben Zandstra will officiate. Hall Brothers Corning Mortuary is in charge of arrangement.

Ivan Edward Whitby

Services for Ivan Edward Whitby, 90, of Anderson, California, were held October 27, 2003, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Anderson. Douglas Pryde of the LDS Church, Balls Ferry Ward, officiated. Mr. Whitby died Thursday, Oct. 23, 2003, at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Ca.

Born December 15, 1912 in Alpine, Utah, Ivan moved to Shasta County in 1951 from Salem, Oregon. Ike, as he was known to family and friends, was a planing mill supervisor for Kimberly Clark in Anderson, a member of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the National Rifle Association and the Farm Bureau.

Survivors include his wife Dorothy (Dot), son Thomas of Anderson, stepsons Gene Malson of Alturas, Ca. and Bill Vincent of Grants Pass, Ore.; stepdaughter Gale Stevenson of Palo Cedro, Ca.; brother Ray of Mesa, Ariz. and George of Alpine, Utah; sisters Mae Morgan of Salt Lake City, Utah and Evelyn Jensen of Murray, Utah. Ike also leaves to mourn 13 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Arrangements were handled by Allen and Dahl Funeral Chapel in Redding.

Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of one's choice.

Sports

Pierce comes to Modoc Friday for playoffs

The Pierce Bears will travel to Alturas Friday night to face Modoc in the second round of the North Section CIF Division three football playoffs. Pierce beat Quincy 40-6 Friday night in the first round. Modoc had a bye. The Braves and Bears are both unbeaten this year, with Modoc coming in at 9-0 as the Shasta Cascade League Championship and Pierce 11-0 as the Sacramento Valley League champs. In September, the Braves beat Quincy 52-13.

Modoc coach Shaun Wood, who scouted the Pierce-Quincy game has plenty of respect for the Bears, but believes they do not match up well with his offensive or defensive fronts.

"It's going to be a tougher game than I originally thought," said Wood this week. "They're solid, run the ball well and play tough defense as well. They don't pass much, mostly screens to their backs, and we need to be ready for that. They also blitz a lot, and we'll have to be able to pick that up."

On paper, the teams look pretty similar. Modoc has held opponents to 52 points all season and Pierce has limited their opposition to 51. Modoc is averaging 30.4 points per game and Pierce is averaging 32.

The Bears have more rushing yards (over 11 games versus Modoc's nine) by 3,553 to Modoc's 2,256. Modoc has 883 yards through the air in nine games, while Pierce has just 457 in 11 games. On defense, the Braves have 47 sacks and Pierce just 28.

"Overall, I think we have the advantage," said Wood. "I don't think they know as much about us as we do about them. Quincy could have given them a better game if they'd passed more effectively. We don't feel they've played anyone yet who hits as hard as we do, or whose defense is as good. I think it'll be a pretty good game."

Against Quincy, Pierce scored 14 in the second quarter and Quincy scored once after a blocked punt. The Bears added 14 in the third and 12 in the fourth. The Bears rushed the ball 49 times for 397 yards and held Quincy to just 74 yards on 28 carries.

The Braves will have to stop the Pierce running game, led by Jake Honsvick, who had 251 yards against Quincy and set a school season record with 1,857 yards.

Modoc will have a decided advantage because the valley school will be coming to much colder weather than they are used to this Friday night and will have to make the long trek from Arbuckle. The forecast for Friday calls for snow showers with highs in the 40s and lows in the mid-20s. The probability is that it will be in the 30's at gametime.

In other playoff action last Friday, Durham beat Mt. Shasta 28-21, and Big Valley dropped Champion Christian 70-0. Durham takes on number one Willows this Friday and the winner of that game will meet the winner of the Modoc-Pierce game for the section title next week.

Playoff game set for 6 p.m

The Modoc-Pierce football playoff game Friday night will have a start time of 6 p.m. Normal season passes are not accepted at CIF playoff games. Admission is $6 for adults or high school students without a student body card, $5 for senior citizens and $4 for students with a ASB card or kids under eighth grade age.

The weather forecast for Friday night is favoring the Braves. The weatherman calls for highs in the mid-40s and lows in the mid-20s amid scattered snow showers.

Teams from the Sacramento Valley (Pierce is in Arbuckle) are 1-4 in playoff games in Modoc.

Brave runners headed to state

Modoc's Scott Joyce and Danielle Moriarity each qualified for the California High School State Cross Country finals Thursday at the North Section meet in West Valley.

The state championships are Nov. 27 in Fresno. Joyce, a junior, is making his third trip to state. He placed third in Division Section meet with a time of 16:37 over the three-mile course. He set his best mark, beating his old time by 44 seconds.

Moriarity, a freshman, was also third in the girls varsity race for Division V, in 22:05, improving her best time by 17 seconds.

Jennifer Joyce, a sophomore, missed qualifying by just two places as she finished seventh in 23:24. That was over a minute improvement. Ryan Carrithers placed ninth, four out of qualifying for state. But he did improve his best time by 72 seconds.

Junior Mark Main, who also plays football, finished 120th out of 168 runners and Brett Joyce finished 111th out of 150 in the junior varsity race. Coach Don Mason said he was very happy with the overall effort and performance of the team at the section meet. "Since I have no seniors on the team, and with them returning next year, if we can get a few more bodies out, we could be contenders for the team championship next year," he said.

Soccer names All-league

Modoc High School Soccer players named to the Shasta Cascade All-League team were Henry Correa and John Yeier. Honorable mentions went to Cory Funk, Raf Sevilla and Ryan Carrithers.

Coach Jay Carrithers named Sevilla and Jose Rosales as co-offensive players of the year and Yeier and Correa as co-defensive players of the year. The coach's award went to Jessica Gray.

 

November 26th, 2003

News

Fire fighting tax to appear on 2004 bill

While there is plenty of political wrangling going on right now, a fire fighting tax passed by the state will show up on next year's tax bill. Basically, the state has adopted a law which will charge $35 per year, per parcel for private property owners living in "state responsibility areas" (SRAs) served by the California Department of Forestry. The first payment, due on the bill in late 2004 will be for $70 per parcel and then $35 per year after that.

According to the Modoc County Treasurer/Tax Collector's Office, it appears the new tax will hit most all private property owners in Modoc County, outside of the Alturas City limits.

The new fee exempts "local responsibility areas," (LRAs), but according to the Tax Collector's office, most of Modoc's parcels are in the SRA class and will be taxed. That includes the major subdivisions of California Pines, Modoc Estates, Summerland, Thoms Creek and so on.

The fee was approved since CDF lost $50 million from its fire fighting budget this year.

The new fees are of major concern to property owners, who may not know much about them at this time. They are also concerning the local volunteer fire departments.

"We believe the fees could really hurt us," said Alturas Rural Fire Department Chief Allan Jacques. "When people pay a tax, they feel they're paying for fire fighting protection and that we could get some of that funding. But that's not the case. CDF is not responsible for structure fires." While CDF responds to most wildland fire incidents, which may include structures, land, not structures is their primary concern.

"It could really hurt our fundraising efforts," said Canby Fire Chief Ron Sherer. "We respond, along with CDF, to wildland fires. We have a good working relationship with CDF. This new tax, however, would impact us negatively down the line. We have to raise most of our funds locally." On Tuesday, the Modoc County Board of Supervisors discussed a possibility of not charging or collecting the tax, but most feel that will be a political, not practical move.

The county and local fire chiefs are advising residents to contact their state representatives and make their feelings known. The new fee may also be facing a legal challenge in the courts. But as it stands right now, the fee is on the books and will be assessed.

Deadline nears for candidates in local elections

The deadline to file nomination papers for the March 5 primary election is December 5.

There are races in Modoc County which include County Supervisors in Districts 2, 3, and 4, three City Council positions and the City Clerk. The County Supervisor seats of Pat Cantrall, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge are also open for 2004. The nomination period is from now through Dec. 5. Each seat is for a four-year term.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless have taken out papers to run against Dunn. Cantrall, Hagge and Dunn have taken out papers for re-election.

Hagge has a potential conflict with holding both an office on the Hot Spring Irrigation Board and on the Board of Supervisors. A decision on that issue has not yet been made by the courts.

Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. All city incumbents are filing for re-election to their council seats. Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Potential challengers for City Council are John Schreiber, Steve Iverson and Tommy Lawrence. Individuals interested in the city races may pick up papers at City Hall.

The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16. .

Cold weather hit hard

Modoc's weather pattern over the last week didn't produce a lot of moisture, but the temperatures dropped to downright cold.

Diana McCulley reports that Canby showed a low of 13 degrees Saturday, 8 degrees on Sunday and 14 degrees on Monday. In Alturas, it was 8 degrees on Saturday, 6 degrees on Sunday and 19 degrees on Monday.

While it was cold (and anyone who attended last Friday's football game could bear witness) there were no records set. The record cold for November was -5 degrees in 1993.

The traveling conditions for Thanksgiving and through the weekend look a little unsettled, but nothing serious and no severe weather is in the forecast. There could be some showers from Friday on, but those are expected to be few and far between.

Major injuries in CR91 wreck

Three local young people escaped injury in a single vehicle rollover Nov. 21, 2:20 a.m. on SR 299 just west of Canby.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Austin MacDonald, 18, of Canby, was driving a 1999 Mazda pickup eastbound at between 55 and 65 m.p.h. when he fell asleep. The pickup drifted off the westbound lane and onto the north gravel shoulder.

The front end of the pickup struck a speed limit sign and MacDonald turned the vehicle sharply to the right. The pickup went back on the road and the driver turned to the left. He lost control, the vehicle started to rotate counter-clockwise and overturned on the highway, coming to rest on its wheels.

All occupants of the vehicle, MacDonald and passengers, Kathleen Snavely, 23, and Amber Fuller, 22, of Alturas, were seatbelted and not hurt. There were also no injuries in a single vehicle accident Nov. 21, 6:20 p.m. on SR299 at Heard Ranch just west of Alturas.

The CHP reports that Cathie Camarato, age 41, Cottonwood, was driving a 2003 Nissan eastbound at less than 55 m.p.h. as she entered a curve and hit black ice. She lost control as it crossed the westbound lane and overturned. She and her passenger, Diamond Camarato, age 12, were wearing seatbelts and were not hurt.

A deer was hit on US395 at Fitzhugh Creek Nov. 22, 5:18 p.m. The CHP states that Kim Dodds, age 47, Alturas, was driving a 2000 Toyota 4-runner when the deer ran into his path. He was not hurt.

There were major injuries in a single vehicle accident Nov. 14 on County Road 91, north of Lookout. The CHP reports that Benjamin DuVall, age 23, Tulelake was driving a 1989 Dodge pickup when he apparently lost control and went down a 15-20 foot embankment.

The driver was stuck in the car and wasn't discovered until some time later when Matt Maddox stopped to check out skid marks on the highway and found DuVall in the pickup.

DuVall sustained major lower body injuries and was transported to Mayer Memorial Hospital in Fall River, flown to Redding hospital and then to U.C. Davis Medical Center

The cause of the accident is unknown.

Community pitches in to help

Donations from a caring community and the T.E.A.C.H., Inc. Emergency Food Bank will allow some 75 local individuals and families to count their blessings and fill their hungry stomachs this Thanksgiving and the few days which follow.

A bag filled with a turkey, all the trimmings and topped off with dessert, were distributed Tuesday from the T.E.A.C.H., Inc. office in Alturas. Sometimes wondering how all the county-wide needs will be met, Peggy Alexander, Emergency Services Coordinator, can also breathe a temporary sigh of relief as Thanksgiving Day arrives. "There are many families in need of food, but it doesn't stop with the holidays," she said, already looking ahead

"The agencies around here know of most of the families who need help during these holidays," said Alexander. "But we also set up another 15 food bags to accomodate those who have need, but don't deal with agencies. We're gonna make it, but it's always very stressful just before the holidays, not quite knowing how this is going to come together."

Through donations and food bank funds, Alexander figures "approximately $1,000" in food bank funds will be used to purchase 75 turkeys for Thanksgiving and another $1,000 will help purchase canned hams for Christmas food baskets.

For the most part, the rest of the items are being donated by the community and through anonymous donations.

"The Cub Scouts have been doing an awesome job of bringing in the barrels of (community donated) food every Friday and we've had a number of anonymous donations," said Alexander, hurrying last Friday in the Food Bank's preparations for providing 75 Thanksgiving food bags this year to Modoc residents in need.

Students in the After School Program delivered 20 pies and food donations they had collected by Friday. More homebaked pies were arriving on Monday and Tuesday.

On Tuesday morning at 8 a.m., Alexander picked up cases of turkeys at Holiday Market and the remainder of pies to fill the 75 paper bags which were given away later that morning.

Pacific Power donated 10,000 large paper bags, imprinted with HEAP information about the free heating and energy assistance program offered through TEACH, Inc. Cub Scouts, Pack 49 and 56, ages seven to 10, are working toward their community service merit badges and have demonstrated their desire to aid the Food Bank for their food barrel project

The Scouts have placed collection barrels at Holiday Market, 4 Corners Market and Walt's Market in Alturas, also at Bank of America, Plumas Bank and US Bank in Alturas and the Alturas Post Office

These containers will be in place through December 19 to also help with Christmas food bags. The Scouts empty the containers weekly and haul the donations to the Emergency Food Bank, located at 112 East Second St., Alturas

The Food Bank originally had planned to provide up to 50 Thanksgiving food baskets, but the need has proven greater, discovered Alexander

Non-holiday food items, which are non-perishable, will also be appreciated to stock the Food Bank shelves through the end of December, until the next round of Food Bank funding is known.

Food Bank policy guidelines allow families and individuals to make use of the food bank up to three times in a 12-month period, notes Alexander. "If a person uses all three times in one month, that's it for the year for them," states Alexander. In October, Alexander stated that in the prior three months, 121 individuals/families relied on the Food Bank for assistance. Some may have been repeat consumers of the Food Bank, she pointed out.

"The Federated Church has a small food bank, available by appointment, but that's the only other option that I know of," noted Alexander. "We cover the entire county."

Food Bank reserves dwindle toward the end of each year, until donations roll in during the holidays; also when needs swell.

Non-perishable donations can also be dropped off at T.E.A.C.H. office, 112 East Second St., Alturas, open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. After Thanksgiving, any cash donations or food donations received by T.E.A.C.H., Inc., will go toward The Christmas Fund which helps provide gifts for the children's "Wish Tree" gifts and Christmas Food Baskets. T.E.A.C.H., Inc. also welcomes any donations of children's coats, snow boots, gloves and blankets at this time of year.

Donations may be dropped off at the office anytime. Donations may be made to T.E.A.C.H., Inc., 112 East Second St., Alturas, CA. 96101. If donors desire, they may specify which project they would like to have funds used toward, said Alexander.

For further information call T.E.A.C.H., Inc. at (530) 233-3111.

Help out Santa with Children's Wish Tree

Families who live in Modoc and who are struggling financially can take heart if they pay a visit to the T.E.A.C.H. office for a little help.

The annual community T.E.A.C.H. Children's "Wish Tree" has already registered 92 youngsters and continues to register children, infant up to age 12, for Wish Tree gifts.

Through community donations, Christmas gifts are provided for those who qualify and are registered on the Wish Tree.

Registration will be accepted between 8 a.m. and 12 noon, Monday through Friday at the T.E.A.C.H. office, located at 112 East Second Street, Alturas. Proof of income and proof that the child lives with the person who is registering the child, are required at time of registration.

All tags are numbered to keep the child's identity confidential to Wish Tree Christmas gift providers. Wish requests are limited to no more than $30. Anyone who would like to provide a gift for a Wish Tree child, may select any ornament from the Wish Tree. The child's age, sex, sizes and wishes are listed.

Gifts should be returned to the T.E.A.C.H. office by December 18. Families will pick up the gifts on December 19.

For information stop by the T.E.A.C.H., Inc. office lobby at 112 East Second Street, Alturas or call the office at (530) 233-3111, regarding donations toward the Wish Tree.

Please note the T.E.A.C.H. office will be closed through Friday, Nov. 28 and reopen 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tuberculosis Testing needed for cattle

On April 25, 2003, the United States Department of Agriculture removed California from its list of tuberculosis accredited free states because of three TB infected herds found in California. California is now classified as TB modified accredited advanced. This means there are now new TB testing requirement for interstate movement of California cattle.

1. All California breeding cattle, six months of age and older, must have official identification and a negative TB test within 60 days of interstate movement. If they originate from a TB accredited free herd or move directly to slaughter, they are exempt for TB test.

2. Pasture to Pasture Permits: A special agreement will allow cattle moving on a Pasture to Pasture permit up to 12 months from the time the permit is issued to have the cattle TB tested. A new permit will not be issued until this testing requirement is met. The TB test for the Pasture to Pasture movement will be good for three years before it needs to be repeated. The Pasture to Pasture testing requirements apply to cattle 24 months of age and older. There fore, all cattle 24 months of age or older going into Oregon or Nevada on a pasture to pasture permit will be required to be TB tested prior to entry in 2004.

3. The USDA has also made a special waiver for feeder cattle. They are exempt from identification and TB testing if they stay in slaughter channels. The state of destination may have additional requirements, so it is advised to check with them.

4. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection ("health paper") issued by your veterinarian and an import permit from the state of destination are required for most livestock movements.

New ideas sought on local economies

Public comments on social and economic issues and concerns in Northeast California and the northwest corner of Nevada will be the focus of public workshops to be held in Alturas and Cedarville during the first week of December.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is hosting the meetings. The Alturas workshop is Tuesday, December 2, in the meeting room of the Christian Life Center, 225 West B Street. In Cedarville, the session is Wednesday, December 3, in the meeting hall of the Cedarville Community Church, corner of Center and Bonner Streets. Both meetings run from 1 to 4 p.m.

"We want to hear from everyone about the social and economic values and issues that we should be considering as we develop new land use plans for BLM-managed lands," said BLM Alturas Field Manager Tim Burke. Burke said workshop participants will have the opportunity to discuss the social and economic values of the region, to provide in put on the future and direction of land use planning, and to discuss the role that BLM-managed public lands play in reaching community goals.

