1998

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January, 1998
 
Record news summaries for Jan. 8, 1998
  • Stop when school bus flashes red lights
  • Cows die from tumble onto Main Street
  • Modoc receives $2 million in Forest Receipts
  • Major injuries in traffic mishaps

The forecast: calls for continued winter weather through Monday.

Stop when school bus red lights flash

Schools are back in session and children of all ages will once again be walking to and from their bus stops and schools. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) reminds all mo torists that effective January 1, 1998, the statute regulat ing school bus sig nals and stops has been amended.

The law now requires the driver of a school bus to acti vate the bus' flashing red lights at all times when the school bus is stopped for the purpose of loading or unload ing students. This is a signifi cant change in the previous law which only required the activation of red lights when children would be crossing the road after exiting a school bus.

It's early, but so far, Modoc drivers are pretty much ignor ing or are unaware of the law and its requirements.

Jerry Hall, Transportation Director for Modoc Joint Unified School District, said that on Monday and Tuesday drivers simply did not stop for the flashing red lights, in ei ther direction.

"The CHP could have issued hundreds of tickets in front of the Middle School and Elementary School," said Hall. "I just don't think people are aware that they have to stop when the red lights on school buses are flashing. Our drivers do have the option to take license plate numbers and report those to the CHP."

Hall is hoping the increased awareness and public atten tion will get people on the right track. He said there are very few problems with traffic passing the red lights on rural roads, most of the problems occur in town.

In Surprise Valley, Bob Staton said people just drove right by the buses with the flashing red lights. He figures the pub lic just isn't aware of the new law yet.

"We solved our problem at the elementary school by mov ing the bus stop into the parking lot out of traffic," said Staton. "We'll still use the red lights because the lot is acces sible to the public, but it should work out slick."

As the primary law en forcement agency responsible for traffic enforcement, the CHP is reminding drivers about the recent amendments to the law and the appropriate course of action when ap proaching a stopped school bus. California Vehicle Code section 22454(a) states in part:

"The driver of any vehicle upon meeting or overtaking, from either direction, any school bus equipped with signs as required in this code that is stopped for the purpose of loading or unloading any school children and displays a flashing red light signal and stop alarm, if equipped, visi ble from front or rear, shall bring the vehicle to a stop im mediately before passing the school bus and shall not pro ceed past the school bus until the flashing red light signal and stop alarm, if equipped, cease operation."

The CHP encourages all drivers to be alert and cau tious when approaching buses loading or unloading children. Additionally, drivers are re minded to allow extra time dur ing their daily commutes to allow for possible delays and traffic congestion at school bus stops.

"CHP officers will strictly enforce traffic violations in volv ing motorists who elect to pass school buses with acti vated flashing red lights," Northern Division Chief Ed Lafond said. "Every day in California, school buses trans port over a million students to and from school. With the motoring pub lic's support of the new law, school buses will continue to be among the safest forms of transportation available to our children," said Chief Lafond.

Cows die after tumble onto Main

Two cows died December 30 after tumbling out of a mov ing stock trailer onto Main Street at the intersection of 10th Street about 3:30 p.m. A dozen other cows in the trailer took off following the accident.

According to Alturas Chief of Police Larry Pickett, Dwight Bennett was driving the load of SX Ranch cattle on Main Street from the Modoc Veterinary Center where they had been inoculated earlier.

According to Pickett, the latch on the stock trailer was not secured tightly and the door sprung open allowing the cattle to fall out. Two cows were dead on Main Street while the oth ers scattered in different directions. One cow was found roaming in Brooks Park, about a mile away from the acci dent scene.

"We would really like to commend Randy Bethel of Bethel's Propane for his quick ac tion at the scene," said Pickett. "The situa tion could have been a lot worse, but he was right on top of it and saved a lot of other prob lems or pos sible injuries."

Bethel, whose business is about a half block away from the accident scene, took his propane truck to the site immedi ately after the mishap and hoisted the dead cows off the street and out of traffic.

The roaming cattle were rounded up and placed in an area behind Bethel's Propane. According to Pickett, Jami and Joe Harris were on horseback and helped round up the strays. In addition, veterinar ian Dave Jacquot responded to the scene to as sist.

Modoc receives $2 million in receipts

Modoc County received $2,071,948 in Forest Receipts for 1997. The funds are collected primarily from timber harvest receipts and other uses.

The funds are split evenly between county roads and schools. Lassen County received $1,754,561, Siskiyou re ceived $5,840,735, and Plumas County received $1,721,985.

Final payments to Modoc and 10 other California Counties are computed under a provision of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993. That Act provides for payments to states for fiscal year 1997 of 76 percent of the five-year average payments for fiscal years 1986-90 for those national forests affected by decisions on the northern spotted owl. Without that provision, Modoc would have received just $1,071,000.

Forest receipts have been a major source of income for county roads and schools and with the slowdown and pro jected reduction in timber harvest on the Modoc Forest, fur ther reductions have county officials concerned.

Major injuries in ice mishap

Slush on the road was the culprit in a single vehicle ac cident January 2, 1998, 11:45 a.m. which caused major in juries to the driver.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Albert Angulo, 83, Alturas, was driv ing a 1991 Toyota 4-runner southbound on County Road 71 at about 30-35 m.p.h. and en tered a moderate curve cov ered with slush. The vehicle slid off the west side of the road and struck a large pine tree. Angulo was transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas.

There were no injuries in s two-vehicle accident Jan. 3, 1998, 9:25 a.m. on County Road 58B.

A 1986 Cadillac driven by Rowdy Joe Campbell, 16, Likely was southbound on CR 58B at about 20 m.p.h. and a 1991 Honda driven by Joyce Schmidt, Alturas, was north bound at about 20 m.p.h. Campbell was driving to the left entering a left hand turn and struck the left front of the Schmidt vehicle.

There were no injuries in a rollover on U.S. 395 January 6, 4:10 p.m. The CHP reports that Tracy Ann Weed, 20, Alturas, was driving a 1995 Nissan pickup northbound at about 50 m.p.h. when the vehi cle began to slide out of con trol. She attempted to regain control of the vehicle, but could not and it crossed both lanes of traffic and rolled when it reached the west side of the highway.

Neither Weed, nor a pas senger in the vehicle, Carol Ann Weed, 47, sustained in jury.

 
Record news for January 15, 1998
  • Truckers want say on city parking ban
  • Burglars hit 5 Alturas businesses
  • Gang speakers addresses parents, teens
  • Tip needed in Modoc elk poaching case
  • County seats up for election in June
  • New manager takes helm at Holiday Market

Obituaries

 
  • Henrietta Flournoy Smith
  •  
The forecast: Look for scattered showers today with snow level at about 5500 feet. High in the lower 40s. Rain is forecast for Friday with partly cloudy Saturday and Sunday. Look for rain and snow Monday.
Truckers have say on City parking plan
About two dozen people representing truckers in Alturas showed up at Tuesday night's Alturas City Council meeting to voice concerns about a city plan to curb truck parking in the city limits.
The City's intent is to limit parking of heavy vehicles on city streets, especially in residential areas, in an effort to protect the street surfaces. Mayor Dick Steyer told the crowd that Tuesday night's meeting represented a starting point and he expected several more meetings before new restric tions were adopted.
The truckers concerns centered around the ability to make a living, being able to park at their homes and overall security of their trucks.
Truckers argued that they have their tools and equipment at home and do most of the light repair work at their homes. Additionally, they were very concerned that if they had to park their rigs somewhere else the potential of theft or van dalism was increased dramatically.
Some truckers argued that trucks are not the main reason for the breakup of city streets, and most people, including the council agreed that there isn't really a good, solid street in Alturas, outside of Main Street.
While the meeting did become excited at times, Alturas City Clerk Cary Baker said it was a productive meeting where both sides got to voice their opinions and bring up points of concern.
In the end, the truckers were asked, and agreed, to form a smaller working committee to try to iron out concerns with the city. The truckers will be meeting among themselves in the near future and their recommendations will be brought back to a work session of the council for further discussion.
Following the work session, the city could develop an ordi nance that might be better accepted by truckers while still protecting city street integrity.
Burglars hit five city busi nesses Tuesday
Burglars struck at five Alturas businesses late Tuesday night and at tempted to burglarize a sixth, according to the Alturas Police Department.
Those business hit by the burglars were TCI, Shear Creation, Dawn's Paper Clip, Coast to Coast Warehouse and Farmer's Insurance. An attempt was made to enter Modoc Minute Lube, but failed.
According to Sergeant Stacy Callaghan, the bur glars took money, checks, some merchandise and change.
They entered TCI by breaking a window, then pried open the alley door into the Farmers Insurance building. Once inside there, they forced their way into Coast to Coast Warehouse and Dawn's Paper Clip. At Dawn's they stole Cross pens, $60 in change and created a gen eral mess by spilling the contents of sales racks.
Callaghan said the case is under investigation, but there are no suspects at this time.
'Powerful' Steele to speak to parents, teens about gang pre vention,
It's an eye-opening, heart wrenching experi ence par ents and teenagers may not want to miss this Saturday in Tulelake.
A special training which will provide in sight and help all parents and teenagers with "Gang Awareness" will be open to the public on Satur day, Jan. 17 from 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. at the Tulelake Butte County Fairgrounds, Home Economics building in Tule lake.
"Powerful" speaker Mag gie Steele, a consul tant with the State of Cali fornia, and based in Sacramento, will be the guest presenter on "Gang Prevention and Awareness" and how to keep communica tion channels open between teens and parents.
Steele, a much sought after speaker through out the coun try, addressed 110 students in Berkeley recently. She will speak at an school assembly on Friday, Jan. 16 at 9 a.m. at Tule lake High School, fol lowed by a 10 a.m. assem bly presentation at Tulelake Ju nior High School.
Migrant Educa tion is sponsoring the public event.
Steele speaks from per sonal experience and will give the program in English, with a Span ish translator on Saturday.
She is of American Indian and Spanish de scent. As a gang member as a child, she shares what it cost her and her family and then travels be yond to help parents and teens. She will be ac compa nied by a young man, the son of migrant parents, who will also share his experiences as a member of a gang, and what toll it has taken on his family and himself.
Steele is now a consultant who also works as a mediator with gangs, school districts and po lice. She and guest Su san Cooper of Dorris, will team up later in the day, to provide role playing activities to help and teach parents how to work with their children.
"We've tried for some time to arrange to have Maggie Steele come to speak here, and we're very pleased she's fi nally coming," shares Debbie Worch, Secondary school ad visor at Tulelake. "She is such a powerful speaker.
When she talks about her own life, in some in stances, people have had to excuse themselves, because they just can't handle it."
Maria Duran of Alturas, who works with Migrant Edu cation explained, "This pro gram is not just open to Mi grant Ed parents. There is re ally a need for training for all parents in prevention of gang-related activities and how to communicate with their children. But, we are seeing big problem areas with gangs and youths in the Newell and Tulelake areas. Parents need this training and we hope they will take ad vantage of it and attend."
No pre-registration is re quired and the class is free to everyone. Lunch will be pro vided.
Call Debbie Worch at 667-3303 or Maria Du ran in Al turas at 233-5541 for further informa tion.
Tip needed in elk poaching case
A developing herd of Rocky Mountain elk in Modoc County's north Warner Mountains is without one of its most regal bulls, a mas sive, 6-point by 6-point, 1000-pound animal killed by a poacher the Department of Fish and Game would like to find.
Unfortunately for state game wardens, the trail is cold. So, Fish and Game is asking for the public's help.
"We need a fresh lead," said warden Cal Albright, who was led to the carcass of the elk by a deer hunter last October in a remote area along the west slope of the Warners off Lassen Creek Road between Lassen and Willow creeks.
Albright said someone shot the elk around October 6, tak ing hind quarter and back strap meat and leaving the rest--including a set of antlers possibly bound for the record book.
Albright asked that persons with informa tion that might help the DFG locate the elk poacher or poachers contact him at 530-233-3263 or call the department's secret witness hotline, CalTIP, at 1-888-DFG-CALTIP.
Secret witness tipsters can be eligible for a cash reward. The elk poachers could face fines of up to $1,000 each or six months in jail, or both.
Fish and Game said the North Warner Mountains elk herd apparently has devel oped through migration of Rocky Mountain elk from Oregon into the northeastern corner of California over the past 10 years.
Several seats up in June election
There are several seats coming open in the county this year and will be on the June 2, 1998 ballot.
For the first time, the primary election will have an open ballot with all political parties listed on the same ballot.
A pair of County Supervisors, Ben Zandstra in District One, (Surprise Valley) and District Five's (Tulelake/Newell) Nancy Huffman, terms expire this year and will be on the ballot. Zandstra is completing a first term and Huffman is completing a sec ond.
Modoc Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier will have his position up for election in June. He will have to declare his intent to run for re-election by February 4. Dier is finishing a term after being appointed to the position.
County Offices up for election this year in clude: District Attorney Hugh Comisky; Sheriff Bruce Mix; Treasurer/Tax Collector, Linda Monroe; Auditor/Recorder, Judi Stephens; Clerk, Maxine Madison; Assessor Josie Johnson and Superintendent of Schools, Carol Harbaugh.
Nomination papers for the above offices can be taken out February 9 and must be filed no later than March 6. Contact County Clerk Maxine Madison for more information and the details on how to file nomination papers.
The final day to register to vote in the June 2 election is May 4. Madison stresses that people who have moved, or had a name change must report those changes or re-regis ter to be eligible to vote in the election.
New manager takes the helm at Holiday
When Carty Van Nes came to Alturas a couple of weeks ago to become the new man ager at Holiday market, he ex pected that people would have questions about prices, brands and delivery sched ules. Instead, Van Nes found that what people were most interested in was if, under his manage ment, Holiday would continue to support various children's and sports activi ties in the community.
"A lot of people have been nervous," Van Nes said. They want to know if we're going to keep doing the things that Holiday has done in this community. I've had more people ask about that than anything else."
Van Nes said he wants ev eryone to "rest at ease" and be assured that Holiday will continue to help out as it has in the past. He also noted that all of the Holiday stores he has worked at have been in volved in community projects and that philosophy comes from the Holiday main office.
Van Nes started with Holi day Quality Foods in 1973 as the manager of their store in Orland. He then moved on to one of their Chico stores before running his own business for six years. In 1994 he came back to Holiday to run their Corning store before moving to Alturas.
Modoc County was famil iar place for Van Nes since he spent about three years in Cedarville as a child. He also has a brother who lives in Al turas. Van Nes feels that peo ple in Alturas "have been real nice."
So far, the biggest differ ence for Van Nes between the Al turas store and others he has managed in the past has been getting things delivered.
"Down in the valley, we could just transfer things back and forth between stores that same afternoon. Up here, if you call for a delivery, they kind of want to know if its snow ing."
Welcome to winter in Modoc County.
 
Obituaries
 
Henrietta Flournoy Smith
Native Modocer Henrietta Flournoy Smith, one of the "Golden Girls" as she and her sisters have been affection ately called by friends over the years, died January 11, 1998, at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif.
Mrs. Smith had observed her 84th birthday on Christmas Day, Dec. 25. She was born in 1913, to William Henry and Gladys Williams Flournoy at the home of Mary Guill Williams, her great-grandmother in Alturas, Calif. That home remains to this day.
Henrietta grew up on her parents' ranch in Likely with her five sisters and two brothers. She dearly loved the ranch life and wide open spaces, riding her favorite horse "Snip." Her equestrian skills were sharp and she won a race on Snip at one of the rodeos in Alturas while she was in her teens. "She was a real cowgirl," recall family members.
Henrietta married "Bob" Robert L. Smith in Carson City, Nev. on September 29, 1933. They spent many years in San Francisco after their marriage. She was an excellent book keeper and was able to find a job wherever they chose to live.
Her parents, husband Bob, sister Eunice and brother Charles preceded her in death, some years ago.
She is survived by her sisters Lois Enefer, Claire Goulden, June Lord, and Ruth Crew, all of Alturas; and brother Jack Flournoy of Fresno.
Services were held graveside at the Alturas Cemetery at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 14. Family and friends gath ered at the home of Claire Goulden in Alturas following the service.
 
Record News for January 22, 1998
No opposition, no election in city
County considers joining refuge lawsuit
Modoc Forest has interim Supervisor
Obituaries
Esther Phyllis (Ward) Sutton
Robert Charles Roberts
Irving Cushman Elliott
Chester P. Burger
Earle Payne
 
The forecast: Light rain at times today and mostly cloudy tonight. Friday calls for increasing cloudiness and a chance of rain. Snow levels about 5,000 feet. The sun shows up Saturday -- goes away a lot.
No opposition, no city election tne election
There is no opposition in the scheduled Alturas City Election of April 14, therefore there will be no election.
According to Alturas City Clerk Cary Baker, two city council seats and the office of the Treasurer were up for election. Both incumbent councilmen Dick Steyer, serving as mayor, and John Kerr filed their nomination papers, but no one filed in op position. Those two will re main on the council with four year terms.
Steyer and Kerr, Kerry Merwin, Jack Ochs and George Andreason make up the Alturas City Council.
Alturas City Treasurer Kathy Alves filed for re-elec tion to another four-year term and was unopposed. She will re tain her seat.
The last day to file nomi nation papers in the city elec tion was January 16.
The county and general primary election slated for June will have several local county seast up.
For the first time, the pri mary election will have an open ballot with all political parties listed on the same bal lot.
A pair of County Supervisors, Ben Zandstra in District One, (Surprise Valley) and District Five's (Tulelake/Newell) Nancy Huffman, terms expire this year and will be on the ballot. Zandstra is completing a first term and Huffman is com pleting a sec ond.
Modoc Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier will have his position up for election in June. He will have to declare his intent to run for re-elec tion by February 4.
County Offices up for elec tion this year in clude: District Attorney Hugh Comisky; Sheriff Bruce Mix; Treasurer/Tax Collector, Linda Monroe; Auditor/Recorder, Judi Stephens; Clerk, Maxine Madison; Assessor Josie Johnson and Superintendent of Schools, Carol Harbaugh.
Nomination papers for the above offices can be taken out February 9 and must be filed no later than March 6. Contact County Clerk Maxine Madison for more informa tion and the details on how to file nomination papers.
The final day to register to vote in the June 2 election is May 4. Madison stresses that people who have moved, or had a name change must report those changes or re-regis ter to be eligible to vote in the elec tion.
County considers joining lawsuit on refuge farms
Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday opted to get more in formation before joining or intervening in a lawsuit affect ing farming on Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges.
The lawsuit was filed in December by environmental or ganizations led by the Klamath Forest Alliance and targets Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. The lawsuit charges that current agriculture practices on refuge leased-lands in the refuges conflict with federal law and wildlife needs.
On the advice of County Counsel Hugh Comisky and Land Use Committee's Sean Curtis, the county will ask California Farm Bureau legal counsel Carolyn Richardson for her opinion on the situation.
Comisky explained to the board that it had three options: to join the suit, intervene, or file a separate lawsuit. Intervening in the suit would place the county on the side of Babbitt, said Curtis. Siskiyou County is also considering intervening in the suit.
"Carolyn Richardson is the luminary on these issues, es pecially on the west coast," said Comisky. He stressed the advantage of getting her opinion before proceeding. Comisky and Curtis were attending a conference in Sacramento Wednesday and intended to talk with Richardson at that time.
While farmers in the Tulelake area had originally de clined help from the county, Curtis said they now feel the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service "invited" this lawsuit and "things have gotten much worse."
According to Curtis, if the lawsuit is successful, farming on all refuge lands would cease. That would impact about $1 million dollars in county revenue and about $22 million in production, he said.
Curtis told the Board the Tule Lake and Lower Klamath Refuges were formed differently than any other refuge in the nation. The formation of these refuges included the pro vision that the 22,000 acres could be leased and farmed. He said the environment groups want these refuges treated like others in the nation where farming is not considered a com patible use.
In addition to the lawsuit filed by Klamath Forest Alliance, an earlier suit in 1994 was settled out of court that has caused the farmers grief, said Curtis. That lawsuit re sulted in, among other things, a proposed Integrated Pest Management Plan that could result in eliminating the use of most traditional pesticides on those lands. That plan could eliminate much of the agriculture production on those lands, said Curtis.
One of the reasons Curtis feels it's important for the county to be involved is so that if a settlement is reached, it addresses the county's concerns.
MNF has interim Supervisor
The Modoc National Forest has a new interim Forest Supervisor, Steve Bishop, who takes over the duties vacated by Diane Henderson-Bramlette's resignation last month.
Bishop introduced himself to the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday morning. He came to Modoc from the Regional Office. He told the board he had also worked in Sierra County and understood the needs and importance of the forest and its activities to rural areas.
Bishop said he intends to work closely with the county to build and continue a solid working relationship with local government.
Early in the day, Forest Public Affairs Officer Nancy Gardner told Supervisors the Forest was on a fast track (after months of inaction) at delineating the process and re sults of the proposed employment reduction of some 24 per manent positions. The Modoc Forest is facing about a $3 million budget shortfall, Gardner affirmed, and was harder hit than other forests in the region because of its diminished timber harvest programs.
On Tuesday, employees of the Forest gathered in Alturas to come up with their alternatives and options to meet the budget crunch. Those ideas, plus management ideas and ideas from local government will all be pooled to come up with a plan. Gardner told the Board the forest is now moving quickly to come to resolution and is looking at a five-year plan of action.
Joe Colt, Chairman of the Board, said the county was pleased to have input into the plan and stressed that while the job losses will be hard to absorb, sometimes cuts make things work more efficiently.
"What's important," said Colt, "is that the Forest comes first. If cuts will make the operation run better and more ef ficiently, we need to consider that."
Gardner said the Forest Service was actively seeking the public's perceptions and ideas on the budget cuts and was very open to suggestion. She also said that the county should anticipate, with the present mood in Congress, that the forest budgets would continue to decrease. She further explained that while there were 24 permanent positions on the block, the loss of scores of temporary positions has a major impact on operations
"We know we're going to have to be more enterprising in our management and operations," said Gardner.
In other action, the Board received the Modoc Medical Center financial report, showing its year-to-date losses nearing $3 million. Supervisors expressed concern over the loss, but are anticipating a decrease in that loss amount over the next year.
The hospital's Teresa Jacques told supervisors she sees the hospital moving in a positive direction and feels better about future projections.
The Board also approved a $5,000 contract for an interim administrator from Redding Medical, to temporarily as sume the duties of Hospital Administrator Woody Laughnan, who is undergoing medical treatment.
Obituaries:
Esther Phyllis (Ward) Sutton
Esther Phyllis (Ward) Sutton, age 91, passed away in her sleep at Surprise Valley Health Care Center in Cedarville, 1998.
She was born in Susanville, Calif. to parents, David and Lida Odette Ward. Esther was the oldest of six children and lived most of her life in Susanville. She graduated from Lassen Union High School and attended College of the Siskiyou's.
Esther married Samuel E. Sutton, June 1926 and together they raised two daughters. She was gifted in many ways, writing poetry, stories, and was an artist painting many pic tures, along with being an avid reader. She was interested in the history of Lassen County as her ancestors pioneered into Lassen County in the mid 1800's. Esther had a great love and understanding of children.
Esther was a past Blue Bird and Camp Fire Girl leader, past president of the Native Daughters of the Golden West and past president of Xi Beta Nu Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi.
Esther is survived by two daughters, Sheila Holcomb of Red Bluff, formerly of Alturas, Sara Jane Fountain of Santa Rosa; sister Lyda Bacon, Santa Rosa, six grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren, three nieces and one nephew. She was preceded in death by her parents and four brothers Ernest, Kenneth, Rollie and Harold Ward. Her husband passed away in 1978.
A memorial for Esther will be planned in the spring in Susanville. Donations may be made to Surprise Valley Health Care, P. O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104.
Robert Charles Roberts
Developer and rancher R.C. "Bob" Roberts, a leader in the manufactured home industry and long-time cat tle rancher in Lassen County, died Thursday, January 15, 1998, in the Marin General Hospital af ter a long battle with cancer. A loving husband and beloved father, he was 61.
He was born in Redlands, Calif. and after graduating from Redlands High School, he furthered his education at Cal Polytechnic State Uni versity and University of California, Davis. He later lived for many years in Marin County, Calif.
R.C. began his career as a builder in Santa Maria and "quickly became known as a mover and shaker as he rose to be one of the major devel opers of mobile home com munities throughout Cali fornia and other western states," recall family mem bers. Mr. Roberts provided homes for over 10,000 people over the past three decades. In the mid 1970s, he began building his own Roberts Homes, "rated among the highest quality manufac tured homes in the indus try."
As a past president of the Mobile Home Dealers Asso ciation and CEO of his own R.C. Roberts organization based in San Rafael, Mr. Roberts was a forceful leader during the early 1980s in the technological revolution to improve the materials, con struction and design of both manufactured and mobile home communities.
"Through his vision and support, new laws were passed to upgrade the indus try in California," say fam ily members.
In 1984, the West Coast Builders Association voted The Orchard, a new R.C. Roberts park in Santa Rosa, the Best Mobile Home Com munity in their annual awards program.
In the early 1960s, Mr. Roberts began a second ca reer in cattle ranching, when he purchased 1,000 acres of grazing land in Lassen County above Su sanville. Today, his ranch holdings exceed 70,000 acres scattered across the high desert country of northeast ern California where he runs 3,000 head of cattle.
He is perhaps best known throughout the United States and parts of Europe for the vast guest ranch operation he opened on his land in 1987. With his long time concern for wildlife and the envi ronment, he worked closely with the Nature Conser vancy, the Forest Service and BLM to provide the fa cilities and opportunities for families, outdoors people and would-be cowboys, to participate in cattle drives, roundups, brandings and most working ranch activi ties, along with viewing wildlife and riding the rugged land at Spanish Springs.
"My first love has always been cattle ranching," he said. "My reward is seeing this historic way of life pre served and watching the dudes who come here to learn about the land and experi ence the life of a real cow boy."
Mr. Roberts was preceded in death by a daughter Robin and a son Robert "Bo." He is survived by his wife Barbel Roberts; sons Niels and Scott; daughters Nicole Roberts, Suzanne Cenarrusa and Sharon Vondracek; brothers Ronald Roberts of Novato and Raymond Roberts of Redlands; sisters Mary Griesback of Rancho Mirage and Arlene Day and five grandchildren, Maxwell, Geoffrey, Tyler, Keegan and Charli.
A memorial service was held January 21 at 3:00 p.m. at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Belvedere, in Marin County. Funeral services are being handled by Keaton Mortuaries of San Rafael. Private burial will be at Mr. Roberts' ranch.
Contributions in Mr. Roberts' memory, may be di rected to the American Can cer Society or the Diabetes Association.
Irving Cushman Elliott
Former Modoc Union High School Coach and Teacher Irving Cushman Elliott, died at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Cottonwood, Calif. on Thursday morning, January 15, 1998. He was 92.
He was born March 13, 1905 in Lincoln, Nebraska to John P. Elliott and Laura Alice Elliott. He graduated from Corn ing High School in 1923 and Chico State College in 1928. He was a member of the Golden Cats, the first group of Chico State Athletes. Mr. Irv ing was a high school teacher and coach at Alturas from 1928-1938.
Mr. Cushman also served as district superintendent, principal, and coach at Etna, Kelseyville, Ione and McArthur schools, and retired as principal from the Par adise Unified School District.
For the last 25 years, he has enjoyed livestock ranching in Cottonwood, and also loved hunting.
His wife of 40 years, Olive Moore Elliott, preceded him in death.
Survivors include his son Warren Elliott of Auburn; daughter Laura Lourence of Corning; and three grandchil dren, Robert Elliott of Tasmania, Australia; Dawn Miller of Greenbrea, Calif. and Anne Elliott of Auburn, Calif.
Funeral services were held Wednesday, January 21 at 1:00 p.m. at Hoyt-Cole Chapel of Flowers in Red Bluff, with burial following at the Chico Cemetery in Chico, Calif.
Chester P. Burger
A memorial service for Chester P. Burger will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 24 at the Kingdom Hall in McArthur. Pastor Dickie Whitehead will conduct the ser vice.
Chester P. Burger, a resident of McArthur, died Friday, January 16, 1998 in McArthur, Calif. Mr. Burger, a member of the Jehovah's Witnesses Congregation in McArthur, loved living in the Intermountain area. One of the things he liked best was helping others learn about the Bible. He loved fishing the Fall River and was a retired plumber.
Born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania on July 9, 1924, he grad uated from high school in Glendale, Calif. He served during World War II with the U.S. Navy. He and wife Patricia were married on June 28, 1947 in Yuma, Ariz. Mr. Burger worked as a plumber in Southern California for many years, before the family relocated to Lassen County, where they have made their home for the past 22 years. He was 73 at the time of his passing.
He is survived by his wife Patricia Burger of McArthur; daughters Nancy of Bieber and Janet of McKinleyville; son David of Texas; nine grandchildren and five great-grand children.
Contributions in Mr. Burger's memory may be directed to Jehovah's Witness World Wide Work.
Earle Payne
Graveside services for Earle Payne, 86 year old Scott Bar native, are scheduled for Friday, January 23, 1998 at 2:00 p.m. in the Scott Bar Cemetery. Mr. Payne passed away January 19, 1998 at Fairchild Medical Center in Yreka.
Earle was born October 22, 1911 in Scott Bar to Grace and Maitland Payne. He grew up in Scott Bar. He loved to sing and was in a local quartet. He worked as a successful gold miner with his father during the depression and became an explosives expert. From 1934 to 1936, he resided in Marysville and was working for the U.S. Geological Survey so that he could get a "grub-stake" to return to Scott Bar and work the Gumboot mine.
He was an avid hunter and fisherman and loved the out doors. He was married to Betty 'Jessie ' Hegler in 1934 and the couple had three children, Tom, Darlene and Dale (Pat).
He began his state career in 1941 working as a highway maintenance man for the Division of Highways, Dist. 03. He transferred to Dist. 02 and after many promotions, moved to Adin in 1960. In 1973, he retired and was awarded the Division of Highways Safety Award for a record of 32 years. Earle was highly regarded for his expertise on a drilling and powder crew which removed rock slides on the Klamath River Highway during the severe floods of 1955-56. He married Charlotte Allen Payne in 1973 and she preceded him in death in 1995. While in Adin, he was active in the lo cal Lion's Club. In 1995, he returned to his much loved Scott Bar, where his family dates back to before California was a state.
He is survived by his sons and their wives, Tom and Sandra Payne of Scott Bar and Dale (Pat) and Mida Payne of Gazelle; a step-daughter, Margie Sherer and her husband, Don of Canby, two step sons, Ed Allen of Yreka and Jim Allen of Tidewater, Ore.; a cousin, Virgil Nesbitt of Yreka; 5 grandchildren, Michael Payne, Debbie Knotts, Dorena Mello, Yvonne Clay and John Scott Payne and 12 great-grandchildren. Earle was preceded in death by his daugh ter, Darlene; a grandson, Danny Mello and a brother, Merle.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Scott Bar Community Association, General Delivery, Scott Bar, CA 96085. Girdner Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrange ments.
 
Record news for January 29, 1998
Most county officers will run in 1998
January weather is warm, same as last year
City prioritizes street repair projects
MJUSD Board discusses drug situations
Judge Dier announces bid for another term
Obituaries:
Imbach
Hinchey
Fletcher
Slinkard
Winnop
Majority of county officials will run for another term
While most incumbents are expected to file for county of fices in the June 2 primary election, Modoc Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier has made it official. Dier announced his attention to run for another term this week. Dier is finish ing a term after being appointed to the position.
One Modoc County Official, Linda Monroe, Treasurer/Tax Collector has decided not to run for a fourth term. She said she feels it's time to retire and is looking for ward to traveling with her husband. She'll serve through the remainder of her term to January, 1999.
A pair of County Supervisors, Ben Zandstra in District One, (Surprise Valley) and District Five's (Tulelake/Newell) Nancy Huffman, terms expire this year and will be on the ballot. Zandstra is completing a first term and Huffman is completing a sec ond. Zandstra has indi cated he will not seek re-election and Huffman is expected to run again.
County Offices up for election who will be running for re-election are: District Attorney Hugh Comisky; Sheriff Bruce Mix; Auditor/Recorder, Judi Stevens; Clerk, Maxine Madison; Assessor Josie Johnson and Superintendent of Schools, Carol Harbaugh.
Nomination papers for the above offices can be taken out February 9 and must be filed no later than March 6. Contact County Clerk Maxine Madison for more information and the details on how to file nomination papers.
The final day to register to vote in the June 2 election is May 4. Madison stresses that people who have moved, or had a name change must report those changes or re-regis ter to be eligible to vote in the election.
For the first time, the primary election will have an open ballot with all political parties listed on the same ballot. In addition, voters should prepare themselves for several state initiatives.
January weather about same, but without disasters
January 1998, is mirroring the weather of January, 1997, with one notable exception, there have been no major disas ters.
On New Year's Day last year a large portion of the east side of the Warner Mountains slid down into and over Surprise Valley, largely because the mountain ground was over saturated with moisture. Warm rains had fallen on a good snow pack and the two added up a disaster. In two days 1.78 inches of rain was measured in the valley, well more than the area could handle. Lake City got hit the hardest and Highway 299 near the base of Cedar Pass on the east side was washed away.
So the big question, how has El Nino impacted the area so far? Not much it seems. January, 1997, was wet and warm with temperatures into the 50s and very few solid freeze days. January, 1998 is nearly the same.
For instance, from January 1 through January 21, 2.64 inches of moisture was measured in Alturas and last year for the same period, 2.62 inches fell. In Surprise Valley 3.34 inches of moisture was measured in 1998, while 3.51 was measured in 1997.
The forecast is calling for more wet weather through the end of the month so the actual monthly totals between January, 1997 and 1998 could be higher. The total for January, 1997 in Surprise Valley was 3.51 inches and in Alturas it was 3.11.
Normal precipitation for Alturas in January is about 1.43 inches. The U.S. Forest Service and Soil Conservation Service take their annual snow measurements the first week of February and those measurements will show the overall water picture forecast for the year
Alturas sets goals for street repair projects
The Alturas City Council approved a set of priorities for city street repair and mainte nance projects for the Local Transportation Commission.
The set of priorities will go to the LTC at a future meeting and that organization will de cide the overall priority for pro jects in Modoc County, in cluding both county and city work.
Topping the city list is ask ing the LTC to include fund ing of about $500,000 to do the road base work for the next FEMA street overlay project. The FEMA project is still in the works. The city is con cerned that a solid base be put down be fore the FEMA road re-surfacing job is done. The city wants to avoid the situa tion occurring on some FEMA repaired streets, where chuckholes are appearing less than six months after the streets were repaired. East Street between 4th and 8th is a good example. A solid base would alleviate that problem, according to the city.
Second on the city's list of priorities is redoing Carlos from Main to West Street, then south on West.
The third priority is redo ing East Street from Highway 299 to Modoc Street and the fourth is repairing West Street to 4th Street.
The city would like up grading all truck routes within its boundaries as the fifth priority and overlaying the streets in the city business district as the sixth wish.
Following the above priori ties are, in order: bus routes, repairing McDowell from Main to the Hospital, dealing with tourism, parks, recre ation and civic needs and then dealing with the residen tial streets.
The above priorities were passed in resolution form and will be forwarded to the LTC.
MJU Board deals with drug issues
The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees has begun 1998 by giving further consideration to an issue they looked at in 1997 - drug testing. Superin tendent Craig Drennan said that is just one option the Board is considering as part of developing a "package" for addressing drugs in the schools.
Drugs came to the forefront again recently when mem bers of the law enforcement community suggested to the Board that they allow a drug sniffing dog to be used at the schools. At their meeting last week, the Trustees decided that they would like to con sider the drug dog as one part of an overall approach to drug prevention and intervention. They directed Drennan to look at making revisions in existing District policies and they will consider other ways of attacking drugs - includ ing drug testing.
Drennan said a drug test ing program would likely only cover students involved in extracurricular programs. Such tests are being done in other districts and the U.S. Supreme Court has declared that at least one such program used in Oregon passed consti tutional muster. Drennan also noted that at least one candidate for California Gov ernor has declared that he would like to see random drug testing for all students.
Other matters before the Board last week included:
Goals: The Board contin ues to work on the goals pro ject that was begun in October. At that time members of the community gave input as to what goals were important to them. Drennan said the Board will take the informa tion from the community and, "Put it in a workable format so we can get some specific things done." He expects that the Board will have this com pleted in the next month or two.
Lawsuit: The District is of ficially finished with the law suit that resulted from five teenage females being video taped in a Modoc High locker-room without their knowledge or consent. The District has been dismissed as a defen dant without having to pay any damages to any of the plaintiffs. Several teenage males remain as defendants in the case.
Get to class: Beginning next fall, the state law will be different for determining av erage daily attendance (ADA). The state funds the local school district based on ADA. Currently, the District gets to count students as part of their ADA if they have an ex cused absence such as an ill ness or doctor's appointment. For the 1998-99 school year, there will no longer be any such distinction. An absence is an absence regardless of the reason, and the district will not get to count excused absences as part of their ADA.
Proposals by Governor Wilson: The Board also heard about several new pro posals made By Governor Wilson.
One proposal might mean that students at MHS and Modoc Middle School have a school day that is about 25 minutes longer. Schools are currently required to provide a certain number of minutes of instructional time per year. "Passing" time, or the time spent going from one room to another between classes, cur rently counts as part of that total. Wilson has proposed to not have that time count, thus requiring the longer school day.
The students might not only have longer days, they might have fewer days off. Wilson also wants to see Cali fornia schools get rid of teacher inservice days. Cur rent law allows for a district to have eight teacher inservice days per year. Under Wilson's proposal, inservice days would only be allowed if they were in addition to the normal 180 day school year.
Finally, the students who are going to school for more days and longer hours will also need to prove that they are learning something. Wilson wants to end "social promo tion" by requiring that stu dents pass a statewide as sessment test in grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 10 before they can move on to the next grade level. Local school district would not have any say in whether the students in those grades were promoted.
Judge Dier will run for new term
Modoc County Municipal Court Judge Larry L. Dier has filed his declaration of inten tion to run for another term. The declaration was filed early on Monday, January 26, 1998, and is confirmation that Judge Dier will be a candidate for the Municipal Court in the June 2, 1998, primary elec tion.
Judge Dier was appointed to the bench by Gov. Wilson in November 1995. He succeeded Judge Bob Barclay as the Mu nicipal Court Judge when Judge Barclay was elevated to the Superior Court after the retirement of the Honorable Guy Martin Young. Since that time, Judge Dier has been serving in the coordinated Modoc Trial Courts as well as working regularly on as signment in courts throughout California.
Dier said that he looks for ward to continuing the close cooperation he and Superior Court Judge John P. Baker have developed in the admin istration of the Modoc Trial Courts. Recent legislative changes to trial court funding have created new opportuni ties for the courts to be more responsive to the needs of their local communities. Judge Dier stated that he looks for ward to a continuing role as an active participant in this process.
Obituaries:
Patricia Anne Imbach
Patricia "Pat" Anne Imbach of Terrebonne, Oregon died Thursday, January 22, 1998 at St. Charles Medical Center, Bend, Ore. She was 64. At her request no services will be held.
Pat was born November 23, 1933 in Hickory, North Car olina, the daughter of David Newton and Lily Mae (Helms) Newton Cattle. As a young girl she moved with her mother to the San Francisco Bay area and then onto Chino, Calif. where she graduated from Chino High School in 1951.
On August 2, 1952 Pat married William "Bill" A. Im bach, Jr. The couple made their home in the Chino area, where they raised three children and worked side by side in their own business, Mechanical Services, Inc., for over 30 years.
In 1984 Pat, and Bill moved to their ranch in Alturas, Calif., where for 11 years she was the business manager for the family ranching operation. While living in Alturas, Pat derived a great pleasure from raising and showing Australian Cattle dogs and she was an active member of the Australian Cattle Dog Club of America.
In 1995 Pat moved to Terrebonne, Ore. where she and Bill and all of the old cattle dogs retired. Pat enjoyed many ac tivities including knitting, crocheting, reading, yard work and decorating her home. But her greatest pleasure came from learning to use and enjoy her personal computer.
Mrs. Imbach will be remembered for her out going per sonality, her devotion to family and friends, and the love and caring she gave to all of her animals, especially her two cats.
She is survived by her husband of 45 years, Bill Imbach, Terrebonne, Ore.; son and daughter-in-law, Ron and Cindy Imbach, Canby, Calif.; son Larry Imbach, Burns, Ore.; daughter and son-in-law, Holly Imbach and Don Lewis, Prineville, Ore; and grandchildren Ryan and Rachel Im bach, Canby, Calif.; brother and sister-in-law, Bob and Anna Jean Newton, LaVerne, Calif.; sister and brother-in-law, Mary and Pete Fassio, Arnold, Calif; sister-in-law, Margo Bumgarner, Oakland, Calif.; numerous nieces, nephews and friends.
Mrs. Imbach was preceded in death by her father, David Newton; mother Lily Mae Cattle; stepfather, George Cattle; brother, Bud Newton; and aunt, Lee Dedmond.
In lieu of flowers the family requests donations in her memory to made to Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, 2425 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95817, Attn: Joan Bar rett or to any of the many Shriners Hospitals or to a charity of ones choice.
The Prineville Funeral Home is in charge of arrange ments.
James Monroe Hinchey
For 43 years, Jim Hinchey has made Modoc County his home, as a well respected man, tall in stature and long on friends. James Monroe Hinchey died January 25, 1998 in Alturas, Calif. at the Modoc Medical Center Skilled Nurs ing Facil ity, where he had been receiving care since the close of 1997.
He was born in Vernon, Texas, October 18, 1920, and served during World War II as a Corporal with the U.S. Army until his discharge on May 2, 1949. He served in the Civilian Conservation Corps "CCC's" and then held a ca reer with the U.S. Forest Service for 28 years, work ing as a warehouseman for the Modoc National Forest Supervisor's Office at the time of his retirement.
Mr. Hinchey was also a certified Boilermaker and was talented at wood work ing.
He enjoyed fishing and hunting and served his commu nity and the Alturas Baptist Church as a member, Sunday School teacher and a Deacon.
He and Patricia Frances Murphy were married in El Ve rano, Calif. on June 16, 1962 and had been married for 35-1/2 years at the time of his passing.
He is survived by his five children, daughters Valeria and husband Dan Gibeau, Black Hawk, South Dakota; Sh eryll and David Hite, Riverside; Pat and Larry Field, Al turas; Bonnie and Bob Davis, Clear Creek, Calif.; Gene Ann and David Packer, Lakewood, Colo. and his son Wal ter and wife Pam Soocey of San Diego, Calif. He also leaves a sister Jewell Peniston, Lee's Summit, Mo.; three brothers Chester of Preston, Mo.; Charles of Kansas City, Kansas; and Gene Willingboro, N.J.; mother-in-law Juanita Mur phy; brother-in-law Tom and wife Barbara Murphy; sister-in-law Bar bara and husband Ernie Hager; grandchildren Danny, Dawn, James Gibeau; Johnathon Ramos Davis; Cpl. Tim Pellett and wife Holly; Jeremy, Ja son, Shane, Mariah Packer; Rachel and Rebecca Field; Lance Cpl. Ja son Price and wife Lance Cpl. Jami Price of El Toro; John, Paul, Vince and Joseph DeCarlo, Yvonne Meche; great-grand children Abbygail Price and Janika, Tenay, and Kenim Meche.
Services were held Wednesday, January 28 at 1:00 p.m. at the Alturas Baptist Church. Pastor Bud Kirk officiated. Burial followed at the Alturas Cemetery.
Memorial contributions be may be made to the Alturas Baptist Church Memorial Fund.
Larry Earl Slinkard
A memorial service for Larry Earl Slinkard, 55, of Durham, Calif. was held January 22 at Brusie Fu neral Home in Durham. Mr. Slinkard died Monday, January 19, 1998 at a Durham hospital.
He was born August 2, 1942, in Marysville, Calif. to Wil son and Barbara Slinkard. He attended Durham schools and grad uated from Durham High School. In his senior year of high school, he placed first in the Northstate Wrestling Championships. On Septem ber 10, 1963, he mar ried Jeannie Amator in Durham.
Slinkard worked for more than 30 years as a heavy equipment operator and lead man for Butte County Road Maintenance. He loved fishing, camping, bow hunting and mule pack ing trips.
He is survived by his fa ther, Wilson Slinkard of Chico; mother Barbara Jean Yrigollen of Paradise; stepmother, Marianne Slinkard of Chico; son Steven of Durham; daugh ters Lorrie Owens of Chico and Cathy Arnold of Wis consin; brother Jerry Slinkard of Sacramento and six grandchildren. Mr. Slinkard's parents and stepmother are all descended from Eagleville pioneers.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Durham Volunteer Fire Department or the Durham Sports Boost ers in care of the Brusie Fu neral Home in Durham.
Irene Madge Fletcher
Former Alturas resident Irene Madge Fletcher died Jan uary 26, 1998 at a care home in Roseburg, Ore. Mrs. Fletcher lived in Alturas for several years, prior to moving to Rose burg in 1994. She was close to her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, as she had made her home with them over a 24-year period in both Klamath Falls, Ore. and Alturas, after her husband W.H. "Bill" Fletcher passed away. She was 83 at the time of her passing.
She was born Irene Bartlow on October 19, 1914. Irene and Bill owned a gas station and restaurant for over 20 years in Beaver Marsh, Ore.
Survivors include son and daughter-in-law Bill and Ruth Fletcher, Fayetteville, North Carolina; daughters and sons-in-law Delphine and Larry DeHaven, Central Point, Ore.; Leona and Roy Hazelton, Milton Freewater, Ore.; Maxine and Glenn Henry, Abilene, Texas. Grandchildren Larry DeHaven and Family, Medford, Ore.; Leora Monroe and Family, Alturas; William "Bill" DeHaven and Fam ily, Alturas; Lyndel Kersbergen and Family, Reno, Nev.; Bruce Pinkley, Alaska; Jennifer, Becky, Calvin and Deb bie, Milton Freewater, Oregon; Linda and Cindy, North Carolina; Valerie Guhlke and Family, Winston, Ore.; numerous other grandchildren and great-great-great grandchil dren, nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by her husband W.H. "Bill" Fletcher; son Melvin "Lee" Fletcher, daughter Ruth Micheaux and grandson Brian Salsbery.
Mrs. Fletcher will be laid to rest beside her husband on January 28, 1998, at 4:00 p.m. at Eternal Hills Memorial Gardens in Klamath Falls, Ore. At her request, no service will be held.
Bill "Boots" Winnop
Bill "Boots" Winnop, Deputy Sheriff in Modoc County in Surprise Valley during the 1930s, and a long time resident of Prosser, Washington, died Tuesday, January 13, 1998, at the Tri-Cities Chaplaincy Hospice in Prosser, Wash. He was 81.
He was born to Hiram and Alpha Wall Winnop on April 3, 1916 at Flagler, Colorado. Boots spent his early years in the state of Colorado, then at the age of 12, he and his family moved to Surprise Valley, Calif. Boots attended school in Eagleville. The family then moved to Oregon, where Boots lived for a few years.
He returned to Surprise Valley in 1936 and served as Deputy Sheriff in Modoc County in Surprise Valley in the late 1930s. He was a veteran, having served in the U.S. Cavalry during World War II.
Mr. Winnop traveled many walks of life. For the past 25 years, he made his home in Prosser, Wash. He was a mem ber of the Eagles Lodge and the Grandview Veterans of For eign Wars Post 6929.
He is survived by two sons, Jack Winnop of Zamora, Calif. and Joe Winnop of Orland; three sisters Majorie Chiarito of Ukiah; Bette Eisele of Denver, Colo.; Shirley Lehr of Sacramento; three brothers, Pat Winnop of La Pines, Ore; Larry Winnop of Evans, Wash. and Dick Winnop of Cedarville; four grandchildren and a large number of nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Monday, January 19. Burial was in the East Prosser Cemetery at Prosser, Wash. Mr. Winnop will be missed by all who knew him and loved him.
February, 1998
 
Record news for February 5, 1998
  • Snow levels good in Modoc
  • Zandstra will not seek re-election
  • Forest Supervisor explains MNF
  • Bieber pool gets Grand Jury clearance
  • County buidling dips in January

The Forecast: There is plenty of snow in the Warner Mountains, as this shot near Cedar Pass shows.

