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January 8, 2004

News

Snow meant short parade in Davis Creek

By Betsy Ingraham

Davis Creek, CA

Happy New Year from Davis Creek!

Well, our 4th annual parade down Plumb St. was very short this year. The wind was blowing and the snow was blinding. At 9:00 a.m. our phone had already started ringing with people calling to see if the parade was a go. I even had a gentleman from Vya, Nevada call to see if we were going ahead with it. I cautioned he better wait until next year. So did most, but of the few Hardy Creekers who could get out of their driveways and made it to the Little Red School House at high noon, we carried on. At 11:45 two big Popular trees blew down across Plumb St. They knocked out electricity to the East side of Davis Creek.

Lizzie Mendoza showed up with her parade entry and me and my new "driving rig" were the only two entries who made it.

So, with such a blizzard going on and Highway 395 closed to all traffic going north, we thought it might be a good idea to invite the stranded travelers to our pot luck. The lights were out, but we were toasty and warm at the school house, so my husband, Fred, went down on the Highway and invited everyone that was stranded to come eat with us.

There was a family from Lakeview, Buck Creek, Billings, Montana, Idaho, Burns, Oregon, and Washington. About 3:00 p.m. the road was opened and our travelers went on their way.

The weather cleared for about two hours, then it started in snowing and blowing again. We have several people in Davis Creek who depend on electricity to warm their houses and a couple of them live on the east/west roads that had totally drifted full. Brian Ingraham fired up his big red tractor and went in and rescued them. (He didn't ask if they wanted to be rescued, he just did it.) Then he brought them to my house and they spent the night. Dinner was heated on our wood stove and lights by candle. Our fire Chief, John Leslie and Assistant Fire Chief, Shan Lewis, checked on everyone to make sure they had heat. Surprise Valley Electric was here as soon as someone called and worked very hard restoring our power.

So next year's parade, I am not sure if we will call it the fourth or fourth and a half annual, because there certainly were people moving around Plumb St. I know that our story isn't unusual at all if you live in Modoc County, everyone looks out for their neighbors. Happy New Year.

Election '04-- Feb. 17 is final day to register to vote

The final day to register to vote in the March 2 primary elections is Feb. 17. Modoc has approximately 5,200 voters registered at this time.

Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison stressed that since there are local elections set for March, voters who have moved, or changed their name or marital status need to register. Also, people who haven't voted in several elections should check to make sure they are registered properly.

Local contested races include a challenge by Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless to District Two Supervisor Mike Dunn. District Four's Willy Hagge will run against Canby rancher Ray Anklin. Each term is four years.

Supervisor Pat Cantrall and Superior Court Judges Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay are unopposed. In the City of Alturas, councilmen Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs will seek another term. City Clerk Cary Baker has also filed for another term.

Challengers for City Council are John Schreiber and Steve Iverson. Baker is unopposed.

There will also be several state issues on the March ballot, including a $15 billion bond measure sponsored by the Governor.

County okays letter to attract feed lot

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday approved sending a letter to California beef feedlot, packing and slaughterhouse operators, in hopes of attracting one of those plants to this area.

Modoc County Planner Scott Kessler told the board the effort has been tried in the past, and several things tend to work as impediments, but felt another effort was worth the time.

Kessler said transportation, feed availability and distance to markets are generally the downsides of locating in Modoc. But he also pointed out that low cost of land, geothermal resources and even the climate are assets.

What Kessler said may be most attracted to Modoc would be a "niche market" operation, such as organic beef. He figures an operator who already has a stake and place in that market could find Modoc very attractive.

Additionally, the current Mad Cow scare flooding the country could serve as a tool leading to more natural or organic beef production, processing and sales. While the scare has impacted the beef market nationally and statewide, organic meats are not affected. The difficulty is the limited organic market size and just where that market may be located.

The county isn't ruling out any type of meat operation, but understands the problems associated with transporting feed grain into this area and transporting the finished product out.

Kessler said there will be some serious environmental concerns over a feedlot or slaughterhouse, but figures some of those concerns could be addressed or mitigated by just a proper location of a facility.

In any case, the county expects there to be some public opposition to a feedlot or slaughterhouse operation and public meeting and hearings would have to be held long before any approval was granted. Kessler said he doesn't know whether the invitation will bear any fruit.

Shaw will replace Harbaugh at MCOE

The Modoc County Board of Education appointed Dr. Vanston Shaw January 6 to complete the term of County Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh, who is retiring in July.

Shaw currently serves as Assistant Superintendent at MCOE and has held that position for the past two-and-a-half years. He is responsibile for human resources, alternative education, career/technical education, curriculum, facilities and the School Attendance Review Board, (SARB).

Shaw served as Director of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) for six years prior to being appointed Assistant Superintendent.

As the SELPA Director, he had responsibility for special education programs in Modoc County for children birth though 22 years of age.

Prior to moving to Modoc in 1995, Shaw was in Los Alamos, New Mexico, for four years as an elementary classroom teacher. He worked 19 years for the Stanislaus County Office of Education as a program specialist, staff development specialist, Resource Specialist, and special education classroom teacher. Shaw lives in Thoms Creek with his wife Nuria. His son, Seth, lives in Saratoga, California and works in the computer industry. His mother, Mary Bunce, lives in Alturas.

Harbaugh is retiring after serving as Superintendent of Schools for the past 14 years.

County opposes vehicle insurance rate hike

Modoc County has the luxury of relatively low auto insurance rates, thanks, inpart, to its location and lack of congested traffic areas.

On Tuesday, the Modoc County Board of Supervisors joined with other rural counties in the state to oppose changes in existing regulations used to set auto insurance rates.