The planning workshops are part of the BLM's process to develop new land use plans, called Resource Management Plans, for about three million acres of public lands in the region. These plans will guide BLM decisions for the next 10 to 20 years.

For more information on the planning sessions, contact BLM Public Affairs officer Jeff Fontana at (530)233-5332.

Obituaries:

Services for Jim Knauss

A memorial gathering with family and friends of James Wayne Knauss will occur Saturday, November 29, 2003 at 2:30 p.m. at the Alturas Elks Lodge in Alturas, CA

Mr. Knauss, a veteran of the Vietnam War and a resident of Modoc County for most of his life, passed away October 11, 2003 at U.C. Davis Medical Center in Sacramento after falling ill in late August and waging a valiant battle against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Jim had just retired this past December, after more than 22 years of service with the Modoc County Assessor's Office

Jim is survived by his wife Kathy of Alturas and daughter Amber of Santa Barbara and his faithful German Wirehair, Bear, son of Baron. He also leaves a sister, Jane Davis of Sahuarita, Ariz.; brother-in-law, Gary Davis of Pleasant Grove, Calif.; nephew Joe Davis of Pleasant Grove; and niece Carolyn Coker and husband, Jason and their infant son Jacob of Magalia, Calif.; aunt Virginia Griffith of Decatur, IL.; and aunt and uncle Jean and Clyde Booher and family of Decatur, IL.; mother and father-in-law, Emmie and Joe Dees of Alturas, Calif.; sister-in-law Linda Wineland of Chico; brother-in-law Scot Wineland of Chico; niece and nephew Shelley and Trevor Wineland, Chico, Ca.; brother-in-law Eric Dees and wife, Sarah and niece Jennifer Dees of Santaquin, UT.

Katie Frances Nelson

Cedarville native Katie Frances Russell Nelson passed away in Cedarville, Calif. on Tuesday, November 25, 2003. Born December 22, 1903, Mrs. Nelson would have celebrated her 100th birthday next month

Services will be held on Monday, December 1 at 10 a.m. at the Alturas Baptist Church on Fourth Street, Alturas. Burial will follow at the Alturas Cemetery. Pastor Bud Kirk will conduct the services. The Record will publish a complete obituary next week

Minnie Elizabeth Smith

Graveside services for Minnie Elizabeth Smith, 91, of Red Bluff, Ca. will be at 2 p.m. on Thursday, October 9, at Oak Hill Cemetery, with Rev. Susan E. Plucker of St. Peter's Episcopal Church officiating

Mrs. Smith died October 7, 2003, at her daughter's residence. Born May 26, 1912 in Red Bluff, Ca., she attended local schools and lived in Tehama County for many years. She then moved to Plumas and Modoc Counties where she was a homemaker and her husband worked for the County Road Department

Mrs. Smith was preceded in death by her husband Albert Smith, her son Harlan Smith, and grandson Wayne Smith. Her survivors include two daughters, Crystal Stone of Red Bluff and Audrey Stradley of Sacramento; four grandchildren: Cheryl Lance and Sandra Lingenfelter of Red Bluff, Susan McGaughran of Bozeman, Montana, and Becky Roden of Oregon. Arrangements are being handled by Hoyt-Cole Chapel of the Flowers, Red Bluff.

Kenneth Harry Hill

Cedarville native Kenneth Harry Hill, 78, of Sacramento, Calif. passed away November 11, 2003.

Mr. Hill served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for valor, Purple Heart with the Oak Leaf Cluster, Combat Infantry Badge and W.W.II Victory Medal. He retired after 35 years of service with CalTrans.

He is the beloved husband of Gertrude "Gay" Hill for 39 years; loving uncle of Steven and Tracy Nicot, Paul, Tom, Harry Hill and Ginny Macko. He is also survived by several great nieces and nephews.

Lombard & Company Funeral Directors at 1550 Fulton Ave., Sacramento took care of arrangements. Interment was at Riverside National Cemetery, Riverside, Calif. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Kenneth 'Cap' DeWitt

Native Modoc resident Kenneth Gorden "Cap" DeWitt passed away on November 20, 2003 at the Skilled Nursing Facility, Alturas, Calif. Mr. DeWitt was 66 and had lived in Modoc County all his life.

The Rev. Boyd Taylor conducted services on Monday, Nov. 24 at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Mr. DeWitt was born on January 21, 1937, in Cedarville, Calif. to Alfred and Sara (Wright) DeWitt. He was next to the youngest of their 16 children, nine boys and seven girls.

An Alturas resident most of his life, Kenneth wrote songs, enjoyed listening to country music, played guitar for a time in his life. When out walking about in Alturas, he always sported his cowboy hat and boots. He was preceded in death by his father and mother; brothers Ray, LeRoy and Donney; sisters Emma, Marie, and Alfreda "Tiny."

He is survived by his brothers Floyd DeWitt, Pete DeWitt, Bob DeWitt, all of Alturas, Calif.; Eddie DeWitt, Lakeview, Ore.; Bill DeWitt, Acampo, Calif.; sisters, Violet Addington, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; Rose Moritz, Marysville, Calif.; Dorris Addington, Patterson, Calif.; Faye Kellner, Benicia, Calif. and numerous nieces and nephews. He will be missed very much.

Irvin McGarva

Graveside services will be held for Irvin Robert McGarva, Nov. 29, 1 p.m. at the Likely Cemetery. A wake will be held at the Likely Fire Hall, Nov. 28, starting at 5 p.m.

Mr. McGarva died Nov. 25, 2003. He was born Sept., 22, 1934 in Likely. A full obituary will be published next week.

Sports

Modoc miscues give Pierce win

Modoc's football team picked up 13 first downs, Pierce picked up two. The Braves rushed 46 times for 245 yards and Pierce rushed 56 times for 65 yards. Modoc passed for 81 yards and Pierce passed for four yards. Modoc punted just four times, Pierce punted eight.

Who won the game? Pierce, 13-12.

The statistic that ended up mattering most was fumbles. Pierce coughed up the ball, on a very cold night, one time, but recovered its fumble. Modoc fumbled the ball six times, all at crucial times, and lost three to Pierce. It was a tough loss for the Braves, who completely outplayed the Pierce Bears Friday night in the North Section CIF Playoff game. Pierce now goes on to meet Willows in Willows Nov. 26 for the title.

"It just wasn't meant to be I guess, I think the effort was there and we had a lot of kids play really well," said coach Shaun Wood. "We made some mistakes at crucial times and we had some injuries late in the game that hurt us. Overall, I was proud of the team, they played hard all night." The Braves struggled with turnovers and penalties all night, shooting themselves in the foot at least four times in scoring territory.

Modoc looked strong early, stopping the Bears convincingly. The Braves moved the ball well and with 6:06 left in the first, Nick Lowell, who had a career night, broke through and scored from the 40. The point after failed and Modoc led 6-0.

The Braves defense, which played as well as any team in memory, shut down the Bear's usually potent offense the remainder of the first period and all the way through the second.

With just over a minute left in the half, Modoc's Travis Wood tried to hit his receiver and Pierce's Austin Bedart stepped in front, picked off the ball, and took it 21 yards for a touchdown. Pierce's point after was good by Jose Lomelia and Pierce led 7-6 at halftime.

Neither team scored in the third quarter, although Modoc had a couple of chances.

The Braves continued to move the ball in the second half, but could not complete a drive. With about six minutes left in the game, Modoc drove the ball 60 yards to the Pierce seven. Wood, retreated and found Marty Stevens open over the middle for the touchdown. The try for the two-point conversion failed when the Braves fumbled. But Modoc led 12-7 with 4:30 left in the game.

On Pierce's next series, Shiloh Pierce seemed to seal the Braves' win when he picked off a Pierce pass near midfield. Modoc had just over four minutes of clock to kill and had been moving the ball well all night.

"Fumble" would come back to haunt the Braves soon thereafter. The Braves' runner lost the ball and the Pierce defender picked it up and returned it to the Modoc 11. Rich Culp made a touchdown-saving tackle.

Pierce was still unable to move the ball in four plays. But, on one of those plays, Modoc's line anchor, Scott McMasters, sustained a knee injury and went to the sidelines. With McMasters on the bench, his knee in an ice pack, the Bears managed to score when Jake Honsvick took it over from about six inches. They failed on the two-point conversion, but led 13-12 with 1:35 in the game.

Culp set the Braves up in good condition when he took the next kickoff into Pierce territory. Wood hit Shiloh Pierce, who made an outstanding catch to take the ball to the Pierce 25. But Modoc failed to complete on the next four passes and time ran out.

Modoc had several outstanding plays, both on offense and defense, including a great catch by Kyle Madison, deep in Pierce territory and several good runs from Lowell.

Lowell stepped up big for the Braves, rushing the ball 22 times for 196 yards, Pierce carried it 14 times for 27 and Wood eight for 18. Modoc's defense held Pierce's leading rusher, Honsvick to 40 yards on 18 tough carries. Bedart had 30 yards on eight.

Wood was 7-for-17 passing for 81 yards and one interception. Pierce's Wesley Henderson was 1-for-6 passing for four yards and had two picked off by Shiloh Pierce.

Madison led the Brave receivers with two catches for 33 yards, Lowell added two for 24, Pierce two for 17 and Stevens one for seven.

The Braves finished the season at 9-1 with the Shasta Cascade League title. Pierce finished its season at 12-0, but Willows is heavily favored in the title game.

 

December 4, 2003

News

November ends with a splash

The month of November ended with a splash as 1.28 inches of rain deluged Alturas over a three day period and the temperatures bounced all over the place.

There were 16 days in November where some precipitation was measured in Alturas, including three inches of snow on Nov. 3 and snow flurries to end the month. The wettest day was Nov. 29 with 1.07 inches of rain, which fell steadily all day and into the night. That day also had a big swing in temperature, from a high of 50 degrees to a low of 9 degrees. On the last day of the month it was downright balmy, with a high of 45 and a low of 35 degrees.

While it was a wet November with a total of 2.18 inches measured, it did not set a precipitation record, which was set at 3.26 inches in 1988. It was above the average November precipitation of 1.6 inches.

State budget crunch may cause severe local problems

When the new Governor repealed the increase in Vehicle License Fees this month, it sent a shock wave through local government, and that shock has not been eased by recent developments.

In fact, the lack of any concrete proposal from the Governor to backfill those funds is a major cause of concern. Locally, the negative impact could be nearly a million dollars combined for both the county and city. The actual numbers are sketchy because of the uncertainty in Sacramento.

Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell, said he expects a two-thirds cut in December's VLF payment to Modoc. The problem now is the lack of direction or action at the state level.

"The one thing I can say for sure is that if something doesn't break soon, services will be severely impacted," said Maxwell. "We've having trouble keeping up now."

According to Maxwell, he sees the immediate impact as cutting about $500,000 from discretionary funds over the next six months and more from some of the mandated departments. That $500,000 loss comes on top of a loss of a $500,000 Rural Sheriff's Grant which was cut from the state budget this year.

A lot of the new $500,000 loss would impact law enforcement, Maxwell said, but he would try to spread the impacts across the board.

According to City Public Works Director Stacy Chase, the city would be hit hard as well. He said about $168,000 would be lost. That could mean the loss of some services.

There is legislation proposed at the state level to backfill local governments' VLF funds, but just where those funds would come from is in question. Both the City and County are advising local residents to contact their legislators and support backfilling the VLF.

Maxwell said the county is also facing funding crunches concerning the employee health benefits and PERS increases. Maxwell said the county was able to absorb most of the impacts with the last budget, but any new cuts will result in serious ramifications.

"I have advised the Board of Supervisors that if the state doesn't do something by January, we could be facing severe budget deficits and will have to take some action," said Maxwell. "All counties in the state are facing the same issues."

While there appears to be nothing available now that indicates the exact amount of cuts facing local departments, those involving health and social services are listed statewide, and those proposed cuts are about $1.16 billion out of this budget.

While the funded levels are still in flux, Chase said current major city street projects will be on hold. He said a planned Warner Street project, which had been scheduled for this summer, will probably be two years away and an Eighth Street project will probably have to wait for another three years.

The city, meanwhile, said Chase, is trying to do the best it can with available maintenance funding.

Deadline nears for candidates in city, county elections

Friday is the deadline to file nomination papers for local election in Modoc County and the City of Alturas. As of Wednesday, no one had taken out papers to run against either Supervisor Pat Cantrall or embattled Supervisor Willy Hagge.

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison states that Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless have taken out papers to run against Dunn. Cantrall, Hagge and Dunn have taken out papers for re-election. Each term is four years. Hagge faces a conflict of interest with holding both an office on the Hot Spring Irrigation Board and on the Board of Supervisors. A formal decision on that issue has not yet been made by the courts or Department of Justice. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's office. All city incumbents are filing for re-election to their council seats. Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Challengers for City Council are John Schreiber and Steve Iverson. Individuals interested in the city races may pick up papers at City Hall. The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

Supes won't hear Hot Spring request on landowner voting

On Tuesday the Modoc County Board of Supervisor opted not to consider a request concerning Hot Spring Irrigation District and a change in its current voting process.

On September 2, Paul Minasian, an attorney representing District members Lawrence and Sandi Ray, sent a letter requesting the Supervisors address the voting issue, which has also been brought up by the Modoc County Grand Jury. He followed that up with another letter Oct. 14, when the Board did not respond to the first request.

What Minasian is asking for, regarding election issues in the district, is that the Board make a request to the state Assemblyman and Senator that legislation be introduced that will allow all landowners in the district voting rights. That is currently not the case.

In a letter signed by Chairman Mike Dunn, Supervisors expressed concern that: "The Board is concerned that taking up the question at this time might in some way be used to impact the outcome of the litigation and will not consider any Board action until the pending litigations are resolved."

Hot Spring and the Rays are involved in several issues through the courts and the President of the Hot Spring Board is Supervisor Willy Hagge, who is facing a court case and a question of conflict of interest by holding both offices. That issue has not been resolved and the other court cases are in progress. The District is also under investigation by a State Water Resources Agency.

The Dec. 2 letter also states that the Board is aware Minasian represents the Rays in the pending litigation, and states: "The Board believes that if it were to consider requesting legislation at some point in the future, the request for such action should come from a majority of the landowners being served by the Hot Spring Valley Irrigation District."

Whether another request for the voting change will come from members of the district is unknown, but some members have suggested it would be a wise idea. There was no legal reason why the Board could not hear the issue.

The Modoc Grand Jury, in its 2003 report was highly critical of Hot Spring and stressed there has not been a "a contested election in more than 10 years" in the district. The Grand Jury also stressed the district's bylaws were outdated and do not conform to current statutes.

Natural resources seen as way out of an economic doldrum

by Anthony Larson

Special to the Record

Lifting many restrictions and modifying policies and practices on local Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands would go a long way towards reviving the depressed local economy in Modoc County that has been effectively throttled in recent decades by politically correct attitudes. This was the message local residents and officials presented to BLM administrators in a workshop held in Alturas on Tuesday.

Officials and locals gathered for a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) workshop to aid in the ongoing preparation of a Resource Management Plan, the guiding document that sets guidelines and addresses concerns for forest management for BLM administered lands under the direction of the Alturas Field Office.

This meeting focused on the economic and community issues that the plan is designed to address in a geographic area that generally comprises Modoc County. Hosted by Tim Burke, manager of the Alturas Field Office, the meeting was conducted by Merle Anderson and Kristin Warren, representatives of Jones & Stokes, a Sacramento-based firm of environmental consultants contracted to assist in preparation of the plan.

Burke explained that his office had just marked the completion of the first year in the three-year process of developing the new Resource Management Plan, which should be in place by September of 2005. By law, BLM field offices are required to have on file a document that outlines the general goals and objectives for each area. The U.S. Congress recently appropriated funds to create new plans since the present plans are dated by 15 to 20 years.

After a review of revealing economic and demographic data for Modoc County prepared by the Sonoran Institute of Bozeman, Montana, the workshop was thrown open for comment and discussion from attendees. Concerns voiced by local officials as well as representatives of county, state and federal agencies covered the spectrum from the economic impact of BLM policies and practices to prominent environmental issues with regard to forest health and management.

A review of the opinions expressed revealed the following: The prosperity of Modoc County is largely dependent upon its natural resources. To the extent that those can be tapped, the county can prosper. In the past, those resources caused a robust local economy. In the present environmentally correct climate, most of those resources are locked out, causing the economy to dwindle.

County residents resent the influence that Easterners have on forest and land use policies locally. While they believe that outsiders should have some say, they assert that BLM practices should be largely set by local opinion since those who live on the land are most familiar with problems and most likely to find viable solutions

The loss of revenues from local forest timber sales, even though partially replaced by RAC money, cripples the county economy. Logging was once the mainstay of the local economy. As this segment of the economy has dwindled to nearly nothing in recent years, so has the welfare of county residents. It was strongly suggested that current logging restrictions be amended to allow some moderate level of logging, at least, in local forests.

Unwarranted environmental restrictions that prevent grazing on BLM lands cause a considerable loss of income to ranchers. Grazing allotments should be reconsidered to allow better public land use and management. A viable mining industry that once prospered in Modoc County has now vanished to appease environmentalists. "I don't believe we have a mine left in existence," said Patricia Cantrall, county supervisor.

Noxious or invasive weeds concern many who feel that all government forestry agencies, including BLM, fail to properly control them. "Everybody knows noxious weeds are a problem, but I don't think they understand the magnitude of how it's degrading some of our ranges," said one attendee. The acquisition of agricultural land by public agencies, especially state agencies, for purposes other than agriculture was another deep concern. Productive agricultural land is at a premium in the county due to the nature of the terrain. Taking that land out of production to create "wilderness" makes little economic sense and flies in the face of logic since most of the county is already in its natural state because farming is impractical there. Worse still, as often as not, land obtained by government agencies has been poorly managed due to a lack of sufficient maintenance funding, causing management problems for neighboring farmers and defeating the stated purpose for obtaining the land. "The state goes ahead and buys it … and then doesn't manage it!" exclaimed one official.