Plenty of snow in those hills, water levels good

While the lowlands of Modoc County have been rela tively free of snow this winter, the high country snowpack looks very good.

The annual January snow survey was done by the U.S. Forest Service and Soil Conservation Service this week and released February 3.

Cedar Pass has 46 inches of snow at its survey site con taining 15.2 inches of water. That's more than last year when the same site had 42 inches of snow containing 12.9 inches of water. It's far above the 10-year av erage for the area of 34 inches of snow with 10.9 inches of water. The sur vey spot is at 7,100 feet ele vation.

Blue Lake now has 30 inches of snow with 9.7 inches of water. Last year it mea sured 25 inches of snow and 6.4 inches of water. The 10-year average for the area is 27 inches of snow and 7.7 inches of water. That site is at 6,800 feet.

At Sweagert Flat, Ken Romberger of the Big Valley Ranger District, measured 35 inches of snow and 12.8 inches of water. The overall average for the area is 27.6 inches of snow containing 8.1 inches of water.

Romberger said the total precipitation for Big Valley be tween July 1, 1997 through January 31 is 10.36 inches, well above the av erage since 1944 of 8.51 inches. Precipitation for Adin for January totaled 4.40 inches. Sue Becker, Forest Hydrologist, reported the pre cipitation for 1997 in Alturas was 12.52 inches and January had 2.84 inches.

The snow depth at Mt. Bidwell this week is 61 inches, containing 21.2 inches of water. Last year, there was 70 inches of snow with a water content of 25.3 inches. The 10-year av erage for that area is 48 inches of snow and 15.8 inches of wa ter.

The Barber Creek snow survey shows 32 inches of snow and 10.7 inches of wa ter. That area is south of Eagleville. Last year at this time the area had 30 inches of snow with a water content of 8.4 inches. The 10-year av er age is 30 inches with 8.3 inches of water.

Hays Canyon, Nevada, show 13 inches of snow with 3.3 inches of water. Last year it had 10 inches of snow contain ing 1.7 inches of water and the 10-year-average is 14 inches of snow and 3.3 inches of water.

Also in Nevada, 49 Mountain, had 15 inches of snow with a water content of 4.6 inches. Last year it had 11 inches of snow and 2.8 inches of moisture. The 10-year av erage is 15 inches of snow and 4.2 inches of waste.

The snow surveys were conducted by Tom Hill SCS and Jake Coffey and Doug Schultz, U.S. Forest Service.

Zandstra will not run in election

District One Supervisor Ben Zandstra confirmed this week that he will not seek an other term.hangese Federated Church and a desire to spend more time with his family were the reasons he chose not to run.

District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman's term ex pires this year and she is ex pected to run for re-election.

Modoc Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier will run for another term. Dier is finish ing a term after being ap pointed to the position.

County Offices up for elec tion who will be running for re-election are: District Attorney Hugh Comisky; Sheriff Bruce Mix; Auditor/Recorder, Judi Stevens; Clerk, Maxine Madison; Assessor Josie Johnson and Superintendent of Schools, Carol Harbaugh.

Nomination papers for the above offices can be taken out February 9 and must be filed no later than March 6. Contact County Clerk Maxine Madison for more informa tion and the details on how to file nomination papers.

The final day to register to vote in the June 2 election is May 4. Madison stresses that people who have moved, or had a name change must report those changes or re-regis ter to be eligible to vote in the elec tion.

For the first time, the pri mary election will have an open ballot with all political parties listed on the same bal lot.

Interim supervi sor explains Modoc Forest differ ences

The interim Modoc National Forest Supervisor, Steven Bishop, detailed the changes in direction and funding of the for est to Modoc Supervisors during Tuesday's meeting.

Bishop told the board that the Forest Service is moving from a "high level of commodity production" to "a greater emphasis on ecosystem management," the national pol icy.

Bishop said the last time such a major change of emphasis occurred was after World War II when the Forest Service moved from predominantly custodial management to heavy emphasis on timber production.

According to Bishop, the forest budget has declined about 23 percent this decade and while the recent emphasis on tim ber salvage brought an increase in the budget, tied to that program alone, it has diminished.

"Discounting the timber salvage budget, funding for our green timber program has dropped from $1.8 million in 1992 to $481,000 in 1997. In addition, budget for general ad minis tration has also declined," said Bishop.

He explained that while the forest is staffed and orga nized to produce 25-30 mil lion board feet of timber annually, it is fi nanced to produce only 10 to 12 million board feet. He expects that lower level of funding to continue for the next three to five years.

One of the real concerns locally is a loss of forest employ ees as the downsizing contin ues. Bishop told the board that employees have designed and proposed an organization in an effort to integrate programs, reduce costs, in crease effi ciency and meet national and re gional shifting priorities and policies.

"Under the proposal, 21 of the 155 positions are abolished," said Bishop. "Thirteen em ployees currently occupying posi tions are un funded."

The key points Bishop stressed about the reorganization were are follows: Ranger District offices in Adin, Cedarville and Tulelake remain open but with fewer staff; programs are centralized in several areas; principal pro gram coordination is managed at the Supervisor's Office in Alturas; em ployees who work in the centralized pro grams remain at their present duty stations; emphasizes an inte grated resource man agement program based on priorities.

"The Pacific Southwest Regional Office must concur with this proposal before any ac tion can take place," said Bishop. "The Washington Office must concur before any positions can be abolished and employees placed on the Workforce Reduction and Placement System."

Bishop stressed the Modoc National Forest is committed to looking for ways to be respon sive and more efficient. Administrative Services have been centralized, with Support Centers now performing administrative ser vices such as personnel, contracting, pur chasing and information sys tems for the Modoc, Lassen and Plumas National Forests. The Doublehead and Devil's Garden ranger Districts have merged administra tively and four management positions have been reduced.

Bishop will take the forest proposal to the Regional Office next week. The RO will make its wishes known and the plan will then be forwarded to the Washington office. Just how long the process will take is un known, but it could be re solved in the next few months.

Grand Jury clears Bieber Recreation District of charges

A Grand Jury report has cleared the Bieber Recreation District, after a resident of Bieber filed a complaint that al leged fraud, misrepresentation and misappropriation of funds.

The Grand Jury conducted an investigation of the district and found no wrongdoing.

The first complaint accused the district of not using the tiles bought by the public as a fundraiser for the pool. The Grand Jury found that the money from those tiles sales is in the bank drawing interest and will be used on the change house when built.

The second allegation was of fraud and the Grand Jury reports it's investigation revealed no evidence of fraud.

The third allegation was of misrepresentation and mis appropriation of funds. The investigation into the allega tions found no wrongdoing.

The Grand Jury stated the allegations could have been re solved by a simple audit and recommended an audit as soon as possible. The Grand Jury also recommended that the Bieber Recreation Committee make a better effort to com municate with citizens on the status of projects.

"The Board of Directors would like to make known at this time that all meetings of the district are open to the public and any person who wishes to attend is welcome," said Sharmie Stevenson, manager. "Meeting dates are posted at the Bieber Post Office as well as the Lassen County Waterworks District Office."

Records of the district are available for review by writing to P.O. Box 457, Bieber, Ca. 96009 or by phoning 294-5378.

The pool will be opening again on June 8 and the Pennies for the Pool drive will be mailed out in March.

"If you were unable to make a donation last year, maybe this year you can help out," said Stevenson. "Any donation, no matter the size, will be greatly appreciated."

The Big Valley Recreation District did receive a $500 do nation recently from the BankAmerica Foundation for use at the Big Valley Community Swimming Pool. Alice Smith obtained the donation from the foundation and presented it to Merldean Bidwell, Chairman of the Board of Directors on January 21.

Building dips in January

Building activity in Modoc dipped during the month of January, with the building department issuing 13 permits worth an estimated $96,850.

That figure is down from December, 1997's totals of 18 permits with an estimated value of $181,566.

Garages, remodeling and additions were the primary building activities.

City building activity was also light in January as its building department issued 11 permits with an estimated value of $55,379. There was one permit for a manufactured home installation and five permits were for heaters.

In December the city issued just nine permits worth an estimated $6,516.

Record news for Feb. 12, 1998

  • Candidates entering local races
  • Combis sentenced, faces new charges
  • Arrests made in Post Officre burglaries
  • City goes ahead with 103 acre purchase
  • Public meeting set for railroad museum
  • 1968 Class holding 30 reunion
  • Class of 48 to meet in summer

Obituaries:

 
  • Berryessa
  • Scarbrough

 

Local candidates stepping up to the election plate
With the filing period just opening this week, several in dividuals have taken out nomination papers for the June 2 election.
Local attorney Barry Kinman has served notice he will be running against Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier is finishing out a first term after being appointed by Governor Pete Wilson and is running for election to a full term.
Modoc County Treasurer Tax Collector Linda Monroe is retiring after this term and three people have taken out papers for the office, Bill Hamby, Jeri Standley and Cheryl Knoch.
District One Supervisor Ben Zandstra is not seeking re-election in Surprise valley. So far, Sandra Stevenson has taken out papers for the position.
District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman will be run ning for another term of office to represent to Tulelake-Newell, Big Valley area.
Incumbents who are seeking re-election are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; District Attorney Hugh Comisky; and Sheriff Bruce Mix. As of Wednesday no one had filed in opposition to those offices.
In the California Pines Community Services District, two people have taken out papers for one seat to replace Bill Jones, who passed away, John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed.
County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot.
Combis sentenced in Cal Pines case New charges filed in Oregon
Trouble continues to follow Ted Combis, of Klamath Falls, who was just sentenced to 57 months in federal prison for conducting a timber fraud operation at California Pines.
New charges have been filed in Oregon alleging Combis violated that state's law regulating timber operations on pri vate property. He has pleaded innocent of the charges.
Combis was sentenced last week to 57 months for the California Pines logging operation under Thena, Inc. He is scheduled to report to the federal correctional facility in Sheridan April 6. Judge Michael Hogan also ordered Combis to pay $16,000 restitution.
The new charges allege that Combis failed to notify the Oregon Department of Forestry of the correct landowners' names before beginning a timber operation last year. Seven of the counts relate to property near Bly. He is scheduled to appear on the new charges March 12.
Combis, was accused of taking $15 million worth of tim ber from lots in California Pines and entered the guilty pleas to avoid a lengthy court case. The federal govern ment, who prosecuted the case, said it placed the fraud loss at be tween $800,000 and $1.5 million.
Combis established Thena Inc. in 1993 and mailed hun dreds of letters to California Pines property owners offering to salvage dead and dying timber from their lots. The gov ernment said Combis took the dead and dying plus large numbers of healthy, valuable trees from the lots. It's esti mated that 7,000 truckloads of logs were hauled from Cal Pines.
The government raided California Pines and Combis' busi nesses in Klamath Falls in February, 1995. All of Combis' assets were seized. Thena, Inc. then filed bankruptcy, still owing tens of thousands of dollars to Alturas and Klamath Falls businesses and Cal Pines em ployees. In total, Thena owed about $3.4 million to about 500 creditors.
In July, 1996, a federal Grand Jury indicted Combis on 48 counts of mail fraud, interstate transportation of stolen goods, money launder ing, failure to pay payroll taxes, ob struction of justice and tampering with a wit ness. He subse quently was charged with bankruptcy fraud in November, 1996.
Arrests made in se ries of Post Office Burglaries
A lengthy investigation involving Modoc and Lake County law enforcement and U.S. Postal Inspectors has led the the arrest of six young men in connection with 33 Post Office or business burglaries.
Those involved are: Christopher Neil Overton, 21, Lakeview, who is now pending sentencing; Conrad Angelo Vaifale, 21, Lakeview, arrested in Georgia and is being es corted by U.S. Marshal back to this area; Jerry Dean Caswell, 21, Lakeview, sentenced to one year, then seven years probation; John Lewis Arensberg, 19, Lakeview; who is pend ing sentencing; Taj Lemieux, 21, Lakeview, also pending sentencing; and Charles Thomas Ortega, 26, in custody in Oregon and being transported to Lakeview.
The string of burglaries started with the August 1, 1996 burglary to the Lake City and Fort Bidwell Post Offices. On August 20, 1996 the burglars hit Napa Auto Parts, the Chevron Bulk Plant in Cedarville, the Eagleville Post Office and Post Offices in Gerlach and Empire, Nev.
Two days later Mix suspects the same group struck at the Adin Post Office, the Adin Transmission Shop and the Adin Century 21 Office.
On October 23, 1996, the Lake City and Ft. Bidwell Post Offices were hit again as well as the Tribal Office in Cedarville. There were also attempts to get into Surprise Valley Drug and Goldens.
On March 2, 1997, the burglars returned to hit the Lake City and Ft. Bidwell Post Offices. Later in the year they hit the Ford garage and Ed Staub plant in Lakeview.
In addition to the above burglaries, the group is suspected of burglaries to the Veterinary Clinic in Lakeview, the Tulelake Police Department and Department of Motor Vehicles, the Merrill Police Department, Merrill Feed Store, Nubieber Post Offices, and Post Offices in Oregon towns of Chemult, Chiloquin, Beatty, O'Brien, Applegate, Gold Hill, Shady Cove, and Seneca. They also struck Mt. Vernon, Oregon, City Hall and a doctors office.
Mix credits local deputies Mark Pearce and Barry Silva, who were key in assisting Federal Postal Inspectors in the inves tiga tion.
There were thousands of dollars worth of goods or dam ages in the burglaries. In many cases, the burglars broke through door locks or doors to gain entry.
Mix said officers have recovered some of the stolen prop erty and he expects more to be recovered as the investigation comes to a close.
City goes ahead on 103 acre purchase
The Alturas City Council voted to adopt a negative envi ronmental impact declara tion on its planned purchase of 103 acres at the former Alturas Mill property west of town.
At a special meeting next Tuesday, the council will vote on whether to open the escrow on the purchase, at about $130,000.
Plans for the 103-acre par cel include the Wrymoo and City of Alturas operat ing rail road museum and other busi nesses who have expressed interest in locat ing on the site.
According to Planner Scott Kessler, there are a couple of small businesses who are in terested in the lo cation, but ne gotiations are underway with those busi ness owners. The railroad museum idea is off and running. In addition, the city okayed a grant from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection to purchase and plant about 158 trees and shrubs and the new Alturas Rotary Youth Park ball fields. The grant is about $23,000 and will cover the cost of trees and planting those trees. It came through Kessler's office and the Small Business Administration Tree Planting Program.
Kessler explained that the trees have to be pur chased from a small busi ness and planted by a small business. Both of those businesses are in Alturas.
Kessler also received the go ahead to execute and manage a Grant Writer program for the city through the U.S. Forest Service. The funds would be used to hire special ized grant writers in exacting fields, such as fiber optics and comput ers, etc.
Railroad meeting set for public
There will be an informal meeting of the Wrymoo Railroad organization at City Hall Friday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Wrymoo is the historical group working with the City Of Alturas to build an operating railroad and Museum at the Alturas Mill property west of Alturas.
Wrymoo officials and City of Alturas representatives will be on hand to answer questions and discuss the overall project, which is gaining steam.
Class of '68 plans 30th reunion
The Modoc High School Class of 1968 reunion committee has set a date of August 8 for its 30th class reunion. The reunion is scheduled for the Elks Lodge in Alturas with tentative plans for light food and refreshment at 12 noon, cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. with dancing to follow.
Any class members wanting to assist, or needing more information or input should call 233-2632.
1948 plans its 50th class reunion
The Modoc High School Class of 1948 is planning its 50th reunion and needs to make sure all classmates are located.
The reunion will be held August 1, 1998 at the Elks Lodge in Alturas. To help, or for more information call Ruth Holloway at 233-2319 or Peggy Dekker at 233-5148.
Obituaries
Bertha Berryessa
Bertha Berryessa, who gave of her time and talents to the Surprise Valley community in which she lived for many years, died on February 4, 1998 in Cedarville, Calif.
She was born to Swiss immigrant parents Martha and Ben Inderbitzen in Oakland, Calif. on March 29, 1912. Bertha was reared on her parents' dairy ranch and com pleted her junior high school years in San Jose. As a young girl, she was involved in gymnastics, swimming and her love of all animals.
She and Edward Walton Berryessa were married on December 5, 1934 in Reno, Nev. and shared almost 33 years of marriage together. After they were wed, Bertha had a very busy life operat ing the dairy her parents owned in San Jose, and tak ing care of her parents who were in ill health. She did so until 1942. In 1945, she and Ed purchased the Jim Hery ford Ranch in Surprise Val ley where she was a ranch partner and homemaker.
After the death of her husband on October 27, 1967, she de voted her life to her family, community and friends. Al ways a physically fit and active person, she taught swim ming to the youth of Surprise Valley in the 1960s and acted as a chaperone for the Modoc District Fair Queen.
"She was active in all worthwhile causes and was awarded the coveted Blue Ribbon Award by the Western Fair Association in the 1960s," note family members.
Mrs. Berryessa later relocated to San Jose and remained there until she returned to Surprise Valley in 1995 to live with her son and daughter-in-law. She was a member of the San Jose Horseman's Club and the Santa Clara County Cat tleWomen's Association and held the presidency in both groups.
California history was her great interest. She was a member of the Santa Clara Historical Society and the Santa Clara Pioneers. She was a charter and life-long member and Past President of the Aelpler Grüppe of Newark, Calif., a group for those of Swiss ancestry. Mrs. Berryessa was a member of the St. James Altar Society of Cedarville and the St. Victor's Senior Group of San Jose.
She enjoyed traveling and had visited Switzerland three times, as well as Australia, new Zealand, Figi, Alaska, Hawaii and points of interest in the United States. Her hus band preceded her in death on October 27, 1967. She was also predeceased by her brother Benny and her parents.
Mrs. Berryessa is survived by her son and daughter-in-law Ed and Sharon Berryessa, grandson and wife Alan and Nadene Berryessa of Cedarville; granddaughter and hus band Renelle and Robin Bengle of Mt. View, Calif.; grand daughter and husband LeeAnn and David Widener of San Diego; seven great-grandchildren, Adam Evans, Allie and Leah Berryessa, Taylor and Collin Bengle and Dane and Dylan Widener and numerous cousins and loving friends.
Funeral services were conducted by Dr. Ben Zandstra on February 7 at 1:00 p.m. at the Surprise Valley Community Church, Cedarville. Interment was at the Eagleville Ceme tery, followed by a time of fellowship for all who gathered at the Eagleville Community Hall.
Contributions in memory of Mrs. Berryessa may be di rected to the Surprise Valley Hospital or to the charity of choice.
Obituary--
Wesley Herman Scarbrough
Alturas resident Wesley Scarbrough, who in the few years he lived in Modoc County, made many friends before he died February 9, 1998 at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif.
Pastor Rod Bodmer will conduct services at graveside on Friday, February 13 at 11:00 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery. A time of fellowship will follow at the Scarbrough Family res idence on East Street, Alturas.
Born Wesley Herman Scarbrough in Jean, Texas on August 5, 1930, the family moved to Blythe, Calif. where Wesley completed high school. As a young man he worked on ranches and broke horses and helped with the round up of wild horses in and around Blythe. He loved animals his entire life and in later years, helped his grandchil dren learn to ride and work with horses.
Mr. Scarbrough served with the U.S. Army during the Korean War and married Leora Berry of Riverside, Calif. on April 22, 1951 in Quartzsite, Ariz. They reared six chil dren and were close to celebrating their 47th year of mar riage, at the time of his passing. Mr. Scarbrough worked 40 years as a Hydro Technician, with 30 of those years in Riverside and 10 years with Rancho Murrietta Water Dis trict, before he retired from Murrietta and relocated to Al turas seven years ago, where he was near several of his children and grandchildren.
While in Murrietta, Mr. Scarbrough raised pheasants as a hobby, and at one time, had the only pair of a special breed of pheasants within the state. He also raised Button Quail, which his daughter Cindy recalls, were only an inch and a half tall. He had a fondness for nature's living things and loved to go out to get wood once he moved to Modoc County.
"It would take him all day, but he loved to do it," recalled Cindy.
"He had the biggest pile of wood a lot of people had ever seen at a home," remembered his daughter Sharon of his past season wood stores. He also raised the family's own beef and did the butchering himself; all skills he'd learned as a young man working on ranches. He was particular about his garden and his lawn and maintained big gardens when his children were growing up. He also enjoyed fishing.
Mr. Scarbrough is survived by his wife Leora of Alturas; two daughters Cindy Haddox and Family in Alturas and Sharon Ponti and Family in Alturas; four sons, Wesley Scarbrough, Las Vegas; Keith Scarbrough and Family in Murrietta, Calif.; Rick Scarbrough and Family in Alturas; Terry Scarbrough and Family of Antioch; 15 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren; and three sisters, all of Blythe.
Donations in Mr. Scarbrough's memory may be directed to the Modoc Medical Center, 228 McDowell Street, Alturas, CA 96101.
 
Record news for Feb. 19, 1998
  • Treasurer race drawing most local interest
  • Modoc's Welfare Office has state connections
  • Refuge add land for crane production
  • County intervenes in refuge farming lawsuit

Treasurer race drawing most local interest

The June 2 race for Modoc County Treasurer/Tax Collector is drawing the most interest as four candidates have taken out papers to replace Linda Monroe who is retir ing after this term.

The four candidates who have taken out papers for the po sition are: Bill Hamby, Jeri Standley, Cheryl Knoch and Manuela Davenport.

The filing period for all offices closes March 6, unless the incumbent doesn't file, in which case it remains open until March 11.

Local attorney Barry Kinman will be running against incumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier is finishing out a first term after being appointed by Governor Pete Wilson and is running for election to a full term.

District One Supervisor Ben Zandstra is not seeking re-election in Surprise valley. Sandra Stevenson has taken out papers for the position.

District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman will be run ning for another term of office to represent to Tulelake-Newell, Big Valley area. No opposition has yet emerged.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; District Attorney Hugh Comisky; and Sheriff Bruce Mix. As of Wednesday no one had filed in opposition to those offices.

Two people had have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones, who passed away. That term runs through the year 2000. The terms of incumbents Marvin Kitchen and Randy Faver come up for election in November. The CSD could have ap pointed a replacement for Jones, but couldn't agree on an in dividual so an election will be held.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot.

Modoc's welfare office has new state-wide connections

It's been a six-month process, but the Modoc County Social Services Department is now connected to the Interim Statewide Automated Welfare System, called ISAWS.

According to Social Services Director Richard Belarde, the new system is a Godsend that will increase efficiency, de crease paperwork and deter fraud. It it sounds special, that's because it really is a major improvement.

According to Modoc ISAWS project Director Pauline Cravens, the new system will be beneficial to the welfare staff as well as the clients. The staff is currently inputing cases to the system and all new cases will be handled through the system. Instead of inches-thick files on clients, the majority of the information will be stored in the computer files. Cravens and team leaders Pat Wood and Becky Givan cut the ceremonial ribbon Tuesday, putting ISAWS officially on line.

For instance, she said a client will now come into the office for about a two-hour in terview and all the information will be fed into the ISAWS computers. At the end of the interview, the client will know whether he's eligible and for what amount of aid.

"Under the old paper system, the process could take from 30 to 45 days," Cravens said. "It's going to take some time in the transition to the system, but the staff is very positive and has been very positive about the change." ISAWS is also hooked directly to the Modoc County Auditors Office and checks will be automatically written, saving that office valuable time. It is also linked to the Modoc County GAIN Program.

Modoc County's current caseload of 2019 cases has required workers to use hundreds of paper forms and master complex, fre quently changing rules. According to Cravens and Belarde, all this will change with ISAWS.

It will eliminate most paper eligibility forms, calculate benefits automatically, and allow regulation changes to be implemented in a fraction of the time now required. Designed to maximize efficiencies in the administration of welfare benefits by pro cessing a multi-program environment, the system enables the same worker to determine an individual's eligibility and benefits amount across such programs as Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Food Stamps, California's Medicaid Program, and the County Medical Services Program.

With ISAWS will increase efficiency and speed up the process, it is also an invaluable tool in helping to protect against fraud and other abuses. For instance, if a welfare recip ient moved into the county and applied for benefits here, the ISAWS program will give the local eligibility worker that person's case history almost immediately.

The predecessor of ISAWS, the Napa Automated Public Assistance System (NAPAS) was developed in Napa County in 1989 and implemented there in 1991. In 1993, several other counties expressed the need for an automated system. As a result, ISAWS was enhanced to provide for multi-county implementation, and 14 counties were se lected to participate.

Following the state legislature's designa tion of ISAWS as a permanent welfare au tomation solution in 1995, and additional 20 counties chose ISAWS to automate their op erations. These counties, Modoc among them, comprise Phase II of the ISAWS im plementation. By completion of Phase II, 60 percent of California Counties will be opera tional in ISAWS.

Refuge adds land to help with crane production

A newly acquired 325 arce parcel of land about two miles east of Alturas on County Road 56 will help increase the overall Sandhill Crane habitat on the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge.

Dave Johnson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge Manager, said the Modoc Refuge is the best crane producer in the system on a per acre basis. The refuge produces an av erage of 18 cranes a year, and Johnson said this extra 325 acres could improve the numbers.

The new piece of refuge land was purchased through a ne gotiated agreement between Sierra Pacific Power Company and California Department of Fish and Game officials. It is now nearing its actual escrow closing.

The property was originally acquired by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1959 as part of the Dorris estate, but was later exchanged for other land holdings held by Barrie Stephens in 1975.

The ranch was later purchased by Adair Brown in 1989 and was farmed for about six years before the Browns de cided to move to another ranch near Davis Creek. After be ing on the market for about a year, Brown subdivided the ranch to make it more marketable.

The area located on the downhill side of the Dorris canal was identified by USFW as excellent sandhill crane habitat and the Modoc Refuge had expressed a desire over some 20 years to bring the parcel back to the refuge.

"With hindsight, we realized that this land was valuable habitat, And we should have kept it as part of the refuge," said Johnson.

The American Land Conservancy of San Francisco ne gotiated an option to purchase the property in early 1997 and began to seek the necessary funding (more than $500,000) to secure the deal.

Johnson said that at the same time, the California DFG was negotiating with Sierra Pacific to mitigate expected im pacts to Greater Sandhill cranes as a result of the Alturas Intertie project through Modoc County.

The DFG and California Public Utilities Commission required that the power company acquire 345 acres of crane habitat and provide the funds necessary for management as crane habitat before the construction of the power line could proceed. Construction on that power line is starting in the Susanville area and will be heading this way this spring.

Building from the base of Sierra Pacific's mitigation needs, the American Land Conservancy was able to add funds from the USFW. The final critical component fell into place when a $100,000 grant was obtained from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

"I am happy that this win-win situation fell into place for all parties concerned," said Johnson. "The Department of Fish and Game is able to meet its legal responsibility of pro tecting a state-listed threatened species from impacts of the power line. Sierra Pacific will be able to meet its mitigation responsibilities and begin construction of their project. The willing seller is able to sell his property and the Fish and Wildlife Service will assume management responsibility for the Grandma Field as part of an existing National Wildlife Refuge."

In addition, Johnson pointed out Modoc County will receive about $225,000 annually in taxes from the Alturas Intertie project and about $3,000 per year in refuge revenue sharing funds from the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Johnson said the area will be managed for crane habitat and hopes that between four or five crane territories will be established on the site.

Cranes have been around since the ice-age and lay two eggs per year, but only one chick usually survives, Johnson said.

Currently the state and federal agencies are preparing a Memorandum of Agreement on the management plan for the land. The plan will involve restoring it to wet meadow and shallow marsh conditions. Comments will be solicited from the general public as the final management plan is de veloped.

County intervenes in big lawsuit on refuge farming

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday opted to intervene in a lawsuit that could affect farming practices on Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges.

The lawsuit was filed in December by environmental or ganizations led by the Klamath Forest Alliance and targets Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. The lawsuit charges that current agriculture practices on refuge leased-lands in the refuges conflict with federal law and wildlife needs.

Comisky explained to the board last month that it had three options: to join the suit, intervene, or file a separate lawsuit. He sought advice from the California Farm Bureau on the issue before recommending the board intervene. Intervening in the suit would place the county on the side of Babbitt, said Curtis. Siskiyou County is also intervening in the suit.

According to Modoc Land Use Committee Chairman Sean Curtis, if the lawsuit is successful, farming on all refuge lands would cease. That would impact about $1 million dol lars in county revenue and about $22 million in production, he said.

Curtis told the Board last month that the Tule Lake and Lower Klamath Refuges were formed differently than any other refuge in the nation. The formation of these refuges included the pro vision that the 22,000 acres could be leased and farmed. He said the environment groups want these refuges treated like others in the nation where farming is not considered a com patible use.

In addition to the lawsuit filed by Klamath Forest Alliance, an earlier suit in 1994 was settled out of court that has caused the farmers grief, said Curtis. That lawsuit re sulted in, among other things, a proposed Integrated Pest Management Plan that could result in eliminating the use of most traditional pesticides on those lands. That plan could eliminate much of the agriculture production on those lands, said Curtis.

One of the reasons Comisky feels it's important for the county to be involved is that no settlement can be reached in the case without the counties' involvement.

In other business Tuesday, Supervisors appointed Thomas Tracy, of Yolo County as Modoc County Road Commissioner/Public Works Director. Tracy was selected from three candidates and is scheduled to start March 23.

Record news for Feb. 26, 1998

  • Most incumbents running unopposed June 2
  • Construction starts on Alturas Intertie project
  • CHP traffic stop nets robbery suspects
  • Don't look for electric deregulation bonus

Obituaries:

  • Pinneo
  • Jenson
  • Brogan
  • Hartlerode
  • Colburn

The forecast: Look for partly cloudy skies today; highs in the lower 40s. Partly cloudy through Saturday with a chance of rain; lows could dip below 10. Look for rain on Sunday with lows mid 20s to mid 30s and highs to mid 40s.

Most incumbents remain unopposed for June election

Most incumbent county office holders are without opposi tion so far in the June 2 election. A few areas are creating some interest.

Four candidates have taken out papers for the po sition for Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, of the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Teasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is retir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election. She holds the position until January.

The filing period for all offices closes March 6, unless the incumbent doesn't file, in which case it remains open until March 11.

Alturas attorney Barry Kinman is running against in cumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier, who was appointed to the position by Governor Pete Wilson upon Judge Robert Barclay's move up to Superior Court is now seeking a full six-year term.

Realtor Sandra Stevenson has taken out papers for Supervisor of District One in Surprise Valley. Incumbent Ben Zandstra is not seeking a second term.

District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman will be run ning for another term of office to represent the Tulelake-Newell, Big Valley areas. No opposition has yet emerged.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un opposed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; District Attorney Hugh Comisky; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

Two people had have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones, who passed away. That term runs through the year 2000. The terms of incumbents Marvin Kitchen and Randy Faver come up for election in November. The CSD could have ap pointed a replacement for Jones, but couldn't agree on an in dividual so an election will be held.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot.

Construction starts on Alturas Intertie

While the weather is holding up some portions of the job, construction has started on Sierra Pacific's Alturas Intertie power line project.

The 160-mile long power line runs from Alturas to Reno, to supply the Reno area with more electric power. According to Project Manager John Owens, all the California permits are in place and "a small army" of construction people are in the field.

Work in Modoc County should have started this week, on the Hilltop Substation, off Crowder Flat Road, on Devil's Garden. Crews must construct a small access road, cut trees and then start the actual construction on the substation.

Owens predicts that substation will be completed by late fall. Sierra Pacific is hoping to have the entire project com pleted by Christmas this year. The wet winter has hampered some of the access to work sites, and the company is hoping El Nino backs away this spring.

Work on the power line will start in Sierra and Lassen counties and move north. There will be work going on in Modoc County simultaneously. Construction started in Nevada in February.

Owens said the general contractor on the job is Union Power, and Sierra Pacific encourages the use of local labor and subcontractors when possible. Some of the specialized skills just don't fit into the local labor force, he said.

Power poles will probably not be erected in Modoc until late summer, said Owens.

The Alturas Intertie is a 345 KV line that will start west of Alturas and run to Reno, Nevada. It will tie into the Bonneville Power line northwest of Alturas.

While fiber optic lines will be included in the power line, negotiations are still ongoing between the city, county, Sierra Pacific and Citizens Utilities for access and use. County Planner Scott Kessler said the fiber optics are impor tant for Modoc's economic future, and he hopes the entities can come to terms.

CHP traffic stop nets bank robbery suspects

A routine traffic stop by an Alturas area California Highway Patrol Officer Feb. 24, 8:30 p.m. resulted in the ar rest of two Oregon bank robbery suspects.

The CHP reports that Officer Jason Viehdorfer stopped a Ford Escort wagon for a defective headlight on U.S. 395, south of Madeline. While questioning the driver, the offi cer became suspicious and checked the subject for war rants. The report came back stating the suspects were armed and dangerous. When CHP back-up and units from the Modoc County and Lassen County Sheriff's Offices arrived, the driver and passenger were taken into custody without inci dent.

The pair was wanted by the FBI for a series of armed rob beries in Portland.

A search of the vehicle revealed loaded firearms beside both the driver and passenger seats. The suspects, Paul Caruso, age 51 and Merlin Granberg, age 45, both of Portland, were booked into the Lassen County Jail on FBI warrants. Evidence recovered in the vehicle included cloth ing worn during the robberies, scanners, drug para pherna lia and approximately $400 in cash.

Electric utility deregu lation program may not impact Modoc

With statewide electric utility industry deregulation sup posed to take effect March 31, local residents might start see ing some in formercials on television. But don't get too ex cited.

As far as most of Modoc, at least those cus tomers served by Surprise Valley Electric and Pacific Power, deregulation will not have any impact. At least it will not have an impact in the near future.

Surprise Valley Electric, a cooperative, is not participat ing in the deregulation, as is its choice. Its rates are already lower.

As far as Pacific Power is concerned, they'll still be main taining the distribution system, but are not going to get into the mar keting end of the business in this area. Pacific's rates are lower than other major California power compa nies, including PG&E and Southern California Edison.

In addition, with the deregulation came a 10 percent re duction in electric bills. That reduction was reflected on Pacific's January billing.

The one thing consumers in Modoc cannot do is switch from Pacific Power to Surprise Valley, or the other way around.

Obituaries

Muriel A. Pinneo

Long-time Alturas resident and businesswoman Muriel A. Pinneo died Friday, February 20, 1998 at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif. Services were conducted at grave side at the Alturas Cemetery on Monday, Feb. 23. Mrs. Pin neo was 84.

Mrs. Pinneo was the first administrator for Modoc Men tal Health, which was a new concept throughout the state, when it was first opened in Modoc in 1970. Mrs. Pinneo pio neered the Modoc Mental Health facility, as the state did the same. She was seeing a caseload of about 100 people a month just before she retired June 30, 1983. Her home phone was a source of comfort to many after office hours.

When she found a serious need in the department's services for an alcohol treatment program, she be gan holding meetings one night a week at the office until Alcoholics Anonymous took over. In addition, a drug program was started and originally all the pro grams fell under the same budget and Mental Health program, until the state be gan separating each pro gram.

In the early years, Mrs. Pinneo had the opportunity to deal with people more be cause the professionals were only in one day a week to go through the clients' cases.

Born in Dunsmuir, Calif. on October 23, 1913 to Everard "Cap" and Jessie Anne Hay, the family moved to Alturas be fore Muriel started school. She graduated from Modoc Union High School in 1932. She married lifetime Alturas resident Harry A. Pinneo on December 6, 1930. He was working for Standard Oil in the 1930s and the Pinneos were transferred to Medford, Ore. for 12 years. The Medford Chamber of Commerce asked the Pinneos to be the "model couple," an honor which pleased Muriel as did the community meetings and the social af fairs they were requested to attend.

From 1945 until 1968, Muriel and Harry owned and op erated Superior Lumber Company in Alturas. During that time, they built and operated Ready Mix Concrete in Alturas, in addition to the lumber yard.

In her younger years, she and Harry enjoyed hunting and fishing in Modoc County. Harry preceded her in death in March of 1969, after 39 years of marriage. Not long after, Muriel applied for the Mental Health Administrative posi tion and was hired.

Mrs. Pinneo is survived by her daughters Margaret Ann Condos and Sue Dea Maiden, both of Carson City, Nev.; two grand-daughters and one great-grandson and many dear friends who will also miss her.

Interment was at the Alturas Cemetery. Services were conducted by St. Michael's Episcopal Church of Alturas.

James Murray Jensen

Long-time Modoc County resident James Murray Jensen, known to his friends as Jim, died February 19, 1998 in Al turas, Calif., at the age of 78 years.

Born on April 8, 1919 in Grantsville, Utah, the sixth of 10 children of James and Iva Jensen, the family later moved to Los Angeles. Jim completed high school in San Diego.

In 1936, Jim met Rosella Marie Hawkins in Los An geles. The two were married three years later on April 15, 1939 in Yuma, Ariz. They were close to celebrating their 59th year of marriage at the time of his passing.

After a few years, they moved to Emmett, Idaho, where Jim was employed in the lumber industry and as a house painter.

After 10 years, they moved back to Los Angeles and after two years, ended up on the Madeline Plains in 1957. While in Madeline, Jim and Rose owned and operated the "Madeline Cafe." Jim was also a school bus driver and was the "Honorable Judge Jensen" as Justice Court Judge for Lassen County, until he retired, when he and Rose moved to Alturas in 1971. Jim was employed by the County of Modoc for 10 years. After retiring in 1982, he helped Rose manage the Arrowhead Golf Course, where he was able to encourage many a young golfer. Mr. Jensen was a member of the Al turas Elks Lodge 1756. He also enjoyed wood working, fish ing, hunting, and was an avid golfer.

Jim and Rose had four children, Jimmy, Sharon, Mike and Kathryn [Kitty], 11 grandchildren and 15 great-grand children.

His greatest pleasure was teaching all of his children, grandchildren and his great-grandchildren to hunt, fish, water-ski and play golf.

The Jensens have made Modoc their home for the past 42 years. Jim will be missed a great deal by his family and many friends.

He is survived by his wife Rose Jensen of Alturas; son James E. Jensen of Gasquet, Calif.; daughter Sharon Olsen of Salem, Ore.; son Michael L. Jensen of Kamiah, Idaho; daughter Kathryn [Kitty] Burkholder of San Diego, Calif.; two brothers and one sister; 10 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.

One granddaughter Carolyn, preceded him in death as did three of his brothers and three of his sisters.

No services will be held.

Thomas James Brogan

Alturas resident Thomas James Brogan's death came as a shock to his family and all who knew him. Mr. Brogan died unexpectedly in his sleep at his Alturas home on Sun day, Feb. 22, 1998, with pneumonia deemed the cause of cut ting short his life of 44 years.

A memorial service will be conducted by Pastor Jerry Chilson at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, March 6 at Christian Life Assembly in Alturas.

Mr. Brogan, his 13-year-old son James and wife LaVelle have made Alturas their home for the past eight years. He had worked as a long haul truck driver for the past 20 years.

Born on June 11, 1953 in Rochester, Minnesota, he completed his schooling in Rockford, Illinois. He mar ried LaVelle Cuppett in Rockford, Illinois on De cember 19, 1980 and the two celebrated their 17th wed ding anniversary this past December. He enjoyed fish ing, hunting, being in the great outdoors and loved to attend his son James' base ball games. He attended Christian Life Assembly Church and loved his fam ily. He will be greatly missed by many friends.

He was preceded in death by his mother Delores Elaine Radke.

Mr. Brogan is survived by his wife LaVelle of Alturas; son James of Alturas; son Jacob of Rockford, Ill.; daughter Jody of Rockford, Ill.; two grandchildren; his father Garrett George and step-mother Nancy Brogan of Rockford, Ill.; sister Terri and brother-in-law Andy Vaughan of Michi gan; brother Michael Brogan, Rockford, Ill., two nieces and two nephews; grandmother Magdalena of Minnesota; aunts Rita, Susie, Cheryl and Georgie and uncle Tom, all of Min nesota; mother-in-law Jo Cuppett of Alturas; brother-in law Russell and wife Shawna Cuppett of Modesto; and in-laws James and Maxine Cuppett, Connecticut; Connie and Den nis Dwyer, Alturas and Bernetta and Richard Bowlin, Al turas.

Inurnment will be private.

The family suggests any contributions be made to the Arthritis Foundation or Modoc County Little League.

Mary Fae Crowl Hartlerode

Services for Mary Fae Crowl Hartlerode will be held at 1:00 p.m. today, February 26 at the Fort Bidwell Cemetery. Mrs. Hartlerode's grandson James Toney will conduct the services. A potluck fellowship will follow at the Ft. Bidwell Civic Club.

Mary Fae Crowl Hartlerode died on February 20, 1998 at the age of 96-1/2 in the home of her daughter Hazel Toney in Klamath Falls, Ore. She was born September 17, 1901 in Clarence, Missouri to John W. and Annie Crowl. They came West by train when Fae was eight-years-old. Her older brother Harry, she and her parents lived in Canby/Alturas area where she grew up. Her father worked on ranches and built many of the buildings, still standing at the Kelly Hot Springs, east of Canby.

Fae loved the outdoors, worked with her father, rode horseback and developed life-long honest, hard-working ethics. This was evidenced by her long and productive life. She still lived alone in her home next to her daughter Mil dred Burgoyne at Soldier Creek Canyon, north of Cedarville, Calif. She was gifted in many ways.

At age 24, she fell in love and married Ernest [Ernie] Hartlerode, November 1, 1925. They raised three daughters, Hazel, Mildred and Virginia.

When the girls were quite young, the girls operated a family-owned shingle mill. This required all of them working to produce cedar shingles. Even Virginia, the youngest, at age five, was no exception. All labored hard to make a living. When the girls were older, they owned and operated a sawmill in Fort Bidwell, Calif. The girls worked in the mill, in the woods and drove logging trucks. Fae was the bookkeeper, homemaker, cooked for the crews, grew a gar den, milked one or two cows, made her own bread and butter and made the supply and parts trips to Alturas, Lake view and Klamath Falls, keeping everything running and on-time.

Fae was well known in her life as a superb cook when she prepared meals for several large crews on ranches in Sur prise Valley and was the head cook at the Surprise Valley Hospital for some time.

She left wonderful memories of her meticulous sewing habits, her beautiful, precise penmanship, her hand quilt ing, and embroidery work. To her last days of life, she was still doing these tasks.

Mrs. Hartlerode was a charter member of the Surprise Valley Hospital Auxiliary and Senior Citizens Center.