A few counties in the state have petitioned Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi to arbitrarily change a regulation that would predominately reduce the emphasis on a driver's vehicle location in determining rates.

According to the County, such a change could result in local auto insurance rates increasing by over 20 percent. In some counties, the rates could go up 60 percent, and would increase from 10 to 50 percent for seven million drivers. According to Californians Against Higher Auto Instance Rates, there would be rate increases in 52 of the state's 58 counties.

The only counties that would see lower rates are those who have heavily congested areas, such as the Bay Area and the cities of Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

"It just makes common sense, a driver's location influences the likelihood that you might need to file an insurance claim," the CAHIR states. "After all, drivers who commute on more congested, accident-prone roads, or drivers who live in neighborhoods with more auto theft claims are more likely to have an insurance claim."

Modoc County agrees that ignoring a driver's vehicle location simply subsidizes higher risk drivers in higher risk major cities and more affluent communities. The courts, and past insurance commissioners have ruled that the allowance of a driver's vehicle location in determining rates is legal.

The County is drafting a letter to Garamendi in opposition to the changes in regulations.

Modoc-Washoe Stewardship Committee Meets February 5-6 in Cedarville

Range improvement incentives and proposed changes in Bureau of Land Management livestock grazing regulations are among the items slated for discussion, when the Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Steering Committee meets Thursday and Friday, February 5 and 6, in the meeting room of the Cedarville Community Church, corner of Center and Bonner Streets, Cedarville.

The meeting is open to the public

On February 5, the session runs from 10 a.m. to about 5 p.m. Committee members will discuss a proposed incentive program for ranchers, hear a report on wildlife populations and conditions on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, discuss long-term monitoring needs for the Warner Mountain Range Project, and discuss a report from the riparian credit subcommittee.

Managers from the BLM will discuss development of a juniper management strategy, while Modoc National Forest managers will present information on the Forest Service's "Four Threats" initiative. Both agencies will provide updates on a variety of activities.

On February 6, the session begins at 8 a.m. Agenda items include a presentation on the BLM's proposed changes in livestock grazing regulations, an update on tuberculosis testing requirements for livestock, and a status report on BLM wild horse and burro management.

The committee will also hear an update on the management plan for the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon-Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area, receive a status report on land use planning for BLM's northeast California Field Offices, and hear an update about safe grouse conservation planning.

The steering committee advises the BLM's Surprise Field Office and the Modoc National Forest's Warner Mountain Ranger District on resource management issues in Northwest Nevada and Northeast California. One of three such committees authorized by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangeland Improvement Act, the committee often focuses on experimental approaches to sustain ranching and healthy, productive public rangelands.

Diverse pubic interests, including ranchers, environmental groups, state wildlife agencies, local government and federal agencies are represented on the committee.

Obituaries:

Ellen Josephine Fulcher

A Memorial service for Ellen Fulcher will be held Sunday, January 11, 2004 at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 1450 Warner St., Alturas, Calif. Pastor Dewey Potter will officiate.

Ellen passed away peacefully in her home in Alturas, California on Thursday, December 25, 2003, after waging a valiant battle against ALS (Lou Gerig's Disease). During her illness, even on her worst days, she always tried to keep her sense of humor and a smile on her face.

Ellen was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt and friend. .

She was active throughout her life in her church, the Art Center and the Alturas Garden Club.

Ellen was a gifted gardener and she loved working in her yard and tending her flowers. She was born Ellen Grimes on February 21, 1929 in Whitesboro, Texas.

Ellen is survived by her husband, Don Fulcher of Alturas, Calif.; her son, Tom Yell and his family of Anchorage, Alaska; her son Harley Yell and his family of Eugene, Oregon; her daughter Elaine McMurry and her family of Kodiak, Alaska; her daughter Connie Mitchell and her family of Woodbine, Georgia. She also leaves her grandchildren, great-grandchildren, her sisters, many nieces, nephews and a host a friends. Ellen, you are dearly loved and will be forever missed.

Donations in Ellen's memory may be made to the organization or charity of your choice.

Cynthia B. Steward Stefani

A Memorial service for Alturas resident Cynthia Belle Steward Stefani, was held Saturday, January 3, 2004 at 12 noon at the Christian Life Assembly Church, 225 West B Street, in Alturas. Pastor Jerry Chilson officiated

Mrs. Stefani, 47, passed away at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif. on Tuesday, December 30, 2003. She had been diagnosed in September with cancer and fought a courageous and valiant battle against cancer and pneumonia.

Born Cynthia Steward to a large family in Cedarville, Calif. on March 31, 1956, she attended Modoc High School, then moved to Oklahoma for several years.

She earned her GED and returned to Alturas a number of years later, at the encouragement of her family, to rear her children in Modoc County. Never a person to impose on anyone, she worked hard, was patient and tenacious. Cynthia was pleased to have successfully passed her bus driver test early in the summer of 2003 to become a driver for Sage Stage. Before she became ill, she drove the Sage Stage during the week and was a server at the Wagon Wheel Café in Alturas, on weekends. She had also delivered "Meals on Wheels" for the Modoc Senior Citizens Center program. She loved being around people.

She had a strong faith in God, which was instilled by her mother and father to all her family, from childhood. The youngest of six girls, with one brother two years younger, all the girls were born while the family resided in Surprise Valley. The family moved to Alturas in 1957, when her father Brucie Steward went to work for CalTrans as a mechanic. Her brother was born in Alturas. Cindy's three children, oldest son Dwight and wife Mandy, daughter Keturah and youngest son Kyle were always her pride and joy. She also had two grandchildren from Dwight whom she adored.