Attendees were nearly unanimous in their insistence that judicious harvest of juniper, which is rapidly encroaching on former rangeland, for use as biomass could provide an excellent renewable natural resource. Its use would provide new industry and jobs, thus generating considerable income for the county.

Consolidating BLM holdings, which in many cases are scattered in a checkerboard fashion among private lands, would improve management and diminish management costs.

Other concerns mentioned included promoting tourism, creating more interpretive centers, providing better access to recreational opportunities, consideration of tribal rights and public apathy or seeming indifference demonstrated by a lack of participation in workshops and scoping programs.

Tuesday's meeting follows a similar meeting convened by the Susanville Field Office two weeks ago and another that was held in Cedarville on Wednesday. Each of those meetings addressed issues relevant to Resource Management Plans under development in those respective BLM field offices for the particular areas they administer. Together, the three field offices are responsible for management of over three million acres of BLM lands in Northeastern California and Northwestern Nevada.

'Christmas Arts Faire' opens Saturday at Niles Hotel

The historic Niles Hotel will open its doors to the 24th annual Christmas Arts Faire on Saturday, December 6, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Refreshments and door prizes will be included in the holiday atmosphere for the public. New and returning participants will offer their unique selections of hand-crafted home and gift items, all locally made and available for purchase. Photos with Santa will be available upstairs. Niles' Mi Casa restaurant will be open for lunch, with a limited menu for this special event.

Participants and the items they will be bringing to this year's Arts Faire include:

Wendi Lancaster, Alturas: ornaments, wreaths, oil lamps, decorations, wall hangings, gifts.

Penny Leigh-Kendel, Willows and Kelly Crosby, Alturas: gourd birdhouses and Native American style gourd art.

Maxine and Monty Sonnevil, Alturas: beveled glass hangings and ornaments, obsidian birds, sun catchers, bowls, candle holders, salt and pepper shakers.

Duane and Dixie McGarva, Likely: Modoc photographs and cards, birch bark candle holders.

Debbie Campbell, Alturas: wreaths, Christmas decorations, oil lamps, Beta fish bowls, baskets, wall hangings, gifts, potpourri lit jars, dish soap bottles, swags.

Karen Knighton, Alturas: dolls, crocheted lingerie hangers and doilies, beading, infant clothes, potpourri bags, pomanders, bath salts, handmade dog and cat treats, doll plastic bag storage.

Ed and Mae Coronado, Alturas: handmade gemstone jewelry, Indian crafts, hand-crafted and flint-knapped arrows, beaded jewelry, table runners, placemats, napkins.

Diane Mello of her "Mello Meadows" in Adin: Fused glass picture frames and jewelry, plastic jewelry gifts.

Evelyn Rose, Likely: fabric quilts and crafts.

Joy Murphy, Alturas: specialty food items --spaghetti sauce and candies, truffles, suckers, jellies, breads.

Bob McAdams, Madeline: blacksmith items, souvenirs, hand-forged items. Walt and Maureen Nicholson of their "Pine Shadows" in Jess Valley: woodworking--turned bowls, salad paws, wine bottle stoppers, pepper mills, wood scoops, candle holders.

Rochelle Greene, Alturas: soaps.

Elsie Vogt of Likely: watercolor paintings.

Ellen Erickson, and Sheila Jacques, Alturas: stick reindeer, ornaments, potpourri bags, gifts, Christmas decorations and ornaments, spiced tea and cappuccino mocha, soaps, candles.

Leslie Chace, Alturas: children's animal towels, snow people, animal picture frames, hand knit items.

Bonnie Chase of "Warner Mountain Weavers," in Cedarville and Kerry Davis of Alturas: hand wooven chenille scarves and shawls, knit sweaters, hats, and neck warmers, hand woven rugs, hand dyed silk wild rags, books by local authors.

Nanette James, Alturas: photos with Santa, upstairs.

Vicki Hughes of Alturas and Linda Ostoja of Alturas: table runners, placemats, fleece tops, towel angels, hand painted glass crafts.

Jodie Keller, Alturas: Christmas and all occasion candy bouquets. Chris and Laura VanAcker, Alturas: photography and framing.

No reason to be left in the cold

The old adage "nothing in life is free" does not apply to the Home Energy Assistance Program H.E.A.P. for Modoc residents. There's no reason for those who qualify to be left out in the cold, says Peggy Alexander, H.E.A.P. coordinator at the T.E.A.C.H., Inc. office.

Anyone can see if they qualify for the Home Energy Assistance Program. H.E.A.P. provides help with an energy cost of their choice, be it propane, heating oil/kerosene, firewood, electric or pellets. Income eligibility is the only requirement.

"Some people don't believe this program is free. This is not a loan or pay back later program. It really offers something for free," says Alexander. Many Modoc residents have signed up for the program, but there are still H.E.A.P. funds to help others who haven't yet registered. And with winter nearly here, H.E.A.P. assistance can be very valuable to local residents. A sampling of the eligibility guidelines follows for a house hold size of one: monthly income up to $628.32 per month would allow the resident to be awarded a $280 H.E.A.P. payment to cover energy costs. Monthly income up to $812.90 ($230 H.E.A.P. payment); monthly income up to $960.57 (a $193 payment to resident); monthly income: $1,643.33 ($162 payment) and above $1,643.32 (not eligible).

For questions or other household size information, please contact Peggy Alexander at T.E.A.C.H., Inc. at 233-3111, ext. 22. To determine eligibility, and to register, please plan to provide proof of income.

Gift sponsors sought for local hospital residents

Modoc Medical Center's Skilled Nursing Facility has trimmed a Christmas tree in the main lobby of the Modoc Medical Center Acute Hospital, Alturas. The tree is located near the MMC Auxiliary's Gift Shop. Each ornament provides pertinent information such as a hospital resident's name, a list of specific gift suggestions, a list of general gift suggestions and a phone number to aid with any questions.

Gift sponsors are now being sought to help provide the gifts for the Skilled Nursing Facility residents.

Wrapped and labeled gifts should be delivered to the Activity Department in the Skilled Nursing Facility, before the residents' Christmas party. The residents will open their gifts during their Christmas party on Christmas Eve Day, Wednesday, Dec. 24 at 10 a.m.

For further information please contact SNF Activity Director Jeannette Duncan at (530) 233-7057.

Obituaries:

Helen Winset Young

Former Alturas business owner and resident Helen Young passed away on November 26, 2003 of congestive heart failure at a Sparks, Nevada assisted living residence where she had relocated from Healdsburg, five years ago. Owner of the upscale "Clothes Horse," located next to the Niles Hotel in Alturas, she purchased the women's clothing shop from Gladys Woodward. She operated the business with her daughters during the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she made Modoc her home for a 15-year period. Originally from Alberta, Canada, where she was born to Vernia and Mabel (Graham) Winset on July 17, 1918, she finished high school in Healdsburg, Calif. and attended Santa Rosa Junior College. During the war, she worked in San Francisco.

In 1954, she married Milton Young, a helicopter pilot, who was killed in a 1969 helicopter crash on the north slope of Alaska. Mrs. Young was a member of the Santa Rosa Assistance League and St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Alturas. She moved several times during her lifetime, but returned to Modoc County to live several times, where she also had family. She is survived by her daughters Pamela Matherly of Reno, Nev.; Dorothy Ray and husband Ken of Reno, Nev.; Mary Lew Biselli and husband Jim of Carson City; son Jim Young and wife Marcella of Santa Barbara, Calif.; grandchildren Anne Matherly, Nancy Matherly, Will and Matt Matherly and Graham Young; great-grandchildren Arianna and Michael; sister Mary Woodward of Alturas; and brother John Winset of Santa Rosa, Calif. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, a brother Donald Winset and sister Dorothy Quinn.

Inurnment will be next to her husband at the Healdsburg Cemetery.

Irvin McGarva

As the Angels in Heaven cried, on Saturday, November 28, 2003, the family and friends of Irvin McGarva gathered in Likely, California to say their final good-byes to a father, a grandfather, a brother, an uncle, a cousin, a friend and a cowboy.

Irvin was born on September 22, 1934 to Bob and Mary McGarva at Likely, Calif., in what is now called "the old McGarva house." Irvin and his brother Doug would spend their early childhood and part of their teen years with their grandparents, Doug and Maggie McGarva.

Irvin knew early in his life that being a cowboy was what he wanted to aspire to. Not having any horses to ride, Irvin and Doug broke a couple of calves to ride. Then, their neighbor, Rob Flournoy, gave the brothers a horse and started Irvin on his way to becoming a Horse Breaker. He would break horses for most of the ranches in the South Fork Valley and Jess Valley. Irvin's passion for work teams, whether feeding cows in the winter or putting up loose hay in the summer, stayed with him all his life. He would often say that the tractor was the worst thing to come to the South Fork Valley, eliminating the need for beloved work horses.

Irvin would travel down a lot of different roads during his time; in the early years, working on almost every ranch in the South Fork and Jess Valley. He enjoyed competing in rodeos, saddle broncs being his favorite event. He was also a very good and fast team roper. He was a member of the Likely Roping Club. Irvin was awarded the All-Around saddle at the Likely Rodeo in 1957. Irvin competed in rodeos for quite a few years.

Traveling down different roads later in his life, he would become a logger, a truck driver and a buckaroo, just to name a few.

Whatever the task at hand may have been, he always gave 100 percent and put a great deal of pride into his work.

The road he traveled down the farthest and one which was probably the bumpiest, was being a father. And being a father was what he did best. Irvin enjoyed telling his children, grandkids and friends stories of the good old days; When the work teams were used to feed and hay with; When you heard names like Pistol, Deep Canyon and Indian Special at the Likely Rodeo.

There was a special place in his heart for his granddaughter Willow, now age 16. Her achievements in the 4-H Livestock show ring filled his heart with pride. His children would often kid him about being the oldest 4-H member still attending 4-H events.

Irvin will be missed very much. He was preceded in death by his parents Robert McGarva and Mary McMullen; brother Doug McGarva; sister Janice (McGarva) Tarp; sons William Robert, Quirt Jerome and Casey Eugene.

He is survived by his children Ernie McGarva, Likely, Calif., Ervalee McGarva, Medford, Ore., Geraldine McGarva, Oravada, Nev., Milton "Yogi" McGarva, Likely, Calif., Russ McGarva, Reno, Nev., Dewey McGarva and daughter-in-law Marci, Likely, Calif.; brothers John McMullen, Lovelock, Nev., Kenny McMullen and sister-in-law Judy, Reno, Nev.; grandchildren, Willow McGarva, Greely Bautista and Aurelia Bautista, Oravada, Nev., Ricky McGarva and Joey, Likely, Calif., Sterling and Jordan McGarva, Battle Mountain, Nev., Sammie McGarva, Klamath Falls, Ore., Hezzie McGarva, Tuscarora, Nev., Canika McGarva, Elko, Nev., Trish Trinyion, Medford, Ore., Charlie McGarva, Ariz.; cousins Velma McCrary, Canby, Calif., Kenneth McGarva and Duane McGarva, Likely, Calif.

Funeral Services were held at the Likely Fire Hall on Saturday, November 28.

Bill Flournoy did the officiating. John Flournoy and Patricia Cantrall sang. Irvin's last ride was behind a team of Belgian work horses.

Two kind and gentle giants carrying a kind and gentle giant of a man home. I will miss you and loved you with will all my heart. -- By Milton "Yogi" McGarva.

Katie Frances Nelson

Cedarville native Katie Frances Nelson passed away in Cedarville, Calif. on Tuesday, November 25, 2003.

Born Kitty Frances Russell to Harry and Ella (Beebe) Russell in Cedarville, Calif. on December 22, 1903, Katie, as she was known throughout the years, would have celebrated her 100th birthday next month. Her father was born in Pennsylvania and traveled over Donner Pass in a covered wagon. From Sacramento, her mother traveled across Goose Lake to Cedarville. Katie's parents moved from Cedarville when they bought a place at Dry Creek Basin. Katie stayed in Alturas with a family while she was attending high school in Alturas.

For over 63 years, Mrs. Nelson was active in the Native Daughters of the Golden West, Alturas Parlor 159 and was recently recognized as a life member. She had been a member of the Cedarville and Alturas Order of Eastern Star since the 1970s and was a 35-year member of Pythian Sisters (affiliated with Knights of Columbus) in Alturas.

Mrs. Nelson was chief operator for the Phone Company for 33 years with Public Utilities which later became Citizens Utilities in Alturas. She retired at age 65 from Beaver State Phone Company in Lakeview, Oregon.

During the late 1930's, when she was working the phone company night shift from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., two nights a week her daughter Wilma would accompany her, so as not to be home alone. When World War II began, Wilma teamed up to help her mother route the calls during especially busy times.

Fond of roses, Mrs. Nelson's Alturas home was surrounded by her favorite flowers. She was an avid hunter and enjoyed fishing. Her hunting expeditions took her to Alaska to hunt caribou, Canada for moose, Oregon for elk, Idaho for deer and elk and California for deer.

She is survived by her sister Mable Teschner of Fredricksburg, Texas; daughter Wilma Waterman of Alturas, Calif.; two grandsons, George and Robyn Waterman of Hayward, Calif.; Don and Sue Waterman of Davis Creek, Calif.; three great-grandsons: Robert Waterman of Modesto, Calif., Doug and Shawna Waterman of Alturas, Calif. and James Waterman, currently serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army; great-granddaughter Jennifer and husband Jack Montgomery of Alturas, Calif. and five-great-great grandchildren, several nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by an infant son, Walter; brothers Charlie, Art, Jess and Bill Russell and a sister Lucille.

Services were held on Monday, December 1 at 10 a.m. at the Alturas Baptist Church. Pastor Bud Kirk, Pastor Curtis Barber, Ray Sweet and Native Daughters of the Golden West were participants in conducting the service. Graveside services were conducted at the Alturas Cemetery by the Order of Eastern Star, Alturas. Pallbearers were Raymond Sweet, Bruce Mix, Lynn Harris, Roy Moore, Dwight Beeson and Bill McMaster.

Alice M. Combs

Former Surprise Valley resident Alice M. Combs, 87, of Klamath Falls, Ore. passed away Nov. 19, 2003, at Carmelita Hudson's Care Home there. Services were held at 11 a.m. Monday at Davenport's Chapel of the Good Shepherd in Klamath Falls, with Lowell Stidolph and Sandy Denning officiating with interment at the Parkview Cemetery in New Plymouth, Idaho on Nov. 28.

Born Alice M. Vogt on Aug. 4, 1916, in Nyssa, Idaho, she was raised in Fruitland, Idaho, and New Plymouth.

A gentle, kind and quiet person, she never missed a detail and often surprised her family with what she knew and remembered.

Married to Manford "Mack" Combs on July 20, 1938, they farmed for many years in New Plymouth and moved to Caldwell, Idaho in the early 60s, where Mrs. Combs served others as a nurse's aide in nursing homes for 18 years, retiring in 1975.

Mrs. Combs was active for 71 years in a worldwide Christian fellowship. She loved to cook, write poetry and hymns. She enjoyed traveling, camping and keeping up her flower garden.

Survivors include her daughters and sons-in-law Ruth Ann and Tom Lake of Lake City, Calif., Kathie and Charlie Vaughn of St. George, Utah; brother and sisters-in-law, Alvin and Janet Vogt of Boise, Howard and Betty Vogt of Salem; five grandchildren, Jim and Lora Lake of Klamath Falls, Dan and Jolene Lake of Walla Walla, Wash., Jenny Vaughn of Colorado Springs, Colo., Tom Vaughn of Austin, Tex., and Helena Castaneda of Albuquerque, N.M.; five great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. She also leaves a host of friends; nurse Sandy Darger; caregivers Carmelita Hudson, Dr. Lois Roberts and Dr. Blake Berven. Mrs. Combs had been a resident at Surprise Valley Hospital for a short time. She was preceded in death by her husband, her brother, Herman Vogt, three nephews and two nieces.

Memorial contributions may be made to Surprise Valley Community Hospital in Cedarville or to a charity of choice.

Lucille Doris McKinnon

Alturas resident Lucille Doris McKinnon, who worked as Modoc National Forest purchasing agent until her retirement in the late 1980s, passed away November 20, 2003 in Alturas, Calif.

Just 10 days shy of her 81st birthday, Mrs. McKinnon had enjoyed the last five years living with her daughter Carol Adams in Alturas.

Born Lucille Doris Ehrlich on November 30, 1922 in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, she graduated from Scottsbluff High School. Raised in Nebraska, she moved to California when she was 19 or 20.

She had some nursing training, but worked in Aerospace industry for many years, where she also met her husband Milton H. McKinnon. The two were married on New Year's Day in 1945 in Los Angeles, Calif. Mrs. McKinnon was a purchasing agent for Edwards Air Force Base outside Lancaster, Calif. When Milton retired, they made their move to Modoc County, where she worked as a purchasing agent with Modoc National Forest for over 10 years, until she retired in 1987. She cared for her husband until he preceded her in death on April 18, 1993.

Active in the Alturas community, she loved to bowl and was a good golfer. She was also an avid reader and a member of the Women of the Moose Lodge, serving as their secretary/treasurer for many years. She also served as secretary for the Koffee Kats Bowling League in Alturas and was a member of the Lutheran Church here. She had a soft spot in her heart for animals--dogs, cats, birds and deer -- and enjoyed crocheting.

At her advance request, no services will be held. Her family will miss her greatly.