She was preceded in death by her husband Ernie in 1967 and their daughter Virginia McCombs in 1991.

She is survived by her daughters Hazel Toney, Klamath Falls, Ore.; Mildred Burgoyne and husband Addis of Cedarville, Calif.; son-in-law Jack McCombs of Alturas; grandchildren Jim Toney, Livermore; Carolyn Toney Souders, Klamath Falls, Ore.; Paula Burgoyne Lane of Adel, Ore; Gus Burgoyne, Chico and Audie McCombs of Al turas. She had 11 great-grandchildren, one great-great grandchild, many nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews.

Those wishing to do so may contribute to the Surprise Val ley Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, Calif. 96104 or to the Fort Bidwell Cemetery, c/o Susie Fee, Fort Bidwell, Calif. 96112.

Elizabeth A. Colburn

Services for Elizabeth Amelia Colburn will be held at Kerr Mortuary Chapel at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 27 in Alturas. Mrs. Colburn, a native of Modoc County, born in Cedarville, Calif. on June 16, 1904, died in Alturas, Calif. on February 21, 1998 at the age of 93 years.

More information will be provided by Mrs. Colburn's Family in the coming Record issue.

March 1998

 
Record news for March 5,1998
  • DA, Supervisors face challenge in June
  • Wet was the word for February
  • Event Center porjecttakes a new path
  • Class of 1968 plans reunion

Obituaries:

  • Miller
  • Davis
  • Colburn
  • Clark

DA, Supervisors toface opposition in June 2 election

Modoc District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter in the June 2 election.

Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and public defender, announced his candidacy late last week.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also now facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso has announced his intention to run for that seat. Misso has been active in the Tulelake area for years.

The race to fill outgoing District 1 Supervisor Ben Zandstra's seat will also be contested. Terry Williams, of Cedarville, has taken out papers to run against Realtor Sandra Stevenson. Williams is retired and serves on the county's Fish and Game Commission.

Four candidates have taken out papers for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, of the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Teasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is retir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election. She holds the position until January.

The filing period for all offices closes March 6, unless the incumbent doesn't file, in which case it remains open until March 11.

Alturas attorney Barry Kinman is running against in cumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Kinman who has appealed a conviction for dissuading a witness has said he will pull out of the race if his appeal is denied. Kinman was cleared of seven other counts in a Modoc Court last year and his appeal was heard last week. A decision is expected within 90 days. Kinman contends that the charges in that case stemmed from his public disputes with Comisky and the Board of Supervisors over the County versus Judge John Baker case, which the county lost.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un opposed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

Two people had have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones, who passed away. That term runs through the year 2000. The terms of incumbents Marvin Kitchen and Randy Faver come up for election in November.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot.

Modoc currently has 5,919 registered voters. The primary election in June is an open election, meaning all candidates will be on all ballots. There will not simply be party ballots mailed to party members.

In Modoc, the current voter registration is as follows: 2,674 Republican, 2,341 Democrat, 640 non-partisan, 174 American Independent, 29 Peace and Freedom, nine Green Party, 16 Reform Party and two Natural Law Party.

Wet was the word for February

The month of February can best be de scribed in Modoc County as very wet and dreary. Residents are hoping, against El Nino, that March will bring some sunshine and dry weather.

While Alturas was pretty close to its aver age of 1.23 inches of precipitation for the month, other areas in the county were wetter. Adin, for instance had 2.35 inches of rain, well above the average of 1.67. Canby was also high with 2.07 inches.

In Cedarville, the Soil Conservation Service measured 2.09 inches of precipita tion. There is also plenty of snow in the high country and Cedar Pass Ski Hill remains open for business this weekend.

According to Ken Romberger, U.S. Forest Service, Big Valley, the snow survey taken at Sweagart Flat, Feb. 27, showed 61.4 inches of snow, with 20.4 inches of water con tent. The average for this date since 1945 is 34.4 inches of snow and 11.1 inches of moisture. Romberger said only three years have had a higher water content at the end of February. In 1952, a record was set with 31.6 inches of water.

Most weather watchers agree that the snow levels in the mountains are better than aver age and the water content is also high. As long as the county doesn't see heavy levels of warm rain this spring, conditions are right for a good water year.

Event Center project taking new path

The long-studied, long-awaited Modoc Western Event Center project in Alturas will take a new path, as the origi nal concept has been pretty much declared dead in the water.

The Event Center has been in the works for more than 12 years without coming to real ity. While there are several reasons for its lack of ulti mate progress, it remains a prior ity worth pursuing.

According to Modoc County Planning Director Scott Kessler, the original concept which included a Joint Powers Authority (JPA) be tween the City of Alturas, Modoc Joint Unified School District and the County of Modoc is dead.

He and the city's Event Center Coordinator Mel Berry, have received the go-ahead from the county and city to dis band the JPA, and will go to the MJUSD Board with the same request soon.

The original concept in cluded an event center for several types of events, plus facilities for school use, in cluding gymnasium and cafeteria. The school district was also to supply the geothermal water as a heating source for the en tire facility. That geothermal well is lo cated between Modoc Middle School and Alturas Elementary School. The Event Center itself is planned for an area on Nagle Street, between both schools.

"Having the JPA in place unnecessarily encumbered the city property," said Kessler. "The city will take the lead on the project and will be looking at new and differ ent sources of grant funding. We need to look at the facility as a re gional event center first, then as a community recreation center. We have not given up on the project."

Another project this city is moving ahead at full steam is the Wrymoo-City of Alturas Historical Operating Railroad Museum. And that project, said Kessler is "chugging along" at a good pace.

He said more Wrymoo lo comotives are expected to be de livered to Alturas this month as well as a caboose and pas senger cars later. According to Kessler, Wrymoo wants to start lim ited passenger rides some time this fall. The rail road historical society is already planning several events around the Fandango Days celebration, including train rides and rides on their 1921 Buda handcar.

Kessler is meeting with of ficials in Lakeview, concern ing other aspects of the rail road operation and its possi bili ties involving the Goose Lake 55 railroad between Lakeview and Alturas.

The railroad project has received overwhelming city council and community sup port. The 103 acres of former Alturas Mill property has been purchased by the City of Alturas and work is under way to renovate the tracks and buildings at that site. Other businesses are looking at the site for possible location.

Duck Race gearing up for third swim

The Great Pit River Duck Race, sponsored by the Rotary Clubs of Alturas is gearing up for its third run dur ing Fandango Days, in a continuing ef fort to build new ballfields and maintain the Alturas Rotary Youth Park.

The Duck Race has been a highly successful fundraiser for the Youth Park, with more than $60,000 raised in the first two years.

The Rotary Clubs are now out seeking support for this year's race, and stress that community and busi ness sup port is what makes the event so successful. If someone wishes to partici pate by donating a prize, of fering a coupon for the coupon book or sponsoring a prize, it will be welcome. Plans are to increase the prizes as well as the num ber of coupons in the book.

Anyone wishing to par ticipate must get in contact with Bill Madison by March 15. The Duck Race tickets will go on sale April 15. Call Madison at 233-3432.

Work on the new ball fields at the Youth Park is pro gressing nicely. The fields have been laser-lev eled, the sprinkler system is 90 percent completed. The parking lot bordering the Little League and Senior League fields has been paved. According to Madison, who co-chairs the event with Mike Mason, the next step will be the con struc tion of the perimeter fence, followed by the plant ing of grass. Following those items will be the dugout, re strooms, conces sion and a playground construction. More funds need to be raised to complete the project.

Class of '68 plans 30th

The Modoc High School Class of 1968 reunion commit tee has set a date of August 8 for its 30th class reunion. The reunion is scheduled for the Elks Lodge in Alturas with tentative plans for light food and refreshment at 12 noon, cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. with dancing to follow.

Any class members want ing to assist, or needing more information or input should call 233-2632.

Obituaries

Harold "Dusty" Miller

Former Alturas resident Harold "Dusty" Miller died of a heart attack on February 24, 1998 at Spring Lake Village in Santa Rosa, Calif. He was 85.

A native of California, he was born in Yreka, Calif. on March 20, 1912.

Mr. Miller worked for the National Park Service at the Grand Canyon until entering the U.S. Navy in 1942. He was sent to Guadalcanal with the First U.S. Marine Corps group and was later re-assigned as a Combat Information Center officer on the U.S.S. Enterprise.

On May 20, 1944, he and Joan Slye, who was originally from Montana, but working in Seattle during the War, were married in Seattle, Wash. They were close to celebrating their 54th year of marriage at the time of his passing.

After the war, Mr. Miller worked for the U.S. Forest Ser vice as a ranger in the Lands and Timber Management De partment. He worked on the El Dorado, Tahoe, Mendocino, Modoc in the 1950s, and Shasta Trinity National Forests during the 1960s, during his long career with the Forest Ser vice. Mrs. Miller recalls their time in Modoc with fondness. They developed many friendships here.

After retiring in 1973 from the Forest Service, Mr. Miller accepted a job with Southern Pacific Land Company in Red ding for seven years.

He is survived by his wife Joan of Santa Rosa; three chil dren, Russ Miller of Modesto, Susan Lowenkron of Eugene, Ore. and Mike Miller of Alameda; four grandchildren Kimberly and Kelleigh Miller and Gabe and Aaron Lowenkron.

A memorial service was held Sunday, February 29 at Oakmont Memorial Gardens in Lafayette, Calif.

Bonnie Jean Davis

Surprise Valley native Bonnie Jean Davis died in Fresno, Calif. on February 27, 1998. She was 65 years of age and had lived most of her life in Alturas and Cedarville.

Born Bonnie Jean Starr to Mildred [Boston] and Eugene Starr in Cedarville, Calif., she attended local schools, in cluding Modoc High School. She was a homemaker and re cently had been united with her daughter, whom she had been separated from when her daughter was very young.

Mrs. Davis died of natural causes. She had been living in Fresno area for the past six months, after finding her daughter.

She is survived by her daughter Dolly Sylvester of Clovis and three grandchildren.

Private services were held in Fresno, Calif., care of the Tinkler Funeral Chapel. Remembrances may be made to the charity of choice.

Elizabeth A. Colburn

Elizabeth Amelia Colburn, a native of Modoc County, died in Alturas, Calif. on February 21, 1998 at the age of 93 years.

Born Elizabeth Amelia Metzker in Cedarville, Calif. on June 16, 1904, to Elizabeth [Addington] and Edward Metzker, she attended local schools. On New Year's Day, January 1, 1923, she married Charles Everett Colburn.

Mrs. Colburn was a cook with Local 228 and was a mem ber of the Order of Rebekah Lodge and Native Daughters of the Golden West. She made her home in Alturas for 60 years, and returned to Alturas after the death of her husband in 1964.

Her husband preceded her in death on June 14, 1964, after 41 years of marriage.

Mrs. Colburn is survived by niece Leona Stripling and nephew Larry Metzker, both of Lakeland, Florida; great nephews Jay and Scott Stripling of Lakeland; and Billy Stripling, U.S. Army; great niece Mae Alexander of Kla math Falls, Ore.; great nephews Ed and Phil Metzker of Lakeland, Florida; great niece Dixie Metzker of Lakeland; great-great nieces Sarah and Rachel Alexander; great-great nephew Ben Stripling and many wonderful friends.

Services were held at Kerr Mortuary Chapel at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 27 in Alturas. Pastor Rod Bodmer officiated. Interment was at Alturas Cemetery in Alturas, Calif.

Douglas Alexander Clark

Modoc resident Douglas Alexander Clark, known to his friends and co-workers as one of the "last of the old style cowboys," died in Alturas, Calif. on February 25, 1998, a month shy of his 70th birthday.

Mr. Clark was born in Watsonville, Calif. on March 30, 1928. He completed high school in Watsonville, graduating in 1946 and attended a year of college at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, Calif. before embarking on his journey as a cowboy and rancher on several cattle ranches throughout Oregon, Nevada and California. He was last employed at the Estill Ranch in Likely, Calif.

"All his friends and co-workers commented on his out standing cowboy skills, especially roping," recalls his daughter Jenny Marsh of Bakersfield.

Fr. Ray Hopp conducted services at graveside in Paisley, Ore. on Friday, February 27.

Mr. Clark is survived by his three children David Clark of Buelton, Calif.; Jenny Marsh, Bakersfield; Martha and husband Greg Ptasnik of Pinedale, Wyoming; brothers and sisters-in-law, Kenneth and Carolyn Clark of Kentville, N.S. Canada; Rex and Jean Clark of Roseville; six grand children, Stephanie Marsh, Nadra Clark, Malia Clark, Hannah Clark, Caitlin Clark and Ryan Ptasnik; one great-grandchild Max Reynolds; his partner in life these past 11 years, Eileen Cody and her grandchildren Robert and Cindy Stanton, Billy and N'ke Charter and Trevor Cody.

He was preceded in death by his parents Basil and Neska Clark of Watsonville and aunt Eula Dolye of Watsonville.

 
Record news for March 12, 1998
  • Several local races in June 2 election
  • MJUSD debates use of drug dog
  • East Street repairs are not far away
  • Duck Race sponsor deadlines nears

Obituaries:

  • Pope
  • Coppedge
  • Gaylord
  • Olson

The forecast: Mostly cloudy skies return today with a chance of rain. Snow level moves up to 6,000 feet. Showers and thunderstorms possible Friday and unsettled weather for the weekend.

June 2 election set with races in some local positions

The June 2 primary election has shaped up with contested races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5. All candidates have had papers officially certified and the filing period is closed.

District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender. Comisky, who has endured a rocky first term, is seeking a new four-year stint as DA.

Alturas attorney Barry Kinman is running against in cumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier was appointed to the bench when Judge Robert Barclay was appointed Modoc Superior Court Judge. Dier is finish ing out that term and is seeking a full six-year term.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso will be seek ing to unseat Huffman in June.

The race to fill outgoing District 1 Supervisor Ben Zandstra's seat will also be contested. Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Realtor Sandra Stevenson.

Four candidates are running for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, of the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Teasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is retir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

Two people have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

County Clerk Maxine Madison stresses that voters need to report changes in name or address to her office. Additionally, she reminds residents that voter registration cards are available all local Post Offices and just need to be filled out and mailed in to her office. The final day to regis ter to vote or make changes in registration is May 4.

MJUSD ponders use of drug dog on high school campus

"Woof! Woof!" may be an expression that will be heard around the halls of Modoc High School in the future, and it won't be Lassie or Old Yeller that's visiting. The dog on cam pus just might be a drug sniffing dog helping to bust students.

Members of the various lo cal law en forcement agen cies have suggested to the Modoc Joint Unified School District (MJUSD) that the California Highway Patrol K-9 dog be used at Modoc High to detect the presence of drugs.

At their last meeting, the MJUSD Board of Trustees considered the matter and gave the go-ahead for the CHP officer and dog to do a demonstration for students at an assembly in the MHS gymnasium.

MJUSD Superintendent Craig Drennan said the board is still considering whether to allow the dog to actually be used for searches on campus. They would like to consider such use in the context of de veloping an overall district policy on drugs and drug use. Part of that policy may in clude drug testing of stu dents who are involved in extracur ricular activities, particu larly ath letics. The dis trict, as re quired by State law, cur rently has a "zero tolerance" policy with regard to stu dents using or possessing drugs on any dis trict cam pus.

In other MJUSD matters:

New Child Care Facility at New Directions: The dis trict and the Modoc County Office of Education are look ing at becoming partners in erect ing a building to be housed at the New Directions site at the corner of Eighth and East streets. The build ing would be used pri marily for child-care programs. The cost of adding the 2,500 square foot building is cur rently estimated at $121,200.

Drennan said the board would like to see a situation where the County pays for the costs of the building and the dis trict provides the land and takes care of running the pro grams that will use the build ing. Drennan gave the board information that benefits from the pro ject would include a training center for child care workers and preschool staff, a per ma nent facility for child care in the community, ex pansion of child care, an in crease in the ability to re ceive grants for programs for teen parents, an expan sion of Head Start services, and a fa cility for the Even Start pro ject.

The Modoc Child Care Council is also strongly in favor of the expansion pro ject, particularly since the facility that housed one of their pro grams was sold in October of 1997.

District Goals: In the fall of 1997 the dis trict went through a goals setting pro cess that al lowed members of the com munity to give input. Based on the meetings held during that process. The board now has a list of specific goals it will focus on in eight areas -- aca demics, learn ing climate, staffing, ex tracurricular, technology, finance, facilities and pub lic involvement.

Each of the eight areas gen erally has about four or five specific goals. For ex ample, in the area of aca demics some of the goals are: (1) provide for the artic ulation of curriculum K-12 including curriculum inte gration where appropri ate; (2) establish work level ex pectancies and sequencing in conjunction with new state standards; (3) create different elective classes at the middle and high school levels, which may include the arts and classes de signed for high achievers.

Drennan said that while the board would like to pur sue all of the goals, finances are limited, and some high prior ity goals may have to wait until funding becomes avail able. He said that many of the goals do not re quire signifi cant expendi ture and that the district would pursue those goals as quickly as possible.

State Stuff: The Califor nia Legislature is currently look ing at a bill called "95-5" that would require that 95 percent of funds be spent at school sites and not in other areas. The major force be hind the bill is the teachers union for Los Angeles schools. Gover nor Wilson also is in favor of the bill. Drennan said that large districts, such as Los Ange les Unified, might have to cut out important pro grams and staff to meet the 95-5 cut.

East Street will be repaired soon

No, the City of Alturas has not forgotten East Street? While it may not be soon enough for residents who live on the street between 8th and 4th Street, repairs are on the way.

East Street, one of the town's major arter ies, which was newly paved last summer un der a FEMA grant (with the process objected to by the city) developed potholes this winter. The road base gave way in several areas, causing the pavement to break up. The City closed the street, except to residents in mid-January. It remains closed, but should be re paired around the first part of April.

According to Alturas Public Works Director Stacy Chase, the city must wait until the base dries out and for Fitch Sand and Gravel to start up their asphalt operations. That generally happens around the first of April, said Chase.

"I'll tell you, we certainly want to get the street repaired and open as soon as we can," said Chase this week. "In the meantime, we would like to keep as much traffic as possible off of it to prevent any further damage. We'll get it fixed as soon as we're able and the weather cooperates."

Chase said the city will go into those areas, excavate and replace the base material before laying more asphalt. He figures those parts of East Street that would fail, have failed, and hopes the remaining portions will be fine.

The city is still negotiating with FEMA for another round of repairs, at more than $400,000, but wants to insure FEMA under stands the process problems associated with the last project -- specifically what happened on East Street. The city, said Chase, is argu ing for a better process on the next project, not just an overlay on unsuitable base material. The city hopes to have the next project in the works this summer.

Duck Race sponsors deadline nears

The last chance to participate as a sponsor or place a coupon for the 1998 Alturas Rotary Clubs' Great Pit River Duck Race is March 15.

The Great Pit River Duck Race is organizing for its third run dur ing Fandango Days, in a continuing ef fort to build new ballfields and maintain the Alturas Rotary Youth Park.

The Rotary Clubs are now out seeking community and busi ness support for this year's race. If someone wishes to partici pate by donating a prize, of fering a coupon for the coupon book or sponsoring a prize, it will be greatly appreci ated. Plans are to increase the prizes as well as the num ber of coupons in the book.

Anyone wishing to par ticipate must get in contact with Bill Madison by March 15. The Duck Race tickets will go on sale April 15. Call Madison at 233-3432.

The Duck Race has been a highly successful fundraiser for the Youth Park, with more than $60,000 raised in the first two years.

Obituaries

Carleton Lewis Pope

Carleton Lewis Pope called Modoc County, "God's little piece of heaven." Mr. Lewis, an Alturas resident for the past 20 years, loved living in Modoc County. Friends and family members were saddened by his sudden demise when he died on Monday, March 9, 1998 in Redding, Calif.

Born in Oxford, Con necticut on January 16, 1910, he was 88 years of age at the time of his passing. He had graduated from Seymour High School in Connecticut and continued his education in Engineering at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. As a tool designer in Connecticut, he designed a clip for a gun, which was patented by the company for which he worked as a young man.

He and Rhea Genevieve Moffitt, whom he knew while growing up and attending school together in Connecticut, were married in New York on July 4, 1936.

"They had a beautiful relationship together for the almost 62 years they were married," shared Mr. Pope's daughter, Nancy Weimann.

The family moved from Connecticut to Southern Califor nia in 1951 and Mr. Pope worked for Lockheed Aircraft in Burbank for 25 years, until he retired in 1978. During that time, he helped design the first space shuttle and some of the materials which were used on that shuttle. He also worked for Boeing and was called back from retirement for his ex pertise on projects being worked on at Boeing. He was a well respected engineer, who made his family proud of his ac complishments.

In 1978, after discovering Modoc County, he and Rhea purchased property in Alturas which they called the "PW Ranch" with his daughter, Nancy, son-in-law William and grandchildren.

"The grandkids were the apple of his eye," recalls his daughter. Mr. Pope enjoyed bowling, fishing, hunting, driv ing his tractor and doing carpentry work. He and wife Rhea took an active role in their community and maintained a close relationship with their children and grandchildren.

Mr. Pope is survived by his wife Rhea of Alturas; daugh ter Nancy Weimann and husband William A. Weimann of Alturas; grandson William C. Weimann and wife Kim berly of Alturas and great-grandsons Johnathen Weimann, Nathan and Cody Book of Alturas; grand-daughter Trudy Jean Cavasso of Redding and grandsons Cody and William E. Cavasso also of Redding; son Richard Pope and wife Carol of Michigan; grandsons Steven Pope, Alan Pope and wife Samantha and Brian Pope, all of Michigan; and one sister Elsie Curtiss and husband Les of Ansonia, Conn.

Elder Earl Clark will conduct a service and time of prayer for family and friends at the home of Nancy and William Weimann in Alturas on Friday, March 13 at 3:00 p.m.

The family suggests that any contributions in Mr. Pope's memory be directed to the Modoc Senior Citizens Center, 906 W. Fourth St., Alturas.

Curtis Vincil Coppedge

Services for former Alturas resident Curtis Vincil Coppedge will be held at graveside at the Alturas Cemetery on Saturday, March 14 at 1:00 p.m.

Mr. Coppedg Medford, Ore., of complications from Multiple Sclerosis. He was 41 years of age.

A graduate of Henley High School in Klamath Falls, Ore., he furthered his education at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Ore. Mr. Coppedge was a structural designer who also enjoyed gardening and motorcycling. Three years of his life were spent in Modoc County. He was born on November 5, 1956 in LaJolla, Calif.

Mr. Coppedge is survived by his sons Vincil Lyle and Shane Curtis Coppedge, both of Klamath Falls, Ore.; his mother Dorothea Chism of Klamath Falls, Ore.; brothers Grant Coppedge of Olympia, Wash.; Bryan Coppedge of Medford, Ore.; and sister Karen Coppedge of Medford, Ore.;

The family suggests that any memorial contributions be directed to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 1650 N.W. Front Ave., #190, Portland, Ore. 97203.

Lynn Melvin Gaylord

Lynn Melvin Gaylord, 82, of Redding, died at his home Wednesday evening, March 4,1998, following a lengthy ill ness.

A native of Bieber, he was born June 29, 1915 to a pioneer family that homesteaded the Widow Valley area of Modoc County.

His father was a teamster, and ran freight wagons and stagecoach lines throughout the north state.

Mr. Gaylord had lived in Bieber most of his early years, but prior to moving to Redding in 1965 he had also lived in McArthur, Burney and Fall River, where he worked in var ious lumber and logging operations. During his youth, he worked for the CCC, the Civilian Conservation Corp. He re tired in 1978 after working 14 years as a lumber grader with Champion International in Anderson.

He was very active with the Anderson Senior Center, and helped build their new hall. He also belonged to the Redding Moose Lodge No. 1006, and was an avid hunter and fisher man. He loved to dance, and was an accomplished musi cian; family members including his parents and siblings all played in a band for many years.

Surviving is a son Dennis Gaylord of Pendleton, Ore.; a daughter Sharon Briggs of Redding; a sister Grace Hales of Redding; a brother Leland Gaylord of McArthur, grand children Russell Catalan of McKinleyville; Bradley Cata lan of Hayward; Jennifer Briggs of Redding; Sean Rose of Seattle, Steven Scritchfield of Richland, Wash. and twins Yolanda and Rhonda Gaylord, both of Sutherlin, Ore.

Funeral services were held Tuesday, March 10 at 2 p.m. at Hoyt-Cole Chapel of the Flowers in Red Bluff, with burial following at Oak Hill Cemetery.

Peggy Anne Olson

Former Alturas resident Peggy Anne Olson, whose hus band the Rev. Karl Olson, pastored at the Federated Church in Alturas for many years, died of a massive stroke in Mc Cloud, Calif. on Friday, Feb. 27, 1998. She was 75.

Born June 14, 1922, her interests were her family, reli gious education for children, women's activities in the churches she served and environmentally concerned groups. She worked for world peace. Mrs. Olson was a member of the Fremont Congregational Church for 18 years, where her husband served as pastor.

She is survived by her husband Rev. Karl Olson of Mc Cloud; five children; two brothers, six great-grandchildren and two step-grandchildren.

Services were held Feb. 28 at the Fremont Congregational Church, in Fremont, Calif.

Record news for March 19, 1998

  • Judge allows motion for county to intervene in suit
  • Oregon Shakespeare Festival comes to town
  • Modoc Health Fair is this weekend
  • Spring music festival is a treat
  • June 2 election has local races

Obituaries

  • Avery
  • McKinney
  • Ciprian

Judge rules to allow intervention in lawsuit

Judge Gordon Burrell has granted a motion to allow Modoc County to intervene in a lawsuit that could affect farming practices on Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges. The motion also allows inter vention by Siskiyou and Klamath County and several area farmers.

According to county counsel Hugh Comisky, the ruling is a big hurdle cleared in the case, but also means the work "now really begins."

The lawsuit was filed in December by environmental or ganizations led by the Klamath Forest Alliance and targets Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. The lawsuit charges that current agriculture practices on refuge leased-lands in the refuges conflict with federal law and wildlife needs.

Comisky explained to the board that it had three options: to join the suit, intervene, or file a separate lawsuit. He sought advice from the California Farm Bureau on the issue before recommending the board intervene. Intervening in the suit would place the counties on the side of Babbitt, said Comisky.

According to Modoc Land Use Committee Chairman Sean Curtis, if the lawsuit is successful, farming on all refuge lands would cease. He said that would impact about $1 mil lion dol lars in county revenue and about $22 million in pro duction.

Curtis told the Board that the Tule Lake and Lower Klamath Refuges were formed differently than any other refuge in the nation. The formation of these refuges in cluded the pro vision that the 22,000 acres could be leased and farmed. He said the environment groups want these refuges treated like others in the nation where farming is not con sidered a com patible use.

In addition to the lawsuit filed by Klamath Forest Alliance, an earlier suit in 1994 was settled out of court that has caused the farmers grief, said Curtis. That lawsuit re sulted in, among other things, a proposed Integrated Pest Management Plan that could result in eliminating the use of most traditional pesticides on those lands. That plan could eliminate much of the agriculture production on those lands, said Curtis.

One of the reasons Comisky feels it's important for the county to be involved is that no settlement can be reached in the case without the counties' involvement.

In another twist, 18 conservation groups are now request ing an Inspector General's investigation of pesticide use on the two refuges. The groups are arguing that improper and illegal application of pesticides are occurring on refuge lands, violating a 1994 settlement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Oregon Natural Resources Council and the Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides.

Oregon Shakespeare Actors come to town

The Oregon Shakespeare festival will present a special evening as this year's School Visit program.

The actors, Andres Alcala and Lorenzo Gonzalez, will perform excerpts from Shakespeare, classic and contempo rary literature at the Niles Theater in Alturas, March 25, 7:30 p.m.

"People who enjoy theater, or people who enjoy profes sional entertainment should take in this show," said Chip Massie, of the Alturas Community Theater. "It doesn't get much better than this and they do some Shakespeare as well as more modern pieces. What's important is that they do everything extremely well. Don't miss it, they have been extremely well received in the past few years."

Tickets are available at the door for $6 each. The Modoc County Arts Council and Modoc Tobacco Control Program are hosting the actors for the school visit program in Modoc. The 1997-98 School Visit Program is funded in part by a grant from US WEST Foundation and support from the many members of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

"This program is one of the very highest quality pro grams we are able to bring to Modoc," said Arts Council Director Ken Franklin. "We're fortunate to get them for the schools and for the performance for the community."

The actors will spend the week in assemblies and work shops at schools in the Modoc and Surprise Valley Joint Unified School District.

Get well at the annual Modoc Health Fair

Take a proactive step toward wellness by attending the Fourth Annual Modoc County Health Fair this Saturday, March 21 in the Modoc High School Griswold Gym. Doors open at 8:00 a.m. and close at 12:00 noon.

Local health professionals will come to gether to offer free health screenings for any age during this special public of fering. The Modoc Indian Health Project and Modoc Medi cal Center have generously sponsored each of the four years of the Health Fair.

Stop by anytime during the Health Fair to take advantage of the services available with free testing for anemia, blood sugar levels, have your blood oxygen measured or a com plete blood screening [$10, fasting recom mended for 12 hours with only water or black coffee consumed].

Among the many stations inside the gym will be a physi cal assessment booth, Physical Therapy information; health care and fit ness information.

Register at various booths for drawings with prizes such as a free mammogram of fered, a free pulmonary function test; a child's bicycle helmet and more.

Check out Audiologist Elizabeth Dare's ear camera and Virginia Hassler's high pow ered microscope - a Colposcope, or stop by the California Highway Patrol's Car Seat Safety information booth or the Modoc County Sher iff's 911 Emer gency booth. A Modoc Med Ambulance will also be available and Fami lies Matter and the Boy Scouts will offer a Chil dren's Fingerprint Identification booth. All services are free, with the exception of the complete Blood Screening for $10, a deal that can't be beaten when compared to the regular cost of such an offer.

The Health Fair provides a wonderful op portunity for children and adults to learn more about their health and the tools that are used to keep them healthy.

To break help break a fast, stop by the Pan cake Breakfast served by Project Graduation in side the gym entry. Meals will be avail able for $2.50 per person.

Students to ring in Spring with Music Festival Tuesday night

Some familiar, some new, but all played for the enjoyment of the public and music for all tastes will be the highlight of the 1998 Spring Music Festival Tuesday night, March 24 in the Modoc High School Gymnasium at 7:00 p.m.

Grades four through 12 will perform and delight their audiences with music from Broadway shows to toe-tapping marches, in strumental and vocal solos.

Join the students for the free concert, under the direction of Karen Siegel, Modoc Middle and High School Music Director, and Eileen Ramos, Alturas Elementary School Music Director.

The evening will open with the combined voices of the Alturas Elementary, Modoc Middle and Modoc High School choirs with "We're Gonna Make Music For You."

The Elementary students will follow on their recorders with "Ode to Joy, Choral Sym phony" by Beethoven. The AES Fifth Grade Band will play "Eagle Summit March" and the Fifth and Sixth Grade Bands will play "Ranger Rock." The Fifth grade choir will sing "Who Can Sail" and "It's aWonderful Thing to Be Me."

"New World Overture" will be performed by the MMS Sixth Grade Band. High School sophomore and flutist Susanna Wise will ac company the elementary chorus in "Flying Free."

MMS Seventh and Eighth Grade Band will play "El Capitan" and the powerful "Phantom of the Opera." Eighth grader Ricky Scott will narrate for "Bubble Trouble" and soloists for "Longer" include Connie Wilson, Jessie Willhite and Blake Thorn with the MMC Seventh and Eighth Grade Choir.

The Modoc High Concert Band will per form the familiar "Washington Post" by Sousa and "Chesford Portrait."

The MHS Choir will sing "Meire's Wed ding" and "Oh Sweet Day."

MHS Jazz Band wraps up the evening with "Opus One" and "Birdland" with solos by Ashley Teeter on Bass and Brad Ray on Tenor Saxophone.

The sound will be full of life as the classes have large enrollments with 56 students in the seventh and eighth grade band; 17 in the seventh/eighth grade choir; 54 students in the 9-12 grade band;24 voices in the ninth-twelfth choir; 80 students in fourth grade music; 80 fifth grade music students and 35 sixth grade music students.

June 2 election set with races in some local positions

The June 2 primary election has shaped up with contested races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5. All candidates have had papers officially certified and the filing period is closed.

District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender. Comisky, who has endured a rocky first term, is seeking a new four-year stint as DA.

Alturas attorney Barry Kinman is running against in cumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier was appointed to the bench when Judge Robert Barclay was appointed Modoc Superior Court Judge. Dier is finish ing out that term and is seeking a full six-year term.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso will be seek ing to unseat Huffman in June.

The race to fill outgoing District 1 Supervisor Ben Zandstra's seat will also be contested. Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Realtor Sandra Stevenson.

Four candidates are running for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, of the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Teasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is retir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

Two people have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

County Clerk Maxine Madison stresses that voters need to report changes in name or address to her office. Additionally, she reminds residents that voter registration cards are available all local Post Offices and just need to be filled out and mailed in to her office. The final day to regis ter to vote or make changes in registration is May 4.

Obituaries

Arthur C. Avery

Arthur C. Avery, 89, known to many Alturas resi dents during his almost 30 years as a resident in Alturas, died March 13, 1998 at his home in Klamath Falls, Ore.

Mr. Avery, an active member of the Odd Fellows Lodge, the Rebekah Lodge, the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3327, Alturas and the Alturas Rifle and Pistol Club, had relocated with his wife Ruth to Klamath Falls in November of 1997.

He was born in Cincinnati on October 5, 1908 and reared in Oberlin, Ohio. During his service with the U.S. Navy, he worked with Radar. Art and Ruth Wait were married in 1935. Mr. Avery was a factory worker over the years. The Averys moved to Alturas in 1970. He loved to fish and was an avid bowler who enjoyed league play in Alturas. He also worked with the Junior Bowlers and the Special Olympics.

He was preceded in death by an infant daughter, June Marie.

He is survived by his wife Ruth of 63 years; two daughters, Mary Thomas of Klamath Falls, Ore.; Janet Johnson of Oberlin; 11 grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren, several of whom reside in Alturas and one great-great-grandson.

Services were held at graveside at the Alturas Cemetery on Tuesday, March 17 at 11 a.m. Lunch followed at the Christian Life Assembly church in Alturas.

Memorial contributions may be sent to the Merle West Cancer Treatment Center, 2610 Uhrmann Road, Klamath Falls, Ore. 97601.

Rose Sylvia McKinney

Rose Sylvia McKinney, an active community member since her move to Alturas 18 years ago, died in Alturas, Calif. on Thursday, March 12, 1998.

Mrs. McKinney was an active volunteer with Modoc Medical Center Hospital Auxiliary, visiting and assisting patients, helping with their many fund raisers and creating items for the hospital Gift Shop.

Born Rose Sylvia An gelico on September 29, 1923, in Pueblo, Colo., she was the second youngest child in her fam ily. She graduated from Centennial High School in Pueblo, before moving to Los Angeles at the age of 19. She went di rectly to work for Lockheed Corp., riveting P-38's during World War II. She later became a telephone and PBX opera tor, positions she enjoyed for 20 years, while rearing her family.

She married Brad McKinney in 1952 in Los Angeles, and the two of them retired to Alturas in 1979. She became active with the Alturas Grange, took up bowling, and enjoyed league bowling. She was 74 at the time of her passing and had made many friends in her life.

A Mass of Christian Burial was held at Sacred Heart Catholic Church at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, March 16. Father Rodney Hall officiated. Interment followed at the Alturas Cemetery. Following the services, Modoc Medical Center Auxiliary volunteers hosted a time of fellowship at the McK inney home.

Mrs. McKinney is survived by two sons, Michael Doyle of Seattle, Wash and Lance McKinney of Redding; three sis ters Phylis Buck and Lena Mathews of Pueblo, Colo. and Tracy Sterba, Los Angeles; brothers Bob Angelico of Solano Beach, Calif., Joe Angelico of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Chas Angelico of Kelso, Wash.; granddaughters Christina Doyle of Santa Cruz; Lori Doyle of Anchorage, Alaska; Katlin McKinney of Redding and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. McKinney was preceded in death by her husband Brad in 1991 and a younger brother.

The family suggests that contributions in Mrs. McKin ney's memory, be directed to the Modoc Medical Center Aux iliary, 228 McDowell St., Alturas, CA. 96101.

Jose Leopoldo Ciprian

Jose Leopoldo Ciprian, a Modoc County resident since 1987, died March 7, 1998 at Modoc Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Alturas, Calif. He was a few days shy of his 67th birthday.

Mr. Ciprian was born in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 18, 1931.

A Mass of Christian Burial was held at 1:00 p.m. at Sa cred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas on Wednesday, March 11. Fr. Rodney Hall officiated. Interment followed at the Davis Creek Cemetery in Davis Creek, Calif. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Record news of March 26, 1998

  • Modoc girls win state hoop title
  • Community to honor girls April 1
  • MJUSD deals with timber loss, drug testing
  • Local races getting started for June 2
  • Chamber out to buy town a timepiece
  • Fair theme contest opens
  • Brigadoon opens at Niles Theater

Obituaries

  • McCowin
  • Allen
  • Jones
  • McGeorge

Modoc wins State!

Modoc's varsity girls bas ketball team won the California Division 5 varsity girls basketball champi onship Saturday in relatively easy fashion by doing what they have all year long -- playing solid team basket ball.

The Braves whipped Mission Prep, a private school out of San Luis Obispo 67-53 at Arco Arena in Sacramento, becom ing the first public school to ever win the state championship in Division 5. They are also the first Shasta Cascade League team and North Section team to win a Division 5 champi onship.

"I'm still overwhelmed," said Modoc coach Mike Martin Monday. "It's great and I think the overall impor tance of the season will sink in soon. I couldn't be prouder of the girls. They went to Arco Arena on a mission and they accom plished it. To set a goal of winning the state title at the be ginning of the season and then do it . . . that's incredi ble."

The Braves did it well. Four girls were in double fig ures for the game, Kayte Christensen with 13, Andrea Knox with 12, Jennifer Kern and Leah Siegel with 10 each. The re maining starter, Wendy Stafford added eight.

Freshman Jessica Kern had six with Lynda Lake and Megan Orner getting four each.

"The girls were calm and confident and nothing was go ing to get in their way of a championship," said Martin. "They put so much effort into the season and to get it done was amazing. There is some sadness because we know that some of them have played their last game for Modoc. Some people said a public school couldn't win in Division 5, but we proved them wrong. We're the best in the state and we beat good teams for that honor."

Mission Prep came into game thinking its quickness and style of play was going to make up for their lack of height. They boasted just one big player at 5-11, to handle 6-3 Christensen, 6-2 Kern and 6-0 Knox.

"We had heard that they were quick, but I don't think they ever imagined we are as quick as we are, especially our big girls," said Christensen. "They thought they could outrun us, but I don't think so. No one has been able to outrun us all year."

Mission Prep's assumed quickness did not bother the Braves and guard Leah Siegel had little trouble bringing the ball up the floor, leaving the Mission Prep girls in her wake most of the game. Siegel and Stafford were able to han dle the Mission Prep press on their own. On the defensive side, Siegel and Stafford ha rassed the guards into mis takes.

While Modoc was getting beat on the defensive boards in the first half, they solved that problem in the second half and wound up out re bounding Mission Prep 39-34.

"We were boxing out, but we were letting them in after the first box out," said Christensen. "We just con centrated more in the second half. They hustled and got to the ball quickly, but we played much tougher in the second half."

Modoc jumped out to an early 11-2 lead in the first pe riod, but free throws brought the Mission Prep squad back to only trail 14-9 after one. The Braves got into foul trou ble and Siegel and Christensen had to sit down. A series of turnovers allowed Mission Prep to take the lead at 20-19 with 2:13 left in the half. The Royals led 24-22 be fore Jennifer Kern took over with 1:40 left. She hit three straight buckets to put Modoc up 28-24 and Orner and Jessica Kern each added two to give the Braves a 32-24 lead by half. The Braves went into the halftime talks in good shape and would come out in the third to make a point.

The Braves went on a 16 to 8 run that gave them a 48-32 lead with about a minute left in the period. Several of those points came off of fastbreaks, when Siegel and Stafford hounded the Royals' guards into mistakes. The Braves had taken the air out of the Royals confidence, but Mission Prep played hard the entire way. Modoc led 48-34 when the fourth period started.

Modoc would go up 54-34 with a minute and a half gone in the fourth and led 61-39 when Siegel hit her second three-pointer of the game with 4:16 left. While the Royals chipped away at the lead, the Braves continued to dominate and got the 67-53 win.

"They played hard and they were a good team," said Christensen. "But, we weren't going to let them set the pace or control the game. We knew we could beat them, we just had to play our game. Our toughest game of the year was in the North State finals against Pinewood."

The Braves held Mission Prep to just 18 of 72 field goals and only three of 19 three pointers. Modoc hit two-of-three three pointers and 26 of 47 field goals. The Braves hit 13 of 21 free throws while Mission Prep hit 15 of 28. Christensen blocked three shots and the Braves survived a 29-turnover night and 24 fouls compared to Mission Prep's 19.

Following the game, the team and coaches fielded ques tions at a press confer ence in the interior of Arco Arena.

"I'm just a little over whelmed right now," Martin told the press. "I told the girls we could celebrate and have a good time after this last one, and that they could enjoy this one for the entire year."

Christensen put it pretty succinctly when she told re porters: "It's pretty sweet, ac tually. Since my freshman year, I wanted to win state in basketball. We worked hard and no body knows who we are or where we're from. They know now."

Jennifer Kern said she was just happy with the win, try ing to choke back some emotion. "It's nice to win and feel good about it, to play hard and beat somebody you know you're capable of beating," she said.

Kern, Christensen, Knox, Siegel and Stafford were all on the volleyball team that lost a state championship game this year. To a player, they felt they should have won that volley ball title as well, but did not have a good outing. But, the ex perience did help settle them in for the basketball game.

"We knew what to expect," said Christensen. "And we knew we could come in and win this game if we played hard. I don't think we were as nervous."

The Braves finish the sea son with a 28-1 record, their only loss came in the opening tournament when the five normal starters were playing in the state volleyball cham pionship game. Once the starters returned, they went 26-0.

Modoc loses Christensen, Kern, Stafford and Ginny Greene to graduation this year.

The State Championship team members are: Kayte Christensen, Jennifer Kern, Leah Siegel, Wendy Stafford, Andrea Knox, Lynda Lake, Ginny Greene, Janet Cannon, Angie Dennis, Jessica Kern, Megan Orner, Sara Howell and Lindsey Delmas.

Community to honor Modoc girls April 1

The community will get its chance to honor the State Champion Modoc High School Girls basketball team April 1 with a parade and reception.

The parade will start at 4 p.m. from Veterans Park and travel north on Main Street to the Modoc High School Gym. Anyone interested in participating in the parade is asked to call the Alturas Chamber of Commerce at 233-4434. At this point, several entries have been included and more are encouraged. Entry is free.

Once the girls get to the gym, there will be a free recep tion, open to the public. There will be sodas and finger foods. Some presentations will be made, as well as talks from coach Mike Martin, Athletic Director Lane Bates, the girls and others. In addition, a video of the state title game will be shown.

The event is being organized by the Alturas Rotary Noon and Sunrise Clubs and the Alturas Chamber of Commerce.

If an ogranization would like to speak or make a presentation, please contact Rick Holloway at 233-2632.

MJUSD gets some green for classes

March 17 was a day for the wearin' o' the green for most people. It was also a day to talk about the spendin' o' the green for the Modoc Joint Unified School District (MJUSD) Board of Trustees when their monthly meeting fell on St. Patrick's Day.

Most specifically with re gard to green, the district has obtained more money for class size reduction. MJUSD re cently received $25,000 from the state to be spent on facili ties. The board approved adding $15,000 of district money to the state grant so that a new portable classroom can be in stalled at Alturas Ele mentary School. The new classroom will be used by the schools' bilingual education program.

In other matters before the board:

Telecommunications money:

The board will hold a spe cial meeting April 2 to hear bids for the district's E-Rate Application. If the district's pro gram is ap proved by the Federal Govern ment, the Feds will pay 80 per cent of the bill for the district's In ternet, intranet and telecommunica tions programs.

End of Joint Powers

Agree ment:

A few years ago the school district entered into an Events Center Joint Powers Agree ment with the City of Al turas. The hope was that both entities would be able to qualify for fund ing to build an events center, a multipurpose facility and a new swimming pool.

However, funding has not been forthcoming. At the re quest of the city, the board voted to end the agreement.

Timber receipts:

The board received infor ma tion about how much tim ber re ceipts might be cut back in com ing years. This year, Modoc Dis trict will receive $522,208 in timber money. That number is projected to gradually drop to around $400,000 over the next five years, ending with the 2002/03 school year.

MJUSD Superintendent Craig Drennan said, "The im portant question is, 'What hap pens in the sixth year?'" He said one possible solution is to go to "actual cut" figures. Since these figures are ex pected to drop dramatically in the Modoc area under current U.S. Forest Service plans, Dren nan said the district probably would get about $100,000, "if we're lucky".

Drennan and board member Sean Curtis will attend a meet ing on timber receipts be ing held in Reno in April.

Modoc High students have indicated in the past that they would approve of having drug testing at their school. The faculty and staff seem to have a different view of the situa tion, according to an infor mal survey conducted by MHS Principal Duke Pasquini.