Cindy was always doing for others. She was a "sweet baby sister," shared her sisters and she will be greatly missed.

She is survived by her three children Brucie (Dwight) Gene Hayles, 28, and wife Mandy of Pipestem, True West Virginia; Keturah B. Hayles, 26, of Alturas, Calif. and Kyle Randy Stefani, 16, of Alturas, Calif.; her grandchildren Kendal, age 6 and Britany, age 4; five sisters, Dori Shaffer and husband Louis of Alturas, Calif.; Mary Ann Smith and husband Bill of Fort Rock, Oregon; Judy Lynch and husband Richard of Alturas, Calif.; Bonnie Steward of Alturas, Calif.; Pat Matthews of Likely, Calif. and Cindy's brother Hal Steward and wife Lara of Casa Grande, Arizona. She is also survived by 15 nieces and nephews and 15 great-nieces and nephews; plentiful uncles, aunts, cousins and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents Brucie and Jane Steward of Lake City.

Donations in Mrs. Stefani's memory may be directed to the Modoc Medical Center, 228 McDowell Street, Alturas, CA 96101. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Jacqueline Olive Collis

Jacqueline Olive Collis, 82 years old, went to be with our Lord on December 8, 2003, and was laid to rest December 12, 2003 at the Alturas Cemetery, with the wonderful prayers and words from the Rev. Destry Campbell.

Jackie, as she was known to all, was born July 13, 1921 to John and Olive (Smith) Adams in Seattle, Washington. Jackie spent her younger years in the Klamath Falls and Chiloquin, Oregon area until she came to Alturas, Calif. to live with her aunt and uncle, Wallace "Doc" and Martha Dorris, who at that time owned the Brass Rail.

She later met and married Harold "Howdy" Mapes on October 30, 1939; to this union they had three daughters, Nancy, Diana and Mary Lou. The couple later divorced in 1949.

Jackie married Randall Collis on May 29, 1954. They owned the old Porter Ranch which is now known as the Dee Jay Ranch, and they also owned and operated Pepperdine Deer Camp for several years before giving the camp to Don Collis.

After the ranch was sold in 1964, they bought the Leo Gysin place on Parker Creek Road. Jackie was instrumental in starting the Modoc County Side Saddlers and later the Modoc Tee Pee Ride, which is still going strong today. Jackie served on the election board, and was a member of the Women's VFW Auxiliary 3327, under the leadership of Virgie Meyer. She was a long-time member of the Modoc Rock and Mineral Society. She was involved with PTA while her children were in school.

Jackie loved to hunt and fish and camp out. She took her children and later her grandchildren and shared her love of the outdoors. She was an accomplished horsewomen before she married Randall and loved the ranch life.

Jackie worked at Modoc Medical Center for many years, and when her husband had a stroke in 1978, she left her employment to take care of Randall until his death in 1991.

Jackie always expressed her greatest accomplishment was the raising of her daughters, but she did many wonderful things for all the people around her. Her family always came first. She was a great listener and a true friend. She lived life to the fullest with love and laughter. She loved to dance and play pinochle.

She was preceded in death by her parents, two brothers, Steve and Hubert and sisters June and Hope. She is survived by her three daughters and their husbands, Nancy and Jim Sanford of Langley, British Columbia; Diana and Fred Derner of Alturas, Calif., Mary Lou and Mickey Allen of Alturas, Calif. and two step sons and their wives, Roger and Rose Collis of Roseburg, Oregon, and Don and Joan Collis of Alturas, Calif.; numerous grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Jackie will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her.

Sports

Sports comes back to action this week

Area high school teams will get back in action this weekend, with the Modoc High Wrestling team at the big Anderson Tournament Jan. 9-10. The Braves are expected to do well, but the Anderson event brings together the best in the section.

The Modoc High Basketball teams start league play against Mt. Shasta Jan. 10 and travel to Weed Jan. 13. On Jan. 16, they are home against Burney. Mt. Shasta is expected to be tough, Weed is a question mark and Burney could be good.

January 15, 2004

News

City, county protest new Governor's '04 budget

Arnold Swarzenegger is starting to look an awful lot like Pete Wilson to California cities and counties, and they don't like the resemblance. In the 1990s, Wilson enacted a "property tax shift" that took property tax funds out of local government coffers, placing them into school budgets, saving the state funds.

It's deju vu all over again with Swarzenegger as he pretty much has proposed the same thing, and it will hurt local government and services. The Governor's proposal is proposed to shift an additional 15 percent of the county's remaining property taxes to balance the state budget.

A frustrated Modoc County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said the actual property tax take from the state would hit Modoc for just over $205,000, but the total cuts in local government services could be closer to $600,000 when all departments are considered.

City Treasurer Kathie Alves is likewise disappointed, saying total budget cuts for the city from the Governor's proposal would be about $200,000. "This came as a real shock to all of us," said Maxwell. "This just might be the straw that breaks the camel's back. It's not just this additional $205,000 cut, it comes on top of a $750,000 cut last year and a $300,000 cut the year before that. We don't have a lot of room to cut anything."

Maxwell said while counties have been creative and frugal, the problem is the state legislature overspent for years. He said it's just not fair to shoulder local government with this burden, when local government has been operating within its means.

"This budget was a complete surprise to everyone," said Maxwell. "We realize the state's in trouble and everyone has to pay a fair share, but this is not fair. I just don't know how we're going to deal with the cuts, but we're meeting with department heads and trying to come up with something. But, I don't think it's going to be good."

Maxwell said he's going to proceed on the budget issue as a worst-case scenario, not just hope something good happens between now and whenever the legislature adopts the state budget, which has been late the past several years.