Mrs. McKinnon is survived one son and two daughters: her son Steve A. McKinnon, wife Roxanne and their son Sean A. McKinnon of Startup, Wash. Daughter Trudy J. McKinnon of Grand Junction, Colo. and her children son David Michael Clark, wife Cathy and their children Steven J. Mantovani, Mickey (James Michael Clark), and his daughter Jennifer Clark of Grand Junction, Colo. Trudy's daughter Deidre Marcia Haley, husband John and their sons Keith, Johnny and Brandon of Roseburg, Ore. Daughter Carol S. Adams of Alturas, Calif. and her children Eric S. McKinnon and wife Litz of Yokosuka, Japan; Dean A. Widener, wife Melanie of Sherwood, Ore.; and Christine R. Breese, husband James and their daughters Candice and Haylie, and son Kaylen of Elkhart, Indiana; Mrs. McKinnon's brother Marvin Erhlich, wife Joan who reside near Gorman, Calif. and their three children Cathy, Gail and Glen and six grandchildren in California and Washington.

Memorial contributions may be directed to Alzheimers Research Foundation, 2065 West El Camino Real, Suite C, Mountain View, Calif. 94040.

Eletha Jean Mackey

Described as a very friendly and outgoing woman, Eletha Jean Mackey spent most of her adult life in Santa Rosa, until she moved to Modoc County six and a half years ago. She and her husband Bill were devoted to one another and enjoyed life together.

Mrs. Mackey, 72, passed away on November 22, 2003 in Alturas, Calif. Born Eletha Jean Taylor in Vallejo, Calif. on July 19, 1931, she graduated from Petaluma High School, Petaluma, Calif. She worked at the Post Exchange "PX" Presidio Army Base in San Francisco earlier in her life. She married William W. Mackey in Reno, Nevada on August 10, 1963. While her children were young, she was active in the Parent Teacher Association in Santa Rosa, Calif., in addition to being a wonderful domestic engineer, wife and mother. She enjoyed the spectator side of horse racing in Santa Rosa, was a fan of singer Kenny Rogers and enjoyed attending his concerts. She also had a passion for cooking and gardening.

She is survived by her husband William Mackey of Alturas, Calif.; daughter Cindy Kleman of Blaine, Wash.; son Marshall Caston; daughter Katie Cahill of Calif.; daughter Lisa Mackey of Santa Rosa, Calif.; stepson Richard Sullivan; brother and sister-in-law Charles and Mary Catherine (Bunny) Tayor of Alturas, Calif. and several grandchildren.

Private family services will be held at a future date.

Contributions in Mrs. Mackey's memory may be directed to the Alzheimer's Research Fund, 2065 West El Camino Real, Suite C, Mountain View, Calif. 94040.

Sports

Joyce ninth at state meet, on to regionals

Modoc's Scott Joyce placed ninth at the California State Cross Country Meet in his division and qualified for the Far Western Regional Cross Country Championships in Walnut Creek Dec. 6. Joyce, a junior, is the first Modoc runner to qualify for the regional meet.

The regional meet brings together the top runners from Hawaii, Alaska, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California.

Coach Don Mason said Joyce followed his advice, and instead of relying on a strong kick, he kept pace with the leaders the entire race. He clocked a 16:37 over a tough 3.1 mile course in Fresno. Five of the eight runners who finished ahead of Joyce were seniors.

Freshman Danielle Moriarity also got a good taste of state competition and placed 100th out of 141 runners in the girls' division. Mason said Moriarity had a case of jitters, looking at the level of competition. But he said it was a good learning experience for Moriarity and she will be able to build on her success over the next three years. She'll keep an eye on being in the top 10 in the state by her junior year.

Mason said the team seems to have a bright future and if he succeeds in attracting more runners, the Braves could be real contenders for a section championship next year in both the girls and boys division.

Brave grapplers aim to repeat as league, section champs

About the only thing that will keep the Modoc Braves wrestling team from winning another Shasta Cascade League and North Section Small Schools wrestling championship is injuries.

The Braves travel to Chester this weekend for a tournament and will play host to its major tournament next weekend.

Modoc has won nine of the last 10 section titles and has plenty of returning wrestlers from last year's second place Masters Tournament team. The Masters includes all schools in the North Section.

Modoc is ranked third in all schools in the North Section, and has the top ranking in small schools.

Ranked wrestlers include Cory Bell, Jason Jones, Travis Wood, Joey Catania and Luke Hammerness.

The Braves are solid with returners Jaafar Mirholi, Brad Bell, Joey Catania, Mark Main, Ryan Carithers, Scott Buchanan, Brian Weed, Nick Hawes, Ian Jacques, Jared Cox, John Yeier and Blake Owens.

There will be some good help from newcomers out this year including Samantha Brush, Sheridan Crutcher, Bill Hammerness, Chris Houghtby, Louis Alvarez, Lenny Gladu, Jesse Harer, Hank Raabe, Nathan Book and Martin Corn.

Coach Shaun Wood, in his 15th season, said the team's experience will be a factor and the team is very strong in the middle to upper weights. He looks for his lighter wrestlers to improve.

In some weights, Wood exh other for tournament titles. The teams from Trinity and Mt. Shasta could be a bump in the road for the Braves, but Wood expects to win his fifth straight league title. The SCL wrestling loop also includes Tulelake, Big Valley, Fall River, Bishop Quinn, Burney and Etna. Last year was Modoc's best, in a long series of highly successful years. Wood runs a very popular youth wrestling program in the middle and elementary school levels which works as a good feeder into the high school. Wood fully expects more than one of his wrestlers to qualify for the state finals this year.

Braves open at Block F today

The Modoc Braves basketball teams open with the Block F tournament at Fall River High School today and play through Saturday.

Coach Mike Martin said he honestly doesn't see a weak spot in the Braves roster this year, but would have liked more than a couple of days to get the team ready for the opener.

"Actually, some of the players just started, because of the football playoffs, so we haven't had any real time for work," aid Martin. "But we look fine, it's just going to take us awhile to jell."

The Braves have Cam Jeffers, Shiloh Pierce, Marty Stevens, Zack McKirahan, Skyler Oats, Raf Sevilla and Bob Martinez coming back from last year. Juniors on the squad are Kyle Madison, K.C. Kirkreit, Cory Funk, Clint Nardoni, Ross Montague and sophomore Micah Eppler. "We're going to be tough inside and we have people who can shoot the ball well," said Martin. "I feel very comfortable with who we have and we just have to put the puzzle pieces together. We're no where near ready for Thursday night, but I feel good about offense, defense and rebounding areas. We just really don't have an area I'm worried about at this point." While the starting lineup is in flux, it probably will feature Jeffers, Pierce, McKirahan, Stevens, with Madison and Eppler also on the list. Martin feels he has nine players who will have plenty of playing time.

Modoc gets to face the North Section champions from last season, always powerful Liberty Christian, to open the Block F, Martin said it is a tough draw, but the Braves will be ready.

Modoc will be busy this next five days, with three games in Fall River, Dec. 8 home against Lakeview and Dec. 9 at Lost River. The Portola tournament is Dec. 11-13 and the Block M is scheduled Dec. 18-20.

Cedar Pass Ski Park has work day

Cedar Pass Ski Park will be having a work party and meeting on Sunday, December 7 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the ski hill.

Mt. Shasta Ski Park has donated many more rental skis and boots that need to be organized, and the rope tow and t-bar need annual maintenance. It takes many volunteers to ensure the smooth operation of this wonderful asset to Modoc County.

Anyone interested in volunteering or helping at the ski hill this year should try to be there. If you can't make it on Sunday, please contact Chris Knoch at 640-2682 or 233-4552 to leave a message.

December 11, 2003

News

State Water Board finds Hot Spring in violation of its licenses

The State Water Resources Control Board has found Hot Spring Valley Irrigation District in violation of its licenses. The District has 20 days to respond to the report.

The SWRCB has notified the District that it plans to issue a Cease and Desist order (CDO) against the district following a years'-long investigation into several complaints. The initial complaints were filed in 2001 by local ranchers Lawrence and Sandi Ray and other complaints followed from ranchers in Big Valley.

The Water Board states it is considering the CDO because: the release of water from storage in Big Sage Reservoir, pursuant with agreements with PG&E, Big Valley Ranches and Big Valley Water Users Association, violates the terms and conditions of Licenses 9722 and 9723, which limit the purpose and place of use of the water to irrigation within the District's boundary.

The second reason for the CDO states: "Diversion to storage in Big Sage Reservoir past the authorized collection season constitutes an unauthorized diversion."

The third cause for the CDO is: diversion to storage in Big Sage Reservoir that may adversely affect the rights of prior right holders downstream constitutes a threatened unauthorized diversion because licenses 9722 and 9723 only authorize appropriation of unappropriated water as defined under Water Code section 1201.

The fourth reason states that the operation of the Cummings, McArthur and Mohr Dams constitutes a threat of unauthorized diversion by the District if natural flows are present and not bypassed.

The Water Board also states that the District does not monitor, measure or record the flow of water in Rattlesnake Creek as it enters Big Sage and that the District's efforts to "monitor, measure and record storage in and releases from Big Sage are inadequate because they lack accuracy and real-time value."

"Without adequate information regarding flows in Rattlesnake Creek, the District cannot substantiate that it is operating Big Sage Reservoir within the terms and conditions of its licenses and that it is not violating the rights of downstream prior-right holders," the report states.

The Water Board also states that Hot Spring does not have the records or specific information on the natural flows in Rattlesnake Creek and the Pit River and the quantity of water released from Big Sage, and cannot substantiate its claim "that it is only regulating the flow of water released from storage in Big Sage Reservoir with its operation of the three dams along the Pit River (Cummings, McArthur and Mohr Dams). In addition, the District does not monitor, measure or record the flow of water in the Pit River at those dams."

The report also states that Hot Spring's licenses define 10,000 acres within a gross area of 15,292 as irrigated. "Upon request, the District was unable to provide a map depicting the lands within the District's boundary that are currently being irrigated pursuant to the District's water rights," the state said.

The CDO would require that the District refrain from releasing water outside its boundaries until a new permit, change order or transfer order is obtained from the SWRCB and to stop collecting water in Big Sage after April 30 without proper authorization and when required, to bypass the natural flow in Rattlesnake Creek as necessary to satisfy the need for downstream prior-right holders.

In addition, the District could be ordered to submit a monitoring plan acceptable to SWRCB within 180 days from the CDO that provides for adequate monitoring, measurement, and recording of the natural flow and storage releases from Big Sage and downstream through Cummings, McArthur and Mohr dams to show compliance with the District's water rights.

Also, within 90 days, the District will have to formally notify its members that it is unable to guarantee that downstream correlative rights are being satisfied and that each individual diverter within the District is responsible to insure that their diversions are reasonable and not excessive in light of the needs of downstream water right holders.

The District had argued all along that it was not "selling" water to PG&E or the other entities, but was merely "abandoning" that water. The state says that argument "is not persuasive" and it "does not appear there is any intent by the District to 'abandon' the water. . . the intent is to deliver to PG&E so that PG&E may generate hydroelectric power." That use violates the Hot Spring license.

"If the District has water to abandon, particularly when its reserves in Big Sage Reservoir are low, and the District's members have received less water than requested during the irrigation season, the Division (Water Board) should re-evaluate the District's need for water under its appropriative right," the report states.

On the issue concerning a dam pulling program, where several of the Hot Spring dam owners were paid by Big Valley Ranches, the state is finding that although two members of the Hot Spring Board, including president Willy Hagge, and a part-time employee were paid, there is no evidence they were acting on behalf of the District. The state does say that although it appears that "unauthorized releases" were made from Big Sage Reservoir immediately following the dam-pulling project, evidence is lacking that the District actually released water from storage to support the project.

In the issue concerning the ownership of the Rattlesnake Creek Dam on the Ray's property, the state says it has no evidence showing the District owns the dam, and that issue is now before the Modoc Superior Court. The SWRCB said it will not make any finding. The report does state that the Rattlesnake Dam appears to have been built prior to the District formation. The state also finds that neither Eddie or Cindy Mohr have violated any downstream water user rights.

The SWRCB is also recommending that a Watermaster district be formed throughout the upper Pit River watershed and that a local water agency be formed to oversee diversion and use of water in areas including Big Valley, Hot Spring Valley, the South and North Forks of the Pit River and all tributaries. .

Races now set for March primary in local offices

Only one candidate will go unopposed in the March primary election, County Supervisor Pat Cantrall in District Three.

With the deadlines passed, all races are set according to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison.

Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless are challenging District Two Supervisor Mike Dunn. District Four's Willy Hagge is being challenged by Canby rancher Ray Anklin. Each term is four years.

Hagge is still fighting a conflict of interest where he refuses to resign as President of the embattled Hot Spring Valley Irrigation District. That district was notified last week by the State Water Resources Control Board that it intends to issue a Cease and Desist Order against it based on past activities.

Hagge is also facing an action before the State Department of Justice alleging a conflict of interest. A decision in that case has not yet been made.

All city incumbents are filing for re- election to their council seats. Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Challengers for City Council are John Schreiber and Steve Iverson. The final day to register to vote in the March primaries is Feb. 16.

City will drop planning contract with county

The Alturas City Council voted Tuesday night to notify Modoc County that it is planning on terminating its agreement for planning services.

Currently, the City puts up about $40,000 annually to pay for services from County Planning staff and Planner Scott Kessler. Under the agreement, the city has to give the county six month notice before pulling out of that contract. The contract, if the city notifies the county, will expire on July 1. While the Council wasn't specific, the plan may be to place the planning services of the city under the City Public Works Department.

Part of the issue stems from possible cuts in funding from the state because of the current fiscal crisis as a well as no guarantee of vehicle license fee backfill from the state. The city is preparing for a decrease in overall funding from the state.

The City also approved a request from Thrifty Payless Inc., Rite Aid, to make a finding of "Public Convenience or Necessity" so that an Off-Sale alcoholic beverage license could be issued to Rite Aid by the State. Kessler told the council that Rite Aid has not made its final determination on locating in Alturas, on property at Fifth and Main Streets, but is getting all of its ducks in a row.

Kessler said he expects a decision in the near future, one way or the other.

Obituaries:

Mary Marie Ford

Mary Marie Ford, a resident of Modoc County since 1946, passed away of natural causes on December 4, 2003, at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif. A homemaker, mother, grandmother and a wonderful cook, Mrs. Ford will be greatly missed by her family

Born Mary Marie Herrick in Keno, Oregon on May 7, 1926, she married Roy E. Ford on May 11, 1942 in Emmett, Idaho, where they lived while their children were young. The family relocated to Modoc County in 1946, where they put down roots for the next 57 years.

Regarded as a wonderful cook and homemaker, Mrs. Ford cooked for the whole family and loved taking care of her children and grandchildren. An avid reader, she especially enjoyed mysteries and romantic novels and loved doing ceramics. Later in life, she enjoyed watching television.

She is survived by her sons Jim and wife Barbara Ford of Emmett, Idaho; son John and wife Charlotte Ford of Alturas, Calif.; daughter Barbara Aristo and husband Don of Emmett, Idaho and daughter-in-law Cheryl Ford of Alturas, Calif. Her grandchildren include Jim and Barbara's children: Gary Ford of Nampa, Idaho, Wendy Renfro and Holly Elliott of Horseshoe Bend, Idaho and Andrew Ford of Emmett, Idaho. John and Charlotte's children: John, Jr. of Reno, Nevada; Katina Ford of Sacramento; Tiffany Ford of Alturas, Calif. David's and Cheryl's children: Robert Watson, Boise, Idaho; Heather Northrup, Alturas, Aaron Ford, U.S. Navy, Hilary Ford of Alturas, but currently abroad. Barbara and Don's children: Brandon Aristo and Jordan Aristo of Emmett, Idaho. Mrs. Ford also leaves half-sisters Beverly Kaltsokis of Crescent City, Calif. and Shirley Nealey of Powers, Oregon

She was preceded in death by three of her children, sons Ken Ford and David Ford and daughter Janet and husband Roy of 46 years, on October 4, 1988

Pastor Rod Bodmer of Faith Baptist Church, Alturas, officiated services at graveside at the Alturas Cemetery on Monday, December. 8. Mrs. Ford was 77.

Services were by Kerr Mortuary of Alturas.

Barbara Rae Slinkard

Services for Barbara Rae Slinkard will be held Friday, Dec. 12 at 2 p.m. at the Federated Church in Alturas. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the service.

Mrs. Slinkard, 82, passed away at her Alturas home on December 9, 2003. She was a native of Lake City, Calif., born Barbara Rae Hobbs on November 16, 1921. An obituary will be published in a future issue.

Phoebe Coffer Young

Funeral services for Phoebe Rachael Coffer Young, 101, will be held Saturday, Dec. 13 at 2:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Lakeview, Ore. Rev. Van Culpepper will officiate. Interment at the Westside Cemetery to be private. A luncheon reception will follow at the Eagle Lodge at approximately 4 p.m. Ousley Osterman Huffstutter Funeral Chapel has charge of arrangements

Mrs. Young, daughter of Leatha Parlee Dorris and Elliott Vanburen Coffer, passed away December 6, 2003 at Lake District Hospital, Lakeview, Ore.

Ava Jo Harden

Alturas native Ava Jo Harden passed away unexpectedly at her home in Alturas on December 9, 2003. Born Ava Jo McGhee in Alturas, Calif. on November 2, 1927, Mrs. Harden was 76

An obituary will be published in a future issue. Service arrangements are pending. Jacqueline

'Jackie' O. Collis

Jacqueline "Jackie" Olive Collis, 81, passed away in Alturas, Calif. on Monday, December 8, 2003. Pastor Destry Campbell will officiate graveside services on Friday, Dec. 12 at 11 a.m. at Alturas Cemetery.

Mrs. Collis was born in Seattle, Washington on July 13, 1921. Services are being arranged by Kerr Mortuary. A complete obituary will be published in a future issue.

Sports

Wrestlers win Chester invite, host big tourney here this weekend

While Modoc coach Shaun Wood said the lack of overall conditioning showed up at the Chester tournament this last weekend, it didn't keep the Braves from winning the championship by over 50 points.

The Braves will host what has grown to be one of the top wrestling tournaments in the north state this weekend at the Griswold Gym. Wrestling starts about 2 p.m. Friday and goes through about 8 p.m. and then will start again at 9 a.m. Saturday and run until about 9 p.m. Modoc has five of the top ranked North Section wrestlers (ranked by MaxPreps) coming to the tournament with 22 other ranked wrestlers also invading town.