Pasquini presented results of the survey to the board which showed that the staff voted 19-0 against having drug testing of athletes. There were five ab stentions. Pasquini stressed that the vote was an informal one taken at an in-service meeting and that many of the staff mem bers didn't vote on some questions because they hadn't thought about the issues.

Pasquini said that staff members felt that it didn't seem fair that athletes be sin gled out for testing. He said there is also a feeling that test ing "might communicate the wrong message" to the stu dents.

"There have been a lot of positive things happening at the school lately," Pasquini said. "My biggest concern is that I want to keep the atmo sphere positive. I would hate to create a suspicious atmo sphere."

There were mixed feelings regarding the use of a drug sniffing dog on campus, with a vote of 7-5 in favor and 12 ab stentions.

The staff is strongly in sup port of the current policy of "zero tolerance" that requires the expulsion of any student caught with drugs on campus. They voted in favor of that by a vote of 15-0 with nine absten tions.

Pasquini also proposed a "Just and Reasonable Cause" system to the staff. This would allow for drug testing of any student if the school had just or reasonable cause to think a student was using drugs. The staff approved Pasquini's pro posal 16-0 with eight absten tions.

Candidates starting campaigns in June 2 primary election

Candidates for local office are starting their cam paigns in earnest this week. In addition, Sam Aanestad, a Republican candidate for the state Third Assembly District was in Modoc this week testing the waters.

Aanestad is running for the seat being vacated by Chico's Bernie Richter. More on his visit next week. He's an oral surgeon from Grass Valley who makes the point that he does not want to be a career politician.

The June 2 primary election has contested races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5.

The race drawing the most interest is where District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender.

Alturas attorney Barry Kinman is running against in cumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier is finish ing out that term and is seeking a full six-year term. Kinman is moving quickly to the campaign trail.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso, of Newell, will be seek ing to unseat Huffman in June.

Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Modoc Realtor Sandra Stevenson for the District 1 Supervi sor seat in Surprise Valley. Ben Zandstra chose not to seek a second term.

Four candidates are running for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, of the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Treasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is re tir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

County Clerk Maxine Madison stresses that voters need to report changes in name or address to her office. Additionally, she reminds residents that voter registra tion cards are available all local Post Offices and just need to be filled out and mailed in to her office. The final day to regis ter to vote or make changes in registration is May 4.

Chamber starts on clock project for community

The Alturas Chamber of Commerce is out to keep better time, for the entire community.

The Chamber is spearheading an effort to put a large clock at the Post Office on Main Street. The base is already installed at the Post Office and the some funding has been promised.

According to the Chamber's Dave Mason, the cost of the clock is about $13,000, of which some $8,000 more needs to be raised. Mason said the chamber is open to idea fundraisers for the project or people who wish can donate to the clock fund at the Alturas Chamber of Commerce. Any amount will be appreciated and move the project along.

The clock is about 16 feet high with a 44.5 inch face. For more information call the Chamber at 233-4434.

Fair theme contest opens

Modoc, the Last Frontier Fair is once again asking for the community's participa tion in the fair's annual theme contest.

The fair is looking for a creative theme that will assist exhibitors with decorating feature booths, floral ar rangements, parade floats, and the Hat and Boot Contest.

Past themes used have been "The Old West at its Best" used in 1980, "Modoc-End of the Rainbow" used in 1993 and "Harvest Holidays" used in 1978.

This year's winner will be presented with two front gate passes for the duration of the fair, plus two free tickets to the barbecue of their choice, the Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce Basque BBQ, Thursday, Aug. 20 or the Sur prise Valley FFA BBQ, Sat urday, Aug. 22.

All theme ideas must be submitted by 5 p.m., April 21. The winner will be chosen by the Board of Directors. Please send your ideas to Modoc District Fair, P.O. Box 26, Cedarville, CA 96104, or you may call 279-2315, Fax 279-2555 or e-mail md ofair@hdo.net.

'Brigadoon' shows up in Niles Theater

"Brigadoon" is appearing in Alturas this weekend. This Scottish village jumps in and out of time, only sur facing for one day every hundred years.

The 50-member cast of the MPAT production has been re hearsing for three months. They've mastered music, movement and lines. Their Scottish brogues would make Mel Gibson proud and the men have finally learned to sit in kilts.

"Brigadoon" is a love story with moments of great com edy. It's an entertaining show full of touching mo ments and great fun.

When the village appears in 1998, two American hunters, Tommy and Jeff, happen upon it. They're sur prised to find the villagers in old fashioned clothing; the villagers are shocked to see someone from the outside world.

Fiona MacLaren recovers from the surprise and reaches out to Tommy. Through the course of the day's events, she and Tommy fall in love. But what will happen to that love when Fiona and the village disappear at the end of the day?

Kerry Davis and Bill Tierney portray the two lovers. Both are veterans of Modoc theater. Their per formance is touch ing and believable.

Jeff, the other American hunter, has his own prob lems. He's being chased by the town flirt, Meg. Plus his flask is almost empty.

Craig Flournoy and Re bekah Richert play this cou ple. Flournoy is a gifted comic actor and his charac ter inspires much of the laughter. Richert's perfor mance is also humor ous, as she stops at nothing to get her man.

While Finona and Meg look to outsiders for love, Jean MacLaren and Charlie Dalrymple have found hap piness inside the village. This is their wedding day and both are very excited. Wendy Clark and Jeran Brown portray this tender and sweet couple.

Not everyone in the vil lage is happy about the wed ding. Harry Beaton, played by Dan Hoover, is in love with Jean himself. Will he be able to watch her get mar ried or will he crack and do something desperate?

The day's events are en joyed by the villagers of Brigadoon, played by mem bers of the large and dedi cated chorus. A troupe of dancers also contribute to the festivities.

The production elements have come together to capture the feel of a Scottish village. Michael Halderman's set is amaz ing, with a functional bridge and a grassy hill side. Nancy North-Gates' costumes are colorful and authentic. The props pro vided by Karen Hays make the action seem realistic.

Lesley Chace produces this story of love, faith and laugh ter. Charles "Chip" Massie is the stage director and Dee Green leads the singing as the music direc tor. Carol Richert is the pi ano accompanist.

If you'd like to take a bit of the Scottish experience home with you, you can order a Brigadoon plaid scarf for just $3. MPAT will also be holding a quilt drawing with a quilt made of the Brigadoon colors. Second prize is a kilt from the show. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5.

"Brigadoon" opens tonight and runs March 26-28 and April 3-4 at 8 p.m. and March 29 and April 5 at 2 p.m. at the ACT Niles Theatre in Alturas. Tickets are $8 for an adult and $5 for students and seniors. Tick ets are available at Pizza and Pasta Place, Great Basin Books and the ACT Niles Theatre box office, Main Street, Alturas.

Obituaries

Bert Roos McCowin

Bert Roos McCowin, owner of Bert's Body Shop in Alturas for the past 23 years and an active member of the Alturas community, died Tuesday night, March 24, 1998 at his home in Alturas, Calif.

Services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Friday, March 27 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Al turas, with graveside ser vices to follow at Lake City Cemetery.

Mr. McCowin was a well-liked man of many talents. He was born in Idaho Falls, Idaho on December 26, 1930 to Ferrol [Roos] and Logan McCowin. He was baptized a Mormon.

He graduated from high school in Modesto and served in the U.S. Air Force for four years during the Ko rean Conflict.

He was a teacher of sheet metal work and also worked on the air craft, while serving his country.

After his military service, he put himself through college, by working in an auto body shop in the Bay Area. While growing up, he had learned about auto mechanics from his father, and he put that knowledge to use later in life. He graduated from Diablo Valley College with an Associate of Arts, then graduated from San Francisco State College with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Business Management.

He went on to obtain his real estate license and his real estate broker's license while in the Bay Area, when he met Barbara Thomas of San Francisco. The two married November 9, 1963 in Sacramento and have shared 34 years of marriage.

Mr. McCowin opened a body shop known as "Haga-Mc Cowin Auto Repair," with a partner in South San Francisco. During the 1960s, he took a special interest in building Dune Buggies and enjoyed racing them in the Mint 500 in Las Ve gas each year. He helped others build dune buggies and be longed to several clubs for the hobby.

In 1975, the McCowins moved to Alturas, when Bert pur chased Stub Miller's business and changed the name to Bert's Body Shop, which he continued to operate at the time of his death. He built and raced stock cars under the Bert's Body Shop name at the Modoc District Fair for several years.

He loved life and worked at living it to its fullest. He was active in the Alturas community as a member of Al turas Rotary Club, for which he served as secretary at one time; Past Exalted Ruler of Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 BPOE, and served as a past president for the Alturas Chamber of Com merce. He enjoyed spending time with his family. He loved to fish and enjoyed photography, as time allowed. He was 67 at the time of his passing.

He is survived by his wife Barbara McCowin of Alturas; mother Ferrol McCowin of Lake City; children Vicki Cos grove and husband John; Jay and wife Sarah Knudsen of Castro Valley; granddaughter Taryn and grandson Elliot and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his sister Maureen and his father.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be di rected to the "Alturas Rotary Youth Park Fund," 135 North Main St., Al turas, CA. 96101.

Fannie Irene Allen

Alturas resident and Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxil iary 3327 member Fannie Irene Allen died Monday, March 23, 1998 in Alturas, Calif. at Modoc Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility, where she had been residing since Jan uary.

Services for Mrs. Allen will be held at Kerr Mortu ary at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, March 27 with interment to follow at the Alturas Ceme tery. The VFW Auxiliary will host a time of fellowship for all, at the Veterans' Memorial Hall in Al turas, following interment.

Visitation will be held from 2:00-6:00 p.m. today, March 26 at Kerr Mortu ary in Alturas.

Mrs. Allen was an active member and served on many committees and in of ficial capacities with the lo cal VFW Auxiliary 3327 for many years.

She actively supported the Modoc Senior Citizens Cen ter activities, as well.

She was born Fannie Irene Lawton, to Mary [Noody] and Charles Lawton. Irene and her twin sister, who died as an infant, were the youngest of 14 children - all boys. She was born September 13, 1918 in Camillus, New York, but as a teen moved to California with her family. She graduated from South Gate High School, South Gate, Calif. and just after her 21st birthday, married Francis L. Allen in Yuma, Ariz. on October 21, 1939. The couple raised their four children and celebrated 48 years of marriage. Francis preceded Irene in death in 1987.

While rearing their children and as a long-time resident of Compton, Calif. she worked on the Voters' Board recalled her daughter Peggy Bell of Bly, Ore. Mrs. Allen kept busy with her children's school activities and later as a great-grandmother continued to help children as the VFW Auxil iary's Safety Chairperson. Through her efforts, she pro moted the "Lite-a-Bike" and "Lite-a-Kid" programs in the Alturas community.

When Francis retired, the Allens relocated to Alturas in 1978, and Mrs. Allen became involved in the VFW Auxil iary 3327, where she made many friends and remained ac tive for many years.

She is survived by two sons, Dale Allen of Long Beach; Wayne Allen of Fountain Valley; two daughters, Peggy Bell of Bly, Ore. and Donna Hill of Paramount, Calif.; 13 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Contributions in Mrs. Allen's memory may be made to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary to Pete Christensen Post 3327, [VFW Auxiliary Post 3327, 400 Modoc St., Alturas, CA 96101.

John "Jack" Jones

Friends and family members were stunned by the sudden passing of John "Jack" Jones of Alturas, the evening of March 19, 1998 at his Alturas home. Mr. Jones, 77, and a res ident of Alturas the past 22 years, died of an aneurysm.

He was born in Munhall, Pennsylvania on June 16, 1920 and graduated from Munhall High School there. He served with the U.S. Army Air Corps in the radio communications field in the Pacific Arena during World War II. He was honorably discharged at the rank of Sergeant on January 4, 1946.

Before entering into military service, he married Rhea M. Bost of Whitaker, Pennsylvania on February 2, 1942. The two celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary this year.

After his discharge, Mr. Jones worked as an electrical contractor in the east before relocating with his family as a Journeyman Electrician to Westchester, Calif. in 1952, where he worked for Hughes Aircraft for many years. The Jones moved to Alturas in 1976, where Mr. Jones was active in the Alturas Rifle Club and as a past member of the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756.

He is survived by his wife Rhea Jones of Alturas; son Robert Jones and wife Dale of Hermosa Beach; son David Jones and wife Sue of Santa Clarita; brother Raymond Jones and sister-in-law Shirley of Munhall, Pennsylvania.

No services will be held, at the request of the deceased.

Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of one's choice.

Marcell Francis McGeorge

Surprise Valley native Marcell Francis McGeorge died in Carson City, Nev. on March 4, 1998 at the age of 80 years. The family is respecting Mrs. McGeorge's wishes that no services be held. Her cremains will be going to Felton, Calif., where she had resided for many years, before mov ing to Carson City.

She was born and reared in Lake City, Calif. on Decem ber 10, 1917 to Frank and Birdie Wheeler.

A son, Ron Wood preceded her in death, as did her sisters Geraldine Baer, formerly of San Mateo, Iva Quirk of Fort Bidwell and a brother Vern Wheeler of Roseburg, Ore.

She is survived by her sons, Skip Wood of Alturas; Sam Hercig, Carson City, Nev.; Gary and Tom Hercig of Felton, Calif. and daughter Connie Clark of Grass Valley; 12 grandchildren, 19 great-grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren, plus numerous nieces and nephews.

April, 1998

 
 
Record news for Feb. 19, 1998
Treasurer race drawing most local interest
Modoc's Welfare Office has state connections
Refuge add land for crane production
County intervenes in refuge farming lawsuit

Treasurer race drawing most local interest

The June 2 race for Modoc County Treasurer/Tax Collector is drawing the most interest as four candidates have taken out papers to replace Linda Monroe who is retir ing after this term.

The four candidates who have taken out papers for the po sition are: Bill Hamby, Jeri Standley, Cheryl Knoch and Manuela Davenport.

The filing period for all offices closes March 6, unless the incumbent doesn't file, in which case it remains open until March 11.

Local attorney Barry Kinman will be running against incumbent Judge Larry Dier for the Municipal Court bench. Dier is finishing out a first term after being appointed by Governor Pete Wilson and is running for election to a full term.

District One Supervisor Ben Zandstra is not seeking re-election in Surprise valley. Sandra Stevenson has taken out papers for the position.

District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman will be run ning for another term of office to represent to Tulelake-Newell, Big Valley area. No opposition has yet emerged.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; District Attorney Hugh Comisky; and Sheriff Bruce Mix. As of Wednesday no one had filed in opposition to those offices.

Two people had have taken out papers for the California Pines Community Services District Board. John Schneider and Robert E. La Gabed are seeking to replace Bill Jones, who passed away. That term runs through the year 2000. The terms of incumbents Marvin Kitchen and Randy Faver come up for election in November. The CSD could have ap pointed a replacement for Jones, but couldn't agree on an in dividual so an election will be held.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot.

 

Modoc's welfare office has new state-wide connections

 

It's been a six-month process, but the Modoc County Social Services Department is now connected to the Interim Statewide Automated Welfare System, called ISAWS.

According to Social Services Director Richard Belarde, the new system is a Godsend that will increase efficiency, de crease paperwork and deter fraud. It it sounds special, that's because it really is a major improvement.

According to Modoc ISAWS project Director Pauline Cravens, the new system will be beneficial to the welfare staff as well as the clients. The staff is currently inputing cases to the system and all new cases will be handled through the system. Instead of inches-thick files on clients, the majority of the information will be stored in the computer files. Cravens and team leaders Pat Wood and Becky Givan cut the ceremonial ribbon Tuesday, putting ISAWS officially on line.

For instance, she said a client will now come into the office for about a two-hour in terview and all the information will be fed into the ISAWS computers. At the end of the interview, the client will know whether he's eligible and for what amount of aid.

"Under the old paper system, the process could take from 30 to 45 days," Cravens said. "It's going to take some time in the transition to the system, but the staff is very positive and has been very positive about the change." ISAWS is also hooked directly to the Modoc County Auditors Office and checks will be automatically written, saving that office valuable time. It is also linked to the Modoc County GAIN Program.

Modoc County's current caseload of 2019 cases has required workers to use hundreds of paper forms and master complex, fre quently changing rules. According to Cravens and Belarde, all this will change with ISAWS.

It will eliminate most paper eligibility forms, calculate benefits automatically, and allow regulation changes to be implemented in a fraction of the time now required. Designed to maximize efficiencies in the administration of welfare benefits by pro cessing a multi-program environment, the system enables the same worker to determine an individual's eligibility and benefits amount across such programs as Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Food Stamps, California's Medicaid Program, and the County Medical Services Program.

With ISAWS will increase efficiency and speed up the process, it is also an invaluable tool in helping to protect against fraud and other abuses. For instance, if a welfare recip ient moved into the county and applied for benefits here, the ISAWS program will give the local eligibility worker that person's case history almost immediately.

The predecessor of ISAWS, the Napa Automated Public Assistance System (NAPAS) was developed in Napa County in 1989 and implemented there in 1991. In 1993, several other counties expressed the need for an automated system. As a result, ISAWS was enhanced to provide for multi-county implementation, and 14 counties were se lected to participate.

Following the state legislature's designa tion of ISAWS as a permanent welfare au tomation solution in 1995, and additional 20 counties chose ISAWS to automate their op erations. These counties, Modoc among them, comprise Phase II of the ISAWS im plementation. By completion of Phase II, 60 percent of California Counties will be opera tional in ISAWS.

 

Refuge adds land to help with crane production

 

A newly acquired 325 arce parcel of land about two miles east of Alturas on County Road 56 will help increase the overall Sandhill Crane habitat on the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge.

Dave Johnson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge Manager, said the Modoc Refuge is the best crane producer in the system on a per acre basis. The refuge produces an av erage of 18 cranes a year, and Johnson said this extra 325 acres could improve the numbers.

The new piece of refuge land was purchased through a ne gotiated agreement between Sierra Pacific Power Company and California Department of Fish and Game officials. It is now nearing its actual escrow closing.

The property was originally acquired by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 1959 as part of the Dorris estate, but was later exchanged for other land holdings held by Barrie Stephens in 1975.

The ranch was later purchased by Adair Brown in 1989 and was farmed for about six years before the Browns de cided to move to another ranch near Davis Creek. After be ing on the market for about a year, Brown subdivided the ranch to make it more marketable.

The area located on the downhill side of the Dorris canal was identified by USFW as excellent sandhill crane habitat and the Modoc Refuge had expressed a desire over some 20 years to bring the parcel back to the refuge.

"With hindsight, we realized that this land was valuable habitat, And we should have kept it as part of the refuge," said Johnson.

The American Land Conservancy of San Francisco ne gotiated an option to purchase the property in early 1997 and began to seek the necessary funding (more than $500,000) to secure the deal.

Johnson said that at the same time, the California DFG was negotiating with Sierra Pacific to mitigate expected im pacts to Greater Sandhill cranes as a result of the Alturas Intertie project through Modoc County.

The DFG and California Public Utilities Commission required that the power company acquire 345 acres of crane habitat and provide the funds necessary for management as crane habitat before the construction of the power line could proceed. Construction on that power line is starting in the Susanville area and will be heading this way this spring.

Building from the base of Sierra Pacific's mitigation needs, the American Land Conservancy was able to add funds from the USFW. The final critical component fell into place when a $100,000 grant was obtained from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

"I am happy that this win-win situation fell into place for all parties concerned," said Johnson. "The Department of Fish and Game is able to meet its legal responsibility of pro tecting a state-listed threatened species from impacts of the power line. Sierra Pacific will be able to meet its mitigation responsibilities and begin construction of their project. The willing seller is able to sell his property and the Fish and Wildlife Service will assume management responsibility for the Grandma Field as part of an existing National Wildlife Refuge."

In addition, Johnson pointed out Modoc County will receive about $225,000 annually in taxes from the Alturas Intertie project and about $3,000 per year in refuge revenue sharing funds from the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Johnson said the area will be managed for crane habitat and hopes that between four or five crane territories will be established on the site.

Cranes have been around since the ice-age and lay two eggs per year, but only one chick usually survives, Johnson said.

Currently the state and federal agencies are preparing a Memorandum of Agreement on the management plan for the land. The plan will involve restoring it to wet meadow and shallow marsh conditions. Comments will be solicited from the general public as the final management plan is de veloped.

 

County intervenes in big lawsuit on refuge farming

 

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday opted to intervene in a lawsuit that could affect farming practices on Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges.

The lawsuit was filed in December by environmental or ganizations led by the Klamath Forest Alliance and targets Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. The lawsuit charges that current agriculture practices on refuge leased-lands in the refuges conflict with federal law and wildlife needs.

Comisky explained to the board last month that it had three options: to join the suit, intervene, or file a separate lawsuit. He sought advice from the California Farm Bureau on the issue before recommending the board intervene. Intervening in the suit would place the county on the side of Babbitt, said Curtis. Siskiyou County is also intervening in the suit.

According to Modoc Land Use Committee Chairman Sean Curtis, if the lawsuit is successful, farming on all refuge lands would cease. That would impact about $1 million dol lars in county revenue and about $22 million in production, he said.

Curtis told the Board last month that the Tule Lake and Lower Klamath Refuges were formed differently than any other refuge in the nation. The formation of these refuges included the pro vision that the 22,000 acres could be leased and farmed. He said the environment groups want these refuges treated like others in the nation where farming is not considered a com patible use.

In addition to the lawsuit filed by Klamath Forest Alliance, an earlier suit in 1994 was settled out of court that has caused the farmers grief, said Curtis. That lawsuit re sulted in, among other things, a proposed Integrated Pest Management Plan that could result in eliminating the use of most traditional pesticides on those lands. That plan could eliminate much of the agriculture production on those lands, said Curtis.

One of the reasons Comisky feels it's important for the county to be involved is that no settlement can be reached in the case without the counties' involvement.

In other business Tuesday, Supervisors appointed Thomas Tracy, of Yolo County as Modoc County Road Commissioner/Public Works Director. Tracy was selected from three candidates and is scheduled to start March 23.

Record News for April 9, 1998

County hopes to protect timber receipts
Combis begins serving 57-month term
Hospital is looking for ways to survive
Railroad Museum has new locomotive on way
There's plenty of snow in the mountains
Obituaries:
Weber
Taubeneck
Matthieu
Nelson

Modoc takes steps to ensure forest receipts

With timber-producing counties forest re ceipts steadily dropping, western community leaders are trying to do something to slow the bleeding.

For instance, Forest Receipts to Modoc County, the bulk of which are timber harvest related, have dipped from $2,941,553 in 1987-88 to $2,153,379 in 1997-98 and are projected at $2,071,199 this year.

Those receipts, representing 25 percent of the National Forest receipts collected annu ally, are split evenly between county roads and schools.

Modoc County Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh and Trinity County Superintendent Jim French addressed the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday, explaining the impacts of the fund decline and inviting them to get involved in an or ganizational meeting next week.

The Western States Working Conference is being held at the Silver Legacy in Reno April 13-15 and is designed to build a broad base of support in rural communities.

According to Harbaugh, more than 100 people will be involved in the conference, in cluding Modoc Supervisors, herself and the County Road Commissioner.

"This is really a preliminary meeting so we can start the building process," said Harbaugh. "We need broad based support from public land users, local government and communities, including schools, county roads, grazers, growers, recreationists, en vironmentalists, businesses, service clubs, agencies and organizations. The schools can not fight the battle alone."

Forest receipts generated a solid source of income from schools and roads through the 1980s, but as timber harvests dwindled and the public's attitude shifted from commodity production to conservation on public lands, the receipts have been hard hit. Without some sort of new direction or policy, the receipts could disappear.

One proposal from the Forest Service calls for future entitlements to Modoc at just over $2 million. That's coming from the Forest Service's Conservation Leadership Policy Initiative.

"In the 1990s the land management polices of the National Forests shifted from a multi ple use orientation toward one of preservation with a consequent decline in timber har vests," said Harbaugh. "That resulted in sharply declining revenues to counties for roads and schools."

Harbaugh said the declines have brought undue and unfair hardships on rural com munities throughout the west, especially those dependent on the timber industry, as in Modoc.

Harbaugh said the goal of the conference next week will be to remind the federal gov ernment of the pact it made with rural com munities in 1908 when it created the U.S. Forest Service. That pact ensured that coun ties would receive Forest Reserve Funds in exchange for those lands being removed from possible private ownership.

"We must have Congress, the President, and his administration honor with policy and funding the intent of the original com pact with the people from forest counties," said Harbaugh.

The major sticking point in the whole ar gument is where does the money to pay coun ties come from if the forests aren't generat ing income? Without a major timber harvest program, where are those fees raised? Those are questions that will be asked and hope fully answered during next week's meeting.

 

 

Combis starts 57-month federal prison sentence

Four years after Ted Combis ran a fraudulent logging op eration in California Pines, he enters a federal prison in Sheridan to start a 57-month sentence.

Combis, 55, of Klamath Falls, had been sentenced in February for mail fraud, failure to pay taxes and a separate count of fraudulent receipt of property. In addition to the 57-month sentence, he was also ordered to pay a total of $16,000 in restitution.

While Combis had requested a delay in his prison report ing date, that request was denied. The law requires Combis to serve a minimum of 85 percent of his sentence.

Combis, was accused of taking $15 million worth of tim ber from lots in California Pines and entered the guilty pleas to avoid a lengthy court case. The federal govern ment, who prosecuted the case, said it placed the fraud loss at be tween $800,000 and $1.5 million.

Combis established Thena Inc. in 1993 and mailed hun dreds of letters to California Pines property owners offering to salvage dead and dying timber from their lots. The gov ernment said Combis took the dead and dying plus large numbers of healthy, valuable trees from the lots. It's esti mated that 7,000 truckloads of logs were hauled from Cal Pines.

The government raided California Pines and Combis' busi nesses in Klamath Falls in February, 1995. All of Combis' assets were seized. Thena, Inc. then filed bankruptcy, still owing tens of thousands of dollars to Alturas and Klamath Falls businesses and Cal Pines em ployees. In total, Thena owed about $3.4 million to about 500 creditors.

In July, 1996, a federal Grand Jury indicted Combis on 48 counts of mail fraud, interstate transportation of stolen goods, money launder ing, failure to pay payroll taxes, ob struction of justice and tampering with a wit ness. He subse quently was charged with bankruptcy fraud in November, 1996.

 

Supervisors hear options for Modoc Hospital

Modoc County Supervisors got a report fromHospital Administrator Woody Laughnan Tuesday detailing the fa cility's financial sur vival options, based upon a March 10 evaluation by Lutheran Health Systems.

Basically, Laughnan told the Record this week there have to be some changes in programs, direction and overall alignment for the hos pital to continue operation.

The two key words in the report by Lutheran are "retrenchment" and "partnership". In both cases, that may mean some down sizing of departments, possi ble elimina tion of others and some loss of jobs. Laughnan and Modoc County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell predict the job cuts could be from 16 to 20 posi tions. Some of those posi tions are open now and will not be refilled.

According to Laughnan, retrenchment refers to ana lyz ing hospital operations and services to determine "core" versus "non-core" ser vices needed by the commu nity. Examples of core ser vices could be emergency room, clinic, long term care, therapy, and dental.

According to the LHS re port, special emphasis should be given to identifying non-core services that are "not con tributing to the financial success of the hospital." The reports suggests downsizing or discontinuing those areas.

LHS also suggested the county look into a partnership ar rangement with other re gional medical centers. Hospitals in Redding are suggested as a logical choice as a partner. Just how that partnership is arranged will be a key part of any agree ment.

Laughnan said that he will move forward on LHS sugges tions, as directed by the Board of Supervisors and the Hospital Board of Trustees, but stressed that any curtail ment of services will have to be approved by the Board of Supervisors. Laughnan and Maxwell will be looking into a variety of options suggested by the LHS report and come back to the board with recom mendations.

"We need this hospital and the community needs this hos pital," said Maxwell. "What we'll be doing is looking into viable alternatives that will make it financially stable. Some changes may be tough, but we really don't have much choice."

During the last fiscal year, Modoc Medical Center lost about $450,000. While that seems enormous, its was down from the previous year when it bled to the tune of about $1.5 million.

The hospital is one of the major employers in the county with about 140 employ ees making up a payroll of some $3.5 million.

 

 

New en gine on its way to Alturas railroad museum

When a Wrymoo gets going, it's best not to get in its way. Probably the best thing to do is hop along for the ride.

Wrymoo is the organization partnered with the City of Alturas on the Operating Railroad Historical Museum set at the old lumber mill site west of Alturas.

According to Dave Rangel, of Wrymoo, the U.S. Army has given an ex-U.S. Army locomotive, number 4031, to Alturas from the Red River Army Deport in Texarkana, Texas.

On March 19, Rangel and George Iness, of Wrymoo, flew to Texas to help supervise the loading of 4031 onto a flatcar. The loading process took over four days.

Rangel said he expects the flatcar to be de livered to Alturas by the end of April, how ever Texas is in the center of a massive rail road gridlock, so the date may skip.

Local railroad volunteers have con structed a main unload ing ramp at the mu seum to speed up the unloading process and save on crane costs. The ramp will also be used to un load a second locomotive that was purchased from the Portola Railroad Museum. That locomotive, number 80, is also expected to arrive at the end of April. Wrymoo pur chased that engine March 27.

"Both locomotives will be ready for the July 5 activities at the new Alturas Railroad Museum," said Rangel. "Number 80 will be used to pull a train and give the public rides.

Number 4031 will be open for public in spec tions and will be used by Wrymoo to take photographs of children in the engi neer's seat as a fund raiser."

Wrymoo has also donated the cost of transportation for both locomotives, $9,000 and the loading charges, $3,000.

"We hope to make some of the money back by selling sou venirs July 4 and 5," said Rangel. Wrymoo is planning a large num ber of activities over Fandango Days.

 

Water content high in snowpack

Above 10-year average

The mountain snow remains deep in April and contains plenty of water, signaling a good water year.

According to the U.S. Forest Service's April snow survey, most areas are above average for snow depth as well as water content. Those surveys were released this week.

Cedar Pass still has 44 inches of snow containing 19 inches of water. Last year the area had 34 inches of snow and 14.4 inches of water. The 10-year average for Cedar Pass is 37.5 inches and 14.8 inches of water.

The Blue Lake snow survey shows 26 inches of snow and 10.4 inches of water. Last year in April it had 18 inches of snow containing 7.4 inches of water. The 10-year average is 23.2 inches of snow and 8.6 inches of water for April.

Medicine Lake has tons of snow: 114 inches, containing 37 inches of water. The overall average for the area is 79 inches containing 32 inches of water. It may be a late open ing for the popular recreation area.

Mt. Bidwell measures 83 inches of snow with 34.4 inches of water. Last year it had 64 inches of snow at this time con taining 25.6 inches of water. The 10-year average for the spot is 54.7 inches of snow and 21.9 inches of water.

Barber Creek, south of Eagleville, shows 36 inches of snow and 14.2 inches of water. Last year it had 17 inches of snow with 4.2 inches of water. The 10-year average is 20.3 inches of snow and 7.4 inches of water.

Last year there was no snow at either Hays Canyon or 49 Mountain in Nevada. This year, six inches of snow with 1.8 inches of water was measured at Hays Canyon. The 10-year average is two inches of snow and .6 inches of water. At 49 Mountain there is 13 inches of snow with four inches of wa ter. The 10-year average is five inches of snow containing 1.5 inches of water.

 

Obituaries

Margery Patricia Weber

Margery Patricia Weber was born May 23, 1919 in Dublin, Ireland to William Charles and Myra Finlay Armstrong. She passed away at her home in Alturas on April 2, 1998.

Margery moved to Orange County, California with her family in 1927, at the age of 8. She first came to Modoc County to visit her sister Ruby Goulden in 1936, where she met her future husband Herman. Herman and Marge were married in Orange, Calif. on September 15, 1938.

Mrs. Weber was a great homemaker and partner in the cattle ranching business with her husband for 50 years. They sold the ranch and moved to Alturas in 1987.

She loved playing bridge, was a member of St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Alturas, where she served as church treasurer for a time, member of Beta Sigma Phi sorority, and a charter member of Modoc County CowBelles, now known as CattleWomen and was their first treasurer.

Along with her husband Herman, survivors include daughters and sons-in-law Patricia and John Kerr of Al turas; Wanda and Glenn Hawes of Palo Cedro; son Warren Weber and special friend Laurie Ververka of Alturas; seven grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren; sisters Jackie Wilson of Rancho Mirage; Helen Selenbrandt of West Warwick, Rhode Island, Judy Fitschen of Villa Park and Marion Olson of Long Beach. She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother Charles Armstrong and sister Ruby Goulden.

Services were conducted at St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Alturas on Tuesday, April 7, with Lay Readers Don Wilson and Bill Hamby officiating. Burial followed at the Alturas Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of choice.

 

Marie W. Taubeneck

Marie W. Taubeneck, age 36, died March 27, 1998, at her home in Sacramento, Calif. after a 12-year struggle with cancer.

A memorial service was held at Westminster Presby terian Church, Sacramento on Saturday, April 4 at 11 a.m. A second service was held at the U.C. Davis Alumni Center at 2 p.m.

Born in Alturas, Calif., she is survived by her husband Lee Taubeneck of Sacramento; her parents Antonette and John Weldon of Adin; maternal grandmother Antonette Archut of Alameda; three brothers, five uncles and two nieces.

Donations may be made to the U.C. Regents for the Marie W. Taubeneck Endowment Fund for Graduate Students and Post-doctoral Fellow Research Awards in the field of Nutri tion, UCD Nutrition Department, Davis, CA 95616, or to the Marie Taubeneck Campership Fund, Westminster Presby terian Church, 1300 N. St., Sacramento, CA.

 

 

Wanda E. Matthieu

 

On Saturday, April 11 at 1:00 p.m., friends and fam ily will gather at Kerr Mor tuary in Alturas, to remem ber Mrs. Wanda Evelyn Matthieu.

Born in Stanfield, Oregon on August 4, 1916, she was the daughter of Gladys Esther Ward and Hugh Clyde Boss. During her early school years, her father worked for the State Highway Depart ment and the family moved town to town, from Eastern Oregon to the Coast. They lived in Bandon, Ore. for a while, where Wanda helped earn an income by deliver ing newspapers on horse back.

Eventually, they moved to Portland, where she com pleted elementary school and attended Jefferson High School. Graduating in 1934, with secretarial training, she worked as an "elevator girl," then a model and sec retary for Portland Suit and Coat Co. A self-professed "tomboy," she enjoyed snow skiing, and climbing to the top of Mt. Hood from Gov ernment Camp three times.

Her adventuresome spirit led her to live in Turkey from 1958-1964, with her then husband Richard Smith, and their two children Madelyn Kay and Douglas DeWitt. Enthralled with the country, she quickly learned its lan guage and customs. Wanda worked as a volunteer for Family services on the air base, helping families new to the country get settled, and serving as a translator. Returning to the United States in 1964, she and her family lived in Torrance, Calif. from 1964 until 1971. Next was a move to Corval lis, Ore. where she resided until the end of her mar riage.

Although Wanda and Glenn Matthieu first met during World War II, he was headed for the South Pa cific and other destinations with the Marine Corps. Fate finally reunited them 35 years later. Married on April 11, 1976, they united two families which included Michael and Gary Paisley. Wanda made Alturas her home for 22 years. Even af ter Glenn's passing, Wanda remained; she loved the beauty of the landscape, the friendliness of the people and the memories of her beloved Glenn.

Wanda E. Matthieu passed away January 27, 1998 at home in Cal Pines. Survivors include her son Douglas Smith, his wife Janet and their sons Devon, Taurean and Navarre; daughter Madelyn Antin ucci, her husband Carlo and their son Matthew; step-son Michael Paisley, his wife Marie and their sons Jason, Mike Jr., Bobby and Eric, and their daughters Julie, Andrea and Gina; and Gary Paisley and his wife Julie. There are also three great-grandchildren, Larissa, Brandon and Brittany Pais ley.

 

Janet Corrine Nelson

 

Private family services are planned for Janet Corrine Nelson, 54, of Chico, who died Monday, March 30, 1998, at a Chico, Calif. hospital.

Janet was born March 18, 1944 in Pocatello, Idaho to Vernon and Lillian Nelson. Moving to Alturas, Calif. in 1946, she relocated to Chico in 1958, where she was a member of the first graduat ing class of Bidwell Junior High.

She graduated from Chico High in 1962, and in 1963, married Richard Eugene Nelson of Reno, Nev. Janet continued living in Chico.

She loved singing, play ing the guitar, writing po etry, gardening and driving trucks. She also loved her dogs and was known as an excellent cook.

She is survived by her son, Richard Eugene Nelson, Jr. of Orland; her parents, Vernon and Lillian Nelson, both of Alturas; sisters Joan Dean of Chico; Jackie Maus of Oak land; Lisa Smith of Sutherlin, Ore.; Linda Razee of Bliss, Idaho; brothers John of Anderson, Jess of Redding, Gary of Paradise and Kevin of Winston, Ore.

Memorial contributions in honor of Janet, can be made to the Chico Humane Society in care of Newton-Bracewell Chico Funeral Home, which handled arrangements.

Record News summaries for April 16, 1998

(This is a short summary of Modoc Record news, for the full package, subscribe by calling 530-233-2632. See subscription info on this web site)

Winter loosening its grip on Modoc?
Drug, bomb arrests made locally
Candidates will speak out Friday
Rotary gears up with third Duck Race
Obituaries:
Atkins
Coffman

The forecast:

Honest, it looks like it's going to warm up this weekend and today is calling for mostly sunny with Friday actually sunny. Variable clouds on Saturday and some morning clouds on Sunday.

 

Winter losing its icy grip on Modoc area

If the weather forecasters can be believed, winter will be loosening its icy grip on northeastern California in the next few weeks. Tempe the end of this week and the morning blankets of snow may disappear.

According to the National Weather Service, El Nino is beginning to fade and its impacts will be diminishing. A return to normal weather is in the offing. But what's normal for Modoc?

For one thing, it's not unusual to have snow falling here in April, or often in May. It has been a little wetter this year than last year since January. Last year through April, Alturas recorded 4.44 inches of moisture. Through this week this year, there has been 5.92 inches measured. In 1996, it was wet with 7.96 inches of moisture measured through April.

It has been cold this year with highs getting only into the 50s. Lows have been in the 20s. Last year on April 5, the mer cury plummeted to seven above.

The highs last year were in the mid to upper 60s each week through April and if this week ends up warming, it will be closer to normal trends. The average high temperature for April is 59.3 degrees and the average low is 29.1 degrees. The average precipitation runs about one inch.

There is still plenty of snow in the mountains, with most snow courses well above average in both snow depth and water content. The inflow to Clear Lake, Devil's Garden north, is 136 percent above average.

Big Sage Reservoir on Devil's Garden is at 69,800 acre feet, about the same as last year and promises a good irriga tion and recreation year.

West Valley Reservoir, east of Likely, is lower this year at about 17,000 acre feet compared to 21,420 at this time in 1997. The snowpack in its watershed is heavy and wet. For instance, Blue Lake shows 26 inches of snow and 10.4 inches of water, above its 10-year average for this time of the season.

 

Drugs, bomber arrests made by cops, agents

 

Alturas Police and Drug Task Force officers arrested William David Holloway, at his Alturas residence April 9, alleging possession of methamphetamine and being under the influence of a controlled substance.

 

Holloway was also charged with felony explosive device violations in connection with a pipe bomb that was exploded on the Modoc High School football practice field the night of Nov. 1, 1997. There was no one at the field at the time.

Sergeant Stacy Callaghan said an ongoing investigation pointed to Holloway as the key suspect. No one was hurt in the incident.

He was booked into the Modoc County Jail and released on his own recognizance.

Task Force agents arrested Tracy L. Nelson and Marc G. Nelson on charges of transportation of metham phetamine and marijuana and conspiracy April 3.

Those charges were the result of an investigation con cerning the smuggling of controlled substances through the U.S. Mail. Both subjects were arrested at their residence and their child was turned over to the Modoc Child Protective Services. Both subjects made bail and the case was for warded to the District Attorney's office for further action. The U.S. Postal Service Inspector's Office in Reno was ad vised.

On the afternoon of April 11, Drug Task Force agents and the Modoc County Sheriff's Office obtained and executed a search warrant on the residence of Jeffery D. Holloway, 34, Ranchera Road in Cal Pines Unit A. That warrant was is sued for the search of illegal controlled substance and stolen property.

According to the Task Force, suspected metham phetamine was found along with narcotic paraphernalia. Also found and seized were several items of suspected stolen property from the Modoc County Road Department and the California Pines Property Owners' Association/Cal Pines Lodge. Holloway had been employed by both those entities.

He was arrested alleging possession of metham phetamine, being under the influence of a controlled sub stance, possession of hypodermic needles, attempted destruc tion of evidence and possession of stolen property.

He was booked into the Modoc County Jail and released on bail.

 

Chance to hear candidates

 

Modoc County residents are encouraged to bring their questions and attend the Friday, April 17 "Meet the Candidates" evening from 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. at Alturas City Hall, 200 North Street.

 

"The Citizens Committee" has invited the candidates and incumbents running for office in the June 2 election in Modoc and will host the evening.

"This is your opportunity to meet with and get to know the candidates early, who are running," notes Arlene Johnson, an organizer.

Attending candidates in clude Manuela "Nellie" Davenport, Bill Hamby, Cheryl Knoch, all running for the County Trea surer/Tax Collector posi tion. Jeri Standley will be unable to attend.

County District 1 Supervi sor candidates Sandra "Sandy" Stevenson and Terry Williams; County Dis trict 5 Supervisor Candi dates David Porter Misso and in cumbent Nancy Huffman; County District Attorney candidate Tom Buckwalter and incumbent Hugh Comisky, Jr.; County Mu nicipal Court Judge can di date Barry A. Kinman and incumbent Judge Larry Dier.

Guests will include Linda Monroe, retiring Country Treasurer/Tax Col lector; County Assessor Josie John son; County Clerk Max ine Madison; County Super in tendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh, Sheriff/Coroner Bruce Mix.

Audi tor/Recorder Judi Stevens will be unable to at tend, along with outgoing District I Supervisor Ben Zandstra; and Robert LaGabed and John Schnei der, who are running for California Pines Commu nity Services District Board of Directors.

Sean Curtis will direct the forum.

 

Rotary starts Duck Race ticket sales

 

Get on your mark, get set and go. That's what Alturas Sunrise and Afternoon Rotary Clubs were told this week by Great Pit River Duck Race Chairmen Billy Madison and Mike Mason.

 

Club members will be out starting this week selling tickets for the 1998 Duck Race, set for Fandango Days. Tickets are $25 each and a limit of 3,000 tickets will be sold. Rotary uses all the money raised for the Youth Park athletic fields between Fourth and Eighth Streets.

There are more prizes of fered this year and the coupon book is chock full of great deals, more than ever before.

First prize in the Duck Race is a new 1998 Chevy step side pickup. New this year is a second prize of a 1998 fish ing boat and trailer.

Gold Crown Sponsors, those people who buy at least 10 ducks, will also have another shot at winning one of two Polaris Express four-wheel ers. Prizes in the duck race include: custom milled lum ber, a Monitor stove, new roof, siding or rain gutter, set of four tires, lawn mower, pow erlift/recliner, one-year free on-line Internet service, 25 tons of

 

driveway gravel, Husquvarna chainsaw, cus tom barbecue, 18-speed mountain bike, a dozen donuts for 52 weeks, a $250 gift certifi cate, a cellular phone, an aquarium setup, a "Big One" fireworks kit, a Zenith 13 inch television, a weekend retreat for two, a free muffler and tail pipe, a two-night stay for two, a CB radio, a one-night stay, a free pair of Vans or Skechers, an outdoor plant stand and a pair of Oakley sunglasses.

Last year the Duck Race tickets sold out early, re minds Madison, so he ad vised that people not wait too long and miss out on all these great prizes and a chance to help the youth of the county.

 

Obituaries

 

Mildred Rosamond Atkins

 

Memorial services for Mildred Rosamond Atkins, a res ident of Davis Creek, will be held Monday, April 20 at 10 a.m. at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas, Calif. Mrs. Atkins died April 9, 1998 at the age of 84.

Born January 2, 1914 at Monticello, Calif. to William D. McKenzie and Rosamond Little McKenzie, she received her early edu ca tion in Monticello and Winters, before attending business college in San Francisco.

In 1947, she married C.V. "Pete" Atkins and they lived in Napa, Vacaville and var ious other California towns, as they followed the con struc tion business opportuni ties. They moved to Alturas in 1967.

After her husband's death in 1973, "Mim" as she was af fectionately called, met Perzie Shedd of Davis Creek on a seniors' bus trip to Bishop, Calif. They became friends and close companions and remained so until her death.

She enjoyed her many friends, family get-togethers, playing cards, exploring the country, looking for arrow heads, working in her yard and life in general. She was a friend to everyone and will be missed by her community, family and many friends.

She is also survived by two nieces and seven nephews.

 

 

Alfred Coffman

Former Southern Pacific Railroad engineer and Likely native Alfred Coffman, died at his home in Redding, Calif. on Tuesday, April 7, 1998. He was 80.