"I just don't think it's going to get better and we can't wait and see what happens," he said. "We are going to have to take action now to avoid being further in the hole later. There are going to be some hard choices ahead for the department heads and Board of Supervisors. But we'll do the best we can and it will be a full team effort. Maybe we'll be able to figure something out, but it isn't looking real good right now."

In addition to the state's hits, Maxwell said the county's PERS costs are going up to the tune of over $200,000, and he expects a major increase in insurance fees.

Alves said a $200,000 cut to the city would probably mean a severe impact on police and fire positions. In addition, some funding for street maintenance and repair will also be impacted and no new construction projects will be undertaken.

The League of California Cities and California State Association of Counties are both opposed to the Governor's property tax shift in the proposed budget and we'll be working with legislators to change the formula.

"Recent history has shown that proposals such as this are foolhardy, shortsighted and ineffective," said Steve Szalay, CSAC Executive Director said. "We are shocked that the Administration is willing to travel down the same path, knowing what the outcome will be: elimination of critical services that Californians depend on every day. Although the Governor insisted he 'didn't want to do things the way they've always been done,' his proposal to grab $1.3 billion in property tax revenues from local governments is exactly that: business as usual."

The League of California Cities is strongly opposed and adamant in its criticism of the Governor's proposal.

"Here we go again," said league President Ron Loveridge, Mayor of Riverside. "This isn't a solution; it's a shell game that will force cutbacks in police and fire, emergency services, after-school programs for kids and many other local services."

CSAC, the League of Cities and others are sponsoring a ballot measure aimed for November that, if passed by the voters, would nullify the Governor's action and would protect local revenues from a state grab in the future. It has not yet qualified for the ballot.

Maxwell is planning to meet with county department heads and officials over the next week or two and bring a proposal on how to deal with the possible cuts to the Board of Supervisors at its meeting January 27. He hopes to have some fairly solid numbers to deal with at that time, and stresses things may be difficult.

City aims to redo public works, planning

Tuesday night the Alturas City Council received a formal proposal to reorganize the city's planning and public works departments. No action was taken, and the proposal will come back soon for adoption.

The proposal was presented by councilmen Joe Coffin and Jerry Smith, as the Government Oversight Committee, and they project the new structure would save between $20,000 and $28,000 annually and provide more service. The current organization has a Director of Public Works, an Assistant Director of Public Works, two working foremen and four other employees. The proposal calls for a new position as Director of Public Works, Planning and Economic Development, with a Deputy Director of Public Works and a Deputy Planner and Building Inspector under that position. There would be a Maintenance Worker 3, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 3, Maintenance Worker 2, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 2, and two Maintenance 1 positions.

According to the proposal, the goals are to bring the planning and economic development functions of the city under the direct control of the City Council, "where they can be given the necessary emphasis."

"Currently, the Planning and Economic Development functions are contracted to the County of Modoc and are handled by the County's Planning Director. The needs of the City of Alturas frequently are required to take a back seat where the needs of the county demand," the proposal states.

The City has terminated its planning agreement with the county which is effective July 1. That's when the city would like the new plan implemented if it's adopted in full by the council.

The City also agreed to authorize the Mayor or Planning Director to sign all necessary documents for the administration of a $35,000 Travel Plaza Grant, through Community Development Block Grants. They also authorized a cash match of up to $7,700. That grant will be used to study the feasibility of a Travel Plaza on SR 299 in Alturas. Plans include motel, restaurant, bowling center and truck stop.

County okays letter to attract feed lot

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday approved sending a letter to California beef feedlot, packing and slaughterhouse operators, in hopes of attracting one of those plants to this area.

Modoc County Planner Scott Kessler told the board the effort has been tried in the past, and several things tend to work as impediments, but felt another effort was worth the time.

Kessler said transportation, feed availability and distance to markets are generally the downsides of locating in Modoc. But he also pointed out that low cost of land, geothermal resources and even the climate are assets.

What Kessler said may be most attracted to Modoc would be a "niche market" operation, such as organic beef. He figures an operator who already has a stake and place in that market could find Modoc very attractive.

Additionally, the current Mad Cow scare flooding the country could serve as a tool leading to more natural or organic beef production, processing and sales. While the scare has impacted the beef market nationally and statewide, organic meats are not affected. The difficulty is the limited organic market size and just where that market may be located.

The county isn't ruling out any type of meat operation, but understands the problems associated with transporting feed grain into this area and transporting the finished product out.

Kessler said there will be some serious environmental concerns over a feedlot or slaughterhouse, but figures some of those concerns could be addressed or mitigated by just a proper location of a facility.

In any case, the county expects there to be some public opposition to a feedlot or slaughterhouse operation and public meeting and hearings would have to be held long before any approval was granted. Kessler said he doesn't know whether the invitation will bear any fruit.

Woman arrested after DUI, hit and run

An Alturas woman, Angelique Hanna, age 35, was arrested by the California Highway Patrol Jan. 11 alleging felony driving under the influence and felony hit-and-run.

According to the CHP, Hanna was driving a 2000 Jeep Cherokee northbound on Pencil Road at approximately 55-60 m.p.h., apparently under the influence of alcohol and prescription mediations.

Waposta VanEtten, age 21, Alturas, was driving his 1990 Honda Prelude southbound on Pencil Road at about 35-40 m.p.h. Hanna allowed her Jeep to swerve into the southbound lane, directly into VanEtten's path. He turned the Honda to avoid a collision and the car went off the west shoulder and into a ditch.

Hanna fled the scene and traveled about a half-mile, where her vehicle went off the road, struck a barbed-wire fence and became stuck in the mud. She was detained by a passerby until CHP officers arrived, as she was attempting to move her vehicle.