' The Braves are not sneaking up on anyone any longer, having placed second in the large schools tournament last year. They come into the second week of this season ranked number two in all school in the north section and clearly at number one in small schools. The large school ranking has Red Bluff first, then Modoc, Willows, Shasta and Sutter following. The Small Schools rankings are in order: Modoc, Durham and Mt. Shasta'.

Modoc's tournament will have most of the top overall teams in the section and area, including: Anderson, Bishop Quinn, Burney, Carson City, Central Valley, Chester, Corning, Etna, Fall River, Foothill, Klamath Union, Lakeview, Lassen, Mazama, Modoc, Mt. Shasta, North Valley, Portola and Tulelake.

The top ranked wrestlers coming to Modoc are: 119-pound Michael Young, Burney; 125-pound Tyler Singh, Lassen; 152-pound Luke Hammerness, Modoc; 171-pound Jake Baldwin, Foothill; and heavyweight Schuyler Wilson, Central Valley.

Other ranked wrestlers participating in the Modoc tourney are: Cory Bell, Modoc, number two at heavyweight; Brett Cox, Lassen, number three and Joey Catania, Modoc, number 6 at 215; Nate Call, Corning, number two and Caleb Jackson, Burney, number three at 189; Cisco Bobadilla, Corning, number two, Brandon Burns, Mt. Shasta, number five, and Zach Osborne, Central Valley, number six at 171; Jason Jones, Modoc, number four at 160; Carl Borba, Mt. Shasta, number six, 152; John Luscombe, Tulelake, number two, Travis Wood, Modoc, number three, and Robert Johnson, Corning, number six, 145; Timmy Singh, Lassen, number three, 140; Dale Sakuma, Foothill, number four, Jaafar Mirholi, Modoc, number five, 135; Warren Jones, Lassen, number two and Trevor Smith, Central Valley, number four, 130; Rogelia Garcia, Tulelake, number three, Jason Post, Foothill, number six, 125; Trevor Brunelli, Foothill, number three and Juan Ruiz, Corning, number four, 103.

The Braves won the Chester tournament with 212 points, far ahead of Lassen with 154.5, Central Valley with 129, Gridley with 122, Mt. Shasta with 96, Etna 92, Live Oak 78, Burney 62, Trinity 58.5, Wheatland 56.5, Chester 51.5, Tulelake 49.5, American Christian 46.5, Quincy 42, Modoc II 35, Portola 30, Point Arena 19, Biggs 12, Fall River 7 and Bishop Quinn 7. "I was very pleased with how we did," said coach Shaun Wood. "We saw where we need to work, primarily on conditioning and cleaning up some technique. The Chester tournament was much tougher than I thought it would be, so I'm glad we were able to win it. It was a good start."

Modoc had three individual champions at Chester. Jaafar Mirholi won the 135-pound division, Luke Hammerness won the 152-pound class and Jason Jones took the 160-pound division.

Taking second place for the Braves were: Travis Wood at 145, Brad Bell at 189, Joey Catania at 215 and Cory Bell at heavyweight.

Mark Main took a third at 171 and Brian Weed took a fourth at 119.

Braves varsity boys open season at 4-1

Modoc's varsity boys have started strong for the season, winning four of their first five games and head to the Portola tournament tonight. Modoc's Block M tournament is next weekend.

"We're playing well, and the win against Lost River was one of the best since I've been coaching the boys," said Mike Martin. "We trailed most of that game, but just wouldn't go away and pulled it out at the end. We also played well enough against Liberty Christian in the opening game to win it, just missed tons of inside shots."

Tuesday night, the Braves beat Lost River 45-40, but trailed up until the final three minutes. Lost River led 12-9 after one and 20-19 at halftime. The teams each added 11 in the third and Modoc won it with 15 points in the fourth, holding the Raiders to nine. Marty Stevens led the scoring with 16 and Cam Jeffers added 11.

Monday night the Braves beat a good Lakeview team 77-61 after the Honkers came out blazing in the first period. Lakeview led 21-19 after one, but the Braves to a 36-31 lead by half. Modoc outscored Lakeview 20-17 in the third and 21-13 in the fourth. Stevens led with 22, Zach McKirahan added 19 and Jeffers had 11.

The Braves won the consolation bracket in the Block F last weekend in Fall River, beating Burney 57-48. Modoc opened with a 10-4 first period lead, but Burney went up 26-21 by the break. The Braves took a 35-30 lead after three and outscored Burney 22-18 in the fourth. McKirahan had 22 and Stevens 21.

Modoc whipped Weed 57-49 in their second game of the tourney, taking a 10-9 first quarter lead and going up 32-28 by half. The Braves led 41-32 after three and added 16 in the fourth to Weed's 17. Stevens had 20 points and McKirahan added 13.

Modoc's only loss of the week came in the Block F opener against Liberty Christian, 50-40. Liberty went up 15-2 before Modoc got on line in the first period. By halftime, the Patriots held a 25-21 lead and after three led 35-31. Micah Eppler had 16 and McKirahan added nine. Stevens and McKirahan were named All-tourney.

Brave JV boys 3rd at Fall River, hit road

Modoc's junior varsity basketball team placed third in the Block F Tournament last weekend in Fall River. This weekend they travel with all teams to the Portola Tournament.

The Braves opened with a 45-25 win over Liberty Christian. They led 6-4 after one, and 16-7 by half. They carried the momentum to a 33-16 lead after three. Taylor Dunn led the scoring with 13.

Modoc lost the second game to Trinity, in a close contest, 36-39. The score was knotted at 8-8 in the first and Modoc led 17-15 by half. Trinity took a 23-21 lead after three. Ross Burgess led with 20 points and Dunn added six. The Braves won the third place game against Fall River 45-30. They led 11-6 after one and 22-17 at halftime. The game was close through three with Modoc leading 33-28. Burgess led with 17 and Zeke Bonham and Dunn added eight each. Burgess and Dunn were named to the All-tourney team. The Braves lost to Lakeview 54-39 Monday night in a game that was close through three. The Braves trailed 10-9 after one and led 21-20 at the half mark. Lakeview led 33-29 after three. Dunn led the scoring with 13 and Burgess had eight.

Tuesday night the Braves lost a close game to Lost River 49-43. They trailed 11-10 in the first but held a 23-22 lead at half. Lost River got up 40-31 at the end of three. Burgess had 20 points and Bonham added 11

"We're short players right now and we're still putting things together," said coach Bunk Richardson. "But I think we'll be fine."

Joyce runs in regionals

Modoc junior Scott Joyce placed 143 out of 237 runners at the West Regionals Cross Country race in Walnut, Ca., Dec. 6.

Joyce chose to run in the seeded race and found himself in the middle of the pack, boxed in for much of the race. Only the top eight finishers from that race qualify for the Nationals. Joyce's time over the course was 17:33. Joyce figures he'll use this experience as a tool to post a better time at sections next year for a better seeding.

Modoc JV girls lose a pair

Modoc's junior varsity girls started with a 48-30 loss to Lakeview Monday in their opening game, but came back from some jitters early. The girls travel to Portola today for a tournament.

The Braves let Lakeview up 21-2 in the first period, but fought back to get within five. Rachel Crosby had seven points and Jessie Harden added six. Coach Bill Hall said freshmen Tacie Richardson, Megan Thompson and Kelly Campagna all added in the comeback effort.

Tuesday, the Braves lost to Lost River 36-31 in a good game. Lost River trailed most of the night, but when Modoc got into foul trouble late, Lost River hit 11-of-16 free throws to take the lead. The Braves committed 29 fouls in the game. Alysha Northrup had nine points and Crosby added six.

Hall said he is pleased with the team's overall effort on defense and expects their shooting to come around.

December 18, 2003

News

City considers change in public works, planning

The City of Alturas, faced with several budget dilemmas and an uncertain future, may reorganize its Department of Public Works and planning areas.

Monday, the council met for a work session to discuss a concept that would change the structure of the departments. Where there is currently a Public Works Director and Assistant, part-time planner, plus two foremen and employees, the change would create a Director of Public Works and Planning.

Under that position would be an assistant for Public Works and an Assistant for Planning and Economic Development, each of whom would be responsible for their departments and operate under the auspices of the Director.

The Public Works Committee of the City Council, Jerry Smith and Joe Coffin, put the issue on the table and were asked to bring it back in a proposal form, that will include costs, saving and personnel numbers. That will probably come back after the first of the year.

"If we've learned anything, it's that we need to be self-sufficient and not rely on the Feds, State or County to help us out," said Councilman Smith. "I believe the departments are really out of balance. We need to move economic development to the top priority and get going. I believe the proposal, and remember this is just a concept, would be more efficient and could save money."

Smith said that if economic development is not stressed, the City could be in danger of its very existence.

Coffin agreed that the pair's look into the current situation brought up some issues that could be better dealt with under the new concept. He said they first need to define the job and ranges of pay and responsibilities. The City has notified the county that it will be terminating its agreement for planning services in July. The City has been paying $40,000 per year to the county for shared services of County Planner Scott Kessler and staff. Smith and Coffin said it might be money better spent if the city were to hire its own planner, under the conceptual model talked abut Monday, and add responsibilities to the positions. One area that hasn't been addressed to the council's satisfaction appears to be building inspections. That could fall under the new assistant planner position.

Smith said the housing study recently completed has pointed out some shocking news about the available and existing stock. He said the City needs an proactive approach in attracting new residents and building, as well as the necessary jobs.

"We also believe we need to concentrate more on grant writing. We've been getting shortchanged in that area for public works and economic development," said Smith. "We need to be progressive and we need to be active."

While Smith didn't commit to actual figures, he said the personnel cost savings to the city could be in the realm of $20,000 to $50,000 annual under the proposal. When the actual proposal is charted and brought back to the council, the numbers will be included and will give the council a better view of which direction it needs to go. .

Modoc jobless rate climbs

The unemployment rate in Modoc went up from 5.9 percent in October to 7.7 percent in November, just slightly lower than last year when the November rate was 8.2 percent.

According to the Employment Development Department, the civilian work force numbered 4,450 on November, 2002 and 4,560 this year. In October, the work force numbered 4,710.

Modoc jobless rate is higher than the state average of 6.3 percent and the national average of 5.6 percent.

Modoc ranked 36th out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen County was ranked 14th at 5.6 percent and Siskiyou was 42nd at 10.1 percent. San Luis Obispo continues to have the lowest unemployment at 3.1 percent and Colusa is highest at 21.4 percent.

Snow, ice creating road hazards

Snow and ice have been the major impetus of vehicle accidents on Modoc highways over the past week.

On Dec. 11, 2:40 a.m. Clayton V. Smith was not hurt when he lost control of his 1995 International truck and trailer on U.S. 395 south of Alturas. The California Highway Patrol reports that Smith was southbound in a snowstorm with the road covered in snow. He attempted to accelerate, but the tractor last traction. He let off the gas and the truck began to slide. The loaded trailers swerved and the tractor slid onto the east shoulder. The rig jackknifed, blocking both lanes of traffic. Smith was wearing a seatbelt and was not hurt.

Another accident occurred on Dec. 11, on County Road 91. about 5 p.m. The CHP reports a Mr. Grasso, 55, of Stateline, was driving a 1999 Ford truck northbound on CR91 when a deer ran from the west side of the road into the side of his truck, causing minor damage. The deer ran away.

There were no injuries in a single vehicle accident Dec. 12, 9 a.m. on U.S. 395 north of Chimney Rock. The CHP reports Peter Prehn, 59, Levinworth, Wa., was traveling about 40-45 m.p.h. on a snow-covered road when he lost control of his 1993 Subaru. The car began to fishtail, slid onto the west shoulder and rolled over a steep embankment.

There were no injuries when Lawrence A. Scrinner, age 70, lost control of his 2000 GMC on US 395 near Dry Creek Road Dec. 14, 7:40 p.m.

According to the CHP, Scrinner, was driving his pickup, towing a utility trailer northbound at about 45 m.p.h. when he lost traction on the ice. The vehicles slid off the east edge of the highway and traveled down a steep embankment, overturning one time. Scrinner was wearing a seatbelt and was not hurt. Both the pickup and trailer sustained major damage.

There were no injuries in a Forest Service Road 43N36 crash Dec. 16, 2:10 p.m. The CHP reports that Clifford Cates, 74, Canby, was driving his 1998 Toyota Tacoma westbound on snow-covered road in a single set of ruts. Cates was coming around a blind curve and James Trutman, 56, Grenada, Ca. was driving his Toyota pickup in the same ruts coming towards Cates. Cates and Trutman both applied the brakes, but were unable to stop because of the slippery conditions. The two pickups collided head on and received moderate damage to the front ends.

MF Supervisor favors results

By Anthony Larson

Special to the Record

"Do what we say we'll do. Be accountable," wrote Stan Sylva, Modoc National Forest supervisor based in Alturas, in a list of goals he created for himself and his staff at the outset of his administration nearly one year ago. "So that's the kind of stuff I shared with these guys. We've got to do what we say we're going to do."

In a recent report to his superior in the Forest Service, Jack Blackwell, regional forester, Sylva detailed the outcome of his first year's management. He filled five typewritten pages with one or two line expressions specifying the many accomplishments of his staff—some minor, some major. "I didn't expect any honeymoon," smiles Sylva. "We actually exceeded what we thought we could get done."

Fellow foresters in his office feel that Sylva has set a new direction and an encouraging tone for them

"Speaking for a lot of people on the ground," says Paul Bailey, timber program manager, "what we feel is a new sense of leadership. I think we're looking at some result orientation instead of some process things that seemed to bog us down in the past. I think we'll have a better ability to focus on what we need to be doing. That's what we feel … what I feel."

"I echo what Paul says," adds Jim Irvin, ecosystems staff officer. "I think the big change is really the focus on results oriented … (to getting) something done, not just chasing our tail in some of the process stuff …" During his first year as forest supervisor, Sylva has grappled with a number of thorny problems, from the heated salvage debate in the aftermath of the Blue Fire to more mundane staffing problems.

Though the public may not be aware of it, filling staff positions in the Alturas office was a serious problem. A lack of key personnel hampered operations in the past. With additional manpower now available to do the work, Sylva seems confident. "We filled most of the vacant positions, which puts us in a position now to get the work done. That's been a key thing." Acutely aware of general public disapproval of local forest management over the last decade or more—a problem he inherited with the job—Sylva has done all within his power to change the way the Modoc National Forest is administered. Additionally, Sylva feels that recent changes in forest policy in the form of new legislation called the Healthy Forest Restoration Act will give him additional help in achieving his goals.

Referring to that legislation recently passed by the United States Congress and the additional "tools" this will give his agency, he makes this lighthearted observation, "I think the stars are lined up now to really treat fuels and treat vegetation. We're going to get saw logs and we're going to get biomass. It really is lined up to move forward now."

When political considerations come into play, as they have in recent years, which "slam way to the left and way to the right every four years, that's what probably makes us the least effective." Sylva emphasizes, "We've got to treat fuels and protect homes regardless of who's in office."

Saying that there ought to be one best way to manage the forests, no matter where public opinion or political views might take us, Sylva explains his philosophy of good forest husbandry. "And that's reflective of Mother Nature. We have certain fire regimes that occur here. If we carry four or five thousand trees per acre in areas where in years past it was several hundred, I mean you're just asking for trouble at some point. All you need is a spark, then you've got a catastrophe on your hands."

Adding that people cannot fight Mother Nature, Sylva grins, "If you do, you get burned."

The tremendously destructive fires in Southern California this year, Sylva believes, pushed the public and the politicians to see that past policies and practices were flawed. "You see people losing their houses … moms out front crying … it's a bad deal. … My sense is that it really makes a difference to the people that live there when they see their neighbor's house burn or their house burn—that something's got to be done.

"Locally, I think our communities here have always had a sense of the importance of natural resources and the management of the forest." Sylva believes that politicians in both parties recognized the value in changing forest policy in the wake of historically large fires in the West. "There was an issue that actually brought parties together for the good of the country in an era where … we've got a lot of partisanship going on right now.

"So, there was a ground swell across the West that said, 'We've got to do something!' Which is really healthy, I think," he remarks. "I mean, that's how things should work."

Will this make his job easier? "I think so," says Sylva. "It provides the societal dialogue … basis … interest to hone in on treating fuels and protecting people's houses."

Snow Park makes most of new snow

Cedar Pass Snow Park officially opened December 13 for the season and last week's snow fall came at a wonderful time for park enthusiasts. The Snow Park wil be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every weekend through the season, as conditions allow. Call (530) 233-3323 for any last minute changes at the Snow Park

Rentals: "Tons of rentals" are now available at the Cedar Pass Snow Park Lodge. Equipment available includes snow boards, boots, skis, poles and lots of small skis for youngsters. The Snow Park now has the contents of an entire rental shop from Mt. Shasta Ski Park. The rental area has been remodeled with a new concrete floor, boot dryers and is now well organized. Daily rates remain the same: T-bar, $15 for adults; $12 for youths under 19; $5 for kids under six. Equipment rentals are $10 for skis, boots and poles, or snowboard and boots.

No risk punch cards offer a good rate and are available at the Snow Park Lodge. Volunteers can trade time for day passes (check in at the rental place to volunteer).

Surprise Valley all aglow over holidays

The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce would like to thank everyone who entered the Holiday Decorating Contest. Many families didn't enter but still put up beautiful lights, adding to the holiday spirit up and down the valley.

The following nine residents and one business joined in the fun: The Minto Ranch, 14461 County Road 1 in Eagleville; The Cockrell Ranch, County Road 31, eight miles south of Cedarville; Chuck and Donna Vermillion, 748 North Main Street, Cedarville; Joann Kemble, 435 Ann Street, Cedarville; Barb and Jim Hill, 667 Lincoln Street, Cedarville; Tracey Cochran and Marc Pearce, 341 Center Street, Cedarville; Brushworx by Travis and Abraham, 539 Main Street, Cedarville; Sandra Parriott, County Road 19, three miles north of Cedarville; Alan Pratt, County Road 190, four miles north of Cedarville; Lee and James Haley, 4484 County Road 17, Lake City. (The list starts in Eagleville and works north for anyone who doesn't want to miss one entry!).