Born October 22, 1917 in Likely, he was reared and at tended school in Likely. He lived in Alturas when he was an engineer for Southern Pacific, then he moved to Shasta County in 1985 from Dunsmuir. He was an engineer for Southern Pacific Railroad for 34 years, a World War II U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and a member of the Dunsmuir-McCloud Masonic Lodge 297 in Mount Shasta, the Scottish Rite Temple in Sacramento, the Neighborhood Church of Redding and the Dunsmuir Veterans of Foreign Wars.

"He was a great guy," recalls Peg Woodrich, his first cousin.

Services were held at the Dunsmuir-McCloud Masonic Lodge 297 in Mount Shasta on the morning of April 11, fol lowed by graveside services at the Chico Cemetery later that afternoon.

Survivors include his wife Donna; daughters Pamela Humphreys of Benicia, Paulette Mitchell of Castella and Sh eryl Larson of Dunsmuir; sisters Orlean Dannemiller of Redding and Mona Melville of West Virginia; four grand children; and seven great-grandchildren.

Arrangements were handled by Allen & Dahl Funeral Chapel in Redding. Members of the lodge and the Rev. Gerri Murray of Christ Unity Church in Redding officiated.

Record News for April 23, 1998

Modoc opts to close Home Health unit
Most Modoc precincts are mail-in
MJUSD takes new course on math, computers
Forest plans some prescribed burns
CDF reminds burn permits are needed
Great prizes for 3rd Duck Race
Obituaries:
Chavez
Lang
Criss

 

County decides to close Home Health unit at hospital

 

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday accepted a recom mendation from Modoc Medical Center to close its Home Health Services Department, in an effort to streamline and cut losses.

According to Hospital Administrator Woody Laughnan, the Home Health unit is projected to lose between $75,000 and $90,000 this fiscal year. He said the future looks even worse as MediCare is changing its reimbursement policy that will have severe impacts in that area.

The closure of the Home Health Unit will impact five em ployees at the hospital: the director, a Register Nurse, LVN, Aide and receptionist. Those employees may be picked up by the California Health Professionals, a private Home Health Care provider in Modoc or they may bump other employees at the hospital who have less seniority.

Laughnan said he contacted California Health Professionals, and they have agreed to help with the transi tion of Modoc Medical Center's existing home health pa tients to their operation and for any new referrals.

"Private providers have less overhead than we do and I think CHP will do well," said Laughnan. "We simply didn't see any future for us to provide the service, but we wanted to insure that those patients were taken into consid eration."

The hospital is working on a program to cuts its losses, esti mated at about $450,000 this operating year and is studying other services and operations. There are no other major cuts planned currently, but Laughnan said many areas will be looked into for viability.

Laughnan stressed that the hospital is not in danger of closing, but will probably become leaner as changes are made.

The hospital is one of the major employers in the county with about 140 employ ees making up a payroll of some $3.5 million.

 

Most Modoc precincts have mail in ballots

 

Most of the voting precincts in Modoc County will vote by mail for the June 2 primary election. According to the County Clerk's office, those people will be getting ballots by the middle of May.

Absentee voters may make application in writing now for ballots and vote after May 4. On the back of the sample ballot is an absentee application and sample ballots should be out the first part of May.

Those areas voting by mail are: Fort Bidwell, Lake City, Eagleville, Stateline-Willow Ranch, Davis Creek, Parker Creek, South Fork, Canby, Adin, Lookout, and Day.

Voters who will be going to the polls are in: Cedarville, North Fork, Alturas C, Alturas A, Alturas D, Alturas B, Hot Springs, Cal Pines and Newell.

Ballots for the June 2 primary election have contested races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5.

District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender.

Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier is being opposed by local attorney Barry Kinman. Dier is finish ing out an appointed first term and is seeking a full six-year term.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso, of Newell, is challenging Huffman in June.

Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Modoc Realtor Sandra Stevenson for the District 1 Supervi sor seat of Surprise Valley.

Four candidates are running for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, and audi tor in the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Treasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is re tir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

County Clerk Maxine Madison stresses that voters need to report changes in name or address to her office. Additionally, she reminds residents that voter registra tion cards are available all local Post Offices and just need to be filled out and mailed in to her office. The final day to regis ter to vote or make changes in registration is May 4.

 

MJUSD takes new route in math, com puter courses

 

The Modoc Joint Unified School District (MJUSD) Board of Trustees was liter ally willing to go to the ends of the State of Cali fornia on Tuesday night. They held their April meeting at State line Elementary School in New Pine Creek.

One of the actions the Board took was to ap prove the list of Modoc High School courses for 1998-99. Modoc Superin tendent Craig Drennan also informed the board about changes in the way that the District will be teaching math to help meet State standards as well as goals that the Board has set.

The goal is that in three years, all fresh men entering MHS will start off in an alge bra class and basic math will be eliminated at the high school level. The plan also in cludes teaching algebra and pre-algebra to eighth graders at Modoc Middle School. Drennan explained that over the next two years there will be a "more narrow curricu lum to focus on these skills" for sixth and seventh graders to prepare them for algebra at an earlier stage.

MHS Principal Duke Pasquini also pointed out that another goal is that in a few years there will be enough students ready to take calcu lus as seniors that it can be of fered as an honors course.

The District will also change the way that it teaches computers. Students at the Middle School will learn ba sic computer skills and opera tions and be certified for those skills. When they reach the high school, the certified stu dents will then be able to take computer courses in more ad vanced applications.

In other matters before the Board on Tues day:

Drug testing: The Board didn't take any official ac tions on drug testing, but did hold discussion on the issue. Drennan told the Board that his recommendation is to "stay with what we have" and not have a random drug test ing program of athletes.

"It just isn't the right thing for our district and our kids," Drennan said, while also not ing, "although I know it is a popular idea right now."

Drennan also said that the District cur rently has a strong program.

"There's not much doubt in the student's mind about what's going to happen if they are caught using drugs."

Drennan recommended that the District add to its cur rent program to allow for rea sonable suspicion tests and referrals to drug addiction programs for students.

Student Board Representa tive Eric Lan caster also in formed the Board, through a letter, "Most of the students feel our current policy of drug testing, where drug testing is available only after a reason able cause has been found, is the best policy."

Lancaster went on to state the MHS stu dents feel that random testing of athletes might cause occasional drug users to become regular users.

"The main reason most of the occasional users are only occasional users is sports. If you take sports away from them then they will become regular users," Lancaster wrote.

Board Member Cindy Culp asked Dren nan if he had spo ken with officials in any school districts that do have drug testing and heard their opinions of how they felt drug test ing was working in their district. Drennan responded that districta he had spoken with reported being very happy with how drug test ing had worked out. However, he said he also felt that many of those districts had higher rates of drug use than MJUSD before resort ing to drug test ing.

Past Board President Ann Marks was at the meeting and noted that Surprise Valley School District will begin drug testing ath letes next year and Modoc District might be able to watch how things work on the other side of the Warn ers before making any deci sions.

Failure notices: The Board may look into changing its policy of when teachers need to notify parents that students are failing. Un der current policy, interim failure notices go out five weeks into each quarter. If students are in danger of failing at any time after that, the teacher is sup posed to notify the par ents.

The Board may look at changing the pol icy so that teachers would be required to no tify parents that a student is failing even be fore the in terim failure notices go out at five weeks.

Alternative Education: Ramona Delmas, Director of Alternative Education, re ported that Warner High School currently has 19 stu dents, 22 students are in Inde pendent Study and 52 are in the Adult Education pro gram. Those programs will produce 15 high school graduates this June.

Delmas also pointed out that those num bers are going up, particularly for Indepen dent Study. She anticipates that Independent Study will have a waiting list next year.

Delmas also addressed the issue of getting more staffing and hours for Warner High School, MJUSD's continua tion school. She gave the Board information about staffing for other continua tion high schools that are sim i lar in size to Warner. Many of the district cited in the Delmas survey had more staff and hours than Warner.

Discipline at Alturas Ele mentary School: AES Princi pal Randy Wise and eight teach ers, who comprise the AES Student Behavior Inter vention Team, wrote the Board a letter stating their concern over students at AES who are repeatedly presenting behavior prob lems. The "Team" feels that the current system of interventions is not changing be havior patterns for some of those students.

The letter stated, "Teach ers are concerned and frus trated with constant interrup tions in their teaching oppor tunities. . . The over whelm ing amount of time spent by Adminis tration and teachers managing these inter ven tions is impacting the quality of the edu cation at our school site."

After the meeting, Wise said, "It seems like we're getting more kids who are present ing these kinds of problems.

The letter recommended that the Dean of Students posi tion be restored at AES. Wise also told the Board that an other solution would be lower ing the eligibility age for sending students to the Com munity School. The County Office of Education also re cently received a grant that could apple to these stu dents.

Drennan recommended that the most ef fective way, both from a financial and cur ricular standpoint, would be for MJUSD to open its own small school for those stu dents. They would be out of AES but the District would still receive funding for them as well as a grant for a teacher.

Timber receipts: Drennan reported to the Board on a con ference he attended regarding federal timber receipts that go to school fund ing. He said the District will lose $125,000 in funding per year by 2003. Af ter that, "We don't have a clue what's going to happen and neither does anyone else."

Drennan also said that af ter the confer ence he realized, "Nobody had any plan of ac tion. There is no coordinated group out there. . . I am not hopeful about anything."

 

Forest prepares prescribed burning

 

The spring prescribed fire season begins this week on the Modoc Na tional Forest. Pre scribed fires occur as soon as con ditions are right.

Burns may range in size from 30 to greater than 1000 acres and will be completed through hand ignition. Daily burn locations will be deter mined according to the local weather patterns to minimize the impacts of the fire and re sulting smoke on roadways and other pub lic areas.

Prescribed fire projects are planned in several lo cations throughout the for est: Tim bered Mountain located north of Alturas; project east of Ash Creek; and Bark Springs lo cated west of Howard's Gulch are slated first. The largest project area is located east of Ash Creek located be tween Messenger Gulch and Am brose Valley. The objective of this project is to burn some of the pine nee dles and small twigs that have accumulated on the forest floor over many decades. Pine needles and small twigs burn very quickly during late sum mer and cause very hot fires. Wild fires spread quickly when there are a lot of fine fu els.

The Modoc National Forest continues to reintro duce fire into the forest's ecosystems through the use of prescribed burning. Last year 4,200 pro ject acres were burned through pre scribed fire. Pre scribed fire is used either by itself or in conjunction with other land management prac tices, such as logging or thinning of tree stands. The Forest Service hopes to achieve forest stands that are less susceptible to large catastrophic wildfires and meet the needs of other re source management con sid erations. Nearly all of the plants and animals that in habit the northeastern Cali fornia Forest have evolved in ecosystems where fire played a major role in shaping the envi ronment.

In addition to prescribed burning, the forest man ages the 550,000 acre Big Sage Fire Management Area where many light ning caused fires are al lowed to burn under man aged conditions. This area was created to curb fire sup pression costs on the Dev il's Garden plateau, but also has great value to managing that ecosystem. A fire man agement area is also estab lished for the South Warner Wilderness. This is the first year of im plementation.

 

CDF: Burn permits are required May 1

 

Burning permits are required starting May 1 for the un incorporated areas of Modoc and Lassen counties and can be obtained at local California Department of Forestry offices and fire stations.

In Surprise Valley those permits can be obtained from the Bureau of Land Management or U.S. Forest Service Offices.

In addition, the CDF will be writing burn permits at the following locations and times: April 30, New Pine Creek store, 9 a.m. to 12 noon; 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Davis Creek Mercantile; May 1, Madeline Store, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, Likely Post Office, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.; May 1, Canby Store, 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

The burn permits will be valid only through July 15.

Residents are reminded to take all precautions to contain their fires at all times. Last year several area residents re ceived fines for burning without a permit, and others paid hundreds of dollars in suppression costs generated by care less, preventable debris burning violations.

 

 

Great prizes for 3rd Great Duck Race

 

There are more big prizes of fered this year in the Great Pit River Duck Race and the coupon book is chock full of great deals.

Members of the Alturas Noon and Sunrise Rotary Clubs are out selling Duck Race tickets now, and according to Race Chairman Billy Madison, the duck tickets have started quickly out of the gate with a better first week than last year. Tickets are $25, which includes the 49-coupon book.

First prize in the Duck Race is a new 1998 Chevy 4x4 step side pickup valued at $26,000. New this year is a great sec ond prize of a 1998 fish ing boat and trailer with a value of $8,071.

Gold Crown Sponsors, those people who buy at least 10 ducks, will also have another shot at winning one of two Polaris Express four-wheelers. Only Gold Crown sponsors have a shot at the four-wheelers.

All proceeds from the Duck Race go into the improve ments and new ball fields at the Alturas Rotary Youth Park. The past two years have seen the Duck race raise over $60,000 and Rotary is anticipating a $30,000 net out of this year's race.

There has been a lot of progress at the Youth Park this past year, including a paved parking lot, leveling of new fields, a new fence, a new sprinkler system, new trees and the grass will be planted this summer. With any luck, the new fields will be playable next spring. But improvements and new fa cilities cost money and that's why the Duck Race continues.

The following is an order of other prizes in the Duck Race: third, $2,500 worth of custom lumber from High Desert Milling; fourth, Monitor Stove from Ed Staub and Sons; fifth new roof, siding or rain gutter ($1,000 value) from J.S. Roofing; sixth set of four tires from Les Schwab, $600; riding lawn mower from Coast to Coast, $568.41; Power lift/recliner from Home Medical, $500; One year on-line service from High Desert On-Line, $359 value; 25 tons of driveway gravel from Fitch Sand and Gravel, $350; Husquvarna chain saw from Modoc Engines, $330; custom barbecue from Surprise Valley Rotary, $300; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; one dozen donuts weekly for a year from the Donut Shop, $260; $250 gift certificate from the Belligerent Duck; 55 gallon aquarium setup from Tahiti North, $250 value; three watt cell phone from Modoc Motor Parts, Napa, $225; The Big One fireworks kit from Village Video, $199; Zenith 13 inch color television from Phillips Appliance, $199; Weekend retreat for two at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging, $150; free muffler and tail pipe, Ron Campbell, Inc. $125; complimentary two-night stay for two an the Best Western Trailside Inn, $110; CB Radio and gift certificate from High Desert Electronics, $109; one night stay for two at Mill Creek Lodge, $100; one free pair of Vans or Skechers from Family Footwear, value up to $100; Outdoor plant stand from Gary's Woodworks, $100; and one pair of Oakley Sunglasses from Tom Krauel, OD, $100 value.

Interested in buying a duck? The call Billy Madison at 233-3432.

 

Obituaries:

 

BEATRICE V. CHAVEZ

 

Beatrice Viola Chavez of Alturas passed away peacefully in Redding on April 16, 1998. She struggled with heart fail ure for several years and symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease in her later years. She was 74 at the time of her passing.

Lovingly known as Bea, her friends will best remember her for her love of children and family unity, strong belief in God, and creative homemaking.

Among the various craft projects that she enjoyed were her hand-stitched Raggedy Ann dolls which will be remembered by all.

There were many special moments and memories that Bea's husband, sons and daughters shared. Although Mrs. Chavez did not have the educational opportunities that she provided for her children, she taught herself to read and write and never stopped teaching and learn ing to her last days with her family.

In a final letter to one of her daughters, she quoted the Bible, "I will go before thee and make the crooked place straight."

Her son will never forget her unquestionable teaching of equality at home, in her relationship with God, and within the community. Another son never forgets her daily letters to him while he was serving in the military.

"Our mother died with dignity and when we think of her, we think of love," say her children. "She has entered into the Kingdom of Heaven."

She was born in Fruita, Colorado on September 25, 1923 and had gone to live in Shasta County at the end of 1997.

Mrs. Chavez is survived by her devoted and loved hus band, Manuel A. Chavez of Alturas; her nine children, Manuel Chavez, Jr. of Klamath Falls, Ore.; Walt Chavez of Redding; Benita Humble of Chico; Steve Chavez of Alturas; Denice Crabtree of Chester; Marcia McDonald of Su sanville; Monica Hansen of Palo Cedro; Annita Bullen of Redding and Patty Cardoza of Alturas. She is also survived by 27 precious grandchildren and three adorable great-grandchildren; brothers Walter and Johnny Cordova, Og den, Utah; Dave Cordova of Sparks, Nev.; sisters Dorothy Chavez, Gridley and Ida Chaves, Sunset, Utah.

Pastor Jerry Chilson of Alturas conducted services at the Christian Life Assembly Church, Alturas on Monday, April 20 at 1:00 p.m. Interment was at the Alturas Cemetery.

Those who wish to donate in memory of Mrs. Chavez, may do so to the Association of Alzheimers Disease, P.O. Box 3148, Paradise, CA 95967.

 

CLIFFORD LANG

 

The familiar site of Clif ford Lamonte Lang, sporting his green coveralls, straw shade hat and Birkenstock sandals, will be missed by the many friends he came to know during his time in Modoc.

Mr. Lang died April 15, 1998 in Alturas, Calif. In November, due to an illness, Mr. Lang chose to live at Modoc Medical Center's Long Term Care Facility, Alturas, where he quickly made friends with other res idents and staff.

He was a health-conscious person and ever visible, bringing his fold-up chair to sit and watch local ball games and events. He could be found enjoying the scenes and trav elers who visited at Veterans' Park, in between his ambles about town, these past years. Before he became ill and had stopped walking as much, he was seen propelling himself about town in his motorized cart on a daily basis, visiting with strangers and locals, alike.

He was born in Jackson, Iowa on March 16, 1914 to Mar ion Louise Johnson of California and Judson Marsh Lang of Iowa. He moved to Modoc County over 15 years ago. He en joyed reading his Bible and being outdoors.

He was laid to rest during a private service at Alturas Cemetery on Friday, April 17. Mr. Lang was 84.

 

Leland Author Criss

 

Leland Author Criss, a descendent of the Criss family of Big Valley, died March 17, 1998 at Sunrise Care and Reha bilitation Center in Susanville, Calif. He was age 82.

Mr. Criss was born March 19, 1915, at Black's Canyon Ranch in Canby, Calif. to Author and Maggie [Duncan] Criss. He attended elementary school in Lookout and high school in Malin.

He served as a gunner's mate aboard the USS Honolulu during World War II and was a Pearl Harbor survivor.

After his discharge from the U.S. Navy, he and wife Pearl, lived in Macdoel and Standish, Calif.

Mr. Criss was active with the Lassen County Sheriff's Posse, American Legion, the National Rifle Association and the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association.

He worked as a farmer, trapper and well-driller. His hobbies include fishing, hunting and collecting arrow heads.

Survivors include his daughter and son-in-law Susan and Ralph Whitlock, Standish; two grandchildren, Leland and Beverly Whitlock, Chico; sisters and brothers-in-law Marie and Archie Tharp, Macdoel; Bernice and Jim Het herwick, Alturas; sister Dolly Thompson, Walnut Creek and many nieces, nephews and friends.

He was preceded in death by his parents, wife Pearl, in fant son Franklin Loren, and brothers, Delmer, Donald and Arnold.

Memorial donations may be made to the NRA or the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. No services will be held.

Record News Summaries for April 30, 1998

City sets goals for future
Sample ballots in the mail
Area code 916 is history
Talk about winning a sea cruise
Modoc Museum opens for season
Obituaries:
Shippen
Adair

 

The forecast:

Look for warm today and unsettled starting Friday with a chance of numerous showers and thunderstorms this weekend. Highs in the 50s and 60s, lows upper 20s and 30s.

Council sets goals for city

Following a nearly all-day work session Tuesday, the Alturas City Council set down in writing some grant and project goals for the future.

The council did not take formal action, nor etch the future plans in stone, but aimed the goals on servicing a city of 10,000 people.

According to vice-mayor Kerry Merwin, essential in all of the planning are major efforts at economic development, public safety, infrastructure improvements, beautification and traffic safety.

Immediate plans call for continued support and grant searches for the Alturas-Wrymoo Railroad Museum located at the former Alturas Mill property.

Merwin said the city and Wrymoo are currently in nego tiations with other agencies and companies to establish a short-line operating railroad which would hopefully include tracks and service from Alturas to Reno, to Klamath and to Lakeview. Included in those plans are passenger and freight service and a heavy dose of tourism.

Both the City and Wrymoo's Dave Rangel know the goals are huge, but feel there is a window of opportunity now open that needs to be investigated and pursued.

Merwin stressed that funding for the railroad projects will come through grants and foundations, not city tax dol lars.

Rangel told the council there is a great opportunity to make the Alturas railroad operation one of the real show pieces in the state and the project, while not unique, has some very positive aspects going for it at this time.

Merwin also stressed that a Board of Directors for the op eration needs to be set up and get moving on the fund raising and grant solicitation process.

One of the goals of the city will be to have a full time grant writer available to actively seek funding for the wide vari ety of projects that come up.

"We need to look to the future and we need to secure jobs for this community," said Merwin. "This city has to take a more active role and I believe this council is proactive. We need to start building, and stop the economic downturn."

In other action Tuesday, the council presented an ordi nance that would ban parking on the north side of Carlos Street from Rine Street to West Street. The city is proposing that ordinance as a matter of pedestrian safety.

The council also heard reports that the Modoc County Local Transportation Commission's number one priority for paving, Carlos Street from Main to Warner and Warner from Carlos to Highway 299 is moving positively through the necessary state levels. Whether that project will be under taken should be known by early sum mer. Construction would be in 1999.

The council also agreed to support a project by the Alturas Chamber of Commerce to plant more street trees on Main Street through to 12th Street. City staff will be looking into grant funding for the project and the Chamber will also be seeking funding sources.

 

 

Sample ballots for June 2 should be mailed this week

 

Modoc residents will be receiving sample ballots for the June 2 election the first week of May, according to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison.

Madison points out that some state candidates have sent information containing a request for absentee ballot. She urges voters to make sure they use the absentee application in their sample ballot or at the very least insure that they mail any request to her office.

Mailing those requests included in statewide candidate information may cause a delay in receiving the actual bal lots if mailed to other cities or jurisdictions.

Absentee voters may make application in writing now for ballots and vote after May 4.

Most Modoc precincts are voting by mail including: Fort Bidwell, Lake City, Eagleville, Stateline-Willow Ranch, Davis Creek, Parker Creek, South Fork, Canby, Adin, Lookout, and Day.

Voters who will be going to the polls are in: Cedarville, North Fork, Alturas C, Alturas A, Alturas D, Alturas B, Hot Springs, Cal Pines and Newell.

Ballots for the June 2 primary election have contested races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5.

The Modoc Record will be interviewing those candidates in all contested races over the next few weeks.

 

Candidates' night is May 5

 

The Modoc County Farm Bureau is hosting a pair of candidates' forums next month.

The first is set for May 5, 7 p.m. at the Brass Rail in Alturas. The second is set in the Newell Elementary School Gymnasium.

Each candidate will be given a maximum of five minutes for an opening statement and written questions will then be collected from the audience. A moderator will ask those written questions of candidates.

District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender.

Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier is being opposed by lo cal attorney Barry Kinman. Dier is finish ing out an ap pointed first term and is seeking a full six-year term.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also facing a challenge for re-election. David Porter Misso, of Newell, is challenging Huffman in June.

Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Modoc Realtor Sandra Stevenson for the District 1 Supervi sor seat of Surprise Valley.

Four candidates are running for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, an audi tor in the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary.

Current Treasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is re tir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seeking re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individuals must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

County Clerk Maxine Madison stresses that voters need to report changes in name or address to her office. Additionally, she reminds residents that voter registra tion cards are available all local Post Offices and just need to be filled out and mailed in to her office. The final day to regis ter to vote or make changes in registration is May 4.

 

Area code 916 gets buried May 16

 

The friendly 916 area code for Modoc and surrounding counties will be officially buried May 16 and it won't be revived.

Citizens Communication reminds resi dents that as of May 16 they must use the new area code 530. Callers using the 916 area code will receive a recording asking them to re-dial, using the 530 code.

"Now is the time to make sure friends, relatives, clients and customers are aware of the new number and that fax machines and auto dialers have been re-pro grammed," said Bill Featham, Citizen's director of operations said. "Stationery, business cards and collat eral and advertising materials should re flect the new area code. Also, customers with cellular phones and pagers should check with their ser vice provider to see if repro gram ming is required."

The new 530 area code serves all customers in all or portions of 23 northern coun ties now served by the 916 code. That includes cus tomers in Adin, Alturas, Bella Vista, Bieber, Burney, Cedarville, Chester, Eagle Lake, Fall River Mills, Greenville, Herlong, Janesville, Keddie, Lake Almanor, Penn, McCloud, Mineral, Montgomery Creek, Palo Cedro, Paynes Creek,

Ravendale, Susanville,, Westwood, Oakrun, Shingletown, Arbuckle, Colusa, Grimes, Maxwell, Princeton, Standish and Williams.

The 916 code continues to serve existing 916 customers in the Sacramento metropoli tan area and other areas. The demand for new telephone numbers for services such as fax machines, pagers, cellu lar phones, sec ond phones, voice mail and computer modems have created the need to change area codes.

Citizens reminds cus tomers that the new area code does not change the seven digit phone numbers. The new area code does not change 9-1-1 service or local service rates.

 

Vacations, makeovers, fashions, all part of gala ACS benefit Friday eve

 

The gang plank has been lowered and all Modoc resi dents and their guests are invited to step aboard for a fun evening for the Fourth Annual Make-Over and Fashion Show on Friday night, May 1 at the Brass Rail Ban quet Room in Al turas.

Tickets are available for $15 per person at the door or in advance, for $12.

"Pizza & Pasta has promised us an ice sculpture to fit in with the cruise theme, pro viding Chip [Massie] can find a freezer big enough to store it and a block of ice big enough to carve," describes organizer Mi chon Kessler.

"We're expecting to have about 13 models this year for the makeovers and fashion show portion, and some are very dramatic makeovers," she adds.

Everyone's invited and tickets may be purchased at the door.

The benefit for the Ameri can Cancer So ciety, Modoc Unit begins at 6:00 p.m. with a social hour. The Fashion Show begins at 7:00 p.m., fol lowed by an Auction for va ca tion getaways and a cruise to the Mexican Riv iera. Door prizes are part of the fun as well as drawings.

The evening should last until 9 p.m. or longer, for those who choose to stay for the dance that follows.

Some "dramatic" makeovers on local adult men and women, young teens and pre-teens are all part of the surprising fun.

Enjoy the evening of sur pris ing hair and makeup makeovers, done by Kalei doscope Family Salon, Al turas.

Enjoy hors d'oeuvres, champagne and wine tast ing, gourmet coffees and cheeses, shrimp, chocolate, desserts, fashions from L & B Ranch Supply and J.C. Pen ney's and footwear by Family Footwear, all in Al turas.

The auction portion of the evening will in clude a seven-day cruise on the Mexi can Riviera with round-trip airfare from Reno, taxes and port charges. The trip has three ports of call includ ing Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. The cruise is valued at over $2000 and can be transferable to someone, other than the win ner. Bidding will open at $500.

Several complete, quick weekend get-a-ways in Reno, Susanville, Cedarville, Likely, Red ding, McCloud, and Kla math Falls will also be auc tioned with some of the pack ages called "Peaceful Re treat," "Family Fun," and "Sportman's Favorite," sev eral of which feature local bed and breakfasts and restaurants.

Many volunteer hands have gone into the elaborate plans and cruise theme dec orations for the special event, to which everyone is in vited.

Modoc County raised and contributed $8,000 to the American Cancer Society last year. Much more than that was put back into the community to assist cancer patients and educate the pub lic.

 

New finds make for intriguing Museum season, as doors reopen

 

There will be some sur prising new and ir replace able finds tucked inside the Modoc County Historical Museum, when it opens for a new season on Tuesday, May 5.

Seasonally open May to October Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., the mu seum is closed Sun day and Monday.

Quilt aficionados and others will enjoy the newly-hung, but old and rare quilts dating back to 1858 and up to the 1900s. Most are hand stitched and one from the Eddingfield Fam ily was hand woven on a loom. Bits of history are stitched into the 1890 'Crazy Quilt.'

A glass case filled with promotional items from by gone days of Alturas will bring back memories to those who can recall the busi nesses, names and times, including an election pin "J.T. Laird for State Sena tor," dated Nov. 8, 1898 and a more current March 1953 Niles Theater movie card.

"It was really interesting and fun to put this case to gether," shared Paula Mur phy, Museum Curator. "I think local people will really get a kick out of seeing the items, that were donated by a variety of people over the years."

Murphy has been busy until the last minute, prepar ing all the labels to identify the new items housed this season.

One walk into the wom en's restroom can startle, as the once plain and dull pale cream walls, have been transformed into life-like paintings with a western theme, based on photographs of the 1920s through the early 40s women circuit horseback trick riders.

The thick gold rope, do nated by Mary We ber, adds a glittering touch to the dressed up restroom, all created by artist Paula Mur phy "as a winter project." Her zest for history and her position, coupled with her talents, have made for a unique and fun creation at the museum.

"It's too bad the men won't be able to see it," she laments, but

the men's room will be transformed next winter, with ideas she is currently consider ing, that will fit into the museum's theme.

Keeping in theme with the Pendleton Ore gon Women Circuit Riders of the past, are new "Cowgirl Company" shirts and sta tionery cards offered in the museum gift shop. "They make for great gift ideas," notes the curator, who also keeps stocked unique keepsakes, educa tional items and gift items for children and adults.

Centered on the museum floor, stands a replica of a schoolhouse bell tower, which now is home to the authentic Davis Creek School bell.

"We can thank Bob Stevens in county mainte nance for restoring the shattered bell and building its new home," notes Mur phy.

The story goes that the Lindale School building, lo cated five miles south of Davis Creek, was bought by the Davis Creek Grange and made into a grange meeting hall. The Davis Creek Grange Dance Hall was con structed in the 1940s, when the Dance Hall above the Davis Creek Mercantile was dis continued. The bell from the Lindale School was put in the stone school build ing at Davis Creek, that was constructed in 1925. The bell was recently donated to the Modoc County Museum.

Last year, an average of 6,000 visitors passed through the museum doors during the summer season. The Mu seum will be open during Memorial Day weekend.

This year, all who come will have a chance to include in their visit, sights of the old Alturas Post Office sign, a collection of a few of the 70 trays of arrowheads found years ago on Centerville Road by R.F. Bush of Su sanville. Mr. Bush has de cided they should be returned to Modoc County, where they were from, and has given the arrowheads to the Museum.

Over half a century old and in beautiful condition is a Paiute Indian Headdress from Nevada, received from Ike Leaf of Likely, and now on loan this season from Don and Shirley Flournoy of Likely.

World War I period cloth ing, including a military uniform and women's cloth ing are from the estate of Lu verne Brown Noblet, and donated by Bert Simson.

"A beautiful Bordello lamp," donated by the family of the late Dorothy and Corny Carstens of Alturas, "was acquired years ago from somewhere in Nevada," says Murphy. It has found a new home at the museum.

Irreplaceable items are housed at the Modoc County Museum and rotation of dis plays each season keeps lo cal residents and travelers returning.

Murphy welcomes the public to come and enjoy viewing and learning more about them through a visit. The museum is located at 600 South Main St., Alturas.

 

Obituaries

 

Vernon Franklin Shippen

 

Vernon Franklin Shippen, a longtime resident of Cedarville, died April 22, 1998 at Veterans Hospital in Reno, Nev.

Active for many years in the Veterans of Foreign Wars Surprise Valley Post 7888, he was also a charter member of the Rotary Club of Surprise Valley, and Cedarville Knights of Pythias. He was president of the Albany, Calif. Lions Club from 1984 to 1985, while he was working as a carpenter and electrician in the Bay area, for close to 40 years when he lived in Berkeley for his work.

Born June 9, 1907, he was 90 years of age, at the time of his passing. He was born in Valley Junction, Ohio and served in the Army Air Corps during World War II, as a top turret gunner, stationed in Italy. He flew 42 combat missions over enemy territory and was honorably discharged as Master Sergeant in August of 1945.

He married Trilma McCulley in September of 1935. They celebrated almost 63 years of marriage together. Mr. Ship pen stayed active all his life, working well into his 80s, when he decided to retire and moved back to Cedarville.

He is survived by his wife Trilma McCulley Shippen of Cedarville; son Lawrence Shippen of Cedarville; daughter Launa Shippen Berner of Cedarville; granddaughters Mar lena Berner of Cedarville and Cynthia Berner of Fullerton; sister Fern Tadlock and family of Penn Valley; brother Bill Shippen and family of Chico; brother Clair Shippen and family of Marysville; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Family and friends are welcome to attend a potluck at the VFW Hall in Cedarville on Friday, May 1 at 1:00 p.m. The Veterans of Foreign Wars will conduct a service at that time. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be made to the charity of the donor's choice.

 

Kenneth W. Adair

 

Former Alturas resident Kenneth W. Adair, 81, died Sunday, April 19, 1998 at his home in Sunnyside, Nev.

Born August 24, 1916 in Tonopah, Nev., he was the son of Kenneth and Margaret [O'Toole] Adair.

Mr. Adair was a pipefitter for Kennecott in McGill, Nev. He was a charter member of the Alturas Kiwanis Club, and a member of the Lions Club of Alturas. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed hunting and fishing, as hobbies.

Surviving are his wife, Mildred Adair of Sunnyside, Nev.; four sons, Bill [Julie] Adair of Ely, Nev.; Louis and wife Dori Shaffer of Alturas; Gary Adair of Hawthorne, Nev. and Richard [Cheryl] Adair of Redmond, Ore.; a daughter Joann Ryan of Tonopah, Nev. and 14 grandchil dren and numerous great-grandchildren.

No services will be conducted. A gathering will take place some time in the future.

MAY

 

Record News for May 7 1998

 

SV Hospital wants no part of Modoc Med problems
BLM, Forest Service to share same office?
No real change in Sheriff activity
Candidates for Judge air views
Lions prowling Alturas hills?
Art Show is this Friday
Land Use studies Sierra impacts
Obituaries:
Myers
Ford
Chambers
Pataye

 

SV Hospital wants no part of Modoc Medical Center prob lems

Sometimes you think it wouldn't hurt to ask about getting together with a party who has common interests. Sometimes the re sponse you get is colder than you would have imagined.

Such was the case recently when Modoc Medical Center (MMC) Administrator Woody Laughnan, Jr., wrote a letter to Sur prise Valley Hospital District (SVHD) Ad ministra tor Joyce Gysin suggesting that the two facilities merge and take up home to gether in Alturas. MMC is currently facing serious cutbacks in it's services. Gysin's re sponse was, "It didn't work in the past and it won't work in the future."

Laughnan's letter on April 22 started, "I have been hear ing persistent rumors that vot ers may not cast the neces sary two-thirds vote to con tinue district subsidy at Cedarville Hospital. In the event your measure is not re newed, MMC stands ready to work with you in developing mutually productive pro grams."

He went on to write, "It would seem realis tic to me that the County needs one ma jor healthcare campus. Al turas with a signifi cantly greater population would probably be the most likely community for primary ser vices."

Gysin shot back a letter two days later stat ing, "We feel confident that the property as sessment will continue for another four years, and pass by more than a two-thirds vote. I would question the ac curacy and the source of your information."

She went on to state that SVHD is doing fine. Both the hospital and the community have no plans to change the current set-up.

She also suggested that, instead of worry ing about SVHD, Laughnan should fo cus on "more prudent man agement of MMC to stop the drain on 'our' county tax dol lars."

Gysin further added in the letter several differences she sees between MMC and SVHD. For example:

"We don't share the same philosophy with the same ded ication to the community."

"Unlike MMC's Board of Trustees, SVHD's Board of Directors are not compen sated for their services."

"The SVHD staff work for less pay than MMC to have lo cal employment as well as health care for themselves, their friends and their fami lies."

"Unlike MMC, SVHD op erates with a posi tive bottom line."

After pointing out that at one point in the past SVHD staff took a cut in hours over a year to help with a cash flow problem, Gysin wrote, "They just worked harder to com plete their work responsibili ties. Would you and MMC's staff do the same? Probably not!"

In an interview earlier this week, Gysin said of MMC, "The public should not think that the county owes them that facility."

Gysin said the two biggest reasons why Surprise Valley residents want to have their own facility are travel dis tance and keeping the elderly "at home" near their fami lies. She pointed out that peo ple already travel long dis tances from Eagleville, Lake City and Fort Bidwell just to get to Cedarville.

If anything, SVHD is not in trouble, but looking at new possibilities, according to Gysin. She said she sees no reason why SVHD would lose it's rural designation and that the District may soon ap ply for Federal designation as a "Critical Access Hospital" which would be an even "more favorable" designa tion.

SVHD currently has 22 long term beds and they are all full. Gysin said they are con stantly getting calls from around the county asking to get other people in, but first priority goes to Surprise Val ley residents.

 

BLM-Forest Service moving into one office?

 

Officials at the Bureau of Land Management and the Modoc National Forest iNo real change in Shbil ity of sharing office and warehouse space and that proposal was presented to the County Board of Supervisors Tuesday.

Supervisors expressed some concerns about a variety of issues, including but not limited to a possible merger of the two agencies. That, said Tim Burke, BLM Alturas Area manager, is not in the cards.

Under the proposal, the 15-person BLM staff would move from its present location at 708 West 12 Street into a portion of the Modoc National Forest building next door. The two or ganizations would also share warehouse space.

Steve Bishop, acting Modoc National Forest Supervisor, said no decision has been made.

"We have assembled a group of staff members from both agencies to look carefully at the pros and cons of sharing space," he said. "We will also be talking with members of the public to get their feelings on the proposal."

Burke said anyone interested in the proposal should con tact him at 233-4666 or Bishop at 233-5811. He said the two agency staffs will meet again in June to discuss their find ings and decide on whether to proceed.

On November 14, 1997 the President signed the Interior Appropriations bill that authorizes the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture to delegate authorities, duties and responsi bilities to each other by the end of fiscal year 2002.

That will allow the Forest Service and BLM to leverage and use their personnel more efficiently and effectively. It empowers the agencies to consider office co-locations and provide one-stop service for customers doing business with multiple natural resource agencies.

According to MNF Public Information Officer Nancy Gardner, a new acting Forest Supervisor has been selected to replace Bishop who is completing his stint.

That person is Chris Knopp, who is now with the Lake Tahoe Basin Forest. Knopp is supposed to be here by May 18.

 

Little change in sher iff ac tiv ity

 

Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix presented his 1997 annual report to the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday, showing an 11 per cent decrease in the number of felonies and a 20 percent in crease in the number of mis demeanors.

Basically, said Mix, there hasn't been a lot of change from the pervious year, and the jail daily census average was exactly the same as last year, 38, but they were stay ing longer.

The Alturas, Likely, Canby area had the most felonies with 92 and misde meanors with 215. Surprise Valley ac counted for 32 felonies and 67 misdemeanor cases and the Newell area had 46 felonies and 86 misde meanors.

Repeat offenders make up most of the cases at 70 per cent, an increase of eight percent over last year. Those cases went up from 419 to 452. First time offender cases actually de creased by 22 percent from 248 in 1996 to 194 in 1997.

In the area of violent crime, including murder, rape, robbery, aggravated as sault, etc., the number of crimes increased from 137 in 1996 to 169 in 1997. That's down from 1995 when there were 189. In 1989, the number of vio lent crimes was 54 and 1990 had 40.

The total felonies for 1997 at 192 is the low est since 189. The toughest year was in 1992 when there were 310. In 1996 there were 215.

Under the violent felonies, the largest number was spousal abuse with 25. There were three elderly abuse cases and 10 child abuse cases. Assault with a deadly weapon accounted for 14 cases.

In felony crimes against property, bur glary accounted for 47 cases, grand theft for 25 and possession of stolen prop erty, seven.

On the misdemeanor side of things, as sault and battery cases were most prevalent with 72, vehicular violations was high with 57, there were 50 vandalism cases, with mi nor in possession of alcohol at 38 and being under the in fluence of a controlled substance at 22.

 

Experience versus change is theme in judge's race

 

In the election race for Modoc Municipal Court Judge, both the incumbent - Judge Larry Dier, and the challenger - attorney Barry Kinman, agree that Dier has a great deal of experience in the Modoc courts and crimi nal justice system. However, while Dier says his experi ence makes him the most qualified candidate, Kinman maintains that Dier's years of experience have shown him to be part of a system that needs to be changed.

Dier said the message he want to get across is, "Experi ence counts. I have it, he doesn't."

He points out that he has 35 years of experience, includ ing several years as an Assis tant U.S. Attorney in Los An geles handling criminal matters, seven years as a Pub lic Defender in Modoc County and three years on the bench.

According to Dier, about 75 percent of the case load for the Municipal Judge is criminal matters and that Kinman has hardly any experience in this area. Furthermore, in Modoc, the Municipal Court Judge hears not just misdemeanors and preliminary matters, but also felony cases and even three strikes cases.

"You have to have had some experience before you hear those kinds of cases," Dier said. "The idea of the law is that after a certain number of years, you under stand how things work."

Dier also points out that the way Municipal and Superior Courts interact may be chang ing statewide. The State Leg islature already made changes so that the courts are state funded now rather than getting their money through individual counties. There is also a measure on the upcom ing ballot that would allow counties to unify their Munic ipal and Superior Courts.

That means lots of new challenges and questions that Dier feels he can best handle because of his knowledge of the system.

"Questions come up every day on this that nobody ever thought of before," Dier said of the changes.

"There is going to be a gi ant step in the evolutionary process of the courts. It would be a shame to start at the be ginning in Modoc County."

Dier said that approxi mately 600 judges in Califor nia are up for election this year. However, of that num ber, only 26 incumbents are being challenged.

"The reason is, that the le gal system rewards experi ence and competence. When a judge has not messed up, there is no reason to challenge him.

"Mr. Kinman moved into the community and is trying to take it over."

Kinman wouldn't agree with that statement, but he does feel it is time for a revo lution in a Modoc criminal justice system that he feels often treats people differently based on "your name and how long you've lived here."

"I believe people in the county, even those who have been here five or six genera tions, want positive change," Kinman explained. "I be lieve that sincerely."

He says he learned that from getting his own type of experience, talking with the citizens of Modoc County.

"I have gone door to door to the four corners of Modoc County and sat in the living rooms of hundreds of people. That's been my best educa tion.

"I've received an outstand ing reception. Far better and nicer than I could have ever imagined."

In making those visits, Kinman said the "single biggest issue" is giving people equal and fair treatment, even if they aren't part of "the club" that dominates Modoc. While he says the abuses are "rampant" and that the in stances are "too many to list," he thinks that the "single worst aspect is retaliation against people who don't join 'the club.'

"That's what the last two years of my life have been about. Participating in the democratic system here can get you into trouble."

When asked how Dier fit into "the club", Kinman re sponded, "I have never said that he is unqualified or is a person who deliberately en gages in the 'good old boy' system. But based upon my own personal observation, there are times when it ap pears he's susceptible to influ ence."

Dier's response is that he doesn't know where or when the "good old boys" are hold ing their meetings and he doesn't even know who is in the group.

"The term 'good old boy' is a very convenient cliché that nobody has ever defined for me," Dier said. "What he (Kinman) is saying is, 'I'm a newcomer and I've seen sit uations where people talk to each other in friendly terms.' That's how things are in small towns. To jump to con clusions based on that is ridiculous.

"If he wants to put me in Hugh's (District Attorney Hugh Comisky) pocket or Hugh in my pocket, it only shows he hasn't done his homework."

Dier said he only rules in favor of law enforcement or the District Attorney "when the facts or the law require it." As an example, he said that in the one criminal case Kin man tried in front of him, he dismissed a count against Kinman's client despite a guilty verdict by a jury. He felt he needed to do so because it was what was required un der the law and the facts in the case.

Kinman said Dier should not be discussing the case be cause it is still pending, hav ing been appealed. Kinman stated that Dier had violated the Judicial Canon of Ethics by bringing up the case.

Kinman has also charged that, "In my mind, Dier and Hugh Comisky are responsi ble for bringing a lawsuit without any legal founda tion."

Kinman was referring to a lawsuit that the County brought against Superior Court Judge John Baker in 1996. One of the issues in that case was the balance of power between Dier and Baker. The case went di rectly to the County of Appeals which ruled in Baker's favor.

"The most important thing was how bad it made Modoc County look outside the County," Kinman said. "Other counties don't do this, especially given the absence of any merit. I don't think he (Dier) has admitted to his er ror."

Dier says it's all water un der the bridge now and he has "no regrets" about doing a "painful but necessary thing." He points out that he and Baker entered into an agreement in February of 1997 to deal with the issues raised in the lawsuit.

"The important thing is that we work well now," Dier said. "We have the best inter est of the court system at heart."

As for the past, "The only effect of raising it up again is to raise ghosts that are best left buried."

The two candidates can even relate their themes of ex perience vs. need for change to the Modoc County Bar Asso ciation recently deciding to endorse Dier in this election.

Dier said he got the en dorsement because of his ex perience and the respect he has in the legal community. Kinman said it is just one more example that "shows how far out of whack" things have become in the Modoc County legal system.

Kinman said he asked the other members of the Bar if they had ever endorsed any other candidate in any race for a contested office and was told that this was a first. Kinman also argued that there are less than 10 mem bers of the Modoc County Bar and half of them, (Kinman, Marilyn Curry, Dier and Wendy Dier) should have been asked to recuse them selves from voting on the en dorsement.

The term for Municipal Court Judge is six years and requires that the Judge sit on cases in outer counties 10 days per month, or about half the time. Kinman said that while he is traveling, once he gets done with the 8 to 5 courtroom routine, he wants to use the other travel time to promote Modoc County as a place to visit and move to.