The Honda sustained minor damage to the undercarriage and radiator. A passenger in the Honda, Wendy Wheeler, age 17, Alturas, sustained minor injuries and was taken to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas.

Fewer Forest Service road maintenance employees to continue work

As part of ongoing efforts to make government more efficient, six Modoc National Forest (NF) employees will be affected by cost effectiveness studies of roads maintenance. Also there are two Lassen NF employees that are stationed in Alturas affected by cost effectiveness studies in fleet maintenance.

A total of 219 employees (139 in road maintenance and 80 in vehicle fleet maintenance) on the 18 NF's in California are affected by today's announcement. The decision follows competitive sourcing studies comparing the costs to those of private sector contractors. The future status of the employees wil be determined through subsequent steps. The Forest Service (FS) will provide assistance to employees throughout the process.

"These detailed studies have found that it is to the government's advantage to continue our road maintenance work in-house through use of a Most Efficient Organization (MEO)," said Stan Sylva, NF Supervisor Modoc National Forest, "MEO's are typically smaller than the existing organization, so changes in our roads maintenance workforce are expected."

"For maintenance of our vehicle fleet, we found that it was more cost effective to contract that work out," said Stan Sylva, NF Supervisor. "The private firm that won the contact is SERCO Management Services an, international outsourcing company."

"I greatly appreciate the professionlism of our employees, including those in fleet and roads maintenance, whose hard work led to completion of these studies," said Stan Sylva, NF Supervisor. "I am very concerned about the effects on our employees. Each affected employee has been personally contacted, and will be provided information about possible transfers to new positions or taking on new duties and other options such as early retirement. We will work closely with each employee to help them make the best possible decision."

Roads and fleet work duties were studied in strict compliance with guidelines established by the Office of Management and Budget, USDA and FS to ensure accuracy, consistency and fairness. The roads maintenance employees will work under a Letter of Obligation, which is essentially the government's contract to accomplish the work. In fleet maintenance, a small residual governmental organization will be set up to implement and administer the SERCO contract, and for any work the contract does not cover.

The transitions are expected to take about six months. More than 5,000 permanet employees work in the 18 NF's and Pacific Southwest Regional Office in California. Most of the affected employees are permanent employees.

Modoc-Washoe Stewardship Committee meets February 5-6 in Cedarville

Range improvement incentives and proposed changes in Bureau of Land Management livestock grazing regulations are among the items slated for discussion, when the Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Steering Committee meets Thursday and Friday, February 5 and 6, in the meeting room of the Cedarville Community Church, corner of Center and Bonner Streets, Cedarville.

The meeting is open to the public.

On February 5, the session runs from 10 a.m. to about 5 p.m. Committee members will discuss a proposed incentive program for ranchers, hear a report on wildlife populations and conditions on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, discuss long-term monitoring needs for the Warner Mountain Range Project, and discuss a report from the riparian credit subcommittee.

Managers from the BLM will discuss development of a juniper management strategy, while Modoc National Forest managers will present information on the Forest Service's "Four Threats" initiative. Both agencies will provide updates on a variety of activities.

On February 6, the session begins at 8 a.m. Agenda items include a presentation on the BLM's proposed changes in livestock grazing regulations, an update on tuberculosis testing requirements for livestock, and a status report on BLM wild horse and burro management.

The committee will also hear an update on the management plan for the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon-Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area, receive a status report on land use planning for BLM's northeast California Field Offices, and hear an update about safe grouse conservation planning.

The steering committee advises the BLM's Surprise Field Office and the Modoc National Forest's Warner Mountain Ranger District on resource management issues in Northwest Nevada and Northeast California. One of three such committees authorized by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangeland Improvement Act, the committee often focuses on experimental approaches to sustain ranching and healthy, productive public rangelands. Diverse pubic interests, including ranchers, environmental groups, state wildlife agencies, local government and federal agencies are represented on the committee.

MUHS 64-65 reunion in the works

Preliminary preparations are underway for a combined 1964-65 Modoc Union High School class reunion in July or August 2004, in Alturas. Date and place to be announced.

Alumni should send name, address, telephone number or email address to: Betty (Clark) Vaughn, P.O. Box 297, Keno, Oregon 97627, (541) 883-8150, email: riverviewtwo@aol.com; Alice (Mattson) Sisemore, 1903 Lakeshore Dr., Klamath Falls, OR. 97601, (541) 884-0866, email:alicesisemore@charter.net; or contact Hazel (Henson) Looper, 1204 W. 11th, Alturas, CA. 96101, (530) 233-2871; email: looper@hdo.net.

Obituaries:

Lucille Green

Lucille Green, 90, went to be with our Lord on Saturday, January 10, 2004, in Alturas. She is survived by her loving husband of 43 years, Warford Green of Alturas, Calif.

Their marriage in 1961 brought together two families consisting of Lucille's four children and Warford's four children.

Warford acknowledges the Lord's blessing in the harmonious blending of the eight children and the addition of their spouses: Grace and Henry Buerer of Orangevale, Calif.; Jeanette and Roger Stone of Redlands, Calif.; Virginia Webb, serving the Lord in Romania; Linda and Tom Carrier of Redlands, Calif.; David and Deon Green of Maumelle, AR; Dwight and Mary Green of Purceville, VA; Duane and Linda Green of Roswell, NM; and Faith and Doug Bettcher of Kirkland, WA. Other survivors include siblings Glenn Lehman, 96, of Grand Rapids, MI; Ruth Westmoreland, 94, of Alturas, Calif.; Dorothy Childers, 84, in Bettendorf, IA; and David Lehman, 74, in Catalina, CA. Preceding her in death are two siblings: Amy Stipe and Harold Lehman, and grandchildren Jim and Darrin Snodgrass and Julianne Carrier. Lucille and Warford have 21 grandchildren, 23 great grandchildren, and four great-great grandchildren.