Heather Travis, Chairman of the Decorating Committee, appointed seven anonymous judges to choose the winning entries. Each home or business was judged on originality, creativity and overall appearance.

1st Place was awarded to the Haley Family of Lake City. This home's decorations are breathtaking. Lee and her husband have created their own winter wonderland, and it's well worth the drive to check out their display featuring a full-size nativity scene, plus many original and humorous Christmas models well-lit by thousands of twinkling lights.

Three years ago, Lee was inspired by the late Delbert Vaughn, a former resident of the S.V.C.H.D. who had a few wooden frogs in his room he had made. He gave Lee a pattern book and she soon started her first projects. She's already planning for next year's contest. Lee also has seasonal yard displays on view throughout the summer.

2nd Place goes to the Minto Ranch. The Minto Family decorated in honor of their father and grandfather, the late Merril Minto, who recently passed away after a long illness. He urged his family to carry on their holiday tradition of putting up their delightful country Christmas display.

3rd place goes to Brushworx by Travis and Abraham. Kim and Heather are the newest business owners in our valley. They went all out to show their Christmas spirit. You can't miss their shop while driving down Main Street in Cedarville.

Each family who entered had some special component that made their display unique and beautiful. The Cockrell Ranch and Lodgings now has a very inviting holiday, entrance way to welcome all of their guests. The Vermillions have a playful Christmas scene, one that warms your heart. Joann Kemble's decorations are very colorful and make you think you really are at the North Pole.

Barb and Jim Hill went crazy with their lights. The polar bear is a great addition, especially surrounded by our recent snows. Tracey and Marc Pearce have an elegant window display. Don't miss the tiny cottages in the windowsill.

The Parriott home has that perfect "Country Ranch" Christmas feel, making you long for a similar place to come home to for the holidays. Alan and Heather Pratt must have put in a great amount of time and effort for their highly visible, colorful Christmas message to withstand our Modoc winds.

Choosing only three winners from among so many varied and lovely displays proved a hard decision for the judges. It's well worth the drive to take your family and friends around the valley to enjoy everyone's efforts in spreading their own distinctive holiday cheer.

Obituaries:

Ava Jo Harden

Ava Jo Harden of Alturas passed away unexpectedly on December 9, 2003 at her home, where she had lived for the past 41 years

Born on November 2, 1927, to Hal and Tessie McGhee in Alturas, Calif., Ava Jo was frequently at her mother's bakery "Polly Ann Bakery," in Alturas, while she was growing up. The bakery was located in a portion of what is today, Brown's Pharmacy. Ava Jo attended Alturas Grammar School and was a member of the high school drill team, graduating from Modoc High School in 1945.

She attended Mills College in Oakland, Calif. for the year that followed graduation and married Harold Harden of Alturas on Dec. 7, 1946, after he returned from war. For the next 16 years, they lived throughout California, Oregon and Nevada, while Harold worked on the booming power line construction after the war.

They returned to Modoc in 1962, when their son Brian was age three. They settled into the home across the street from the house in which Ava Jo was born

An avid sports fan, Ava Jo loved listening to Giants baseball games and watching football and basketball. She was a loving mother who always had a gentle smile on her face. Anyone who knew her will describe Mrs. Harden as a "really nice lady." She was also proud to have earned her 50-year pin as a member of the Order of Eastern Star in Alturas

Mrs. Harden was a cat fancier and quite a horticulturist, able to grow and keep tropical plants, such as Bird of Paradise, blooming indoors over the years. Many of her large palms and plants were inherited from her mother.

Mrs. Harden is survived by her son Brian Harden of Alturas, his wife Sheri and their children Jessi and Jason; brother and sister-in-law Sheldon and Dot Harden of San Luis Obispo, Calif.; numerous nieces and nephews and some long lost cousins in Texas

Interment will be private at Alturas Cemetery. A memorial time of remembrance for family and friends will be held at the Harden home, 947 Main Street, Alturas on Sunday, Dec. 21 at 1 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to the Harden Memorial Scholarship Fund, care of U.S. Bank, 346 N. Main St., Alturas, Calif. 96101

Barbara Rae Slinkard

Barbara Rae Slinkard passed away December 9, 2003, at her home in Alturas, Calif., after a lengthy illness. She was 82.

Born Barbara Rae Hobbs on November 16, 1921 in Lake City, Calif., where her parents, Roy and Frankie Hobbs, owned a ranch. Barbara was the youngest child and worked on the ranch with her three sisters, Rhua, Thelma and Phylis

Barbara attended school in Lake City, Calif. and graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1940. She attended Healds Business College in Sacramento for one term. On Nov. 7, 1940, Barbara married another Surprise Valley High School graduate, Steve Slinkard, in Carson City, Nevada. They lived in Reno, until Steve entered the military. Barbara and her young son, Don, returned to Cedarville, Calif. until the end of World War II

Steve and Barbara settled in Alturas where two more children, Gary and Wanda, were born. Barbara and Steve were married for 63 years, 50 years of their marriage in one home. Barbara enjoyed entertaining in her home, especially during the holidays. She enjoyed playing bridge, doing needle work, gardening and was a deacon in the Federated Church. She and Steve were feted for their 60th anniversary with many family members in attendance at the Nugget in Reno

Barbara is survived by her husband, Steve of Alturas; daughter, Wanda of Reno, Nevada; sons Don and wife Bonnie; Gary and wife Susan of Alturas, four granddaughters, Shannon Galpin, Eagle Point, Ore.; Stephanie St. John, Laughlin, Nevada; Kerry Slinkard, Portland, Ore. and Jennifer Huntington, Gaithersburg, Maryland; three grandsons, Scott Slinkard, Alturas, Calif.; Sean Slinkard, Alturas and Bryan Slinkard, Chico, Calif.; four great-grandsons and one great-granddaughter.

Barbara's parents and her three sisters preceded her in death

Private family committal services were held Thursday, Dec. 11, followed by a celebration of her life at the Federated Church in Alturas on Friday, Dec. 12, 2003. Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted the services. Kerr Mortuary handled arrangements

Memorial donations may be directed to the Federated Church in Alturas.

Services for Barbara Scofield

A memorial service for former Alturas resident Barbara Scofield will be held Tuesday, Dec. 23 at 7:00 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Alturas.

Mrs. Scofield passed away September 7, 2003 at Wessington Springs, South Dakota. She was 62

Married to Texus V. Scofield in Gardena, Calif. on February 7, 1959 they lived in various places and worked for the government. They arrived in Modoc County in 1965. When they retired in 1985, they relocated to Wessington Springs, SD. Texus preceded her in death on April 10, 1992

Barbara raised mini donkeys for 25 years, in addition to working several different jobs. She enjoyed raising and caring for her animals, riding horses and moving cattle on the Devil's Garden and Warner Mountains, snow skiing, attended auctions and refinished antiques. She was an active outdoors woman, who was also a lifelong supporter of 4-H and FFA and an avid supporter and spectator of her children's and grandchildren's sporting events, attending every game. She was a member of Legion Auxiliary of Alpena, SD, Elks, a 61-year member of Western Fraternal Life Association and a member of the American Donkey Association. She was a best friend and devoted mom and grandma

Grateful for having shared her life are her son, Curtis Scofield and friend Karen King of Alturas, CA., her daughter Dawn Luckett and husband Val of Wessington Springs, SD, three grandchildren Mace, Josh and Vance Luckett, Wessington Springs, SD; one brother Dan Dolezal and wife Mary of Big Sandy, Texas and one niece Susan Dolezal of Plano, Texas; her uncle Louie (Dorothy) Cvikel and aunt Albina Brown all of Southern California and many dear friends

Snook Macdonald

Charles Stuart Macdonald III, 59, passed away on December 12, 2003 at the Surprise Valley Hospital in Cedarville, California. Known as Snook, he had been fighting cancer for most of this year

He was born on August 13, 1944 in Pueblo, Colorado to Charles Stuart and Dorothy (Guye) Macdonald II. At a young age, his parents presented him with a pair of cowboy boots. He promptly announced he was going to be a cowboy--and that he was

Snook was an avid basketball player and fan. He also held the pole vaulting record at Pueblo High School, District 60 for 15 years. With his big smile and gentlemanly manner, Snook made friends wherever he lived and worked

He is survived by his father, C. Stuart Macdonald II of Pueblo, Colorado; his sister Virginia Biglow, husband Bob and niece Becky of Salida, Colorado; his son Justin Macdonald, wife Michele and granddaughters Brittany and Charley of Camp Verde, Arizona; his daughter Jami Mead, husband Brad and granddaughters Megan, Cassie and Paige of Seligman, Arizona; and lastly his friend and partner Linda Moorhouse of Eagleville, Calif.

Robert Leo Weilmunster

Former Surprise Valley resident Robert Leo Weilmunster, 69, of Gerber, Calif. passed away at his home on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2003 of natural causes. Services will be held today at 10 a.m. December 18 at Chapel of the Flowers in Red Bluff. Jack Bullen of Sacred Heart and the Veterans of Foreign Wars will conduct the graveside service at Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Calif

Mr. Weilmunster was born on March 5, 1934 in Cedarville, Calif. to Leo and Bea Weilmunster. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he served from 1954 until 1958 and fought in the Korean War. He was a 2nd class petty officer engineman diver and received the China Service Metal. Robert participated in the evacuation of refugees passage to freedom and the Tachen evacuation aboard the USS Cacapon and the USS Bolster. Robert moved to Tehama County from Cedarville in 1958. He was a graduate of Shasta College. He was employed as a pipe fitter with Diamond International for many years. A prior member of the Elks and Moose Lodges and John Birch Society, he was a current member of the National Rifle Association and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post in Los Molinos. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and the great outdoors. Above all, he was a master of practical jokes. He was well loved by his family and friends and will be missed by all

He is survived by his beloved wife of 28 years, Patti Weilmunster of Gerber, Calif.; son Robert Weilmunster of Red Bluff, Calif.; step-daughter, Liz Mosier, Gerber; brother, Don Weilmunster, Garden Valley, Idaho; step-son, William Morse, Rocklin, Calif. He also has seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Leo and Bea Weilmunster. Hoyt-Cole Chapel of the Flowers in Red Bluff was in charge of arrangements

Charles 'Charley' Dameron

Charles E. "Charley" Dameron, 89, died December 13, 2003, at Lake District Long-Term Care Facility in Lakeview

Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at the First Baptist Church, Lakeview, with Pastor Ray Durkin officiating. Interment will follow at Westside Cemetery. A reception and luncheon will follow at the church. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday in Ousley Osterman Huffstutter Funeral Chapel, Lakeview

Mr. Dameron was born July 13, 1914, in Milan, Kansas, to Anson B. and May V. (Rhodes) Dameron

He lived in Milan until moving with his family to Canoga Park, CA., when he was 10 years old

He married Roberta Heard on November 29, 1936, in Cedarville. They owned and operated a grocery store in Lake City for several years before moving in 1946 to Lakeview. In 1948, they moved to Westside, where he farmed until selling the farm in 1970

While farming, he held several jobs and drove school bus at Westside. The jobs included those at Lakeview Lumber, Lakeview Mercantile, and Moty and Van Dyke

His first wife preceded him in death on January 21, 1962, and he was also preceded in death by his next three wives, Loretta; the former Essie Pradmore; and Lucille Threet, prior to marrying Lucille Conger in Reno on May 22, 1993

He enjoyed meeting and being with people

Mr. Dameron was a member of First Baptist Church for many years. Among his survivors are his wife Lucille Dameron of Lakeview; daughter and son-in-law Sally and Con O'Keeffe of Boise, Idaho; sons and daughters-in-law Douglas and Rosemary Dameron of Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Gary and Michele Dameron of Filer, Idaho; sister Clara Wray of Bellingham, Wash.; brother Merle Dameron of Washington D.C.; 10 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; half-brothers Leroy, Kenny and Jerry Dameron; half-sisters Clella Paschal, Sonja Dameron and Vina Cink; and numerous nieces and nephews

He was preceded in death by a brother, Virgil Dameron

Memorial donations may be made to Lakeview County Library Endowment Fund, P.O. Box 44, Lakeview, OR. 97630, or the charity of the donor's choice

Phoebe Coffer Young

Phoebe Rachael Coffer Young, 101, died Dec. 6, 2003 at the Lake District Hospital in Lakeview, Ore

Mrs. Young was born May 27, 1902 in Alturas to Modoc County pioneers Elliott Vanburen Coffer and the former Leatha Parlee Dorris.

Her father was the second settler in Old Willow Ranch where he was in partnership with Andrew Snider. He was as a rancher and blacksmith. Her mother was the daughter of Cyrus G. and Elizabeth (Barnes) Dorris. Cyrus was one of the Dorris brothers who settled the town of Alturas and Corris, alif. Rachael fondly remembered her aunts and uncles Ed, Vernile, Roland, Green, Elsie Walker, Minta Bonner and Wylie Dorris

Rachael married George Earl Young on April 19, 1919 in Yreka. Rachael was only 16 years old when they started their married life together on a logging camp at Bray. In 1933, they move dto Lakeview where they resided next to the Alstrom grocery store. Their first child, Ella Dorris Young, died the same day she was born on was born November 5, 1920. They had 12 more children after that, however: George Elliott, Charles Dwayne, Emmaline Sara Huskey, Chester Vernile, Hester Carmen Wilson, Harold Nate, Melvin Jay, Jerome Raymond, Loretta Ann Simpson, Bonnie Rachael Jelley, Bert Lewis and Guy Ervin Young. Nate, Charles Chester, George and Ella all preceded Rachael in death. Her husband was a sawyer in a lumber mill in Lakeview at the time of his death at the age of 56 on February 13, 1951. At last count, Rachael had 180 descendants including 47 grandchildren, 121 great grandchildren, and 60 great great grandchildren. She is also survived by two nephews, Bill Coffer and William Young

Mrs. Young was a lifelong Baptist and was proud to have helped in the planning and building of the Trinity Baptist Church. Most of her grandchildren remember being taught by her in Summer Bible School. Her other great interest was the Lake County Fair, for which she was a volunteer until she reached 101 years of age. She operated the hamburger concession in the Indian Campground until the 1960's and sold poppies as a member of the VFW 4070 Ladies Auxiliary. She was a life member and a Gold Star mother of the Auxiliary. When she was 99 years old, Mrs. Young became a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution

A very active woman with a clear mind, she could relate stories of Lake and Modoc County history. Her most memorable experience was watching, as a small child, the volcanic eruption of Mt. Lassen

She saw the first airplane land in Alturas and was a passenger on the train from Lakeview to Alturas

Memorial donations may be made to the Lake County Senior Citizens P.O. Box 871, Lakeview, OR., 97630 or to the Lake County Museum Endowment Fund C/O Eleanor Lynch, 203 South E Street, Lakeview, OR., 97630 or to a charity of the donor's choice

Funeral Services were held December 13 at the First Presbyterian in Lakeview, Oregon with Rev. Vance Culpepper officiating. A potluck luncheon/reception followed at the Eagle Lodge. Ousley Osterman Huffstrutter Funeral Chapel has charge of the arrangements. The interment at the Westside Cemetery in Lakeview was private. Casket bearers were: George E. Young, Tim Young, Jeff Huskey, Chester James Young, Floyd Wilson, Melvin J. Young Jr., Quip Risley, Leroy Simpson, John Jelley and Gary L. Young. Honorary casket bearers: Dr. Robert W. Bomengen, Dr. Tim Gallagher, Bill Coffer, William Young, Orval Layton, Kenny Young, Ralph Young, Kevin Young, Howard Huskey, Jim Wilson, Don Wilson, Ray Young, Quirt Risley and Edward Jelley

Jacqueline 'Jackie' O. Collis

Jacqueline "Jackie" Olive Collis, 81, passed away in Alturas, Calif. on Monday, December 8, 2003. Pastor Destry Campbell will officiate graveside services on Friday, Dec. 12 at 11 a.m. at Alturas Cemetery.

Mrs. Collis was born in Seattle, Washington on July 13, 1921. Services are being arranged by Kerr Mortuary. A complete obituary will be published in a future issue.

Sports

Braves win invite, head to Lakeview Saturday

There's little doubt that Modoc's wrestling team deserves the number two ranking in the north state, after winning its invitational tournament here over the weekend.

The Braves beat big schools Anderson, Central Valley, Corning, Lassen, Mazama, Klamath Union and several smaller schools for the title. Last weekend the Braves won the Chester tournament

"We had many of the very best wrestlers in the north state here last weekend, plus some top guys from Oregon," said Modoc coach Shaun Wood. "We feel pretty good about beating them and we're certainly going to see them again. I felt pretty comfortable that we were favored going in, so I wasn't surprised we won it."

Modoc had a dual meet with Foothill last night and will travel to Lakeview Saturday.

The final match of the Braves' Northeast Classic Tourney Saturday night lived up to its billing as the number one ranked heavyweight wrestler, Skyuler Wilson, of Central Valley, met number two, Cory Bell, of Modoc, in the finals. The match was knotted at 12-12 in regulation and went to two overtimes, where Bell got a one-point win in the second overtime period. The win put Bell into the number one spot by MaxPreps, dropping Wilson to number two. They will probably meet again. Modoc's Travis Wood (145) and Luke Hammerness (152) come in at number two in the rankings, with Jason Jones (160) and Brad Bell (189) at number three and Joey Catania (215) at number six. Overall, Red Bluff is ranked number one, Modoc number two, Willows number three, Shasta number four and Orland, number five in the northstate. In small schools, Modoc is number one, Durham number two and Mt. Shasta number three.