"My big picture is that I'm somebody who's young and excited with enough energy to do something more than 8 to 5."

Kinman also says that he's young enough to guarantee that he'll serve six years, something he questions about Dier because of the laws relat ing to pensions and retire ment for California state em ployees. Dier, 64, admits that after two more years on the job he will stop earning pension benefits, but he also says that he will not be losing pension benefits or lose salary by con tinuing to work.

"My intention is to serve out my term because I love my work," Dier said. "I'm full of energy and my health is very good. I have given absolutely no consideration to not filling my term out."

 

Lions prowling Alturas?

 

Tuesday night a call for disturbing the peace was made from a Carlos Street home, as all the dogs in that neigh borhood were barking loudly.

According to Alturas Chief of Police Larry Pickett, of ficers investigated the area and found what ap pears to be mountain lion tracks on Tank Hill. He ad vises area res idents to be cautious and report any sighting of lions in the area quickly. The officers did not see the lions Tuesday night and Pickett said they discov ered two sets of tracks, one large and one small which could indicate a mother and cub.

Deer frequent Tank Hill on a regular basis, plus there are plenty of dogs and cats in the area. Pickett said his of fice isn't certain whether the lions were just passing through or are making regu lar visits to Tank Hill, but of ficers will be checking the area.

 

 

Spring Art Exhibition, Juried Show adds new element for '98 opening

 

It's always a festive evening when the Spring Ju ried Fine Arts Exhibition and Sale opens. The event will celebrate its 14th year by open ing in the J.E. Niles Room of the his toric Niles Hotel on Main St., Alturas on Friday night, May 8 at 6:30 p.m.

All art exhibitors and the public are in vited to the Fri day opening reception with complimentary wine, and hors d'oeuvres and a chance to look over the art, the winning pieces and make art pur chases.

Around 8 p.m., a new addi tion -- an Art Auction will open, with the artists to receive 50 percent from their sales and the Modoc County Arts Council to receive the other 50 percent as a benefit. Artists may designate an unlimited number of pieces for auction and will assign the value on their art. The price bidding will start at the assigned price listed on the label placed near each piece.

"I think it will be a good op portunity for the artists to sell their work and the public to en joy the event," offers Ken Franklin, Modoc County Arts Council Director.

The event attracts artists and their work from Modoc and surrounding counties to Southern Oregon.

The local recipient of the California Summer School for the Arts scholarship will also be announced and intro duced during the evening.

Lynne's Deli and Steak House will be serving dinner lunch and dinner both Satur day and Sunday, Mother's Day Brunch on Sunday, May 10, while the show continues through May 10. Show hours Saturday and Sunday begin at 10 a.m. The restaurant will be open for dinner Friday evening as well.

Particulars for the artists

Participants who wish to exhibit and sell their work only and not enter the Juried por tion of the show, pay $5 per piece with an un limited num ber of pieces allowed in the show. All sales proceeds go directly to the artists.

The Juried Show welcomes five pieces maximum per cat egory with $10 per piece charge. The Juried Show en try fees cover the cost of the cash awards to the top three places in each category and ribbons [first through fourth and Honorable Mention].

All paintings, drawings and other must be matted and frames with wire on back for hanging. Submitted art work will remain on display until Sunday at 4 p.m.

Entry forms are now available at the Art Center, 317 Main St., Alturas and at Modoc County Library, 212 West Third St., Alturas.

Check in: Thursday, May 7, 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. at the Niles Hotel, J.E. Niles Room and Friday, May 8 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

 

Land Use group interested in timber, Sierras

 

The Modoc County Land Use Committee will discuss the Sierra Nevada Conservation Framework and other timber related matters at its meeting May 13, 1:30 p.m. in the Farm Advisors Conference Room on Fourth Street in Alturas.

According to Sean Curtis, the Sierra Nevada plan may have some impacts on the Modoc National Forest, even though the Modoc is not a part of the Sierra Nevada range.

The Land Use Committee, said Curtis, is concerned about interim guidelines issued by the Forest Service that may not go along with accepted local Forest Management Plans.

The Sierra Nevada plan is the result of a scientific study done on the Sierras and those environmental problems asso ciated with management of that mountain range. The local committee is concerned guidelines used to protect areas in the Sierras may also be put in place here, whether they are necessary or not.

"We don't necessarily have the same problems or impacts as the Sierra Nevadas have," said Curtis. "We are trying to insure that local government will have a say in what affects this area."

The Land Use Committee will also be discussing the master plan for the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge and the future of timber receipts.

Under new business, the committee will be discussing the impacts of small mill/low impact logging and a possible new set of regulations that could make it simpler and more efficient for those small operations to function.

 

Obituaries:

 

CLAYTON MYERS

 

Clayton Craig Myers, 76, a native Modoc'er, and a long time Modoc County Road Department employee before he re tired, died April 30, 1998 in Alturas, Calif. after a long ill ness.

Mr. Myers, who loved to drive and found his calling as an equipment operator for 27 years with the Modoc County Road Department, was born in Adin, Calif. on March 5, 1922. He made Modoc County his home for his entire life, with the excep tion of time he spent in the U.S. Navy during World War II until his honorable discharge in 1946. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Pete Chris tensen Post 3327 in Alturas.

He and Nora Belle Hoyt were married on July 17, 1949 in Reno, Nev. and had been married 43 years, when she passed away in 1992.

After Mr. Myers retired from the Road Department, he was out fishing as often as possible. He enjoyed and appre ciated what Modoc County had to offer.

He is survived by his daughter Marie English of Alturas; four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren; sisters Anita Randolph of McArthur and Mavis Wright of Manton, Calif.

No service will be held. Memorial contributions may be directed to the American Cancer Society or the charity of choice.

 

Jerry Ford

 

Jerry Ford, 61 of Adin, California, died at the home of his daughter and son-in-law, Janette and Mark Turk of Libby, Mont, on Friday, May 1, 1998, from advanced prostate can cer. Jerry was an avid outdoorsman, expert marksman, and a skilled gunsmith. He was also a true gentleman.

He is survived by his wife Connie Ford of Adin, Calif., son Brian Ford of Juneau, Alaska, daughter Janette Turk of Libby, Mont., daughter Suzy Ford of Fre mont; four grand sons, Brandon and Brady Turk of Libby, Mont., and Christo pher and Erick of Monterey; two brothers, Lew and Bob Ford of California. Mr. Ford had many friends and will be missed by all.

A memorial was held in Libby, Mont., on his 62nd birth day, Tuesday, May 5.

Friends wishing may send memorials to: WINGS, a re gional cancer support center that was good to Jerry and helped him dur ing his stay in Montana, at 310 Sunnyview Lane, Kalispell, MT 59901, or the American Cancer Society.

Jerry was cremated and his ashes spread in the moun tains of Montana. Ar rangements were made by Nelson and Vial Funeral Home in Libby, Mont.

 

 

Pearl Chambers

 

Memorial services were conducted for Pearl Chambers at the Memorial Building in Bieber, Wednesday, April 29, 1998 at 3:00 p.m.

Pastor Walt Fisher offici ated the services. The Native Daughters of the Golden West performed a ceremony and presented a 50-year pin to Pearl's daughter for her years served.

An earlier private grave side service was held for the immediate family at Hillside Cemetery.

Pearl Eyssel Claussen Chambers was born August 29, 1909 in Alturas, Modoc County to Edwin Detlef and Elsie Pearl Claussen. She attended school at Clover swale, Alturas and Auburn, California.

June 20, 1929 she married Victor B. Chambers and then worked along side him in many endeavors. Seventeen years with "Vic's Market" in Bieber, Service Station in Canby in the late 30's, ranch ing and cooking for huge hay ing crews in the 30's and 40's.

Some of the organizations she was active in were Native Daughters, Life Member of the Historical Society, Ladys Country Club, Bieber Cham ber of Commerce and she en joyed the Bible study the Christian Women's Group had for several years.

She loved fishing, hunting, cooking and gardening.

She is survived by six great-grand children, Way lon Jennifer, Victor, Matthew, Karli and Evan Dowell; grandchildren Kurt and Kerry Dowell; a daughter Ethel Dowell and a brother Forrest A. Claussen. A brother, Otto Claussen and her husband Victor Chambers preceded her in death.

 

Services for Julia Joy Pataye

 

Memorial Services for Julia Joy Pataye will be held at the Adin Cemetery on Saturday, May 9 at 11:00 a.m.

Memorial donations may be directed to any volunteer organizations at Mayers Memorial Hospital Long Term Care or the charity of the donor's choice. A complete obitu ary to follow.

 
Record News for May 14, 1998
It's been wet for too long
Some questions with open primary
Woman, man face charges in shooting
Hospital administrator resigns
Children's Fair this weekend, rain or shine
Treasurer/Tax Collector candidates air views
Obituaries:
Smith
Kober
Wallace
Adams

Feeling gray and gloomy? Weather has not been bright spot

The gray and gloomy weather that has entrapped Modoc since January may ease some this weekend, bringing a lit tle sun and a brighter outlook. At least there is hope. Wanna buy a bridge?

While most Modoc'ers weather the gloom in pretty good fashion, it's no wonder people are getting a little tired of the wet. Since January it has rained or snowed about 70 percent of the time. Of the 133 days to date, inclement weather has held on for 92. The situation causing the gloomy outlook is that most of those poor days came in big sections, raining for more than a week at a time, getting a day break and then raining another week.

For instance, just lately, it has rained every day in the month of May. The Pit River has poured over its banks in several places this week and is running full and swift.

During the month of February, Alturas recorded precipi tation for 25 of the 28 days. In January, the clouds poured poured water on 24 of 31 days. Based on those numbers, the month of March was balmy, it only rained 16 days and in April in rained 15 days.

Since January 1, the Alturas weather station has recorded 8.63 of precipitation, well above average and well ahead of last year's totals.

The weather has raised havoc with high schools sports schedules and curtailed both baseball and softball seasons. The track season is heading into its league and section meets and coaches and athletes are hoping for a break in the weather.

 

1st open primary causing some new ques tions

 

The first open primary election in the State of California since 1909 is caus ing some concerns and ques tions, accord ing to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison.

Madison said she has fielded several inquires the first part of this week after sample ballots were mailed and most just have to deal with the number of candidates on each bal lot.

This open primary means that every voter is getting a sample ballot with all candi dates listed for each office, re gardless of political party af filiation.

"It's important that voters understand they can only vote for one candidate for each of fice," said Madison. "For ex ample, they can't vote for a Republican and a Democrat. The candidate from each party who receives a simple majority will be the winner and qualify for the general election in November."

The open primary issue was passed by state voters as Proposition 198 in March 1996 by a 59.51 percent margin.

Modoc has lost voters since the November, 1996 election. Currently there are 5,958 reg istered voters in the county, down from 6,005 in 1996.

Republicans still hold a slight edge with 2,692 voters. The Democrats are close be hind with 2,347. The remain ing vot ers registration are as follows: Non-partisan, 648; American Independent 180; Peace and Freedom 29; Libertarian, 31; Greene 11; Natural Law 4 and Reform, 16.

Madison said the requests from absentee ballots have been arriving at a furious pace. She reminds voters that those precincts with mail-in only ballots must have them in to her office by election day.

Most Modoc precincts are voting by mail including: Fort Bidwell, Lake City, Eagleville, Stateline-Willow Ranch, Davis Creek, Parker Creek, South Fork, Canby, Adin, Lookout, and Day.

Voters who will be going to the polls are in: Cedarville, North Fork, Alturas C, Alturas A, Alturas D, Alturas B, Hot Springs, Cal Pines and Newell.

Ballots for the June 2 pri mary election have contested

races for Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5.

This week the Record has views of Surprise Valley Supervisoral candidates and the candidates for Treasurer/Tax Collector.

Next week, the paper will be dealing with the District Attorney race.

District Attorney Hugh Comisky is being challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender.

Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier is being opposed by lo cal attorney Barry Kinman. Dier is finish ing out an ap pointed first term and is seeking a full six-year term.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also fac ing a challenge for re-elec tion. David Porter Misso, of Newell, is challenging Huffman in June.

Terry Williams, of Cedarville, is running against Modoc Realtor Sandra Stevenson for the District 1 Supervi sor seat of Surprise Valley.

Four candidates are run ning for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, an au di tor in the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary. For one of the four candidates to win the seat in June, he will have to have 50 percent plus 1 of the vote cast. If no one gains a majority, the top two will have a run-off in November.

Current Treasurer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe is re tir ing after this term and is not seeking re-election.

Incumbents who are seek ing re-election and are un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individu als must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

 

Eagleville woman faces attempted murder charges in shooting, abuse

 

An Eagleville woman, Karlena Stacey, was arrested Saturday night alleging at tempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon and felony spousal abuse after she shot her husband Ray Stacey.

According to District Attorney High Comisky, the hus band is also being charged with felony spousal abuse with the intent to inflict great bodily harm.

According to Comiksy, the shooting ap parently was in retaliation for a fight and beating of Mrs. Stacey by her hus band. Comisky said that following the alterca tion, Mr. Stacey went to bed. Mrs. Stacey allegedly then got a .38 cal iber handgun, walked into the bedroom and shot Mr. Stacey. Comisky said the husband put up his hand in defense as his wife shot. The bullet tore through his thumb and lodged above his abdomen.

Mr. Stacey is recovering at Modoc Medical Center and will be booked when he recovers. Mrs. Stacey was arrested and booked into the Modoc County Jail.

 

 

Modoc Medical Center administrator resigns

 

On Tuesday Modoc Medical Center Administrator Woody Laughnan resigned his position effective June 19. He presented that letter to County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell and it will be presented to the Board of Supervisors next Tuesday.

In addition, Director of Nurses Mary Buckland also pre sented the county with her resignation. Last week, Becki Steward, Administrative Secretary/Human Resources Manager resigned from that position.

Those resignations come amid an ongoing reorganiza tion of the hospital, which included some layoffs and the shutdown of the hospital's Home Health Care department.

Laughnan was in the middle of what he called a "retrenchment" of the facility, analyzing each department for its production and cost effectiveness. His intention, based upon a study by a hospital group, was to close down or trim those operations that were not a core part of the facility.

Several members of the staff discussed the hospital and its changes at a Board of Trustees meeting last week.

 

Choice of 2 trucks highlights 3rd annual Great Pit River Duck Race

 

The third annual Alturas Rotary Clubs' Great Pit River Duck Race is scheduled for Fandango Days in Alturas and something new has been added.

That something new is the first prize win ner will get a choice between a 1998 Chevy 4x4 step side pickup or a 1998 Chevy Silverado Extra-Cab two-wheel drive pickup, each val ued at about $26,000.

The change was made to give the winner of the pickup a real choice of vehicles.

Also new for this year is a great sec ond prize of a 1998 fish ing boat and trailer with a value of $8,071.

The tickets are the same price as always, $25 each, and the limit of 3,000 will be sold.

Gold Crown Sponsors, those people who buy at least 10 ducks, will also have another shot at winning one of two Polaris Express four-wheelers. Only Gold Crown sponsors have a shot at the four-wheelers.

All proceeds from the Duck Race go into the improve ments and new ball fields at the Alturas Rotary Youth Park. The past two years have seen the Duck Race raise over $60,000 and Rotary is anticipating a $30,000 net out of this year's race.

Progress at the Youth Park includes a new fence, parking lot, sprinkler system and trees. Grass planting is scheduled this spring.

The race is sponsored by both the Alturas Noon and Sunrise Rotary Clubs of Alturas.

The following is an order of other prizes in the Duck Race: third, $2,500 worth of custom lumber from High Desert Milling; fourth, Monitor Stove from Ed Staub and Sons; fifth new roof, siding or rain gutter ($1,000 value) from J.S. Roofing; sixth set of four tires from Les Schwab, $600; riding lawn mower from Coast to Coast, $568.41; Power lift/recliner from Home Medical, $500; One year on-line service from High Desert On-Line, $359 value; 25 tons of driveway gravel from Fitch Sand and Gravel, $350; Husquvarna chain saw from Modoc Engines, $330; custom bar becue from Surprise Valley Rotary, $300; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; one dozen donuts weekly for a year from the Donut Shop, $260; $250 gift cer tificate from the Belligerent Duck; 55 gallon aquarium setup from Tahiti North, $250 value; three watt cell phone from Modoc Motor Parts, Napa, $225; The Big One fire works kit from Village Video, $199; Zenith 13 inch color television from Phillips Appliance, $199; Weekend retreat for two at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging, $150; free muffler and tail pipe, Ron Campbell, Inc. $125; complimentary two-night stay for two at the Best Western Trailside Inn, $110; CB Radio and gift certificate from High Desert Electronics, $109; one night stay for two at Mill Creek Lodge, $100; one free pair of Vans or Skechers from Family Footwear, value up to $100; Outdoor plant stand from Gary's Woodworks, $100; and one pair of Oakley Sunglasses from Tom Krauel, OD, $100 value.

 

Children's fair is this weekend

 

Hoping for sunshine, but if not that lucky, the Modoc County Children's Fair will still take place this Saturday for one day only on May 16 from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. on the Modoc High School Campus, Eighth and Main Streets, Alturas.

It's a day of fun, low cost foods, free enter tainment, games and experiences for all ages in a tobacco, drug and alcohol free set ting, with free admission.

Activities for the youngest toddler to the senior citizen are offered, as families come together to learn and have fun together.

This year's Main Stage location has been moved from the campus lawn [too soggy to hold a large stage] to the rear of the lawn area.

Wheeler Cole will be sure to grab every one's attention as the opening morning act when he gives a fast-paced performance with unicycling, comedy, fire-eating and a col lec tion of bizarre inventions that incorporate his multi-talented background. He will per form throughout the day.

Cole will be traveling from Vallejo. He won the San Francisco Street Performer's Competition and an international perform ers competition in Milan, Italy, early in his career. It will be his first visit to the Modoc Children's Fair and planning committee members are hoping for a large attendance to welcome him.

Wheeler started his performing career 22 years ago, while attending University of Rhode Is land. There he founded High Street Circus while studying pantomime and speech com munications. After graduating in 1981, he relocated to San Francisco, where he honed his act on the streets of Fisherman's Wharf. After winning both the Performers' Competi tion awards in 1986, Wheeler left the High Street Circus to pursue a solo performing ca reer. He continues to perform through the U.S. and internationally. His talents also include playing the five-string banjo, man dolin, guitar, singing, and song writing.

Get ready to watch some "extreme airs, extreme thrills and extreme excitement," as the unique "Wheels of Freestyle," a group from Impe rial Beach, Calif. perform their bi cycle stunts, enter tain and educate kids and adults about bicy cle safety and drug free lives.

Stu dents had a sneak preview of the bicy cle trick team's show, as they gave assem blies in schools throughout the county this week, leading up to the Children's Fair.

Kids are reached in a powerful new way through this performance, which includes amazing stunts, hard-hitting messages, high energy music and audience participation. They will bring their pro box-jump ramp and two professional ath lete/performers and a sound system that won't quit.

Catch the show on the closed off section of East Street near New Directions, if the weather is good. And, if the weather doesn't cooperate, watch the "Wheels" acts in the Oxley Social Hall.

There may not be the animal rides this year, but committee members say, "We hope the quality of the fair overrides the quantity. We've picked up new acts for the fair this year and dropped others."

Catch the arrival of TEAM 02, a cus tomized van and trailer with traffic stop ping graphics and a state-of-the-art sound and video system that attracts crowds wherever it goes.

Stop by the TEAM 02 vehicle to test your knowledge of tobacco facts and a chance to win t-shirts emblazoned with de signs from the popular statewide anti-tobacco bill board campaign. TEAM 02 will be visi ble from Eighth Street and located between the Social Hall and Gymnasium.

Wild Things will bring the return of the folks who show and tell about the wild ani mals, reptiles and snakes for which they care. They educate the public in a novel and enlightening manner. It's a secret so far about what they plan to bring this year.

Country music, popular and rock hits will fill the air as "Lone Pine," a Kla math Falls based band comes for their first time to the Children's Fair. Local resi dents may recog nize a few faces in the group, such as Tom Moore, the salesperson for Goe bel's Office Supply, who visits Alturas weekly. He plays the bass and electric guitar for the group and said he is looking forward to the Children's Fair experience for his first time.

Robin Brush returns with his "Full Cir cle" Karaoke fun for all ages.

Forty booths filled with activities, games, information, displays and concessions such as quesadillas and hamburgers will be set up around the main campus lawn area.

Pizza and Pasta Place will bring their popular "Dough Pro in Training" booth, which taught 300 children and a few adults how to properly open and throw pizza dough during last year's Children's Fair.

Belles and Beaus from Klamath Falls will show their country dance style with costumes to match inside the Griswold Gym.

Take home a special prize from the Dime Toss open to all tossers under a covered tarp area on the campus lawn. Bingo with white elephants as prizes will be located indoors in the New Directions Conference Room.

Find a map on campus, the day of the Fair or use this week's ad in the Modoc Record to locate all finds the Children's Fair has to of fer.

Watch for the folks in the blue aprons sell ing 50/50 drawing tickets. They will be sell ing the day of the fair and some lucky person will win half the cash when the drawing is held at 2:00 p.m.

"As of Wednesday, we've sold $1,000 worth of tickets with more ticket sales expected now through Saturday," says Gail Eppler, com mittee member. After the prize money is awarded, the other half will be put towards the 1999 Children's Fair.

Plenty of choices will keep kids and adults from being hungry with every thing from quesadillas, tamales, ham burgers, corn dogs, onion rings, nachos, pop corn, sundaes and strawberry shortcake to coffee, Italian sodas, fruit punch, lemonade, sodas, and candy at low cost.

Demonstrations from rockets to kite mak ing, stained glass, and much more to young children's activities such as spin art, giant bubble making, hand prints and poems, the return of the birdseed tub and GAK, a fun, sensory experience for kids. Returning will be the open doors on emergency response ve hicles and demonstration of the Jaws of Life.

Wander around the entire campus, within the open buildings and out, to catch the many activities and demonstrations ongoing throughout the six-hour day.

Numerous local individuals, groups, agencies, students, clubs, organizations and businesses are pitching in their energy to help make this 11th year a fun one for every one.

 

Treasurer/Tax Collector candidates share views

By Geoff Griffin

Special to the Record

 

Why would anyone want to be a tax collector? Its a sure way to ruin your social life. Nobody will want to invite you to go fishing because they'll be afraid you're appraising their boat. Even Jesus got criticized in the New Testament for hanging out with tax collec tors.

Furthermore, why would anyone want to be treasurer? When you're the one holding all the money, everybody is always bugging you for some of if. Being Treasurer for Modoc County is like being a parent to 10,000 teenagers who want to go to the mall.

Despite all of that, the job of Treasurer/Tax Collector is the most sought after position in the County in this election season. With current Trea surer/Tax Collector Linda Monroe retiring, no less than four candidates - Manuela "Nellie" Davenport, Bill Hamby, Cheryl Knoch and Jeri Standley - have entered the race to fill a four year term in the soon to be vacant spot. The plans and qualifications of all four are outlined below, in alphabetical order.

Nellie Davenport said she is in the race because, "I need a new challenge."

Seeking new challenges seems to have become the theme of Davenport's life over the last 18 years that she has been working at the Califor nia Pines Community Ser vices District. She started out there as a secre tary/bookkeeper, but has since taken on more and more re sponsibilities to the point where she is a tax collector and auditor for Cal-Pines.

Davenport said that she is already doing tax collection on certain bonds for Cal-Pines properties and is also overseeing a variety of ac counts. She feels that at Cal-Pines she is already doing on a small scale what she would be doing as the County Treasurer/Tax Collector. She also said she has demonstrated "very good" people skills while in her current position.

"I've had 18 years of in creasing responsibility in public service and financial administration," Davenport said. "I want to emphasize that I will perform the job (Treasurer/Tax Collector) to the best of my ability, making it a career and not just a job, as I have done at California Pines Community Services District."

Bill Hamby has focused his campaign on the experience he has gained over the years that have given him "top qual ifications" for the job of Trea surer/Tax Collector.

"All of my background fits in with this job," Hamby said.

That background includes 20 years of running his own business in Alturas, six years with Bank of America, Air Force experience where he did work efficiency studies, a de gree in Business Administra tion and experience with stocks and bonds. He feels that all of this has given him manage ment experience, a solid fi nancial background, an un derstanding of investments and knowledge of the value of customer service (taxpayers are customers in his mind). He also states that his Busi ness Administration Degree is the most appropriate type of degree for the Treasurer/Tax Collector position.

"This is not a position where you just promote a County person into it," Hamby said of the job he is running for. "This is not just a bookkeeping position. This is a major County position. . .It requires a financial per son to manage an important office and represent both the people and the County."

He added that he hopes vot ers will, "Realize what the po sition calls for, take the quali fications of the candidates and compare them, and relate them to the position."

If he gets in office, Hamby said he would look at possible investment strategies that would pay higher returns than Modoc County is currently getting by investing in a State fund that he calls "ultra-con servative." He said he real izes that with public dollars, "You have to be conservative, but you don't have to be ultra-conservative." He feels that there are safe investments that could mean more money for the County that he would present to the three-person In vestment Committee that is in charge of handling those de cisions.

"The Treasurer role is to be knowledgeable enough to rec ommend and develop a plan for investing," Hamby said. "I want to make investment a well managed part of the job, not just a secondary part."

When Cheryl Knoch first heard that the Treasurer/Tax Collector job was open, "I did n't really think about it."

However, when one of Knoch's co-workers in the County Auditor's office sug gested that she run, she started thinking, "I could do that job. I'm probably one of the best qualified people in the county for it," and "Why not? It's a step-up into a new challenge."

Knoch asserts that she has become qualified through the work she has done in the Ac countant-Auditor positions she has held over the last four years. She points out that she already handles many tax matters, works regularly with the staff of the Treasurer's of fice and has a strong knowl edge of the computer system that serves both the Treasurer and Auditor offices.

"The Auditor's office has a lot more than people realize." Knoch said.

She pointed out that she has been in on the ground floor of new tax cycles and a new computer system that just went into effect this past year. She claims that she has the best knowledge of how these work while also recognizing that "there's always room for improvement" in these areas.

"I have a big part in all of them," she said of the Coun ty's different tax cycles while also emphasizing that she has experience with apportioning out taxes to various entities such as the school district.

Jeri Standley said, "This has been a goal of mine for many years, to hold a depart ment head position. I couldn't resist this opportunity. I never want to say to myself, 'I should have done that.'"

Standley points to her 19 years in local government as well as her experience in fi nancial management as her qualifications to be Trea surer/Tax Collector. For 10 years she worked in the Fi nancial Department of the City of Tracy where she be came Department Supervisor. She has spent another nine years in Modoc County gov ernment, the past two as As sistant Administrative Ser vices Director. She also spent four years as a fiscal officer for T.E.A.C.H. and helped open two local businesses with her husband.

"As I looked at this job and as I'm out there talking to peo ple, most of the questions have centered on investments or interest rates," Standley said.

She feels she can help the County earn more money with a "low-risk prudent plan" that worked well for her in Tracy. While there she advised the City to invest its restricted funds in long term plans, while investing contingency funds in shorter term instru ments.

"We did weekly projec tions of our cash needs and had the money people working with the project people," Stan dley said. "We were then able to do 10 to 30 day invest ments with the contingency funds and the dollars weren't just sitting there idle."

Stanley said that while "it's always nice to get a high return," it is only the third most important issue to her when deciding how to invest County money. The "pri mary objective" is safeguard ing the principal followed by having the liquidity to allow the County to get money when it needs it.

Standley also points out that the Treasurer/Tax Col lector, as a department head, must have leadership skills and be able to handle person nel supervision.

"My public sector experi ence has allowed me to de velop very specific job skills," she said. "I take a common sense approach to leadership. My style is to focus on contin uous improvement and cre ative solutions."

 

Obituaries

 

Rollin A.Smith

 

Rollin Allayne Smith returned to Surprise Valley after many years absence and died in Cedarville on May 7, 1998, just three days after his 88th birthday.

Mr. Smith was born to Earl and Etta Smith on May 4, 1910 in Westfall, Ore. where his parents were homesteading in Eastern Oregon.

In 1919 they moved to Fresno County and Rollin received his high school edu cation at Burrell, near Fresno. He mar ried Susie McClenaghan on February 19, 1934 in Fresno and they left that area the same year.

Mr. Smith did farming and carpentry work in Palo Ce dro, Whitmore and Red ding. In 1942, he studied Mortuary Science for a year in San Francisco. He took a position in a Greenville mortuary for a year, but found he preferred working outdoors and soon left for Su sanville where he had lived for some time and eventu ally made his way to Al turas, then Lake City. He made many cherished friends and learned to laugh and have fun in Lake City.

While on a mission trip to Mexico in 1969, Susie and Rollin fell in love with a young boy whose mother begged them to take her son to the U.S. to give him a bet ter chance at life. When it came time to go, the little boy refused and his five-year-old brother wanted to go in stead and did.

At the border, the authori ties would not let the Smiths take the child into the U.S. without permission from the birth par ents. The mother gave permission, but his fa ther was de ceased, so they would not let him continue his journey. The authorities did allow the family to take the child over the border each Sabbath to church and fi nally the family decided to just keep on going, never to return to Mexico. The Smiths immediately went to the authorities and ex plained their plight and soon they were able to adopt the boy, naming him Samuel Rollin Smith.

Mr. Smith loved the out-of-doors and living in the high country. He took his father on nostalgic trips to Oregon and he spent hours typing his dad's books and helping build rentals for his parents. His greatest joys were the many trips he took around the United States. He worked with Mission church builders on Maranantha trips to Mexico, Ireland, Singapore, Borneo, Thai land, India and Nova Sco tia. He funded his own trips and loved using his building ability to help others.

His wife preceded him in death on March 17, 1993 in Lake City. A few months later, while on a mission to Washington, he met a woman the family had known while living in Su sanville, years before. She was a widow and they were mar ried later that year and lived in her home in Farm ington, Wash. for five years, until Mr. Smith's health began to break and it was necessary for him to have medical atten tion. He returned to Cedarville where he died.

He is survived by his daughter Rowena of Phoenix, Ariz.; sons Duane, Redding; Sam, of Hayden, Idaho; five grand children and one great-granddaugh ter; brothers Kenneth of Angwin and Lauren of Red ding; sisters Virginia and Shirley and numerous nieces and nephews.

Pastor Craig Klatt con ducted services at graveside at the Lake City, Calif. cemetery at 4 p.m. on May 9.

 

Walter Kober

 

Fort Bidwell native Wal ter Wilhelm Kober, owner of the former Cedarville busi nesses Highway Grocery and Kober's Cash Store, died in Redding, Calif. on May 10, 1998 at the age of 86.

He was born July 31, 1911 in Fort Bidwell, Calif. and graduated from Surprise Valley High School in Cedarville. He continued his education at Polytechnic School of Engi neering in Oakland where he earned his Aeronautical En gineer ing degree.

On June 4, 1938, he mar ried Dorothy Wilson in Reno, Nev. and the couple enjoyed 60 years of mar riage before his passing.

Mr. Kober took after his parents who had owned Kober's Store in Fort Bid well, and he opened his first grocery store on Townsend Street in Cedarville. He called the business Highway Grocery where it was located for its first two years. He then purchased the old Sur prise Valley Bank Building on the corner of Main and Townsend Streets in Cedarville, and he operated Kober's Cash Store in that lo cation for 38 years until his retirement some 26 years ago. After he retired, Mr. Kober especially enjoyed spending time with his grandchil dren. He loved watching baseball games on T.V. and in town. He was a fan of the Lawrence Welk T.V. Show and any polka would bring a smile to his face and a tap to his toes. He loved music.

He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and was honored by the Surprise Val ley Lodge F&AM No. 235, with his 50-year membership pin on July 5, 1995.

He is survived by his wife Dorothy Kober of Redding; daughters Sharon Haskins of Bonanza, Ore; Caroline Bowne of Cottonwood; brother George Kober of Berkeley; four grandchil dren, Renee Bowne, Cotton wood, Cristal Arnold of Elk Grove, Craig Haskins of Kent, Wash. and Jeff Hask ins, Hillsboro, Ore.; and three great-grandchildren.

Services were conducted by the Rev. Ben Zandstra on May 14 at 2 p.m. graveside at the Cedarville, Calif. Cemetery.

Contributions in Mr. Kober's memory may be made to the charity of the donor's choice.

 

Erlyn Wallace

 

Former Fort Bidwell res ident Erlyn Eugene Wallace died May 6, 1998 at the Veter ans Medical Center in Reno, Nev. at the age of 72.

Mr. Wallace was born to James and Ada Baltazor Wal lace on April 17, 1926 in Winnemucca, Nev. He was reared in Fort Bidwell and graduated from Surprise Valley High School with the class of 1944. Shortly after graduation, he en listed in the U.S. Navy. He served in the Pacific dur ing World War II on an LST as a Ma chinist Mate 3rd Class. In 1946, he was listed as "killed in action" and received an honorable discharge after recovering from injuries re ceived at that time.

Mr. Wallace was mar ried to the former Elrene Sweeney in Reno, Nev. on April 3, 1954. He followed construction as a heavy equipment operator for a number of years before set tling permanently in Lake view in 1976.

He was a charter member of the Surprise Valley Veter ans of Foreign Wars 7888 and a life member of the Al turas Dis abled American Veterans No. 113. He was an avid hunter and fisherman and also enjoyed dancing. His greatest source of plea sure was his family.

He is survived by his wife, Elrene of Lakeview, Ore.; daughters and sons-in-law, Sue and Buck Cartwright of Lakeview and Kim and Sandy Blake of Alturas; daughter Debbie Wallace of Pendleton, Ore.; son Jim Wallace and daughter Lisa Wallace of Alturas; 11 grandchildren and one great-granddaugh ter.

Services were held Satur day, May 9 at 2:00 p.m. at the People's Church of Fort Bid well with the Rev. Dan St. Clair as officiant. Interment followed at the Fort Bidwell Ceme tery, Fort Bidwell, Calif.

Contributions in the memory of Mr. Wallace may be made to the charity of the donor's choice.

Desert Rose Funeral Chapel of Lakeview was in charge of arrangements.

 

Dorothy Jean Adams

The Record received word this week that former Modoc resident Dorothy Jean Adams died of lung cancer on April 24, 1998 in Mountain View, Calif. Mrs. Adams, wife of Don Adams, had been a long-time resident in Modoc, before moving to Billings, Montana.

She was born February 17, 1923 in Detroit, Mich.

A memorial service was held May 17 at the family resi dence in Sunnyvale, Calif.

Record News for May 21, 1999

 
  • Some changes necessary at hospital
  • Child molester blocked from parole in Modoc
  • Group out to get pass guardrails
  • Unemployment dips in April
  • Record office closed for
  • holiday
  • Destruction Derby
  • pos toned
  • Remembering Memorial Day
  • Ft. Bidwell celebrates
  • 23rd annual barbecue
  • Sign up now for summer
  • Blue Lake Camp season
  • Comedy at Modoc High opens Friday
  • Obituaries
  • Vaughn
  • Gerig
  • Coffin

 

Some changes necessary at hospital

While there were several opinions given and comments made about the state of Modoc Medical Center at Wednesday's work session, there was no clear picture of the problem nor the solution to the financial problems.

The meeting was a joint session between the Modoc County Board of Supervisors and the Hospital Board of Trustees. The public was invited and did make several comments.

The predominate theme in most of the conversation was the need to work together and cooperate to get the hospital moving in a positive direction.

Suggestions of what to do ranged from trying to keep it open as it is now to radical downsizing. The key question is a matter of money, or more specifically, how much county general fund money might be necessary to backfill hospital losses.

Additionally, if the county can't afford to keep the hospital open at the current level, should the voters decide whether they would like to kick in some money?

Most of the panel agreed that sending a hospital district to a vote, which includes a funding vehicle (tax), would proba bly not pass with the two-thirds vote necessary. But, they agreed, it might be a necessary step.

Hospital Trustee Bobby Ray said he didn't think the fi nancial situation should be politicized or dealt with in an open public session. He said the staffing or downsizing prob lems at the facility be solved internally, without the political overtones.

Ray said the management and trustees were carrying out direction in downsizing recently, until it blew up when some employees politicized the situation. The staffing issues were internal problems, he said, not community problems and they should have been resolved in house.

He also said the hospital was "it's own worst enemy" when it comes to some of these issues, including gaining and maintaining community trust. He argued that patient care was quite good and through all of the turmoil, it re mained good.

'If we don't work together, we'll lose what we have," Ray said. " We need to cut costs and we all need to support the fa cility. I'm not prepared to cut any more services. The county hospital can't survive without county money. I think we're on the right track and we need to keep working at it." Trustees President Vernon Knoch said the hospital is at a crossroads and some changes are needed. He agreed with Ray that the board was moving in the right direction and needed to continue.

According to the Hospital's Teresa Jacques, the hospital is on track to break even financially by April, 1999.

Supervisor Ron McIntyre said his concern is the amount of county money the hospital would need. "We know we have a financial problem," he said. "I'd like to figure out just what the amount of the county backfill would be in real num bers. We only have a certain amount of funding to deal with."

According to Supervisor Joe Colt, the one thing the hospital needs to do is develop trust in the facility by the community. That, he said, was going to take a Herculean effort and needed the cooperation of everyone involved.

Supervisor Ben Zandstra, who represents Surprise Valley, said his picture is clear, the hospital has lost 3.2 mil lion and in is debt on the long term care facility by 2.15 mil lion.

"We are in a serious position," he said. "We need radical reconfiguration of the hospital and we need to cut to live within our means."

Zandstra said a vote of the entire county should be taken to see if residents want to fund the hospital. He said there needs to be change and he realizes there is resistance to change by some employees and that the changes may make some people unhappy. He also charged employees to work within the system if they had complaints, or to "keep your mouths' shut" or resign.

McIntyre stressed that he in no way would entertain an idea to shut down the facility. He would prefer to keep it open with as many services as possible. But he wants to see the numbers and what is feasible.

Supervisor Pat Cantrall said she is generally pleased with the facility and its level and quality of services and would like to see it maintained. But, she said, there are prob lems to solve.

Colt said the charge of the two boards is to come up with a solution to maintain the hospital at a quality level and at a level the county can afford. Both boards stressed that man agement and staff need to be working in the same direction, with the understanding that there may be changes coming.

Lesley Chace suggested the board move cautiously before cutting back on services. She said a good idea would be to slow down and look at the whole situation.

Peri Coiner, a clinic consultant, said no one person will make the difference at the hospital and the community needs to support and have faith in the facility. In order for that to happen, she said, the staff needs to work together and stop be ing its own worst enemy.

 

 

Child molester blocked from parole in Modoc

 

A convicted Modoc County child molester, John L. Scott, scheduled for parole back to Modoc County will not be allowed to return.

 

According to District Attorney Hugh Comisky, his of fice's and Sheriff Bruce Mix's efforts on behalf of the victim and family, resulted in the state Department of Corrections changing the location of the molester's parole.

Comisky said the child molester, a 63-year-old man, was convicted and sent to prison in August, 1994 for lewd and lascivious acts on minors and he considers the man a sex ual predator.

Just where the man will be paroled was not released.

 

 

Group out to get pass guardrails

While it has been tried in the past, a new effort is being made by a volunteer group to have Caltrans install guardrails on Cedar Pass.

Donna Sheehan, of Cedarville and Citizens for Safety, said the pass remains dangerous during the winter in spite of Caltrans best ef forts. She said Caltrans needs a snow-blower, but doesn't have one for the pass. It's her group's contention that guardrails could save lives or reduce injury.

Her group is seeking statements from people who have had accidents on Cedar Pass over the past five years. Confidentiality is guaran teed, she said. Send a short de scription of the accident to Sheehan at P.O. Box 101, Cedarville. 96104.

 

Unemployment dips in April

 

Unemployment in Modoc County for April took a big dip to 12.9 percent from March's 15.2 and February's 16.7 percent.

 

In numbers from the Employment Development Department, it means the county went from 620 unemployed persons in February to 510 in April. In April, 1997, the coun ty's unemployment rate was 14.1 percent.

While the county unemployment rate is still higher than the state's at 6.1 percent and the 5.0 percent nationally, the April, 1998 figures show some promise.

The county still ranks 45th out of 58 counties for the most unemployment. Imperial is 58th with 23.8 percent unem ployment and Marin has the least at 2.2 percent.

Lassen County's unemployment for April was 10.6 per cent and Siskiyou was 13.2 percent.

 

Record office closed for

holiday

The Modoc Record business office will be closed in ob servance of the Memorial Day holiday on Monday, May 25 to allow our employees to enjoy the holiday.

The office will re-open on Tuesday, May 26 with regular hours from 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. and open through the noon hour to accommodate our customers. We wish our cus tomers a safe holiday weekend.

 

Destruction Derby

pos toned

 

Surprise Valley Rotary Club has canceled the De struction Derby in Cedarville at the Modoc District Fairgrounds that was set for this Memorial Day weekend, Saturday, May 23.

 

Organizer Roy Moore states, "It is with deep regret that the Surprise Valley Ro tary will have to move the date of the destruction derby to Saturday, August 22, 1998, during the Modoc County Fair."

Due to the inclement weather, the staff at the fair grounds has been unable to finish repairs to the guardrail in front of the grandstands. The guard rail was removed after it was found to be substandard and ordered to be replaced by the Modoc County Fair Board. "Our insurance will not provide coverage until the guard rail has been re placed and inspected," ex plains Moore.

The rules and prize money will remain the same for the August 22 event. For those who have pre-entered, Rotary will be returning their entry fees.

For more information, please call Roy Moore at (530) 233-4079.

 

Remembering Memorial Day

 

Services in observance of Memorial Day will be conducted in Alturas un der the Big Flag in the Plumas Bank parking lot, Main St., Alturas, on Mon day, May 25 at 11:00 a.m.

 

The American Legion Post 163 is hosting the program and is planning an interesting one with all local veterans' groups to participate. They encourage the public to attend.

Buddy Poppies will be offered to the public on May 23 in Eagleville, Ft. Bidwell, Cedarville and Friday, May 22 in the Alturas area.

On the traditional Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30 services will be held at 11:00 a.m. at both the Alturas Cemetery and the Eagleville Cemetery. Alturas Veterans of Foreign Wars to Pete Christensen Post 3327 and Surprise Valley VFW Post 7888 will conduct the services in their respective communities.

The public is encouraged to attend any one of the services, to reflect on the meaning of Memorial Day and give thanks to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice - their lives - in the line of duty

 

Sunday

Ft. Bidwell celebrates

23rd annual barbecue

 

It's a relaxing setting to renew old acquaintances or meet new friends when the 23rd An nual Volunteer Fire Department's Barbecue welcomes the public on Sunday, May 24 from 11:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. in the park surround ing the Ft. Bidwell civic hall in Ft. Bidwell.

 

The creek side setting, with its tall cottonwood trees, pro vides a shady area for visiting amid the open air picnic ta bles. Always a popular event which draws visitors from far and near, the fire department serves a feast and offers drawings in addition to games of volleyball and horse shoes.

No matter what the weather, the event is well received and everyone seems to have a good time.

The serving of barbecued beef rib-eye steak, ground beef steak or chicken, plus baked potato, beans and cole slaw will be served from 11:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.

The cost for adults will be $10 and children, six through 12, will be served ground beef steak for $6. Children five and under served free when ac companied by a paying adult.

Dining will also be accom modated inside the civic hall for those who want an indoor setting.

Join the games of volleyball and horseshoes or purchase tickets for the drawings.

"Rain, shine, snow or sleet, our annual barbecue can't be beat," offer Ft. Bidwell residents.

A drawing will be held late in the day, for a hind quarter of beef, a front quarter of beef, all cut wrapped and frozen, plus many other locally donated prizes. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5, available at the entrance. All proceeds will help the Ft. Bidwell Fire Department.

Sign up now for summer

Blue Lake Camp season

 

Blue Lake Camp has helped make good memories for many over the years and will continue to do so during this year's camping season.

 

Young people from far and near come together for the camp held at Blue Lake in the Warner Mountains on the Modoc National Forest. Registration opened May 1 for the 1998 summer camp season.

A High School Work Camp for ninth through 12th grades and graduating se niors will open the season. Join them for a week of fun camp activities as well as a few hours of work preparing the camp for the younger groups to follow.

This year, there will also be a large group of high school students from the Berkeley area attending.

The High School Camp is scheduled for June 22-26 and will cost $50 per camper.

The third and fourth grade camp will be held July 1-3 at $50 per child; the sev enth through eighth grade camp will be July 6-10 and fifth and sixth grade camp will be held July 13-17. The fifth/sixth and sev enth/eighth grade campers are $95 per camper.

All of the camps include organized activities such as swimming, crafts, a time of worship, games and "great meals" as well as some free time.

Registration forms are available from Ike Richard son at New Directions Cen ter; Federated Church, and Surprise Valley Community Church or call Joan at (530) 233-3355 for a registration form to be mailed.

Registration will not be ac cepted over the phone. Third through sixth grade camps will be directed by Dr. Ben Zandstra from Lake City. The seventh/eighth grade camp will be directed by Patrick Johnson, a junior high school teacher from the Chico area.

The High School camp will be co-directed by Ben Zandstra and the adult lead ers of the Berkeley youth group.

All children, regard less of race or creed are wel come at Blue Lake Camp.