Grace Lucille Lehman was born March 30, 1913, in Langley Township, Kansas. She moved with her daughters to California in 1948. She worked for at time at Norton Air Force Base Commissary and later in the San Bernardino Public School Cafeterias while Warford worked at Halsey Machine Company.

She lived in San Bernardino from 1948-1975, when she and Warford retired to a home they were building in California Pines. They were active in Roving Volunteers in Christ's Service (RVICS) and became members of Faith Baptist Church in Alturas, where they have worked and enjoyed the fellowship of many brothers and sisters in Christ.

The funeral and following potluck dinner will be held at Faith Baptist Church on Sunday, January 18, at 3:00 p.m. with Pastor Rod Bodmer officiating. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas is handling arrangements.

In addition, a graveside service will be held at Montecito Memorial Park in San Bernardino, California, on Thursday, January 22, at 10:00 a.m. for friends and family in that area with Bob Caddel of Campus Crusade for Christ giving a devotional message.

The family extends sincere gratitude for the multitude of expressions of sympathy and love from those who knew and loved Lucille.

Charles E. Reed

Lookout resident Charles E. Reed, 93, passed away of natural causes at Mayers Memorial Hospital in Fall River Mills, Calif. on January 6, 2004. Mr. Reed had moved from Los Angeles to Modoc County in 1978. He was a Chief Radio Technician with the U.S. Navy for 22 years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He was born in Centralia, Washington on November 10, 1910.

He is survived by his son Robert Reed of Lookout, Calif.; two grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

McDonald's Chapel, Burney will be in charge of graveside services to be held at a later date. Burial will be at the Lookout Cemetery.

Sports

Braves knock off top wrestlers

Modoc's 145-pound Travis Wood placed second in his weight at the huge Anderson Invitational last weekend. He was the highest place-finisher for the Braves, who placed eighth as a team with 105 points. .

Wood knocked off the number one ranked wrestler in the section, Lander Beyer of Shasta, 6-3, in the semi-finals. He lost, in overtime, to Bella Vista's Matt Vigna in the finals.

Cory Bell, Modoc's heavyweight took a third in the division while Jason Jones, at 160 pounds, finished in fourth place and Joey Catania finished seventh at 215 pounds.

Jones lost to Robert Bohn, of Davis, in the third-place match. Reno's Mike Kummer won the weight division. Bell beat Red Bluff's Geoff Drake for third place. Catania beat Orland's Nathan Rinehart for seventh.

According to Max Prep Sports, Bell remain as the number one ranked heavyweight in the north section. Wood has moved into the number one position as well. Jones is ranked at third in his division. Catania has moved up to number four in his weight and Jafar Mirlohi is fourth at 135 pounds. Luke Hammerness sits in the fifth spot at 152 pounds and Brad Bell is ranked sixth at 189 pounds.

Elk Grove won the tournament with 199 points, Red Bluff was second with 166, Wood Creek third with 160, Grants Pass fourth with 137, Willows fifth with 120, Bella Vista sixth with 110, Campo Lindo seventh with 108. The Braves finished ahead of several large schools including Shasta, Foothill, San Leandro, Reno, West Valley, Ukiah, Anderson, Orland, Lassen, and Central Valley.

Modoc remains the top ranked small school in the north section, followed by Durham and Mt. Shasta. Modoc is ranked second among all schools, with Red Bluff in the top spot, Willows, Shasta and Orland round out the overall team rankings.

The Braves are at the Burney Invitational this weekend and will be favored to repeat as that tournament's champion.

"The Anderson tourney was tougher than usual and I was pleased with our performance," said coach Shaun Wood. "We should have nine or 10 guys in the 14 finals matches at Burney and should win seven."

Modoc trips Bears in overtime, 68-67

Modoc's Braves blew an 11-point lead with about two-minutes left in the game, and had to go to overtime to beat the Mt. Shasta Bears 68-67 last weekend.

Modoc coach Mike Martin said his boys varsity team still led by eight with 57 seconds left in the game, but missed a couple of front ends of one-and-ones and the Bears sunk two long three-pointers and forced a turnover to tie it at the end of regulation.

The Braves outscored the Bears 10-9 in the overtime period, as the Bears missed the second of the two free throws in the final seconds.

"We missed some easy early shots in the game and took a while to get going," said Martin. "Those final two minutes were frustrating, and we went just 7-for-15 for the free throw line for the game."

Marty Stevens led the scoring with 22, Zach McKirahan added 15 and Micah Eppler had 14.

The Braves traveled to Weed last night and results were too late for press-time.

Hornets in full EL action

The Surprise Valley Hornets basketball teams are in the middle of Evergreen League action, meeting Happy Camp in McCloud Friday. The Hornets boys are 2-0 in league play, and Happy Camp is the top-ranked team in Division six, and remains unbeaten this year.

On January 13, the varsity boys started slowly, down 37-36 at halftime, but came out and outscored the Tulelake Honkers 44-17 in the second half for a 80-54 win. Adam Evans led the Hornets with 23 with Scott Soletti getting 15, Loren Harris 13 and Kevin Konz 12.

The varsity girls fell to Tulelake 76-44. Cara James led the scoring with 24 and Sara Teuscher added 12. The junior varsity boys lost 79-77.