The Braves won the Modoc tourney team title with 202 points, followed in order by: Corning 169, Lassen 153, Mazama 116, Central Valley 101, Klamath Union 100.5, Lakeview 94, Anderson 93, Mt. Shasta 76, Burney 60, Etna 49.5, Tulelake 38.5, Hamilton 27, Portola 25, Modoc II 25, Lassen II 23, Los Molinos 16, Bishop Quinn 13, Chester 13, Fall River 1, and Foothill 0. Modoc has one unbeaten wrestler, 160-pound Jason Jones, who pinned Corning's Andres Bobadilia, at 1:45, for the title at Modoc's tournament. Wood won the 145-pound title, pinning Dustin Power of Mazama at 5:22; Brad Bell pinned Caleb Jackson, Burney, in 2:39 for the 189-pound championship, Catania lost to Brett Cox, Lassen, by pin at 1:07 in the 215-pound finals. Hammerness lost to Corning's Robert Johnson in the 152-pound finals. Jaafar Mirlohi pinned Hamilton City's Justin Chambers at 1:14 in the 135 division.

Brian Weed beat Lakeview's Lee Foster for fifth place in the 119-pound division, Bill Hammerness beat Lassen's Matt Lively for fifth at 145 pounds. Mark Main beat teammate John Yeier for fifth at 171 pounds.

Tulelake's John Luscombe took a first place at 140 pounds.

Cory Bell was named the Outstanding Heavyweight Wrestler at the event and Coach Wood was named Most Sportsmanlike Coach.

In the Junior Varsity division, Modoc's Jared Cox took a first at 160 pounds, Chris Houghtby was second at 171 pounds, Chris Buchanan, third at 140 pounds and Samantha Brush was third at 152 pounds.

Modoc looking forward to the rematch with L.C. Patriots

In the first game of the season, the Modoc Braves varsity boys lost to Liberty Christian 50-40. Coach Mike Martin is looking forward to a rematch.

That rematch will happen Saturday night in the final game of the Block M Tournament in Alturas.

"I know we can play a better game now than we did the first time around," said Martin. "They are a good team, and I'm looking for us to play well against them. It should be a battle."

Modoc opens the Block M against Chester, tonight at 8:30 p.m. and meets Big Valley Friday night before the finale against Liberty Christian. Martin expects both Chester and Big Valley to have strong teams.

Last weekend at Portola, the Braves won a pair and lost one to a good Quincy team. But overall, Martin said his team played well and the 7-2 start this season is good.

The Braves opened the Portola tourney with a 53-49 win against the hosts. The score was tied at 16 in the first and Modoc trailed 27-23 at halftime. The Braves perked up in the third and led 43-39 going into the fourth. Zach McKirahan had 20 and Kyle Madison added 10.

Against Quincy, Modoc led 19-13 in the first and 30-29 at the half. But Quincy changed defenses and took a 47-38 lead after three, then outscored the Braves 22-12 in the fourth for a 65-50 win. Stevens had 16 points and Micah Eppler added 11.

Modoc beat Loyalton 56-43 in the final game. The Braves grabbed a 13-9 first period lead and led 24-20 at halftime. Loyalton came back in the third to lead 33-32, but Modoc outscored them 23-10 in the final period. Madison and Stevens each scored points for Modoc. They were also named to the All-tourney team.

Varsity girls having some difficulty finding hoop

Modoc's varsity girls team is having trouble scoring and have yet to win a game this season, losing all three in the Portola tournament.

The girls will play Big Valley, Chester and Liberty Christian this week in the Block M and are looking for a better showing.

In Portola, the girls lost to Quincy 49-40. Quincy led 10-7 after one and 23-20 at half. The Trojans outscored Modoc 12-7 in the third, and went on for the win. Kristen Taylor had 15 points, Emily Pence had nine points.

In the second game, the girls lost to Portola 71-52. They led 11-6 in the first, but trailed 32-27 at halftime. Portola got up big in the third, leading 54-34. Modoc scored 18 to Portola's 17 in the fourth. Taylor and Pence each had 11 points.

The Braves also lost to Loyalton 64-32. Loyalton led 17-12 in the first and 34-16 by half. They led 46-22 after three and Modoc was outscored 18-10 in the fourth. Taylor had 10 points and Allison Campagna added nine. JV girls lose three.

The Modoc junior varsity team also lost all three games in Portola. They lost to Quincy 27-21 after spotting the Trojans a 10-2 first period lead. By the end of three, the Braves had cut into the score, trailing just 21-15. Alysha Northrup led with eight points.

Loyalton came back in the second game to beat the Braves 31-25. Jessie Harden led with six and Northrup had five.

In the final game, Modoc was down to Portola 16-5 at half, but they fought back to within three at the two minute mark in the fourth. But they couldn't pull it out. Tough defense by Janel Hughes, Kelly Campagna and Rachel Crosby made the difference. Amanda Martin had 11 points.

The JVs are 0-5 but coach Bill Hall expects them to play well during the Block M this weekend.

JV boys win two, lose one

Modoc's junior varsity boys team won two and lost one in the Portola Tournament last weekend, and will open the Block M against Liberty Christian Friday morning.

The Braves ran into a solid Quincy team in the fist game at Portola, losing 46-26. The Braves were ice cold in the first period, getting down 14-2 and by half trailed 32-12. By the end of three, Quincy led 40-17. Ross Burgess has 12 points and Grant Hall added eight.

The Braves beat Portola 38-32 in the second game. Modoc led 10-6 after one and 17-11 at halftime. Modoc led 29-24 after three. Taylor Dunn had 13 points and Hall had 12.

The Braves beat Loyalton 48-29 in the third game, getting a 16-5 first period lead and 26-12 by half. At the end of the third, Modoc led 38-19. Dunn had 18 and Burgess added nine.

"We played pretty well, and it's very encouraging," said coach Bunk Richardson. "We put in a new offense and took a little time getting used to it. But the attitude is good and we're looking forward to playing at home this weekend."

Hornets open season 8-2

The Surprise Valley Hornets boys varsity has started the season 8-2, and are set to start Evergreen League play.

The Hornets have just seven players, so injuries must be kept to a minimum.

Surprise Valley has beaten Paisley twice, took a second place in the Greenville tournament, going 3-1 and in the Westwood tournament, also going 3-1. Both the Hornet losses have come from ranked teams in Division 5 and 6. Loren Harris and Adam Evens were named to the All-Tourney team at Westwood.

The team is averaging 70 points per game, with five players averaging in double figures. Evans leads the way with 17.8 point average, Harris leads in blocked shots with 12 and Josh Boneck leads in steals with 37. According to Max Preps, Boneck is second in steals and Evans is third in scoring.

The Hornets will open league play at home against McCloud, January 9, and travel to Dunsmuir, January 10.

Hoop shooters shot ball well

There were 32 participants in the Alturas Elks Lodge Hoop Shoot contest this year. The winners will move on to compete in Portola District Finals January 17.

The girls winners are: Ashley Hoy, age 8-9; Jennifer Jardine, age 10-11; and Courtney Holloway, age 12-13.

The boys winners are: Murphy Cockrell, age 8-9; Joe Dewey, age 10-11; and Jacob Close.

December 24, 2003

News

Do the drive to light up a night

From one side of the Warners to the other, Christmas lights and decorations are brightening up the dark nights.

The Alturas Chamber of Commerce announces winning holiday picks for the annual Christmas Lighting contest. The Chamber also recommends many lovely places for viewing the holiday glow within and near Alturas. Harold and Cordelia Rosendahl of Alturas at 206 West C Street win first place and $125 in Alturas Chamber Bucks for their efforts. They have tastefully decorated their entire corner lot, both front, side and back yards, which are all visible to passers by. Rene Larranaga and Jodie Porter went all out at their 1204 West Fifth Street, Alturas home to win second place and $75 in Alturas Chamber Bucks. Third place and $25 in Alturas Bucks were awarded to the adjoining two lots and homes of Pam Crawford at 603 and 601 N. East Street. Numerous yard ornaments including a gingerbread house, a shimmering tree and lights fill the yard.

Honorable Mentions: The Moore home on Highway 299; Tom and Judy Moore home at Woodduck Lane; Doug and Billie Taylor at 608 West Second St., and the lovely section at Poplar and Park Street is aglow at the Hill, Killingbeck and Jacques family homes.

The Chamber will provide commercial winning entries for next week's Record.

DOJ decision forces Hagge resignation

Modoc County Supervisor Willy Hagge has finally been forced to resign as President of Hot Spring Irrigation District, the result of a Department of Justice decision

Hagge has resisted resigning the Hot Spring or Supervisor seat, for four years, even though local officials have advised him correctly that they were incompatible offices and represented a conflict

The DOJ decision, issued Dec. 19, cleared up the issue as DOJ agreed to join a quo warranto lawsuit filed by Lawrence and Sandi Ray questioning whether Hagge was unlawfully holding both positions

Hagge opted to resign the Hot Spring position in a letter to its directors, dated Dec. 22, and effective Dec. 23. He cited the decision by State Attorney General Bill Lockyer as the reason for his resignation. The DOJ has opted not to agree to fines or forfeiture of salary Hagge received as Supervisor. Hagge has led the embattled district into several lawsuits as well as a recent Cease and Desist Order from the State Water Quality Control Board, concerning its unlawful transfer and sale of water to entities outside the district boundaries. Many of those lawsuits are ongoing and have cost the district thousands of dollars in legal fees

In the DOJ decision, the Attorney General states: "The common law doctrine of incompatible public offices prohibits a person from holding two public offices at the same time if the performance of the duties of either office could have a significant adverse affect on the other."

It goes on to state, "Offices are incompatible if one of the offices has supervisory, auditory or removal power over the other or if there would be any significant clash of duties or loyalties in the exercise of official duties. Only one potential significant clash of duties or loyalties is necessary to make offices incompatible . . . We have previously concluded that the office of county supervisor is incompatible with a variety of other local public offices."

In addition, the DOJ states that there are numerous ties between water district and county government, including the county filling vacancies of the district board, initiating preliminary proceedings in the organization of the district, allocating special funds, contracting or transferring property. In addition, it states a county supervisor may also have "divided loyalties' when adopting general and specific plans and amendments to areas served by the water district

In much of what the DOJ states, common sense seems to prevail. "What is best for the county may not be what is best for the water district. As the chief executive officer of the district, a county supervisor would be subject to contrary and inconsistent considerations in determining what constitutes the 'public interest'."

The DOJ also states that the Board of Supervisors supervises the "official conduct of all the county officers, and officers of all districts and other subdivisions of the county . . . the legislature has provided several specific statutory ties between county Boards of Supervisors and irrigation districts."

"In light of these relationships, overlapping powers, and potential conflicts between a county board of supervisors and an irrigation district board of directors, we find that the question whether Defendant (Hagge) is unlawfully holding the office of director of the district presents substantial issues of fact and law requiring judicial resolution."

Whether Hagge's resignation will put an end to the matter remains in question as the ball is now in the hands of the Rays, who could continue their lawsuit on the issue.

More flu vaccine for now

With the state and federal health agencies predicting a possible flu epidemic this year, good news came to Modoc this week

The Modoc County Health Department has received more flu vaccine and free shots will be provided as long as the current supply lasts

Adults age 18 and older may come to the Health Department on Dec. 29 and Dec. 30 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. for inoculations.

Another chance for flu shots will be Jan. 7, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. only, also at the Health Department at 441, N. Main Street in Alturas. The phone number is 233-6311.

Modoc cares in a big way

"The donations were astronomical, absolutely fantastic. This community did an awesome job," described Peggy Alexander of the Christmas wrap up with food baskets and toys for Modoc children and families, who may otherwise, have gone without.

Alexander, who coordinates the Wish Tree and Emergency Food Bank services at TEACH, Inc. said all Christmas gift wishes were filled with enough donations to provide for the 196 children registered on this year's Wish Tree. "All wishes were filled and all the kids will be happy."

In addition, the last of the 75 food baskets, filled with canned hams and Christmas dinner ingredients, were picked up and distributed Tuesday afternoon from TEACH, Inc. for residents throughout the county. Trying to provide was made more stressful than usual because Thanksgiving fell later this year, leaving only three weeks to gear up for Christmas food boxes and Wish Tree gifts. The Wish Tree deadline was last Friday, Dec. 19 when families picked up the gifts.

The Food Bank usage also increased during December.

"I guess a lot of people shop this month and don't buy food," said Alexander. "We had way more people come to use the Food Bank this month, than in the past.

"But, a lot more people were giving this year," she added. "We had a lot more anonymous donors this year. I'd say, we had 10 -- maybe 15 people anonymously give cash. Some of them would hand over a $100 bill and not want to give their name. They'd say, 'just call me Santa's helper or Santa's elf.' It was very cool," said a heartened Alexander.

Community Service workers and agencies worked together to determine where the 65 bicycles, donated and delivered last Thursday morning by Devil's Garden Conservation Camp, would meet families' needs and make a child happy.

As far as the Food Bank goes, Alexander said, "We'll make it through the year, but we're low on canned goods and can always use non-perishable food items to restock the shelves."

Fuel Reduction Project will protect Eagleville and surroundings

Work is now underway in southeastern Modoc County on a fuel reduction project designed to provide wildfire protection for property and homes near Eagleville and Emerson Canyon.

Crews from the Devil's Garden Conservation Camp are cutting juniper trees and removing brush in a mile-and-a-half long fuel break designed to slow the spread of fires. Crews will burn the debris piles on days when weather conditions allow for safe and successful burning.

"Fires have threatened the Eagleville and Emerson Canyon areas several times in the past decade, most recently in the Barber Creek Fire last summer," said Owen Billinsley, manager of the Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Field Office. "Recognizing the risk to communities and public lands, private landowners and government agencies formed a partnership to complete the fuel break."

In addition to removing flammable brush and juniper, crews are incorporating roads into the fuel break design because they can also be used as fuel breaks to help control the spread of wildfires. A fire-retardant green strip will be seeded through the center of the fuel break to improve effectiveness. The project will also benefit wildfire. Perennial grass seeding will provide food sources and habitat diversity

Billingsley said the fuel break is being constructed with visual aesthetics in mind. Large juniper trees over 200 years old will be left. Planners also used natural fire barriers such as rock outcropping, as part of the fuel break design.

"The fuel break is on private land owned by the Grove brothers, Susan Aitkens, and Marge and Carol Scott, and their support has been instrumental," Billingsley said. "In addition to protecting private land and homes, the fuel break can help prevent wildfire from spreading onto BLM managed public lands or onto the Modoc National Forest."

Key government partners include the Eagleville Fire Department, whose chief and assistant chief provided valuable assistance in the design of the fuel break. The BLM, Modoc Fire Safe Council, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection also were key partners.

A special holiday gift

On Thursday, Devil's Garden Conservation Camp donated 63 refurbished bikes to T.E.A.C.H., Inc. .

"These bikes will go to needy children in Modoc County--kids who may not get other Christmas presents," stated Brett Moore, Lieutenant at Devil's Garden Camp.

Officers of the California Department of Corrections and Fire Captains from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection at Devil's Garden Camp donated over $400 to the Bicycle Refurbishing Program that has been in place at Devil's Garden Camp since it opened in 1988. Seab McDonald of Seab's True Value matched the donated money. Seab has been supplying the parts needed to refurbish the bikes since the program began. The inmates at Devil's Garden Camp supply the labor, working on the bicycles year round. The bicycles are completely refurbished.

The program is made up of three to five inmates that donate their spare time to refurbish the bicycles.

"The immates tell me they enjoy participating in the program because they hope it might make a child's life better. Many of them don't have children of their own and they enjoy having someone to give to," said Lieutenant Moore.

Throughout the year, Devil's Garden Camp receives phone calls from locals who want to donate bikes to the program. Once a year, the Alturas Police Department gathers all the bikes they have found or impounded and they donate them to the program. Once the bicycles are delivered to T.E.A.C.H., Carol Callaghan matches the bikes to children and the delivery process begins.

The program is just one more way Devil's Garden Camp supports Modoc County and they are especially proud of that accomplishment.

Obituaries:

Mina A. 'Jo' Tripp Brown

Jo Brown, wife of Bud Brown, who preceded her in death in January of 2000, passed away on December 19, 2003 at Mayer's Memorial Skilled Nursing Facility, with the love of caregivers and family at her side. Jo was born Mina Alzada Tripp to Eletha and Lloyd Tripp, in Eagleville, California on January 26, 1920.

Jo and Bud Brown were married in Reno, Nevada on January 8, 1940 and reared their family in Alturas, Calif., where they were active members of the community. Son Jim and wife Lee and their families Heidi and Rob Coffee and Scott and Lee Brown live in the Sacramento area. Daughter Kathy Davis and husband Gary reside in Fremont, Calif. Daughter Marian, who preceded her mother in death in December, 2001, is survived by husband Pete and their childrens' families, Kevin and Shaun Davis of Burney, and Shelly & Greg Nickel of Redding

Bud and Jo had four wonderful great-granddaughters: Sheree, Marissa, Tiffani and Hannah, a tribute to their loving legacy. The family asks that you honor Jo's memory by remembering her as you celebrate the Joy, Peace and Spirit of this season.

The family has requested that charitable contributions be made to support nursing scholarships. Contributions may be directed to Intermountain Health Care Foundation, Mayers Memorial Hospital, Box 459, 43563 Hwy. 299 E., Fall River Mills, California 96028. Please designate in memory of Jo Brown. Services will be private

Sterling Curtis La Place

Sterling Curtis La Place, 89, passed away on December 21, 2003 in Alturas, California.