Comedy at Modoc High opens Friday

Get ready to chuckle, thanks to the antics and act ing of Modoc High's Drama Club, when they open with their comedic performances of "Man of the House" both Friday and Saturday nights, May 22 and 23 at 8:00 p.m. in Oxley Hall, Modoc High School, Alturas.

They have learned their lines well, act them with ex pression and feeling and volume so the audience can enjoy the play, with costumes and an elaborate set created by Mike Halderman and props by Drama Coach/English teacher Mi ran Reynolds.

The story revolves around a thief who is continually in terrupted as he goes about his "trade" and is mistaken for the real man of the house. A cast of nine students have been working with Drama Coach Miran Reynolds to present their second produc tion of the season.

A few changes in the cast were made this week, but all was running smoothly dur ing Tuesday after noon/evening's dress re hearsal. The Drama Club has added a few new faces to the stage, with this final sea son performance.

The play, written by Robert Alan Blair, will last about one hour with a brief intermission included.

The Cast and their roles: The Man-David Wolverton; Olive-Josanna Clark; Tammy-Hilary Ford; Mar jorie-Colleen Walter; Ed-Jeran Brown; Violet, Christina Crawford; Po licewoman-Stacy Calkins; Harry-James Alphin; Mama-Hilary Ford; Clyde-Matt Jeffers.

Tickets will be available at the door, $3.00 for adults; $2 for students with Student Body cards and $2 for chil dren and senior citizens.

Come enjoy the fun, the students' live stage perfor mance and their talents.

Help select a Fandango

theme, Grand Marshal

The public is invited to nominate a Grand Marshal and a theme for the 1998 Fandango Days Fourth of July celebra tion in Alturas.

The Alturas Chamber of Commerce is seeking nomina tions for a theme by Friday, May 29. Nominations for the special person who will be Grand Marshal must be submit ted by Friday, June 19 to the Alturas Chamber of Commerce, 522 South Main St., Alturas.

Alturas and Modoc County will have a special opportu nity to display the signifi cance and romance of the rail road in this area through Fandango activities. Parade en tries can include the theme and Fandango Committee members are searching for a person who can reflect the history and diver sity of Al turas and Modoc County, and serve as Grand Mar shal in the 1998 Fandango Parade.

For more information, call or FAX (530) 233-4434.

Obituaries

Col. Edward Manning Vaughn

Alturas resident Col. Edward Manning Vaughn, a re tired U.S. Air Force colonel, died May 14, 1998 at Merle West Medical Center, Klamath Falls, Ore.

Col. Vaughn had moved from Sacramento to Alturas in 1994.

"He liked Alturas very much because it reminded him of the small town in which he grew up," shared his wife Dolores.

He was born January 21, 1918 in Oklahoma City and grew up in Kingfisher, Okla. He served with the U.S. Air Force for 27-1/2 years, as a pilot and as commander of a Strategic Air Command communica tions squadron. He retired to Sacramento in 1963. He later was a Chartered Life Underwriter for Banker's Life of DesMoines for sev eral years.

Col. Vaughn then served as a disaster control officer for the California Office of Emergency Services. He was also the owner and operator of Orangevale Orbit Gas and Mini Mart at one time and was a member of a Veterans of Foreign Wars Post in Sacramento.

After he relocated to Alturas, he and Dolores Myers, for merly of Sacramento, were married on July 22, 1994 in Al turas. Col Vaughn loved to travel and did much traveling during his lifetime.

"He would say, 'where are we going next,'" recalls his wife.

He had recently taken up interest in the hobby of rock pol ishing and was a sponsor for the local Stock Car Racing As sociation.

He is survived by his wife Dolores of Alturas; a brother Norman E. Vaughn of Oklahoma City; a daughter Karla Vaughn Golbahar of Sacramento; four sons, Edward of Huntsville, Ala., Brian of Pleasant Valley, Calif.; Geoffrey of Sacramento, Chris of Houston, Tex.; four stepdaughters, Catherine Stevens of Sacramento, Deborah Struder and Sandra Alexander of Orangevale, and Peggy Alexander of Alturas; 15 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Preceding him in death were two wives, Nettie Alice Har ris and Betty Lou Tauber, and a daughter, Mary. A memo rial mass was held May 19 at the Church of the Divine Savior in Orangevale.

Contributions in Col. Vaughn's memory may be made to the Modoc Medical Center, Alturas or Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas.

Obituaries

Dale Eugene Gerig

Dale Eugene Gerig, a native Modocer, died in Adin, Calif. on May 15, 1998. Mr. Gerig was the owner and operat ing engineer for his heavy duty equipment operating busi ness for over 30 years.

He was born in Alturas, Calif. on July 27, 1939. He grad uated from Richmond High School in Richmond, Calif. and attended Shasta College in Redding. He made a career with his operating engineering expertise and was called on for work throughout the state and to New Mexico, as a union member with Local 3.

He also enjoyed hunting, fishing and gold mining as time allowed. He and wife Loretta were married December 4, 1994 in Redding and returned to Modoc County shortly af ter their marriage. He was 58 at the time of his passing. His son Steve Gerig preceded him in death in 1994.

Mr. Gerig is survived by his wife Loretta of Bieber; sons Kevin Gerig, McKinleyville; Greg and wife Christa Gerig, Redding, daughter Angelia and husband Steve Boero, San Carlos; mother Mary Hillhouse, Redding and 11 grandchil dren.

Pastor Craig Klatt conducted services in Bieber on Wednesday, May 20 at 1:00 p.m. Interment was at Hillside Cemetery in Nubieber, Calif.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in Dale Gerig's memory, may be made through Tri Counties Bank in Bieber toward the Big Valley Alumni Association Scholarship Fund or the Big Valley Swimming Pool Fund.

Obituaries

Thelma Ward Coffin

 

Thelma Ward Coffin, 91, passed away at Grossmont Hos pital in La Mesa, Calif. on Sunday, May 17, 1998. She leaves several family members in Alturas.

She is survived by two sons, Don Coffin of Mesa, Ariz. and Joe Coffin of Alturas; a daughter Colleen Wenham of San Diego; nine grandchildren, including Cheryl Ford of Alturas, CPO Jim Coffin of Oak Harbor, Wash. and Modoc High School graduates Kimberlee Coffin Aldana of Marina and Stephanie Coffin of Tustin, as well as 16 great-grand children.

Thelma Ward was born on December 20, 1906 in York, Nebraska, to Hiram Owen Ward and Etta Rosalia [Baines] Ward. She spent most of her childhood in various commu ni ties in Northwest Iowa where her father served as a Methodist minister. She graduated from Plover High School in 1924, and from Iowa State Teacher's College in 1926. Dur ing her first teaching assignment, she met and fell in love with the coach. She and Owen Coffin were married on Au gust 14, 1928. She returned to teaching in 1952, and retired in 1972. They moved from Sioux City, Iowa to El Cajon in 1977, where they spent the remainder of their lives.

She was preceded in death by her husband in 1986, by one daughter in infancy, by a grandson and her only sister. A memorial service will be held at the Safari Mobile Home Park Community Center in La Mesa on May 22, 11 a.m.

 

Record news summaries for May 28, 1998

Voter interest seems high for June 2
Kinman wins appeal of conviction
Medicine Lake Geothermal project has impacts
Area schools graduate seniors
Too cool for the pool
Cattlemen had field day June 7

The forecast:

Look for rain and snow and unseasonably cool weather Friday. On Saturday, showers will decrease and it will warm. It's still mostly cloudy on Sunday. Just what you wanted to hear, right?

June 2 election could see strong voter interest

Campaigns are tuning up in this last week before the June 2 primary election in Modoc. Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said absen tee ballot requests have been strong and she expects a good voter turnout on Tuesday.

Madison stresses that vot ers with mail-in only ballots must have them in to her of fice by election day.

Modoc precincts voting by mail include: Fort Bidwell, Lake City, Eagleville, Stateline-Willow Ranch, Davis Creek, Parker Creek, South Fork, Canby, Adin, Lookout, and Day.

Voters who will be going to the polls are in: Cedarville, North Fork, Alturas C, Alturas A, Alturas D, Alturas B, Hot Springs, Cal Pines and Newell. Hot Spring voters have a change in their polling place. Instead of voting at Dee's Collectibles, they now vote at the Alturas Rifle and Pistol Club.

Contested races in Modoc are: Modoc County District Attorney, Municipal Court Judge, Treasurer/Tax Collector, County Supervisor of District 1 and Supervisor of District 5.

In one of the highly charged races, District Attorney Hugh Comisky is be ing challenged by Modoc Family Law Facilitator Thomas H. Buckwalter, a former District Attorney and Public Defender.

Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier is being opposed by lo cal attorney Barry Kinman. Dier is finish ing out an ap pointed first term and is seeking a full six-year term. The judge's race has drawn plenty of interest and sparked some political spar ring.

Four candidates are run ning for the po sition of Treasurer/Tax Collector: Bill Hamby, co-owner of The Toggery in Alturas; Jeri Standley, Assistant in the County Administrator's Office; Cheryl Knoch, an au di tor in the Auditor/Recorder's Office; and Manuela Davenport, California Pines Community Services District secretary. To win the seat in June, a sin gle candidate will have to have 50 percent plus 1 of the vote cast. If no one gains a majority, the top two will have a run-off in November.

District 5 Supervisor Nancy Huffman is also fac ing a challenge for re-elec tion from David Porter Misso, of Newell.

Terry Williams, a retired Post Master from Cedarville, is running against Modoc Realtor Sandra Stevenson for the District 1 Supervi sor seat of Surprise Valley. One of themwill replace Ben Zandstra, who is not seeking a second term.

Incumbents who are run ning un op posed are: Clerk Maxine Madison; Auditor/Recorder Judi Stevens; Assessor Josie Johnson; Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh; and Sheriff Bruce Mix.

County central committees are up for election this year as well and interested individu als must file with the County Clerk to get on the ballot. Geri Byrne has filed for election to the Republican Central Committee.

Polls will open at 7 a.m. June 2 and close at 8 p.m. The polling place is printed on the back label of the sample bal lots, which have been mailed.

In addition to the local elections, the primary in cludes the following races: Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Controller, State Treasurer, Attorney General, Insurance Commissioner, Board of Equalization, Untied States Senator, United States Representative, Member of the State Assembly; and Propositions 219 through 227.

Kinman succeeds in appeal

 

Alturas Attorney Barry Kinman, who is running against Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier in the June 2 election, has won his appeal on conviction of dis suading a witness.

Kinman told voters early in the election that if he lost the appeal, he would remove himself from the race.

"I began my campaign with a promise to the voters that I would immediately end my campaign if I did not prevail in my appeal re lating to criminal charges brought against me," said Kinman Tuesday. "I am proud to say I just re ceived the results and I won. I withstood nine separate crim inal charges. Each charge was without merit."

The appeal decision, re leased May 20, came from the State Appellate Court and voids the conviction of Kinman. The conviction came from an April, 1997 jury trial in Modoc Municipal Court surround ing a case filed by Modoc District Attorney Hugh Comisky alleging nine counts, including elder abuse, dissuading a wit ness, false imprisonment, as sault, and battery involv ing Kinman and Lookout residents Mona and Dewey Phillips.

The jury found Kinman not guilty of five of those charges, guilty on two elder abuse charges and the dis suad ing witness charges.

The elder abuse charges were later dismissed by the court after granting a mo tion for a new trial when the prosecution chose not to retry. That action left the dissuading a witness con victions in place. Kinman appealed that conviction.

Kinman has argued all along that he was the victim of bias prosecution by Comisky in the matter. Comisky denies any bias, but has been disqualified from the case. Judge Larry Dier did not hear the case; it was heard by a sitting judge, Stephen Bradbury.

"I put my money and my career on the line in maintain ing I did nothing legally, morally or ethi cally wrong," said Kinman. "There was never a doubt in my mind. In the end the only thing that was proven . . . was that I was the victim of a bi ased prosecution. I proved the district attorney's bias in court and it is on the record."

Comisky disagrees that any bias occurred and said the state could still choose to re-try the case. He said Kinman is still not off the hook, since the charges could be re-filed. Comisky may not be able to re-file the case since he has been dis qualified and it may have to be done by the Attorney General.

In the decision, the ap pellate court states the judge's in structions con cerning the dissuading a witness charges were in er ror.

"The instruction, com bined with the prosecutor's argu ment, permitted the jury to find the defendant guilty of vic tim or witness dissuasion for filing a civil action even though the jury may not have been persuaded that the defen dant acted maliciously," the opinion reads. "The jury was authorized under the instructions and (prosecution) argu ment to find the defendant guilty even if he acted in good faith, believing that Mrs. Phillips had made a false, unpriv ileged report to the Alturas police. That in struction and that argu ment were in error . . . the error was prejudicial, and the judgment must be re versed."

The dissuading charges came about after Mrs. Phillips filed a police report against Kinman accusing him of the va riety of charges listed above. Kinman then threatened to sue the Phillips unless they withdrew that police report. Kinman was acting as the Phillips' attorney at the time of the inci dent. He later filed a civil action against the Phillips, claim ing they had filed a false police report. His suit brought about the dissuad ing charge.

Medicine Lake geothermal project has several impacts

 

The Draft Environmental Impact Report for the Telephone Flat Geothermal Project, near Medicine Lake is now out for public re view and comment.

The Telephone Flat project is one of two current geothermal power plant proposals in the Medicine Lake area. The other project is the Fourmile Project, and a final environ mental statement is due on that project in July.

Both projects have spawned a great deal of public concern because the Medicine Lake area is a major recreation area and a spiri tual, cultural area for Native Americans. Other concerns are for the general environ ment of the area, including visual, water quality, forest and roadless area impacts.

The Telephone Flat project is one-and-a-half miles southeast of Medicine Lake and the Fourmile project is three miles northwest of the lake. Each plant would use geothermal steam to produce about 48 megawatts of elec tricity.

According to the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service, who are in a combined effort on the environmen tal documents, the public review period gives people a chance to review the document and tell the agencies if they have overlooked crit ical information in the environmental analysis or if there are other steps needed to improve the proposal.

There are currently four open houses scheduled to review the environmental doc uments and they are as follows: July 6, 4 to 8 p.m. at the Home Economics Building, Tulelake Fairgrounds; July 7, 4 to 8 p.m. at the Main Lodge, Mt. Shasta Park, in Mt. Shasta; July 8, 4 to 8 p.m. at Miners Inn in Yreka, at the Miner's Inn Convention Center; and July 9, 4 to 8 p.m. in the Art Building of the Intermountain Fairgrounds, McArthur.

In addition, copies of the DEIS/EIR are available a local public libraries and the Modoc National Forest Office in Alturas. Written comments should be sent to Randall Sharp, USFS/BLM Project Leader, Telephone Flat Geothermal Project, 800 West 12th Street, Alturas, Ca. 96101. Those comments must be received by July 22.

The DEIS/EIR identified the Agency Preferred Alternative and that alternative should be studied and commented on by the public. The proposed action addressed in the document is construction, operation and de commissioning of a 48-megawatt geothermal power plant with 10 to 12 production wells, three to five injection well pads, associated pipelines, access roads, and a 230 Kilovolt transmission line.

While several of the environmental and socioeconomic and cultural concerns could be mitigated, the DEIS/EIR concludes that impacts to Native American traditional uses cannot be mitigated to less than significant levels.

 

Area schools graduate the Classes of 1998

 

Area schools are preparing to graduate the Class of 1998 next week. Seniors are making final preparations and tak ing care of finals over the next few days.

Modoc High School will graduate 67 seniors June 4, 8 p.m. at the Griswold Gym.

Surprise Valley High School will graduate 17 seniors June 5, 8 p.m. in the high school gym.

Big Valley High School will graduate 22 seniors June 5, 8 p.m. in the Big Valley Gym.

Modoc Middle School will graduate its eighth grade class June 3, 7 p.m. in the Griswold Gym.

 

Too cool for the pool

 

Only polar bears would enjoy a dip in the Alturas Municipal Pool at the present time.

The cold weather has delayed the normal opening time for the pool from the Saturday after school is out until "the weather improves." The pool water temperature is still way too low and the solar heating system hasn't been able to warm it up much.

Eleanor Dorton returns as the manager of the pool with Amie Ambers as assistant manager.

The opening date and traditional free swim day will be announced as soon as possible.

 

Cattlemen's Field Day June 7

 

The Modoc County Cat tle men's Spring Field Day will be held on Sunday, June 7 at the Tulelake Butte Valley Fairgrounds. Start ing at 10 a.m. in the park ing lot of the Fairgrounds groups will leave to tour the Mint Industry from field production through the ac tual processing of mint for extract.

Sierra-Nevada Produc tion Credit Association will spon sor the social hour be ginning at noon, and a rib steak din ner will be served at 1 p.m. for the cost of $7 per person. Fol lowing dinner, the Modoc County CattleWomen will an nounce their 1998 scholar ship recipient.

Carl Borden, attorney with the California Farm Bureau Federation, will be the keynote speaker high lighting employer-laborer issues fac ing ranchers and farmers in California. Ed Hastey, State Director of the Bureau of Land Manage ment will discuss the affect on management of live stock on BLM permits of the recently released Range land Health Standards and Guide lines for California and northwestern Nevada. Brief reports will also be presented on what is hap pening on Capitol Hill and inside the California Cat tlemen's Asso ciation.

June

 
 
Record News for June 4, 1998

 

Buckwalter wins DA seat, Dier re-elected
May was wet, but not the wettest
Junior show celebrates 50 years
Forest has campgrounds open
CHP saves man from poisoning
Obituaries:
Flournoy
Friberg
Call
Joiner
Flynn

 

The forecast:

Partly cloudy skies are in deal for the next five days, with temperatures in the high 60s and low 70s. Look for afternoon thunderstorms.

 

Buckwalter wins DA race; Dier retains seat

Modoc County voters turned District Attorney/County Counsel Hugh Comisky, Jr. out of office Tuesday, electing Thomas Buckwalter with 58.6 percent of the vote.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, Buckwalter picked up 2,002 votes and Comisky received 1,404, a 598 vote difference. While Buckwalter wins the posi tion, he does not take office until January 1 for a four-year term. Comisky is finishing his first term as DA.

Buckwalter carried all five Supervisorial Districts and all precincts except South Fork (Likely), Adin and Little Hot Springs (Day). In District One, Buckwalter grabbed a 339-240 lead. District Two favored Buckwalter 462-268 and District Three voted Buckwalter 403-332. He took District Four by a 477-266 margin and District Five by a 321-298 split.

Modoc Municipal Court Judge Larry Dier survived a challenge from local attorney Barry Kinman. Dier won re-election to a six-year term with 2,411 votes compared to Kinman's 889 votes. Dier received 72.8 percent of the vote.

A run-off was just avoided in the Treasurer/Tax collector race where Cheryl Knoch won with 1,712 votes, four votes over a necessary majority. Bill Hamby had 815 votes for 23.8 percent and would be in the run-off in November. Jeri Standley received 623 votes and Manuela Davenport received 266.

In the race for Supervisor in District One, Surprise Valley, Terry Williams won the seat with 371 votes, 63.7 percent, to Sandra Stevenson's 208 votes, 35.7 percent. Williams will replace Ben Zandstra in January.

Incumbent District Five Supervisor Nancy Huffman narrowly beat challenger David Porter Misso for that super visor's seat. Huffman had 329 votes, for 53 percent and Misso had a strong showing the 290 votes, 46.7 percent.

The Surprise Valley Hospital District passed easily with 513 votes for and only 58 against. It needed a 66 2/3 percent majority to win and received 89.8 percent approval for self-imposed $150 annual tax.

In the often vocal race for California Pines Community Services District board, John Schneider won with 78 votes, over Robert LaGabed with 66 votes.

The voter turnout in Modoc was 60.4 percent as 3,597 out of 5,958 voters cast ballots. By Supervisor Districts, the turnout was as follows: District One, 57.9 percent; District Two, 45.7 percent; District Three, 51.7; District Four, 48 percent; District Five, 49.6 percent.

In the statewide races, Modoc agreed with state voters in picking Dan Lungren as the Republican nominee for Governor and Gray Davis as the Democratic nominee. Lungren had 1,397 votes and Davis had 1,017.

In the race for Lieutenant Governor, Modoc liked Tim Leslie on the Republican side with 1,776 and Cruz Bustamante on the Democratic side with 362.

Incumbent Barbara Boxer was picked as the democrat nominee for U.S. Senator with 893 votes. Republican Matt Fong picked up 795 and chief rival Darrell Issa had 544.

Wally Herger remains popular in Modoc with 2,314 votes for U.S. Representative. Roberts Braden, gets the Democratic nod with 707.

In the race for State Assembly in the 3rd District, Modoc liked Republican Sam Aanestad with 1,197 votes over David Reade with 1,064. Democrat Scott Gruendl had 887 votes.

The county liked incumbent Republican Secretary of State Bill Jones with 1,900 votes, and Democrat Michele Alioto with 786.

The county voted in the following manner on the Propositions: Prop. 219, Local ballot measures, yes, 1,819; no, 1,161; Prop. 220, Superior Municipal Courts, yes, 1,682; no, 1,338; Prop. 221, Subordinate Judicial Officers disci pline, yes, 2,282; no, 631; Prop. 222, Murder, peace officers, yes, 2,594; no, 537; Prop. 223, school administration spend ing, yes, 1,526; no, 1643; Prop. 224, state funded design,, yes, 1,454; no, 1,699; Prop. 225, limit Congressional terms, yes, 1,857; no, 1,314; Prop. 226, union political contributions, yes, 1,885; no, 1,393; Prop. 227, English only in schools, yes, 2,621; no, 746.

In the non-contested local races County Clerk Maxine Madison received 2,923 votes; County Assessor Josie Johnson received 2,893 votes, Sheriff Bruce Mix received 2,759 votes; Auditor Judi Stevens received 2,745; and Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh received 2,471.

 

May, '98 ends as second wettest on record book

 

While May, 1998 was wet, ugly and dreary, it wasn't as wet as it was in May 1949, when 4.88 inches of precipitation fell in Alturas.

It was close, however. For last month, 4.30 inches of rain was measured at the U.S. Forest Service weather station. That's more than any May since 1905, except 1949. The aver age for the month of May is 1.21 inches.

The May totals pushed the precipitation since January to 10.4 inches, nearing the season average of 12.5 inches for the area.

June showed up with a wonderful first day as tempera tures were in the high 70s and skies were blue with some puffy white clouds. The warm weather is supposed to stay through the weekend.

Velma McCrary of Canby, who mans the weather station, said she measured 5.66 inches in May and 16.14 inches since January.

Lois Bailey, who takes the weather readings at Parker Creek, said her figures show that May was 1.75 inches wetter than any time in the past 30 years. The May precipitation at her site was 6.46 inches.

 

Junior Show celebrates 50th year

 

The world has changed in many ways between 1949 and 1998. Then again, some things are still the same.

From the Truman Adminis tration to the Clinton Era, from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Florida Marlins, from Frank Sinatra and Charlie Parker to Puff Daddy and Marilyn Manson - there have always been a couple of con stants that could be counted on year after year. First, chil dren and teenagers love ani mals and can learn a great deal from raising them. Sec ond, once they have raised the animals, the kids can take them to the Junior Livestock Show and Sale sponsored by Alturas Rotary Club.

The Junior Livestock Show and Sale turns a fabulous 50 this year and doesn't look one day over the hill after all that time. This year's festivities begin Monday, June 8 and continue through the week until the barbecue, awards and sale on Friday, June 12.

This tradition started back on May 14, 1949, when 172 members of 4-H, Future Farmers of America (FFA) and Future Homemakers of America showed their entries at the old Rodeo Grounds in Alturas. The event was put on by Alturas Rotary and two barns were moved over from the Modoc Fairgrounds to house the various exhibits. Categories for entries in cluded: clothing, foods, food preservation, beef, horses, hogs, chickens, rabbits, farm shop and field crops.

Retired Farm Advisor Bob Savage ran the Show for 36 of the 50 years, from 1956 to 1991. He said he believes the Junior Livestock Show is the only one of its kind in California that is independent of other shows and also includes a sale. There are other show pro grams throughout the State, but they do not include a sale. There are other sales in Cali fornia, but they are usually connected to the County Fair system, unlike the program here in Modoc, which stands on its own.

Savage said there have been changes over the years in how the show has been or ganized.

"Back in 1956, whoever wanted to meet and help set the date and organize it, just met," Savage said.

That system changed in 1959, when the Show orga nized its first governing board consisting of Kent Larsen, Ray Callaham, Hippy Burmister, Tag How land and Pete McGarva.

Two years later, in 1961, Savage moved to have the kids take more of a role in orga nizing and running the Show. An Advisory Commit tee was formed that year which consisted of one mem ber from each local 4-H club and FFA chapter.

"I had always wanted to get the kids involved," Savage said. "After all, it's their Show."

That initial 1961 Advisory Committee has blossomed into the Junior Show Board, begun in 1967, which is now respon sible for the entire organiza tion and execution of the Ju nior Livestock Show. This year there are 25 members of the Board who serve on com mittees covering everything from keeping track of awards to cleaning restrooms. For 1998, Laurie Nelson is presi dent of the Board, while Ray Anklin serves as vice-presi dent and Stacey Cook serves as secretary/treasurer. The Board has been meeting regu larly since December to pre pare for the Show.

The year 1961 also marked a major turning point in the history of the show in that the location was moved from the old Rodeo Grounds (which Savage termed "pretty rus tic") to the current location at the John Cummings memo rial Livestock Grounds, Al turas. From that point on, the facilities have gradually been built up and added to over the years. Savage credits Bob Howard with spearheading construction in 1979 and mov ing on from there. The facili ties now ensure that the Show can go on regardless of the rain or heat which may be present at this time of year in Alturas.

"We used to be right out in the open," Savage noted of the early years. "There were several years where we had to postpone the Show or move it to the Auction Yard."

Another change Savage has seen over the years has been the quality of the ani mals being shown. Thanks to advances in genetics and nutrition, there's a lot more muscle than fat on the ani mals of today. A winning an imal from the 60's, "wouldn't have a chance today," accord ing to Savage.

Despite all of the changes in the Show, what kids get out of the experience of raising an animal has stayed the same. Valerie Coe, Farm Advisor for the past six years, stated, "It enables the kids to get a sense of responsibility when they are caring for another living thing."

She also pointed out that kids learn about money, lead ership and teamwork through the process of preparing an animal for the Show. All in all, Coe said she feels the pro gram teaches valuable lessons that are applicable in many areas of life.

"We're very fortunate here in Modoc County that so many parents want to spend time with their kids on programs like this to teach them val ues," she said. "Parents here want to teach their kids to be decent people."

Of course, both Savage and Coe point out that the Show and Sale couldn't have survived this long without the support of the Alturas Rotary and the in dividuals and businesses that buy the animals at the Sale.

"We're very fortunate that in a small community we have such strong support from the business community and individuals in the commu nity," Coe said.

"We don't have large cor poration around here, it's the families who support it," Sav age said of the Show. "If it wasn't for the individual sup port and local businesses we have here, it wouldn't make it."

Next week, over 100 4-H and FFA members will get the chance to show how they've done in four different areas -- horses, beef and swine, rab bits and sheep.

It all starts on Monday, June 8 with the horse show. Performance classes will be held in the morning, followed by gymkhana in the after noon. On Tuesday, over 100 rabbits will be shown at the rabbit market, breeding and showmanship classes.

All market animals will be weighed in on Wednesday. On Thursday and Friday, the market, breeding and show manship classes will be held for beef, sheep and swine.

It all ends on Friday, June 12 with a barbecue at 3:30 sponsored by Alturas Rotary, followed by the awards at 4:30 and the Sale at 5:30.

 

Forest has most campgrounds open

 

The Modoc National Forest offers a wide variety of camp grounds and picnic areas. Visitors looking for a pleas ant camping experience can find most campgrounds open at lower elevations. Camp grounds located at higher ele vations are still closed due to snow. Call your local Forest Service Office for current in formation.

Campgrounds open: Blue Lake, Cedar Pass, Cottonwood Flat, Howard's Gulch, Lower Rush Creek, Mill Creek Falls, Plum Valley, Stowe Reservoir, Willow Creek, Most reservoirs on the Devil's Garden area.

Campgrounds closed: Soup Springs, Patterson, Cave Lake, Pepperdine, Upper Rush Creek, Medicine Lake Camp grounds.

Medicine Lake Camp grounds -- A.H. Hogue, Headquarters, Hemlock, Medicine -- remain closed due to approximately five feet of snow. The Forest Service expects these campground will open near the July 4 weekend. Telephone the Dou blehead Ranger District office for current conditions, (530) 667-2248.

Foot high snow drifts keep cave Lake Campground and Lily Lake Picnic Area closed. Emerson Campground may be accessible by this weekend if we receive drying weather conditions. Telephone the Warner Mountain Ranger District office for current conditions, (530) 279-6116.

Use caution when travel ing forest roads as winter conditions still exist.

 

CHP saves man from poi soning

 

A Lakeport, Ca. man is fortunate a California Highway Patrol Officer stopped to check on him May 31, 8:30 a.m. as he was parked in a turnout on Sugar Hill.

Officer Mark Moriarity found Robert Clark, 57, in his parked 1976 Toyota. Clark was unresponsive and there was uncharacteristic conden sation in the vehicle. The of ficer opened the rig and de termined Clark was suffer ing from carbon monoxide poisoning. He was uncon scious, was removed from the vehicle and emergency aid was rendered. The Lakeview ambulance responded to the scene and Clark regained consciousness prior to their arrival. He was transported to the Lakeview hospital.

There were no injuries in a solo accident May 31, 8:15 a.m. on County Road One. The CHP reports that Freedonna H. DeGarmo, 49, of Cedarville, was driving a 1995 Oldsmobile northbound on CR 1 at about 55 m.p.h. when she fell asleep at the wheel. The car crossed over the southbound lane, left the west edge of the road and the left front wheel struck a pile of rocks causing moderate damage.

 

Obituaries

 

Harry Orlando Flournoy

 

A true Modoc'er and Mod oc's own "Mr. Announcer," Harry Orlando Flournoy, also known as "Hi" died May 29, 1998 at Redding Medical Center, Redding, Calif. His husky voice be came familiar to folks as he was the voice behind the mi crophone for well over 35 years at Fandango Parades, rodeos, county fair events and community gatherings. He volunteered his time for his community and "did it for the kids." He was 82 at the time of his passing.

Born to Arthur and Lutie Flournoy on Nov. 15, 1915, he was the seventh child in a family of 10 children born on the Likely home ranch. Although the family called Likely their home, by the time Harry started school, his father had purchased a house in Alturas so that his children could attend high school. In the summers, the family returned to the ranch. Harry was a standout in both basketball and base ball and was a member of the Alturas Tigers baseball team at the age of 16 and was still playing when the Tigers disbanded nearly 30 years later.

When he graduated from high school, his father as signed him manager of the Jess Valley ranch. Harry married Alice Twyman on September 19, 1938 in Reno, Nev. and the two were able to share nearly 60 years of marriage. His biggest plea sure in life was his family.

When an uncle Eldon Flournoy put the Likely store up for sale in 1939, harry and Alice took it over and moved to Likely where they raised four daughters.

In 1972 he was elected to serve as a Modoc County Su pervisor for the Third Dis trict. Involved in many community organizations, Harry was always a famil iar figure behind a barbecue pit or serving table at public events. He was a past-presi dent of the Alturas Rotary Club and past-captain for the Modoc Sheriff's Posse, past director and for many years a rider and cook on the Modoc Tribe Ride. He was a member of the Ranchero Vistadores Trail Ride in Southern California and Federated Church. He was a charter member of the Likely Fire Department and Likely Roping Club, a board member for the Surprise Valley Electrification Corp. and a Modoc Union High School Board member. He was the recipient of many honors including life mem bership with the Future Farmers of America, and PTA; the Blue Ribbon award from the Western Fairs As sociation, was honored as a Modoc Senior Citizen of the Year and Grand Marshal of Fandango Days. He was also a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow.

He was often in atten dance at the local sporting events whether it be a girls or boys game. Harry was known for his kind deeds whether it was for a friend, family or total stranger. He was a well thought of person with friends in all direc tions.

His many loves included music, fishing, hunting, playing horseshoes, garden ing and volunteering his time to community events. He was never without a dog - he was a master at develop ing a mutual respect with his pet.

Mr. Flournoy is survived by his wife Alice of Alturas; daughters and sons-in-law Sharon and Ed Berryessa, Cedarville; Lynne and Peter Gerig, Bieber; Rebecca and Bob Franzoia, Sacramento; Sally and Tom Costello, Rocklin; brothers Don, Rob and Warren Flournoy of Likely; sisters Hazel Dor ris, Woodland and Mabel Mitchell, Woodland Hills; grandchildren Renelle Bengle, Mt. View; Lori Salters, Gazelle; Alan Berryessa, Cedarville; Bryan Gerig, Bieber; LeeAnn Widener, San Diego; Kate, Kelli and Ali son Costello, Rocklin; Jil lian Franzoia, Sacramento; 10 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers Kenneth and John Flournoy, sisters Georgie Flournoy and Helen Auble and grandson Curtis Gerig.

A celebration of his life was held on Wednesday, June 3 at the Federated Church in Alturas. The Rev. Ben Zandstra presided over the 1:00 p.m. service. A fel lowship luncheon followed in the church social hall.

Memorial donations may be directed to the Federated Church, Harry Flournoy Memorial Fund or to the Al turas Rotary, Harry Flournoy Special Youth Pro ject Fund.

 

 

Vivian Lucille Friberg

 

Vivian Lucille Friberg died on May 25, 1998 at Saint Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, Nevada. Born and raised in Ogden, Utah, she moved to Sparks, Nevada shortly after high school graduation where she married Morris Richard Friberg.

The couple had five children prior to moving to Alturas in 1957. Morris was the Road Foreman of Engines with the Southern Pacific Railroad and Vivian worked as a home maker and also the desk clerk at the Niles Hotel for several years. Following Morris' death in 1983, Vivian moved back to Sparks.

Survivors include son Edward and grandsons Eric and Mark of Reno; son Richard and wife Ann and grandson Kenneth of Gordonsville, Virginia; son David and wife Et tie and grandson Morgan of San Diego; granddaughter Larkin and husband Ernie Holavarri of Corvallis, Ore. and grandson Dean of Albuquerque, N.M.; son Ronald, wife Roberta, grandson Derryl and granddaughter Natalie of Tucson, Ariz. and daughter Maureen and husband Lloyd Hopkins of Reno. She is also survived by two sisters, Bettie Cramer of Maryland and Delores Badger of Utah.

 

 

Clara Joy Call

 

Life was cut short for Clara Joy Call due to complications following heart surgery. Mrs. Call, a Lake City resident for many years, died at Redding Medical Center in Redding. Calif. on May 30, 1998. She was 56.

Born Clara 'Joy' Mix to Charles and Grace Mix on February 27, 1942, in Al turas, Calif., she was reared in Surprise Valley and graduated with the Class of 1959 from Surprise Valley High School, Cedarville. She attended the Portland School of Nursing in Portland, Ore. where she received her Li censed Vocational Nursing degree.

On October 10, 1974, Clara and Fred Call were married in Reno, Nev. They were able to share 33 years of marriage until her passing. Mrs. Call worked as a homemaker and had made Modoc her home for 52 years.

She is survived by her husband Fred Call of Lake City; brothers Dennis Mix of Sedalia, Mo.; Bruce Mix of Alturas; Robert Mix of Yakima, Wash.; and sister Lori McKinnis of Walla Walla, Wash.

She was preceded in death by her parents and her brother David.

Pastor Klatt conducted services at the Lake City Church at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 3. Interment was at the Lake City Cemetery

 

Albert Willis Joiner

 

Albert Willis Joiner, age 89, passed away in Fall River Mills, Calif. on June 1, 1998. Friends are invited to attend a graveside service at the Lookout Community Cemetery to day, June 4 at 11:00 a.m.

Albert was born in Pittville, Calif. on Septem ber 5, 1908 and spent his early years in Fall River Valley. At the age of five years his father and mother, Willis Charles Joiner and Lydia Naomi Joiner pur chased a ranch along the Pit River north of Lookout, Calif. An early and cher ished childhood memory was riding his little Indian pony and helping drive their herd of dairy cows across Big Valley Mountain to the "new" ranch north of Look out.

Albert's mother was an elementary school teacher and he accompanied her and attended various elementary schools around the Big Val ley area.

After graduating from Adin High School, Albert attended Oakland Polytechnic School.

In 1934, Albert married Lillian Steiger, and the two of them spent the next 40 years building, through acquisition of surrounding properties, a model and prosperous ranching operation. The ranch was sold in 1969 and Albert and Lil lian spent the next 25 years traveling to every state in the union including Alaska and Hawaii, and Mexico. They drove the Baja trail before a road existed, played in the Pa cific, Atlantic, and Sea of Cortez, and most major lakes and rivers in between. Besides his wife and family, Mr. Join er's great love was travel and people. He never tired of see ing new places, trying new things, and meeting new people- he never met a stranger.

Mr. Joiner is survived by his loving wife of 64 years, Lil lian Joiner of Lookout; his sister Rose Seiber of Eureka; his children Bill Joiner and wife Barbara of Lookout; Peggy Crum and husband Ted of Little Valley; John Joiner and wife Penny of Eureka. He is also survived by his grand children Dixie and Jim Howard, Craig and Anna Joiner, Jennie Joiner, Greg and Cindy Crum, Duane and Sandra Crum, Joni and Rudy Bautista, Jason Joiner, and eight great-grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of choice.

Sheila Euphemia Flynn

 

Canby resident and past Canby postmaster Sheila Eu phemia Flynn, passed away at her home in Canby, Calif. on May 27, 1998.

Mrs. Flynn had turned 70 on May 3, having been born in 1928 as Euphemia Bath gate to James and Dolly Bathgate in Edinborough, Scotland. She maintained contact with her relatives in Scotland and was able to make frequent visits to Scot land over the years as her health allowed.

She completed high school in Edinborough and met Ev erett Flynn during World War II in Edinborough while she worked with the American Red Cross in Ed inborough.

In August of 1946, at the age of 18, she immigrated to the United States and became a dual citizen of the U.S. and Great Britain. On August 31, 1946, she married Everett Oral Flynn in Burney, Calif. The Flynn family moved to Canby, Calif. from Burney, Calif. in 1952.

Over the years, Mrs. Flynn dedicated her life to serving the Canby commu nity. She was a member of the Arlington School Board of Trustees during the 1950s until the school districts uni fied, was a Parent Teacher Association [P.T.A.] mem ber, assisted with school out ings and projects, was a Cub Scout leader and den mother, helped with commu nity barbecues and the bag ging of fruit for the school Christmas program.

She was respected for her honesty. She worked for Sur prise Valley Electric as a meter reader, but her posi tion at the Canby Post Office was the one she called her career. She was employed for 29 years by the postal ser vice at Canby and for two and a half years of those years, served as Canby's Postmaster, retiring in 1990. She saw to it that the children of the community received a birthday card each year from the "Post Mistress."

She spent many hours knitting and crocheting items for her family, from doll wardrobes to sweaters and afghans. She also made many bed dolls with full cro cheted skirts for the newest members of her community. Her favorite pastime was a good game of pinochle, preferably 'cut throat' or a game of cribbage. For many years she was one of the group who played pinochle at the Canby Hotel during the winter months. She also en joyed camping and liked activities that made a person think.

Family members recall her saying, "if you don't use your mind, you'll lose it - so either use it or lose it."

One of the other joys in her life was reading and writing poetry. Her favorite was one by Robert Burns en titled "My Heart's in the Highlands.," a few lines of which follow: "My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here; My heart's in the Highlands, a chasing the deer; A-chasing the wild deer, and following the roe, My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go. Farewell to the Highlands, farewell to the North, the birthplace of valor, the country of worth; Wherever I wander, wher ever I rove, the hills of the Highlands for ever I love..."

A Committal service was held at graveside on May 29 at the Alturas Cemetery, Al turas, Calif.

Mrs. Flynn is survived by Everett, her husband of 51 years; son Melvin Flynn and wife Roxana of Canby; daughter Trish Flynn of Cal Pines; six of her seven brothers who all live in Scot land, Peter, James, Alex, Malcolm, Duncan and Paul Bathgate; mother Dolly Bathgate of Scotland; five grandchildren Rhonda Nel son of Magalia; Laura Gal legos of Burney; Desiree Flynn, Canby; Connie Dix son, Susanville; Melody Jones, Alturas and four great-grandchildren: Travis and Courtney Galle gos, Amanda Davis and Elizabeth Knigge; mother-in-law Edith Flynn of Cot tonwood; brothers-in-law Arnold of Sparks, Nev. and Don Flynn of Cottonwood.

She was preceded in death by her father James and brother John.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Ameri can Lung Association.

Record news summaries for June 11, 1998

Local growers hoping for sunshine
CHP stop results in major bust
MPAT puts on "An Evening with Moliere"
Judge seeks Grand Jury members
CalFed water program is explained
Guardrails needed on Cedar Pass?
Obit: Dr. Fay Repath

The forecast: Look for scattered showers today and thunderstorms on Friday. Fair weather for the weekend is possible, so is a chance of winning the lottery.

 

Local growers hoping for days of sun shine

 

Growers in all parts of Modoc County are hoping for a break in the weather, and soon. Sunshine is sorely needed and in some cases could mean the difference between high prices or bust.

According to Modoc County Farm Advisor Don Lancaster, alfalfa growers are hoping to get a first cutting in very soon. In order to do that, they need four to 10 days of sunshine to cure the hay. The worry, said Lancaster, is cut ting the hay and having it rained on while it's down. The rain would lower the overall quality of the product.

On a positive note for local growers, said Lancaster, is that hay crops in the Central Valley have been of poor quality because of rains, so if local growers can get a quality crop, the demand and price will be high.

Lancaster said hay brokers, especially in the dairy in dustry, are already offering top dollar for the hay. Growers just need the time and dry weather to take advantage of the op portunity.

The alfalfa got a slow start because of the lack of sunshine and Lancaster said many growers are nearing a point where they're go ing to have to cut the first crop in order in sure a good second crop. If it keeps raining, that first crop quality may have to be sacrificed in hopes for a better second cutting.

In addition, he said, alfalfa weevils are starting to be a problem and a cutting, then some sunshine would help with that situa tion.

Another good thing for growers is their ir rigation costs have been minimal for the first month and a half of the sea son. That's not good news for Surprise Valley Electric, how ever.

According to SVEC Manager Dan Silveria, the first irri gation bills covering April 20 through May 20 showed a 64 percent decrease. With the second month billing nearing its end, Silveria doesn't expect the numbers to improve much. Continued rain, however, will also erase any good impacts to growers.

"The good side for farmers is their costs are down, but then so is our revenue," said Silveria. "We don't expect to re cover that. We figure our season is six months long and if it warms up we're hoping to cut our losses to about 20 percent by the end."

Silveria said SVEC has a good reserve and will handle the situation in good shape, with out any rate adjustments necessary.

Lancaster said the wet spring has hurt most all farmers in the area, with the only real benefit to rangeland, which has pros pered.

Tulelake potato growers, for instance, generally plant by May, but many have not gotten the seed potatoes in the ground. And those growers are running out of time.

Most of the fields were planted late, said Tulelake Area Farm Advisor Harry Carlson. Farmers who haven't planted yet are rapidly approaching the point where they will have to abandon the fields. Their other options would be to plant cover crops like winter peas, cereal crops or others.

Carlson said the ground is just too muddy to work or it was muddy when it was worked.

Most of potato crop was planted two to four weeks late.

Carlson said the muddy conditions in creases risk for soil diseases. He said they can expect poor stands and can expect some seed rot.

"The bottom line is yields will be reduced and prices have not been that good for pota toes," said Carlson. "In some cases it'll al most cost more to grow than they'll get back."

Just about everything is late, said Carlson, and losing a month in an already short growing season will reflect in reduced yields for most crops.

"It's hard to find someone who hasn't been affected by this rain," he said.

 

CHP stop re sults in major pot bust

 

California Highway Patrol Officer Mike Nardoni stopped a car east of Adin June 5 for a seat belt violation and ended up with a major marijuana seizure.

According to the CHP and the Modoc Drug Task Force, Nardoni stopped a 1998 Lincoln Towncar driven by Jerome S. Berkeley, 33, of Cleveland, Ohio. Nardoni smelled the odor of marijuana and the driver consented to a search of the car.

Nardoni discovered the driver was transporting a large amount of marijuana in the trunk of the car and contacted the Drug Task force who responded to the scene. They found several large duffel bags containing about 150 pounds of pro cessed and packaged marijuana.

According to the Task Force, the approx imate street value of the marijuana was $765,000. Berkeley was arrested and booked into the Modoc County Jail.

On June 4, Task Force agents arrested Rebecca Lynn King on charges of furnish ing a minor with marijuana, transporta tion of marijuana, resisting arrests, pos session of a sawed-off shotgun, felon in possession of firearms and possession of stolen property.

On June 6, Dennis M. King was also arrested for felon in possession of sawed-off shotguns, possession of firearms by convicted felons, possession of stolen prop erty and felon in possession of ammuni tion.

Both Rebecca and Dennis King reside in Modoc Recreational Estates. Both are subjects of a felony probation out of Del Norte County. The Del Norte County Probation Office has placed holds on both suspects.