The Hornet boys beat Dunsmuir 50-46 January 10. A poor shooting night for Surprise Valley kept the game close, said coach Arnold DeGarmo. Evans led with 16 points, Loren Harris added 10 and Konz and Soletti each added nine.

The varsity girls lost to Dunsmuir 53-52, in a game where 47 total fouls were called. With Dunsmuir leading 53-51 with six second left, James inbounded the ball to Teuscher who passed back to James. She was fouled on lay-up attempt and made the first free throw, but missed the second. She led the team in scoring with 34, Teuscher added eight, and Patricia Soletti had six.

The junior varsity boys lost to Dunsmuir 53-38.

JV boys lose on free throws

The Modoc Braves junior varsity boys spent a lot of this week practicing free throws after going just eight-for-33 from the line against Mt. Shasta, and only 1-for-10 in the final minutes.

Modoc lost the game 52-50, and coach Bunk Richardson said all they had to do was hit a few free throws for the win.

The Braves got off slowly, falling behind 18-8 in the first period, but closed the gap to 28-21 by halftime. Mt. Shasta led 38-32 after three and Modoc fought back in the fourth before the free throw curse came up.

Ross Burgess led the scoring with 22 and Taylor Dunn added eight points.

JV girls lose to Bears, 39-21

The Modoc junior varsity girls team shot just 20 percent from the floor against Mt. Shasta, losing their opening league game 39-21.

Coach Bill Hall said practcices have been good and he expects a rebound from the poor outing. Amanda Martin led with 10 points and Mary Nardoni pulled down six rebounds for the Braves.

Modoc met Weed last night and hosts Burney Friday.

January 22, 2004

News

Clinic exceeding goals under new operating deal

The Modoc Medical Center Clinic is exceeding projections for the first seven months of operation under the permanent physicians and should continue on solid footing.

According to Hospital Administrator Teresa Jacques, excluding one-time costs of the acquisition, the clinic will make a profit of $141,172 for the first seven months. "With the acquisition costs . . . the projection for the first year is a profit of $46,934."

Jacques told the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday that the facility was also meeting other goals. The Medical Center purchased the private practice of Doctors Ed Richert and Owen Panner and installed a third permanent doctor, Debra Clyde, on staff in April.

According to Jacques, other goals met include: improving the quality of care for the community; improving the continuity of care for patients; opening longer hours on a routine basis; improving the use of the Emergency Room; having a medical director for the Clinic Emergency Room and Ambulance; and increasing the obstetrical deliveries.

"I had estimated that we would need to average 62 patients a day with the new acquisition to meet our financial goal," said Jacques. "We are averaging 63.52 patients a day. What had not been allowed for in the original proposal was the additional dollars that would be carried in accounts receivable."

The hospital continues to carry more in accounts receivable (money owed it) than Supervisors or Jacques would like. That part of the hospital operation has been a sore spot for years, and a solution is still evasive.

Salvage sale finally comes out of Blue Fire remains

Modoc National Forest officials announced last week the successful completion of a timber sale from the Blue Fire area

"It's the Sunflower fire salvage sale," said Paul Bailey, timber program manager in charge of timber sales in Modoc National Forest. "We negotiated a sale with John R. Wood Trucking of Grants Pass, Oregon." Since there were no other bidders, the sale went for the minimum acceptable bid, set by the Forest Service. Said Bailey, "They came in and picked it up … what we call negotiation for minimum bid. If there's only one bidder, of course, they always take it to the minimum bid."

"We're doing it for a profit, of course … we hope. We've got it figured that way," said buyer, John Wood, speaking tongue in cheek

This is the only Forest Service timber sale completed out of seven originally offered of the Blue Fire area. "I would guess that'll probably be it," noted Bailey. "Although, some saw logs will probably be removed with the chipping operation."

The initial sales, as originally structured and offered last October, proved uninteresting to commercial loggers due to the loss of value in the timber over time. As Bailey acknowledged, so much time had passed that normal processes of disease, decay and insects had rendered the once salvageable, though blackened, trees nearly useless for commercial timber. Repeated attempts by the Forest Service to attract bidders for sales of Blue Fire salvage left officials frustrated. "It was good to finally get something coming off of that hill," said Bailey

The sale, bid at $31,262, entails the logging of about 2.5 million board feet, a small fraction of the 90 million board feet of commercially viable timber left standing in the wake of the Blue Fire over two years ago "If they'd have sold it sooner, they'd have made more money on it," said Wood, explaining that the poor quality created by the two year delay in harvesting the timber made it difficult to find buyers. "We had to research a long way around to sell that type of wood."

"They're (already) logging. Next week should see some logs come down off the hill there," said Bailey, noting that the logs will be hauled to distant mills since there are no longer any in this area

"We're hauling the wood quite a ways," confirmed Wood. Some of the timber will go to Yreka Timber Products in Yreka, some to Murphy Veneer in White City and the remainder to Superior Lumber in Glendale, Oregon. Wood estimates that only 2 to 3 months of operation should be necessary to complete logging operations, unless conditions deteriorate. "It all depends on the weather. If the weather stays cold … keeping it froze up … we can do it. If it warms up, we'll have to shut down."

"They're fighting snow up there now," observed Bailey. "There's about three or four feet of snow they're wallowing around in." The remainder of the timber in the Blue Fire area, about 80 million board feet, will be offered for sale at a much lower value rather than going for the more profitable lumber or other wood products. It will be "chipped," or chopped up for use as biomass

"Well, we don't know for sure," said Bailey about expectations for the chipping sales that his office will offer in the next two week. "We had some interest expressed, so we'll put some out and see how they go."