He was born in Esther, Louisiana July 24, 1914 to Germain La Place and Dixie Alexander. In 1917, they relocated to San Francisco, and then Lawndale, California. His grandmother, Laura Alexander and Aunt Patricia Alexander, who was greatly influential in his life, raised Sterling. He attended Leuzinger High School and graduated with honors in its first class. He was active in baseball, football and debate. His experiences, while in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Idyllwild in the early 1930's, left lasting impressions

During World War II, Sterling was a supervisor at Douglas Aircraft Company, where he met his future wife. In 1949, Sterling and Nellie McCarley were married in Reno, Nevada and settled in Chico, California. There, he operated Sterling's Chevron Service at Ninth and Main Streets. His daughter's participation in the Chico Aqua Jets Swim Team led him to become an active member in the parents' organization. In 1980, he fulfilled a life-long dream when he and Nellie moved to Alturas

Respected for his leadership qualities, strength and determination, Sterling had a remarkable sense of humor, loved a great story and enjoyed a good laugh. His life-long loves were photography, music and baseball, and he was an ardent hunter and fisherman. After moving to Alturas, he enjoyed shooting skeet with many friends

Survivors include his beloved wife Nellie, of Alturas and daughter and son-in-law Jeanne and Bob Spreen of North Bend, Washington. At his request there will be no services. He will be buried in the Alturas Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to your favorite charity

Wilma Ellen Rea-Freeman

Wilma Freeman, 88, died Tuesday, December 2, 2003. A native of Cedarville, California, she lived in Benicia for 62 years.

Wilma was a homemaker and a Certified Nurse's Aide. She was an active member of the community for 60 plus years. She was a member of Myrtle Rebecca Lodge #15, Mt. Moriah Ladies Auxiliary #38, an advisor for the Estralieta Theta Rho Girls Club #108, all affiliated with Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F).

She was also a member of the Washington Temple Pythian Sisters #88. She was a Girl Scout leader, and honorary lifetime member of the Parent Teacher's Association (P.T.A.) and served on election polls for over 50 years. Mrs. Freeman was a dedicated member of the Benicia Senior Citizens, where she volunteered to help manage their bingo on Friday for the last 10 years, up until November 28, 2003. She was born Wilma Ellen Rea on October 24, 1915.

She was the mother of daughters: Sherry Fay Morgan of Vallejo, Calif., and Patty Rea Keeter and her husband Keary D. Keeter of Fairfield, Calif., and Bonnie Marie Freeman (who preceded her in death). A sister, Carmelita Newbry of Sparks, Nevada; brothers, Samuel Rea of Cedarville, Calif., Thomas Rea (preceded her in death) and Leo Rea (preceded her in death). She had five grandchildren, Bonnie Brown, Dean Douglas Brown, Jr., Michael Morgan, Johnna Morgan and Daniel Lee Morgan all of Vallejo, Calif. She also had seven great-grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Surprise Valley Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA., 96104, Wilma's family's hometown. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.

Sports

Patriots hang on to win Block M

The Liberty Christian Patriots beat the Modoc Braves 53-49 in the final game of the Block M Saturday night, in a game that started badly for the Braves.

The Patriots jumped out to a 15-2 first period lead, but the Braves managed to out things together, led by Marty Stevens, to trail only 28-25 by halftime. The teams each scored 15 in the third and Liberty scored 10 to Modoc's nine in the fourth. Stevens led the scoring with 18 and Zach McKirahan added 16.

"It was a tough loss," said coach Mike Martin. "Spotting them a 15-2 lead really hurt, but I was really proud of how well we came back. We played well the final three periods."

In the second game of the tourney, Modoc beat Big Valley 79-32. The Braves led 23-7 after one, and 40-17 at halftime. After three, Modoc led 62-21 and scored 17 to Big Valley's 11 in the fourth. McKirahan led with 16 points, Micah Eppler added 12, Stevens had 11 and Kyle Madison added nine. The Braves fell to Chester 60-51 in the opening game. They led 17-16 after one and were tied 35-35 at half. Chester took a 47-42 lead after three and outscored Modoc 12-9 in the fourth. Stevens led with 17, Eppler added 16 and McKirahan had nine.

Varsity girls

Modoc's varsity girls team beat the Liberty Christian team 85-50 in their final game, playing better than they have all season. Modoc led 10-6 after one and 31-17 by half. They led 57-34 after three and put up 28 points to the Patriots 16 in the fourth.

Kristen Taylor led with 29 points and Jennifer Davis added nine. The girls beat Big Valley 68-60 in the second game with Taylor netting 30 points. Big Valley led 17-14 after one and 32-30 at half. Modoc took a 35-42 third period lead and Modoc outscored the Cards 23-18 in the fourth. Davis added 15 points and Emily Pence added 12.

Modoc lost its opening game to Chester 65-42. Chester led 18-11 after one and 31-26 by halftime. The Volcanoes jumped up 50-38 after three and Chester scored 15 to Modoc's 4 in the fourth. Davis led the Braves with 20 points and Pence added seven.

JV boys win title

A very strong junior varsity boys team had little trouble wining the Block M title, ending the run with a 51-34 whipping of the Liberty Christian Patriots. The Braves played a 12-10 first period but went up 25-14 at the half. They led 37-24 at the end of three. Ross Burgess, the JV MVP, scored 16 points and Grant Hall added 16.

Modoc beat Big Valley 54-15 in the second game. The score was 14-5 after one, 24-7 at half and 42-15 after three. Burgess led with 18 and Liam Iverson added eight.

The Braves beat Chester to open the tourney 40-23. Modoc led 6-3 after one, 19-9 after two and 26-21 after three. A good fourth peered sealed the win. Hall had 11 points and Burgess added 10.

JV girls win two

Modoc's junior varsity girls team put a solid third game together to beat Liberty Christian 31-22. The Braves played tight through three, but opened the game up with a 21-point fourth period. Jessie Harden led the way, with Amanda Martin and Tacie Richardson each getting eight points. The Braves beat Big Valley 20-15 in the second game. Harden led with five points and Richardson added four.

The Braves lost to Chester 31-22 in the opener, after spotting Chester a 12-0 lead. Good defensive play from Mary Nardoni, Megan Thompson and Rachel Crosby brought the Braves back in the end.

Braves win Lakeview Tallman Invite

Modoc Braves wrestling team continued its dominance of this part of the world by winning its third straight tournament championship, this time in Lakeview.

The Braves scored 124 points, with Henley placing second with 95, followed in order by Lakeview 68, Mazama 64, Grant Union 60, Mt. Shasta 60, Bonanza 56, Tulelake 40, Klamath Union 28, Fall River 20, Crane 12, Chiloquin 8 and North Lake 4.

Modoc won six of the 14 individual titles along the way and were missing some wrestlers to vacation and illness.

"This time around teams bought the entire squads to Lakeview, so it was a tougher tournament than normal," said Modoc Coach Shaun Wood. "We did quite well and our conditioning is improving."

Modoc's Jaafar Mirholi avenged last weekend's loss to Lakeview's Ryle Ferry, by pinning him at the 48 second mark in the first round in the championship match.

Travis Wood had no trouble winning the 145 pound division, pinning S. Horn, Grant Union, in 37 seconds of the first round.

Jason Jones, still unbeaten this season, won the 160-pound division over Erik Lentz of Mazama, 9-4.

Modoc's Brad Bell, 189 pounds, pinned Shane Bourne, Henley, in 2:28 for the title.

Joey Catania decisioned Lakeview's Steven McFarland 12-11 for the title in that division.

Cory Bell pinned Zach Thomas of Bonanza at 3:08 to win the heavyweight title. Modoc's Blake Owens took a third place.

Hank Raabe took a third place at 112 pounds, Brian Weed took third at 119 pounds, Nick Hawes took a third at 125 pounds, Jesse Harer took third at 160 pounds. In fifth place were Sheridan Crutcher at 125 pounds, and Mark Main and Ian Jacques at 171 pounds.

Last Wednesday, the Braves whipped Foothill 47-26. The Braves were without Cory Bell for that match.

In for Bell, who was ill, was Owens and he promptly went out and pinned Foothill's heavyweight for the win.

The Braves did well, with Catania pinning his opponent, Brad Bell pinning his opponent, Travis Wood winning by pin, and Raabe won by pin. Brian Weed got a technical pin.

Mark Main won his match 15-0, Jones won his match 11-5, Luke Hammerness won 19-4, Hawes won 15-2. Crutcher, Mirholi. Bill Hammerness each lost matches.

For the season, Jones is 14-0, Wood is 13-1, Cory Bell is 11-1, Brad Bell is 12-1. Mirholi is 12-2 and Catania is 13-2.

Good use for Christmas tree

Don't just toss that used Christmas tree into the landfill, it has a good use for fish habitat.

There will be a free Christmas Tree drop point opposite the east end of the Modoc High Football Field, on CDF property. Look for an open gate at Ninth Street.

The discarded trees will be collected at that spot and then transported and anchored into Dorris Reservoir.

December 31, 2003

News

Winter storms hit area hard, more snow in the forecast

Major winter storms hit northern California over the Christmas weekend, but Alturas and Modoc seemed to avoid the major problems of other areas. The forecast calls for continued severe winter weather through Monday with snow showers common. The National Weather Service is predicting another six to 10 inches of snow in the area by Thursday night, with the snow level dropping to 2,000 feet on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. Alturas and Canby received about six inches of snow, with the mountains getting well over a foot. Adin reported seven to eight inches, Lookout had over 10-inches. By contrast, Cedarville reported very little snow accumulation.

Modoc was tame compared to areas like Chester, with 36 inches, Burney, 15 inches, and even downtown Redding, which got hit with eight to 14 inches. In addition, heavy snows closed Interstate 5 between Redding and Medford. Pacific Power and Light also lost service to over 4,000 customers in western Siskiyou County and parts of Oregon. Modoc reported no outages.

According to Steve Riley, Modoc National Forest weather watch, 14.5 inches of snow has been measured for December. The measured precipitation for the month is 2.87 inches, so far, with more on the way. That's well above the 1.4 inch average for the month. Last December, only .86 inches of moisture was measured for the month. Over the past seven days, 1.36 inches of precipitation has been recorded.

The record precipitation for December is 4.15 inches, set in 1964.

No injuries in Alturas house fire

There were no injuries in a house fire at the Futterman residence, First and Caldwell Streets Sunday afternoon.

According to Alturas Fire Chief Joe Watters, the fire was started when embers from a wood stove escaped the chimney and ignited the wood shingle roof. The fire burned through the shingles and into the roof structure and into the attic area which had been turned into a room. Watters estimates the fire had been burning for about two hours before it was discovered by the family and reported. When firemen arrived, it was burning hot, and took about two-and-a-half hours to extinguish.

Watters said there was fire damage to the roof and extensive smoke and water damage inside the second story of the home. He said the fire department managed to save about 90 percent of the furniture and belongings and none of the family was hurt.

The AFD had 13 firemen fighting the blaze, which was complicated by the home's hillside location and a strong winter storm.

Moderate injuries in wreck on ice, snow

An Alturas woman, Debra J. Reynolds, age 49, sustained moderate injuries in a single-vehicle accident Dec. 24, 4:35 p.m. on State Highway 139, 3.4 miles north of Loveness Road.

The local California Highway Patrol reports that Reynolds was driving a 1994 Isuzu pickup southbound at approximately 45-50 m.p.h. when she lost control on the snow and ice-covered highway. The rig slid across the northbound lane and off the east side. The pickup overturned one time, coming to rest on its wheels. Reynolds was transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas. A passenger in the pickup, Niles Reynolds, age 15, sustained minor injuries. Both occupants were wearing seatbelts. An accident Dec. 25, about 9 a.m. resulted in damage to a 1994 Ford Explorer, but no injures to the occupants.

According to the CHP, Daniel Prudencio, 22, Carson City, was northbound on U.S. 395 north of Sagehen Summit, traveling too fast for conditions and attempted to slow down. The Explorer slid on the ice, rotated in acounterclockwise direction and ran off the road. The vehicle overturned and came to rest on its left side. Prudencio was traveling with three other adults and a seven-month old baby, and no one was hurt.

Snow and ice were also contributing factors in a single-vehicle accident Dec. 29, 10:15 a.m. on U.S. 395, south of Fillman Road.

The CHP states that Tim Burke, age 45, Alturas, was driving southbound at an unsafe speed for roadway conditions. The road was covered with ice and snow. He attempted to pass a southbound snow plow on the left, but because of oncoming traffic, applied the 1996 Jeep's brakes. The vehicle lost traction, slid off the east side of the road and rolled over. Burke was wearing a seatbelt and was not hurt.

There were also no injuries in a single-vehicle accident Dec. 29, 8 a.m. on U.S. 395 north of Ash Valley Road.

According to the CHP, Thomas Cleveland, age 53, Salem, Or., was driving a 1997 Honda northbound at an unsafe speed for the snow and ice-covered highway, lost control and the vehicle slid off the road, colliding with a small juniper tree. The impact resulted in moderate damage to the Honda, but Cleveland was wearing a seatbelt and was not hurt.

Help the Aquatic Center plan, and win $2,004 cash

The year 2004 could start off sweet for one local person. The Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee (MARC) is holding a drawing and you may be the winner of $2,004 in cash.

The first prize is $2,004, second prize is two Southwest airline tickets to anywhere Southwest Airline flies in the Continental U.S.A., and the third prize is 100 gallons of regular unleaded gas.

The drawing will be held at midnight on January 1, 2004 at the New Year's Eve Family Dance that starts at 8:30 p.m. on New Year's Eve.

Tickets for the drawing can be purchased for $5 each or six for $25. If you purchase $25 worth of tickets, you will receive two free admissions to the dance. Each ticket has a coupon on it for a free 16-oz. Pepsi fountain drink at Alturas Chevron, donated by Alturas Pepsi Cola.

The second prize, the airline tickets, is donated by Joe and Lori Catania, and the third prize, 100 gallons of gas, is donated by Ed Staub and Sons. MARC committee members will be out in the community throughout December selling these drawing tickets. You can also get your tickets by contacting Joe Catania, Kip Lybarger, Bernice Miller, Eleanor Dorton, Ann Francis, Teresa Jacques, Mike and Debbie Mason, Gavin Kleinman, Roy and Ardie Ferry, Doreen Powers, Emilie Martin, Patricia Cantrall, or buy your tickets at the door of the dance.

The New Year's Eve Family Dance is sponsored by "Families Matter," Modoc Alcohol and Drug, Alturas 21st Century Learning Centers, Modoc Tobacco Education Program, and MARC. Admission is $5 per person and children 12 and younger $3. This event is an alcohol, drug and tobacco-free event. Parents are encouraged to come celebrate with their children. Children 12 years old and younger need to come with an adult.

All proceeds for the drawing and the New Year's Family Dance will go to creating a recreation district and indoor Aquatic and Recreation Center for Modoc County. For more information call 233-7125.

Obituaries:

Cynthia B. (Steward) Stefani

A Memorial service for Alturas resident Cynthia Belle Stefani, will be held Saturday, January 3, 2004 at 12 noon at the Christian Life Assembly Church, 225 West B Street, in Alturas. Pastor Jerry Chilson will officiate. Mrs. Stefani, 47, passed away at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif. on Tuesday, December 30, 2003.

Born Cynthia Steward, to a large family in Cedarville, Calif. on March 31, 1956, she had made Alturas her home for many years. She was most recently employed as a driver for Sage Stage and as a server at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Alturas, before being diagnosed with cancer in late summer. Donations in Mrs. Stefani's memory may be directed to the Modoc Medical Center, 228 McDowell Street, Alturas, CA 96101.

A complete obituary will follow

Beverley S. Brown

Beverley Brown passed away early the morning of December 23, 2003 in Columbus, Ohio. She was 55 years of age. Beverley was born in Alturas, Calif. on October 16, 1948 where she resided until graduating from Modoc High School. After graduating, and while attending Shasta College in Redding, she met her husband, Ron Brown.

Beverley is survived by Ron; her two daughters, Aimee Brown and Shauna Ward, along with Shauna's husband, Edward Ward, and two granddaughters, Alexandra and Kathryn Ward. Beverley is also survived by her parents, Lyle and Mattie Dunn of Alturas, Calif. as well as by her sister, Shirley Tonn and her brother Roger Dunn. Along with Shirley's husband Ray Tonn and Shirley's sons Travis and his wife Emily and Trevor Tonn, Beverley also leaves a number of relatives in Alturas, Northern California and Oregon.

Beverley was a loving wife and mother. She was active throughout her life in a number of church and civic leadership roles, and she was a gifted decorator and gourmet cook. While throughout her married life she traveled extensively around the world and lived in various locations around the United States, she always considered Alturas home. For that reason, her family brought her home for her final resting place.

Services were held on Monday, December 29 at the Federated Community Church in Alturas, and she was buried in the Alturas Cemetery.

Ellen Fulcher

Ellen Fulcher of Alturas, Calif. passed away in her home on December 25, 2003. There will be a Memorial Service held January 11, 2004 at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 1450 Warner St., Alturas, Calif. A complete obituary to follow at a later date.

Sports

High school teams get back in action

Area high school teams will get back in action next weekend, with the Modoc High Wrestling team at the big Anderson Tournament Jan. 9-10. The Modoc High Basketball teams start league play against Mt. Shasta Jan. 10 and travel to Weed Jan. 13. On Jan. 16, they are home against Burney.

Bell leads Braves in wrestling rankings

Modoc Heavyweight Cory Bell is ranked number one in the division by MaxPreps, leading a solid group of ranked Braves.

Travis Wood is holding down the number two spot at 145 pounds, with Lander Beyer of Shasta holding the top spot.

Jason Jones is ranked third at 160 pounds, behind Nick Hernandez of Pleasant Valley, first, and Paradise's John Eaton, second.

Luke Hammerness has the number three ranking at 152 pounds. Jeff Gross, Oroville is ranked number one and Robert Johnson, Corning is number two.

Modoc's Brad Bell is ranked third at 189 pounds, behind Robbie Basinger, West Valley, number one and Kyle Bergstedt, Paradise, second.

Joey Catania is ranked fifth at 215 pounds. The top wrestler in that division is Erik Nye, of Red Bluff.

The Braves are ranked second in all schools in the North Section, with Red Bluff, first. Shasta, third, Willows, fourth and Orland, fifth. The Braves are ranked number one in small schools with Durham, second and Mt. Shasta, third. Red Bluff is the top-ranked large school and Willows is the top ranked medium school.