 

'An Evening with Moliere' opens tonight at Niles

King Louis the 14th cor dially invites the good towns people of Alturas to attend a royal entertainment. The court's playwright, Moliere, has written two humorous comedies, which are sure to delight the audience.

This royal entertainment, "An Evening with Moliere," opens tonight, June 11, at 8 p.m. and runs through the weekend, at the ACT Niles Theater. The ex citement takes place at the king's court and Sandy Boldon directs the two comedies.

The first play, "The Flying Doctor," features towns people well known to Alturas audi ences. Craig Flournoy dis plays his comic gift in his role as Sganarelle, a simple valet. First he impersonates a doc tor, and then he por trays both the doctor and the doctor's twin brother at once.

Nancy North-Gates shows off two skills: her acting ability and her skill at cos tume design. She designed the wonderful outfits on stage. And in her role as Sabine, Lu cile's cousin, she is funny and expressive.

Dee Green portrays the dim-witted Gorgibus, Lucile's father. His amusing charac ter is a great contrast to that of his level headed sister, Gabrielle, played by Grace Har ris.

Gerry Gates plays Lucile's worried lover, Valere. He is earnest yet deceitful as he contrives to elope with Lucile, portrayed by Jodee Roberts.

Edith Asrow, Valerie Ross and Janie Erkiaga are de lightfully unprofessional as three doctors called in to di agnosis Lucile's illness. And Larry Shippen pops into the play as a bombastic lawyer.

The second play, "The Pre cious Maidens," features truly over-the-top characters. Silly girls, fops dressed in pastel coats, and humiliation royal are all part of the ac tion.

Jennifer Welty and Katharine Richert play Cathos and Magdelon, two girls who have been subsist ing on a ro mance book diet. Their performances are funny and de cidedly silly.

Geoff Griffin plays the Marquis de Mascarille. Even apart from his appearance in a wig, plumed hat, and pas tel coat, his performance is hi larious. He's a fop with a truly poetic soul.

Dee Green portrays the other fop, the Vicomte De Jodelet. His strutting is also really funny, especially when he tries to ingratiate himself to Cathos.

Gerry Gates and Larry Shippen play two suitors, scorned by the girls because they weren't frilly enough. Their characters are a won derful contrast to the two fops.

Ben Casad plays Henri, Magdelon's father. He is very convincing as a man who just doesn't understand what the two girls are talking about.

April Dorton plays Marotte and Marya Gates plays An gelique, the servants of Hen ri's house. They provide nice scenes of humor as they laugh behind the backs of the two girls.

Craig Flournoy and Larry Shippen are two sedan porters who have a memorable scene with the Mascarille. And Barbara Green provides live music as the violinist called to the house. In between the two plays, there will be danc ing to a minuet played by Carol Richert and Barbara Green.

Lesley Chace produces the per formance and Karen Hays is the assistant director.

"An Evening with Moliere" runs June 11-13 at 8:00 p.m. and June 14 at 2 p.m. at the ACT Nile's The ater in Alturas. The show runs June 20 at 7:30 p.m. and June 21 at 2 p.m. at the Coun try Hearth in Cedarville. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students and seniors.

 

Judge Baker seeks Grand Jury members

 

Modoc County Superior Court Judge John Baker is looking for a few good men and women to serve on the 1998-99 Grand Jury.

Baker said he normally appoints the Grand Jury members off the voter regis tration list, but would like to change the process this year by asking for applicants.

"We're looking for inter ested people with ability, who do not have an agenda, with diversity in geographic, eth nic, gender and age areas," said Baker.

Potential grand jury mem bers should call the court at 233-6222 to make application. Grand jury members serve for one year, and Baker likes to hold over those interested in serving a second year because of experience.

Anyone interested should call the courts and make appli cation prior to July 1. The Grand Jury will be appointed after July 1. Baker is holding six current grand jury mem bers over for another year and has openings for 13 more peo ple.

"I'd also like to publicly thank 1997-98 Grand Jury Foreman Jimmie Ferguson and all members of the 1997-98 Grand Jury for doing an excellent job," said Baker.

 

 

CalFed water issues key topic for Davis Creek program

 

Will future California water uses affect Modoc community water rights? That's the topic for water politics' expert Dennis O'Con nor when he addresses the subject of the "CalFed Bay Delta Program- Facts and Fic tions," on Friday, June 19 at 6:30 p.m. in the Davis Creek Grange Hall in Davis Creek.

The public is invited to hear the program sponsored by the Modoc County Library. The program is funded by the state library's "University in the Library Grant," which makes available programs of importance to and custom-tailored to a community's inter est and information needs. Experts from the University of California speak to local issues and interests.

The Davis Creek community quickly ac cepted the idea for the water issue, back in April, when the community gathered to select a topic. The water issue topic was proposed by County Supervisor Joe Colt, who lives in Davis Creek.

The guest speaker will talk about the CalFed Bay-Delta Program. There are con cerns that water from far Northern Califor nia may be diverted to the region east of San Francisco.

O'Connor directs the California Research Bureau's environment, and natural re source branch which provides non-partisan policy research for the legislature, gover nor's office and cabinet secretaries. He has also been a member of the State Library staff for five years. His expertise is mostly in state water and transportation issues. He has written several reports on the financing of state water projects.

"It should be a really interesting program and one close to the hearts of many Mod ocers," shared Godelieve Uyttenhove, Modoc County Librarian.

A question and answer session is planned after O'Connor's talk.

The county's Davis Creek Branch Library was awarded the funding to make the pro gram possible.

The program is open to anyone interested in attending and learning more.

 

Group out to put guardrails on pass

 

A group led by Donna Sheehan of Cedarville is out to place guardrails on the steep side of Cedar Pass's Highway 299.

Sheehan has drafted and sent a letter to Russ Wenham, the Caltrans District Director in Redding detailing the re quests. She also sent petitions containing 297 names.

She contends that Cedar Pass has a history of injury acci dents, especially during the winter, and many go un reported because of "the self sufficiency" of the population.

"Your (Caltrans) accident and fatality data and the CHP (highway patrol) data are not the same but in general since 1995 (CHP), there have been 17 reported accidents with seven injuries and two fatalities, all between mile markers 52 and 54, south of the summit," wrote Sheehan. "This does not dis count all the current unre ported accidents or all the in juries and fatalities of the past."

Sheehan, representing "Citizens for Safety" is re questing several things from Caltrans including the in stallation of one mile of guardrail on the south side of the Cedarville grade, Additionally, Caltrans is re quested to purchase, rent or lease a snow blower to ease the snow removal problems.

"The speed limit on the six percent grade is 65 m.p.h. and we request it be reduced to 55 m.p.h.," said Sheehan. "There are two areas near the bottom off the east side where the sun never hits and there fore black ice from all winter. Those two accident-probe ar eas are known by locals but not by tourists. Consider sig nage at those areas."

The group is also asking that an emergency telephone be placed at the summit to call in road conditions or emer gen cies.

"After doing public survey, there seems to be an agree ment that guardrails for at least stop a vehicle from going over the cliff," said Sheehan.

Sheehan said the public survey pointed to Fandango Pass (north of Cedar pass in the Warners) a less traveled, gravel road has more guardrails than Cedar pass. It gets no traffic at times during the winter.

 

Obituaries

 

Fay A. Repath, M.D.

 

Dr. Fay A. Repath, a physician at Surprise Valley Com munity Hospital for several years, died June 6, 1998 at UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif. Dr. Repath had made Lake City her home from 1986 until October of 1997. She was born in Franklinton, Louisiana on December 2, 1943. She was 54 at the time of her passing. Services are pending. A complete obituary will be printed as it becomes available to the Record.

Record news summaries for June 18, 1998

County toughens stand on junk, cars
Water issues subject of Friday meet
MHS Ag department says school deaf
Five arrested in stabbing at motel
Duck ticket sales nearing end
Obituaries:
Minto
Repath

Junk cars no longer tol erated

 

"Get that clunker outta here!" That was the message sent by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tues day when they passed a new junk and trash ordinance.

The ordinance passed by a vote of 4-1 with Supervisor Pat Cantrall dissenting.

Under the new law, wrecked or junked cars may not be on private or commer cial property for more than 72 hours un less the property is licensed as a junk yard or auto wrecking yard. Two cars may be stored on a prop erty if they are in a garage or have a fence built around them which hides them from view. The ordinance will apply only to properties that are in towns and will not be applied to ranches or farms where agricultural equip ment is being stored.

Planning Director Scott Kessler will be in charge of en forcing the ordinance and he said he prefers to help peo ple find ways to move or dis pose of the cars rather than using the heavy hand of the law.

"What we're after is com pliance, not to beat up on peo ple," Kessler told the board. "You try to be solution ori ented even if you are in an enforcement situation."

Kessler said that he would act mostly on complaints from neighbors and would give the responsible parties 30 days to move the cars. He also pointed out that the county would help find ways to dispose of the cars, such as offering free dump trips. Kessler said that if the prob lem was cleared up before he prosecution date, District Attorney Hugh Comisky had agreed he would drop the charges.

Violation of the ordinance will carry a criminal penalty, a misdemeanor that will result in a fine but no jail time. Two board mem bers, Nancy Huffman and Cantrall, ex pressed concern over the criminal enforce ment of the ordi nance. Huffman asked that at the next meeting, the board look at having a civil rather than criminal enforcement.

Cantrall said she felt it was unreasonable to have the county give a person a crim inal record just for having a car in their yard that didn't run that they were planning to fix. She pointed out that this is a far different situa tion from someone who robs a bank, yet both situations would result in the person having a criminal record. Cantrall also said she ob jected to the ordinance be cause people don't know about it and will be caught unaware.

Other board members disagreed with her and pointed out that the ordi nance was intended to focus on people who have had 32 cars on their property for five years rather than some one who stores one car for a cou ple of months.

"This isn't running roughshod," Supervisor Ben Zand stra said. "These are minimal standards. These are not unreasonable."

Board Chairman Joe Holt said he hears a "constant com plaint" from citizens who have invested in prop erty and taken care of it, "and it breaks your heart to see somebody next to you or down the street is running a junk yard."

Other matters before the Board of Supervisors Tues day included:

Modoc Medical Center: Theresa Jacques reported to the board that the center sus tained a loss of $49,508 in March and had a gain of $1,191 in April. From the date the county bought the facility there is a nega tive balance of $3,366.711. The pro jected number of full-time employees for May was down to 112.

Center Administrator Woody Laughman told the board that he had put the contracts for emergency room physicians out to bid. He said he will recommend to the center Board of Trustees that they accept the bid of a new group that would re place the existing group of emergency room physi cians.

Land Use: The board voted to send a letter to the Regional Forester in Sacramento at the recom mendation of Sean Curtis of the Land Use Committee. The letter objects to Modoc County being included in the Forest Service Sierra-Nevada Conservation Framework.

Curtis explained that he thought Modoc was only be ing in cluded in the Sierra-Nevada section "so there is n't a gap in the corner of the state." Other areas all around Modoc are included in other conservation framework sections and Modoc simply may have been put in the Sierra-Nevada sec tion because there was nowhere else to put it.

Having Modoc forests under the same rules as those in the Sierra-Nevada is a bad idea, according to Curtis, because the two areas are very different.

The letter to the Regional Forester, signed by Chair man Colt, states, "By no sci entific measure does the landscape of the MNF (Modoc National Forest) fall under even a broad defini tion of the ecosystem of the Sierra Nevada; your own maps and those of the Biodi versity Council identify this area as a separate and dis tinct bioregion. Its unique cli mate, vegetation, soils and geology correctly place it as part of the Modoc Plateau."

The letter further states, "The MNF staff needs relief from the regionally devel oped one-size-fits-all direc tives it is already laboring under, not additional ones."

Elk Study Grant: The county budget will be modified to include a $10,000 grant to conduct a study on elk in Modoc County. The money is being provided by the Forest Service, the Bu reau of Land Management and the California Depart ment of Fish and Game. The study has been approved by the local Elk Working Group and the grant will be adminis tered through the Farm Advisory Office.

 

South's grab of north's water remains hot issue

 

The Bay Area Delta is an environmental mess, by most standards, and the solution to fixing that area's problems means sending it more water. Much of that water comes from the north state.

The CalFed (California Federal) water project has been in the works since the early 90's and in March released its Environmental Impact Report/Statement citing three alter natives to repair the delta.

While the Delta is half-a-state away from Modoc, the plans to fix the area will have a direct impact on Modoc County and its water.

To that end, a lecture and open forum on the CalFed Bay Delta water project is scheduled for the Davis Creek Grange Hall June 19, 6:30 p.m. The event is sponsored by the Davis Creek/Modoc Library and funded through a federal grant administered by the state library.

The featured speaker on the topic is Dennis O'Conner, Assistant Director of the State Library Research Bureau.

O'Conner has a good background and experience in California water politics as well as an unbiased stand on the subject.

"We wanted an unbiased speaker because the CalFed Bay Delta project is a controversial issue," said Modoc Librarian Godelieve Uyttenhove. "Many people in the northern part of the state are concerned about the possible diversion of water toward the south. The Modoc County Board of Supervisors sent a representative to the May 14 meeting in Redding in order to have Modoc's concerns voiced along with everyone else's. The public input has been extended until July 1."

The meeting in Redding was a public session to take comment on the CalFed report and alternatives and pro vided a stage where many north state views were expressed. Few of those views liked the idea of sending water south without compensation or without ensuring that enough water remained for use in the north. More storage in the north is one thing being considered along with new canals to move more water south.

O'Conner's presentation is planned to give local resi dents an opportunity to have the Bay Delta water project ex plained and to consider the three alternatives proposed by CalFed.

"Whether you are a rancher, a fisherman, a recreational user of the outdoors, a real estate developer, county planner or politician, you all have something at stake," said Uyttenhove. "Don't miss this opportunity to become informed without having to drive 200 miles or read 500 pages of re port."

 

MHS Ag program asks for more help

 

 

The Modoc High Agricul tural Program took center stage at the beginning of Tuesday night's meeting of the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees.

At issue is the course of ferings for next year in the Agricultural Department at MHS. Ag teacher Mike Kraft has a schedule where he teaches five classes per day, has one prep period and has a period that he devotes to spe cial projects and competi tions for FFA and individ ual projects that students are working on.

For next year, Kraft has a total of 17 students in Ag Me chanics classes that are taught over two periods, 14 students in Ag III-IV, and 19 students in Ag II. That leaves one class period for teaching Ag I where there are 33 students signed up.

Possible solutions include leaving things as they are with 33 students in one class; splitting the class into two classes, taking away Kraft's special projects period and giving the special projects money back to the Ag pro gram; or hiring someone through Lassen College to come in and teach one period per day. This last option may not work out if a quali fied instructor cannot be found.

Various parents and stu dents came to Tuesday's board meeting to express their unhappiness with the current situation.

"We need to get some things straight. I'm appalled by the board and by your su perintendent," said Ed Ferry, MHS Ag Advisory Committee President. "My theory is, you've let us down. I think there is a little bit of a personality conflict."

Ferry later stated that he would like to see the Ag De partment increased each year to the point where there are two Ag teachers instead of one.

District Superintendent Craig Drennan responded by saying, "You're not being constructive by making ac cusatory statements."

The main thrust of Dren nan's argument was, "You don't have the numbers." He pointed out that there was no significant increase over last year in the number of students taking Ag courses, and that last year there had been 30 students signed up for the AG I class. The over all average of students per Ag period next year would be 16.5. He compared the stag nant Ag numbers to a major rise in the number of stu dents signing up for wood shop classes and said that the district had agreed with the wood shop teacher to "buy" that teacher's prep period and have him teach seven classes per day to accommo date the major increase.

Drennan also explained that the district has given the Ag Department the choice of proceeding in two or three ways in the matter. He said there had also been an at tempt to hire a person with an Ag credential who could have filled in one or two pe riods per day, but that the teaching candidate had turned down the offer.

"A sincere effort was made," Drennan said. "You can't show anywhere that you've been treated any dif ferently than anyone else."

Kraft told the board of the importance of the special projects period.

"It might just seem like a little bit of extra time, five hours a week, but to me it's real important."

Kraft said that the need for the extra time was illus trated by the fact that during this past school year, between Christmas break and spring break, he only had one weekend off.

The issue of the Ag classes also brought up the issue of whether MHS teach ers have had enough input in creating the curriculum for next year. Kraft told the board, "A lot of teachers at the high school are real upset right now" over the issue. Student board member Eric Lancaster and student Jen nifer LeNeave of the Alturas FFA chapter also raised the issue of adequate teacher involvement in curriculum planning. Drennan said he felt teachers did have the op portunity for input and pointed out that changes were made in three areas at the request of teachers.

As for the Ag classes, the Ag Advisory Committee and department will try to decide whether it wants two Ag I classes and no special pro jects period or one large Ag I class while efforts continue to find someone through Lassen College.

In other matters before the board:

K-6 Community School: Drennan asked the board to take a "second look" at cre ating the new school for ex pelled and problem students in light of financial figures he had come up with. The board approved the Commu nity School at last month's meeting and instructed Drennan to go ahead with procedures for creating the new school.

Drennan reported to the board that the expenses for facilities were greater than originally anticipated. To buy a lot somewhere in Al turas and construct a build ing would cost $153,000 plus the price of the land. The district could also seek a waiver from the State to al low the district to put a portable classroom plus bathrooms near the Latch-Key building at the east side of the Alturas Elementary property at a cost of $109,000.

The board elected to seek the waiver and build the school at the Alturas Ele mentary site and to proceed with creating the new school. Drennan told the board that he thought the building would pay for itself in about five years, perhaps sooner depending on enrollment.

The initial projected en rollment is predicted to be between five and ten stu dents and the building is ex pected to be ready in October.

Scholarships: Board of Trustee scholarships were ratified for Veronica Allan, Ryan Campbell, Lawrence Cavasso, Veronica Coates, Mariah Cook, Ginny Greene, Matt Hamilton, Eric Lancaser, Ted Simmons and Wendy Stafford.

Dropout Rate: The board received information from the State regarding dropout rates. The dropout rate for the Modoc District in the 1996-97 school year for grades 9-12 was 1.8 percent, or six students out of 337 dropping out. The average for the district is also 1.8 per cent over the years 1993 through 1997. The State dropout rate for 1996-97 was 3.3 percent.

 

Five arrested after stabbing

 

Five Alturas people were arrested after a break-in and stabbing at the Court Motel in Alturas June 10.

Alturas Chief of Police Larry Pickett said a complaint has also been sent to the District Attorney requesting charges against five other people.

According to Pickett, those arrested and booked into the Modoc County Jail are Rebecca Larson, 18, Edgar Thornburg, 24, Robert Arnett, 36, Roberto Quesada, 20, and Rollie Klabbatz. They were arrested on charges of assault and attempted murder.

According to Pickett, those five were part of a group that broke through the motel room door about 1:15 a.m. June 10 and allegedly attacked Jose Mendoza, 25, and Louis Velasco, 23, of Lindsay, Ca. They allegedly assaulted the two men and stabbed Mendoza in the chest. Mendoza sus tained a minor puncture to his lung and was flown to Chico's Enlo Hospital for treatment.

 

Want a duck to win a truck? Better hurry to get one soon

 

A couple of days of sun shine really picked up sales for ducks in the third annual Great Pit River Duck Race scheduled for July 4.

According to Alturas Rotary duckmaster Bill Madison fewer than a third of the ducks remain and are go ing quickly.

"I guess the sunny days re ally perked up people's spirits, because ducks were really moving out of here," Madison said. "We're very pleased with the continued support and we'd advise people who are considering buy ing a duck to get it soon. When we're out, we're out."

The tickets are the same price as always, $25 each, and the limit of 3,000 will be sold.

For the first time, the first prize win ner will get a choice between a 1998 Chevy 4x4 step side pickup or a 1998 Chevy Silverado Extra-Cab two-wheel drive pickup, each val ued at about $26,000.

Also new for this year is a great sec ond prize of a 1998 fish ing boat and trailer with a value of $8,071.

Gold Crown Sponsors, those people who buy at least 10 ducks, will also have another shot at winning one of two Polaris Express four-wheel ers. Only Gold Crown spon sors have a shot at the four-wheelers.

All proceeds from the Duck Race go into the improve ments and new ball fields at the Alturas Rotary Youth Park. The past two years have seen the Duck Race raise over $60,000 and Rotary is antici pating a $30,000 net out of this year's race.

Progress at the Youth Park includes a new fence, park ing lot, sprinkler system and trees. Once the weather clears up and the ground dries, the grass will be planted at the fields.

The race is sponsored by both the Alturas Noon and Sunrise Rotary Clubs of Alturas.

The following is an order of other prizes in the Duck Race: third, $2,500 worth of custom lumber from High Desert Milling; fourth, Monitor Stove from Ed Staub and Sons; fifth new roof, sid ing or rain gutter ($1,000 value) from J.S. Roofing; sixth set of four tires from Les Schwab, $600; riding lawn mower from Coast to Coast, $568.41; Power lift/recliner from Home Medical, $500; One year on-line service from High Desert On-Line, $359 value; 25 tons of drive way gravel from Fitch Sand and Gravel, $350; Husquvarna chain saw from Modoc Engines, $330; custom bar becue from Surprise Valley Rotary, $300; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; one dozen donuts weekly for a year from the Donut Shop, $260; $250 gift cer tificate from the Belligerent Duck; 55 gallon aquarium setup from Tahiti North, $250 value; three watt cell phone from Modoc Motor Parts, Napa, $225; The Big One fire works kit from Village Video, $199; Zenith 13 inch color television from Phillips Appliance, $199; Weekend retreat for two at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging, $150; free muffler and tail pipe, Ron Campbell, Inc. $125; complimentary two-night stay for two at the Best Western Trailside Inn, $110; CB Radio and gift cer tificate from High Desert Electronics, $109; one night stay for two at Mill Creek Lodge, $100; one free pair of Vans or Skechers from Family Footwear, value up to $100; Outdoor plant stand from Gary's Woodworks, $100; and one pair of Oakley Sunglasses from Tom Krauel, OD, $100 value.

To buy a duck, look for the happy duck signs in store windows, or call Madison at 233-3432.

 

Obituaries:

 

Vrle T. Minto

 

The family of Vrle Travis Minto invite all who knew Vrle to join them in celebrating his life and accomplish ments at the Eagleville Community Church on Saturday, July 4 at 11:00 a.m. The dedication of Vrle's memorial marker at the Eagleville Cemetery will directly follow the service.

Vrle was reared on the Minto Family ranch in Ea gleville, Calif. He is the son of the late Robert and Edythe Minto. It has been said that home is where the heart is and Vrle's heart was always in Surprise Valley. This is why his family has chosen to honor his memory in the place he loved best.

The Eagleville community potluck and barbecue will be held at 4:00 p.m. Barbecued meat and paper products can be purchased for $6. A dance and fireworks will follow.

As a testimony to Vrle's special gift of bringing people to gether to accomplish good, the Minto Family plans to paint the Eagleville Community Church on July 3. The commu nity is welcome.

 

 

Fay Ann Repath, M.D.

 

A memorial service will be held at the Cedarville Park, Saturday, June 20 at 1:00 p.m. for gifted physician, talented artist and writer Fay Ann Repath, M.D. The former Sur prise Valley resident Dr. Repath died June 6, 1998 at UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.

She was born December 2, 1943 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Erwin J. Repath and Audrey Galivan Repath. She graduated from Benjamin Franklin High School in the small town of Franklinton, Louisiana in 1961. She received a Bache lor of Science degree from Louisiana State University in 1965 and completed her Medical education at Louisiana State University Medical School, graduating in 1968.

Dr. Repath was dedicated to the care and well being of her patients, spending much of her professional medical career working in under-served rural areas. She contributed gen erously in the teaching of physicians, nurses, EMTs and al lied health professionals. When she visited Surprise Valley during a vacation in 1985, she was impressed that the com munity would tax itself to support a community hospital and returned on January 1, 1986 to practice medicine in Surprise Valley, leaving her Clear Lake, Calif. practice to come to Modoc County. She was instrumental in the reopening of the Surprise Valley Hospital.

After her retirement in 1994, due to health reasons, she turned her energy, vast experience and humor into writing short stories. Her indomitable spirit, courage, sense of hu mor and generosity will be "greatly missed," shares Mary Harlis.

Dr. Repath enjoyed painting scenics and landscapes with watercolor and oils, some of which now belong to families in Surprise Valley.

She is survived by her brother Erwin Repath, Jr. of Pearl River, LA and cousin Shirley Vorhoff of Belle Chasse, LA and beloved friends Lane, Terry and Terrell Kennedy of Jackson, MS; Judy Sarber of Porterville and Jeff, Mary, Heidi and Collin Harlis of Lake City.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be directed to the American Heart Association, the Scleroderma Foundation or to your favorite charity.

Record news summaries for June 25, 1998

City looks for funding on mill site
New teen driving law takes effect
Fandango Days has plenty of activity
CalFed water project may not affect Modoc
I'SOT Park Days celebrates country living
No fireworks allowed in federal lands
Obituaries:
Beeson
Morgan
Callas
Dobbs

 

City looks for funds for mill site

 

The Alturas City Council decided at its Tuesday night meeting to apply for two Community Development Block Grants -- one to do a feasibility study at the mill site and the other to do an in come and housing study of the homes and citizens re siding in Alturas.

Each of the grants will be for $35,000 and the city will be required to match that with approximately $8,000 of its own money. The applica tion process will begin in July. The mill site falls un der the funding area of eco nomic development while the housing and income study will fall under the area of community devel opment.

Planning Director Scott Kessler told the council that a technical assistance study on the mill site will allow Alturas to move another step forward to do rehabilitation on the site. Kessler said he would like to see the mill site developed into an "indus trial incubator program" where small businesses could go to get warehouse and office space. He also pointed out that if a business from outside the area were looking at locating its pro duction facilities in Alturas, the city would already have a site set up that could be of fered at a very affordable price.

On the community devel opment side, before deciding on the housing and income study, the council also gave consideration to Fire Mar shall Joe Watters' request for a grant that would fund having an architect design a new fire hall. Watters told the council that he reviews the condition of the current fire hall on a quarterly ba sis; he can see the break down of the building every three months.

Watters also told the council that he has been looking at other grant sources to help get funding for the fire hall. However, to get some of that funding, he would have to show that at least 51 percent of the popula tion of Alturas is low in come. The only figures available at the present are from the 1990 federal census which put the low income figure for Alturas at 45 per cent. Various members of the council predicted that the low income figure had prob ably risen by at least five percent in the past eight years given what has hap pened in the Alturas econ omy over that period.

The irony, of course, is that the way to show that 51 percent or more of Alturas is low income and get the fund ing for the fire hall would be to conduct the income and housing study recommended by Kessler. That study would, of course, supersede getting funding for the de sign of the fire hall.

"It sounds as if we have a catch 22," Mayor Dick Steyer noted.

Kessler told the council that the income and housing study "will affect almost ev ery grant you write."

The idea is showing that a certain percentage of Al turas is low income would allow the city to qualify for a variety of grants, including ones that would help build a new fire hall. Mayor pro tem Kerry Merwin also noted that such information might help bring in funding needed for sewage treat ment, which is an issue the city will have to deal with. Kessler said that the housing study also will allow Alturas to apply for grants to reha bilitate various properties in the city.

The council decided to ap ply for the grant to conduct the housing and income study and wait on the fire hall.

Kessler said he will seek to have a university conduct the study since that is gener ally the cheapest way to get it done. Students working for the university would canvas the town reviewing housing and noting deficiencies, as well as getting information on income.

In other matters before the City Council on Tuesday:

Junk: Danalee Yarbor ough appeared before the council with concerns about lots near school sites that have old washers, dryers, re frigerators, water heaters and various other junk stored on them. She stated that she had often seen chil dren playing on and around these items and that one child even climbed inside a dryer.

"Sooner or later somebody is going to get hurt," Yarbor ough said.

She said she had tried various avenues of attack ing the problem with no suc cess, and asked if Alturas had any type of ordinance or procedure similar to the one passed last week by the Modoc County Board of Su pervisors.

Watters said he had just recently sent notices to ap proximately six to eight properties to clear away junk. If those properties are not cleaned up in that time frame, the city will clean them up. Watters noted he would like to work on "get ting more teeth into the ordi nance" that applies to junk on properties.

Steyer said he would like to see Alturas come up with a comprehensive plan for tak ing care of the junk problem with various city depart ments, including law en forcement, working to gether.

"I don't want our city to have the left hand not know what the right hand is do ing," he said.

Youth Golf: The council agreed to waive green fees for the Evie Capik Memorial Youth Golf Program which begins July 13. Golfers ages 8-12 will be able to play a round with their instructors for free while learning golf etiquette.

Rite-Aid: Kessler pre sented the council with a rendering of the 11,000 square foot store that Rite-Aid will be building in Al turas. Kessler said he was not overjoyed with the ap pearance of the building, but also noted that it might not be a good idea to make too much of a fuss over it because "Alturas is a marginal market for a business of this size." Therfore, it wouldn't be a good idea to make too many demands.

 

State's new teen driving law goes into ef fect this July 1

 

A new teen driving law goes into effect July 1, affect ing permit and driver li censes for 16 and 17-year-olds. The new re strictions are designed to lower the high rate of teen deaths in the state.

While the law may be a good idea, Chief of Police Larry Pickett thinks its overkill in most rural areas. "Most of our young drivers are pretty good," he said. "The new law is on the books and we'll have to enforce it, but it does create some hardships in rural areas where there is no public transporta tion. For us, a lot of it doesn't make good sense."

One of those areas that is pretty senseless in Alturas, said Pickett is a provision of the law that states teen drivers can't drive between midnight and 5 a.m. unless supervised by a parent guardian or driv ing instructor over 25 years of age.

Pickett points out that in Alturas, the curfew for teenagers is 11 p.m. so they're not allowed out anyway. The other situa tion that creates a sticking point is the portion of the law that states a new teen driver, getting his permit and license after July 1, cannot transport passengers under 20 years of age without an adult in the car for the first six months. In effect, what that means is siblings can't drive their siblings to school in the morning, unless the parent is along as well.

According to the California Department of Motor Vehicles, 16-year-olds have the worst driving record of any age group. They are 5.4 times more likely to be at fault in a fatal or injury accident than all drivers. According to DMV, 17-year-olds fall into second place with a ratio of 3.7 times higher than average drivers.

"We enforce the law, and we make sure teens under stand they will be stopped if they break traffic laws," said Pickett. "But, we don't want to have the image that we're picking on teens. Overall, our teenagers are pretty good kids and we don't want to penalize all of them for the actions of a few."

The new law says that 16 and 17-year-olds applying for an instruction permit/drivers license on and after July 1, will have to hold their instruc tional permit for sixth months before they can take a drive test for their provisional li cense. Previously, the law specified 30 days. During the permit pe riod, the prospective driver must have 50 hours of adult-su pervised driving practice, 10 of which must be at night.

The new restrictions do not apply to drivers who obtained their permit or license prior to July 1.

These new conditions add to the restrictions already in place on the provisional li censes issued to 16 and 17-year-olds in California. Under current law, they face a 30-day suspension if they col lect two violation points in 12 months. They face a six month suspension if they reach three points in 12 months. Regular tickets and at-fault accidents count one point. More serious violations such as DUI, reckless driving and speed contests count two points.

Young drivers who have their instructional permit be fore July 1 do not come under the new restrictions, nor do drivers who have their li censes before July. Those drivers who have their in structional permit before July 1 and get a license af ter that date are also not bound by the new restrictions.

 

 

Grand Marshals chosen, Fandango ready

 

Southern Pacific Rail road employees who worked for 40 plus years for SP in Alturas, have been selected to preside as Grand Mar shals for the July 4 Fan dango Days Celebration in Alturas.

In keeping with the "Alturas Trails to Rails" 1998 theme, the Fandango Executive Committee has se lected six people. They are Alturas residents John Simpson, Paul Robison, Norton Smith, Paul Liv ingston, Janis Smith and Genevieve Drown.

Cal Pines will light up the night on Friday, July 3 start ing with a barbecue from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. At 9:30 p.m. the annual fireworks show will begin, compliments of the California Pines Property Owners Association which generously funds the display for the public. Watch the show at lakeside.

Head to downtown Al turas on Saturday morning for an 11 a.m. parade on Main Street from north to south then to Veterans' Park for activities from 12 noon, starting with the Lions' Club Barbecue on the park patio. The eighth annual Classic Car Show is behind the Mu seum, with games, food, a petting zoo being set up by the Wood 'n Peg Ranch and the Great Pit River Duck Race start ing at 2:30 p.m. Modoc County Museum will host an Open House from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. and Stock Car Races at Cedarville Fairgrounds will start at 6:00 p.m.

Railroad Fun Day opens Sunday, July 5, with Friends of the Alturas Railroad Mu seum hosting concessions, live music, historical NCO photo display plus motor car rides on the half mile of track already laid and a railroad collectible swap op portunity.

Travel to the old site of Calandor Pines Mill near the Alturas Airport to take part. The building which will be used as the future site of the Alturas Railroad Mu seum has been cleaned by volunteers and made safe for the public. Temporary track has been laid inside the building where antique handcars will be set up for rides. The nearly new red engine parked outside the building will be open for pub lic exam ination. Admission is free.

"We want this event to be a enthusiasm builder, and just give people a taste of what's to come. We are far from where we want to be," offers George Andreasen, City Councilman and a Friend of the Alturas RR Museum volunteer.

"Grants have already been submitted for refurbish ing the building," he notes.

The actual plan may take five years to complete, An dreasen figures, but added, "It's all happening fast, due to the enthusiasm and a dream coming true at very little cost."

"Friends of Wrymoo" is also considering a name change to embody the "spirit of the community," he added. The name will be changed to "Friends of the Alturas Railroad Museum."

Fandango Parade entry forms are available at the Alturas Chamber of Com merce office, 522 So. Main St., Alturas.

 

CalFed may not impact Modoc

 

Will the CalFed Bay-Delta program affect Mod oc's water rights?

Dennis O'Connor's pre sentation of the program in Davis Creek last Friday ap peared to indicate that it will not. However, O'Connor an swered a lot of questions from worried ranchers and supervisors during his two-and-a-half hour talk and encouraged everyone to be vigilant and send letters to Washington and Sacra mento expressing local con cerns.

A 26-page brochure sum marizing the problem and the options under review is available in the local li brary. It includes a form ready to mail to Sacramento with your own comments. The entire EIR/EIS draft (2100 p.) is also available for review in the Alturas li brary. You may obtain your own copy by calling (800) 900-3587. The deadline for the current round of com ments is July 1. Once the preferred alternative is cho sen (December 1998), there will be another review and comments period to examine that specific plan.

The Davis Creek lecture was well attended and the speaker did an excellent job of outlining a very complex issue. At least 47 people gath ered at the Grange Hall, welcomed by the Ladies Aux iliary group, including Margot Curtis and Carol Baldwin, the Davis Creek li brary staff. O'Connor used maps to illustrate the prob lem area and the solutions considered. He believes a modified version of the sec ond alternative is the most likely to be adopted.

O'Connor, who is a mem ber of several of the working groups which constitute the Bay-Delta Advisory Coun cil, explained how the issues of water quality, habitat degradation, water supply and unstable levees are all inter-related. He said that the issue of watershed man agement has not been ad dressed very much so far and that the upper area would see little effect of the pro gram. New water use effi ciency rules may not be im posed in this part of the state either.

The speaker guaranteed the audience that no more retirement of agricultural lands is to be allowed in or der to redirect water flow. Worthy of notice is his ob servation that though Modoc carries little weight in the state by population stan dards, it has a lot more weight if one considers its natural resources. Preserva tion of these resources ap pears to be the better tactic for our county planners.

 

I'SOTs host 19th Park Days celebration

 

I'SOT Park Days returns for the 19th year, with two days of games, contests, entertain ment, and food on July 3 and 4 at the I'SOT Family Park in Canby.

The Park will open Friday, July 3, from 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 4 from 7 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.

The theme "Country Gardens" has been selected and a "Country Bonnet" contest is planned.

Meals will be served from the "Olive Gar den" dining area on Friday at 3:30 p.m. with barbecued tri-tip steak or chicken, baked potato, carrots, French bread and salad bar available for $3 or $2 for children 10 and younger. Breakfast starts off Saturday, July 4 from 7 a.m. - 9 a.m. pancakes, eggs, bacon and fruit and the 4 p.m. hot dogs, hamburg ers, beans and salad bar.

Join in the fishing derby, garden sports, swimming and water games, wheel barrow races, flower walks, fruit pie eating contests where one can win a fruit pie, three-legged sack races, a balloon toss and more. "In Search of Truth"[ISOT] members host the event with a new theme and activities to com plement the theme each year. All events wel come the public.

 

Caution tops for July 4 holiday fires

 

Northeastern Californi a's wildlands are a great place to spend a July 4 holi day, but everyone needs to remember to leave their fireworks at home and take extra care with their camp fires, according to officials at the Susanville Intera gency Fire Center (SIFC).

"Fireworks have no place in the wild land, the risk of staring a fire is simply too high," said Tom Reed, SIFC manager. "That is why they are illegal on all National Forests, National Parks and Bureau of Land Manage ment lands."

People using or possess ing fireworks on federal wildlands could find them selves facing as much as a year in jail and/or a fine as high as $100,000, depending on the federal agency in volved.

If you live in an area that allows fireworks use ex treme caution when setting them off, even if they are the "safe and sane" kind. A single spark can set a shake shingle roof afire or start a blaze in a nearby dry grassy area, and every year people are injured lighting fire works at home.

Campers also need to ex ercise care. Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure that it is dead-out before you leave. "Stir the ashes of the campfire once you think it is out and check for any sources of heat," said Reed. "It is amazing what a little wind and warm weather can do to a campfire someone thought was out."

People should not be lulled into a false sense of security by the cool and wet spring. Northeastern California is in a warming trend through the July 4 holiday and the fire danger is rising.

"Just the other day we picked up three fires from afternoon thunderstorms, so the risk is there," said Reed. "We are staffed and ready to respond aggressively to any wildfire this July 4 and through out the summer, but we're hoping that, with help from those who enjoy the wild lands, the fire season will be a slow one."

 

Obituaries

 

Cecil Harold Beeson

 

Everyone who knew Cecil Harold Beeson can recall something dear about him and the special things he did. Mr. Beeson passed away on June 14, 1998 from complications fol lowing surgery at UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, Calif.

A truMorgan in Eagleville, Calif. to Somer and Georgie [Cambron] Beeson on June 13, 1919 and was reared on the family ranches in Surprise Val ley and Davis Creek. He attended two years at Surprise Val ley High School and two years at Modoc Union High School, graduating with the class of 1937 from Modoc Union High.

Cecil, as he preferred to be called, raised sheep and cattle on his ranch in Likely, where he lived the longest and reared his children.

He worked at the Alturas Mill prior to his retirement. Alturas had been his home for the past 26 years, where he loved touring the streets of Alturas day and night, enjoyed gardening, knife making, fishing, hunting, collecting and was good at making anything he set his mind to, including inventions, recall family members.

He and Jewel Bucher were married on March 17, 1972 and shared a special relationship in their love for one another these past 26 years.

Cecil made Modoc his home for all of his 79 years of life. He had many stories to share.

Mr. Beeson is survived by his wife Jewel Bucher Beeson of Alturas; sons Dwight Beeson, Alturas and Milo Beeson, Modesto; daughters Marlys Nelson, Great Falls, Montana; and Toni Snyder, Youngstown, Ohio; stepson Rodney Green of Redding; sister Edna Talbott of Alturas; 11 grandchil dren and three great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his daughter Sandra Jeppson, a brother Carroll and two grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held on July 11, 1998 at 2:00 p.m. at the Alturas Baptist Church. Pastor Bud Kirk will conduct the service.

Memorial contributions may be directed to the Modoc Scholarship Fund, 510 No. Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

 

Alfreda Morgan

 

Former Modoc resident Alfreda Morgan, 86, died June 18, 1998, following a five-year stay at the Manor Care nursing home in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

She was born in New Pine Creek, Calif. on June 24, 1911 to Ettie (O'Neil) and John Larkin and was the oldest of four daughters. She went to school in New Pine Creek and Al turas. In 1941 she married Manuel Yribarren, a Basque immigrant from Spain. They had one daughter, Ettie Be nigna who was born in 1945. During this time, Freda worked for several years as a nurse's aid at the hospital in Alturas. Manuel died in 1954.

Alfreda married Frank Morgan in 1956. They lived and worked on several ranches in Nevada, California and Ore gon. They settled in the Davis Creek area in 1980. Frank died in 1985.

All three sisters, Eva, Grace, and Alice, and one stepson, Jim Farrell, preceded Alfreda in death. She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Ettie and David Friberg of San Diego, and three grandchildren, Larkin of Corvallis, Dean of Albuquerque, and Morgan of San Diego. Also sur viving are stepchildren Peggy and Doug Walls of Payson, Ariz., Mike and Bette Morgan of Burns, Ore.,Wanda and Larry Carlin of Burns, and Pat Tierney of Lakeview, Ore.

Freda was a long-time active member and past president of Native Daughters of the Golden West, Alturas Parlor. She was a very kind and giving person, always willing to take care of other's needs. She loved people, the outdoors, garden ing, and Modoc County.

Graveside services will be held at the Davis Creek Ceme tery at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, July 3.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Modoc County Museum, 600 South Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

 

Dean G. Callas, Jr.

 

Dean G. Callas, Jr., 52, Tulelake Volunteer Fire De partment Chief, died Friday, June 19, 1998 of a heart attack while fishing with friends at C Reservoir near Alturas, Calif.

He was born July 3, 1945 in Klamath Falls, Ore. to Frances Rose Callas and Dean G. Callas, Sr. He at tended Tulelake Elemen tary and graduated from Tulelake High School in 1963.He attended South ern Oregon College and Ameri can River Junior Col lege.

After returning to Tule lake Dean farmed with his father until 1982. At that time he went to work for Tulelake Irrigation District, where he was employed at the time of his death.

In 1974, Dean joined the Tulelake Volunteer Fire De partment. He held the office of President and Captain be fore being elected to Chief in 1984. During the last 14 years, he was instrumental in obtaining the Jaws of Life, Turnout gear for Tulelake and Newell departments, several new trucks, the new fire hall and Fire Fighter Certification through Col lege of the Siskiyous where he was a member of the Ad visory Board.

In 1975, he married Peggy Lee Bryan. They had two daughters, Angelee Nicole Callas, now of Klamath Falls and Carrielee Dean Callas, now of Tulelake. Dean enjoyed watching his girls play volleyball, soft ball and basketball. He also helped with their 4-H horse and swine projects

Survivors include wife Peggy of Tulelake, daugh ters Angie of Klamath Falls and Carrie of Tulelake; sister Diane Kellstrom and family of Bend, Ore.; sister and brother-in-law Barbara and Harry Childers of Chil oquin; mother-in-law Gladys Peppers of Klamath Falls; nephews Harry, Scott and Rod Childers of Chilo quin; aunts and uncle Jean Rose of Medford; Helen Foland of Reno, Nev. Mar vin and Carol Rose of Tule lake and numerous cousins.

Dean was preceded in death by his parents. grand parents, uncles Harry Rose, Herman Foland and nephew Tyler Childers.

Memorial services were held Tuesday, June 23 at 2 p.m. at Tulelake Presbyte rian Church with a dinner that followed at the Tulelake Volunteer Fire Department. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrange ments.

Memorial donations may be made to the Tulelake Vol unteer Fire Department c/o Mike Hickman, P.O. Box 306, Tulelake, CA 96134-0306.

 

Donald Gene Dobbs

 

Donald Gene Dobbs of Newell died June 12, 1998 in Newell, Calif. at the age of 59 years. Mr. Dobbs had been working at the Newell Water District for the last two weeks of his life, when he was taken by a fatal heart attack.

He was born November 11, 1938 in Keystone, Okla homa. He was a graduate of Tulelake High School and worked for 13 years with the U.S. Forest Service on the Modoc National Forest from 1965 until 1978 as a Crowder Flat Fire Crew su pervisor and a lumber scaler. He had lived in both Canby and Al turas during those years.

When he left the Forest Service in 1978, he went to work for lumber scaling bu reaus, which required him to travel.

He later took up farming and raised potatoes and barley at his Newell farm.

He and Donna Marie Harden were married in Reno, Nev. on October 3, 1974. They shared a loving relationship for the past 26 years. Mr. Dobbs enjoyed bowling, boating and camping and loved "lots of joking," recalls his wife. "He was always in good health."

Mr. Dobbs was preceded in death by his father John Clyde Dobbs, his sister Mary Ann Howerton in June 1996 and son Donald Gene Jr. in January 1993.

In addition to wife Donna of Alturas, he is survived by his mother Claudia Dobbs, Alturas; children Kathryn Plumb, Adrian, Mo.; Shelley Stone, Susanville; Rence Randolph, Walla Walla, Wash.; Rodney Gately, Alturas; grandchil dren Kathleen Huych, Tulelake; Alisha Grijalva, Redding; Amber Gardner, Alturas; Cody Green, Walla Walla, Wash., Jennifer Burt, Walla Walla; great-grandchildren Michael Grijalva, Redding. Numerous nephews, cousins, one dear niece and many friends.

Services were held at Kerr Mortuary Chapel, Alturas at 1:30 p.m. on June 16. Pastor Dewey Potter officiated. Inter ment was at the Alturas Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be directed to the Alzheimer's Foundation.

 

 

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