Asked his view of the logging and forestry industries from his perspective, Wood offered an opinion typical of logger. "Well, they say they're going to change things around. I'm going to have to wait and see. If they keep waiting long enough there'll be no mills left to saw those boards up."

Modoc jobless rate nears 9%

The unemployment rate in Modoc County for December increased to 8.8 percent, up from a revised 8.0 percent in November. In December, 2002, the rate was also at 8.8 percent.

The number of unemployed people went from 280 in October to 390 in December, The workforce in October numbered 4,710 and that dropped to 4,480 in December.

The state unemployment rate for December was 6.1 percent and the federal unemployment rate was 5.4 percent. None of these rates include people who are out of work and no longer on the rolls collecting benefits or who have become discouraged and stopped looking for work.

Modoc is ranked 38 out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen is ranked 27th at 6.6 percent and Siskiyou is ranked 43rd at 11.3 percent.

New water right fees assessed by SWRCB

Some local water right holders were surprised this month when they received a bill for $100 from the State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Water Rights.

According to the SWRCB, Senate Bill 1049 was passed in September by the state legislature and amended the Water Code to require the SWRCB to adopt emergency regulations revising and establishing fees to support its water right program. The fee is being assessed on all water right permit and license holders in the state.

The regulations became effective January 1, 2004. The annual water right fee adopted by the SWRCB for permits and licenses is: "Greater of $100 or $.03 per acre foot per annum."

There is no exemption for tax exempt entities, including cities, counties, water districts, irrigation districts, and others. Any entity capable of owning property, and capable of holding a water right is subject to the fee. If a water right holder chooses not to pay the fee, the Board of Equalization will first assess penalties and interest to the outstanding fee amount. If payment is not received eventually, they will seek collection of fees with penalties and interest through other means, such as attachment of wages, liens and so on.

The fee is based upon the face value of the water right and does not depend upon whether a person is able to divert water.

In the past, the state's water rights program was primarily supported by the General Fund. The state cut the General Fund support for the water rights program by 30 percent to help offset the current budget deficit. In addition, the Legislature determined that the funding source for almost half the remaining allocation in fiscal year 2003-04 should be shifted from the General Fund to a special fund financed by water right holders.

The fee is due by February 7, 2004. In addition, the SWRCB will also increase filing fees for water right actions.

Obituaries:

Gerald 'Jerry' Downard

Alturas resident Gerald "Jerry" Boyd Downard, 88, died suddenly from a stroke and heart attack while on vacation in Clearwater, Florida on December 23, 2003.

Mr. Downard had relocated to Modoc County, California in the late 1970s, where he purchased property that had belonged to a relative. He was an active community supporter during his years in Alturas.

Born on October 3, 1915 in Keosauqua, Iowa to Boyd and Dorcus Downard, he was reared in a very musical family and learned to play the steel guitar and the organ. He was a talented musician.

A former pilot and flight instructor, he was a decorated Korean War veteran and served a long and extensive military career. He retired from the military in the late 1960s, as a Master Sergeant. He was a life member of the Alturas Disabled American Veterans Chapter 113.

Mr. Downard was also an accomplished master cabinet maker and carpenter. He and his brother created and built Chris Craft Boats, Inc. Jerry later sold his half of the business to his brother, who later sold the business.

Mr. Downard enjoyed every aspect of life and lived it to the fullest. He loved people and was a great supporter and a fan of the Alturas Country Jam sessions, which he videotaped over the years. He also enjoyed attending the daily lunches, visiting with other senior citizens at the Modoc Senior Citizens Center. His interests were in friends and electronic toys.

He was preceded in death two years ago by his wife Mary Downard; his parents Boyd and Dorcus Downard; son Gerald Don, Daughter Mary Dorcus Sikes; granddaughter Brenda J. Downard and two great- grandchildren.

He is survived by daughter and son-in-law Nell and Jim Orndorf of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; son William Frederick Downard of Byrdstown, Tennessee; grandchildren Teri Downard, Milana Riffe, Dwight King, Adona Frye, Rebakah Flohr and six great-grandchildren, all from Ohio. Pastor Dewey Potter, the Veterans Groups of Alturas and Veterans' Chaplain will conduct a memorial service with military honors and "a celebration of Mr. Downard's life" on Saturday, January 24 at 10 a.m. at the Veterans' Memorial Hall, So. Main St., Alturas. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alturas D.A.V. Chapter 113.

A Native American Indian ceremony was also held in Ohio, as Mr. Downard was proud of his Blackfoot heritage.

Nadine Jimmy Phillips

Services for Nadine Jimmy Phillips of Cedarville, will be held Friday, January 23, 2004 at 10:00 a.m. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the services at the Surprise Valley Community Church in Cedarville. Interment will follow at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Mrs. Phillips, who had made Modoc County her home for the past 11 years, passed away of natural causes at the age of 103 in Cedarville, Calif. on January 17, 2004.

Nadine Jimmy Chappell was born on December 9, 1900 in Tyler, Texas to Anne Elizabeth (McGinney) and Thomas Sidney Chappell. When Nadine was a young girl, her father moved the family from Texas to a small ranch near Tucumcari, New Mexico, where Nadine graduated from high school. She enjoyed participating in sports, especially basketball. She loved to play the piano and loved to dance.

After high school, she worked as a secretary and in the local bank. She married Roy T. Phillips in Tucumcari, New Mexico on April 20, 1922, after he had returned to Tucumcari after World War I. To find better job opportunities, they loaded what few personal belongings they had into their Model T Ford and headed west, first settling in the Los Angeles, Calif. area. They had no money, no jobs, but strong wills. They had driven roads that were made of only two wood planks to accommodate tires across the sands, west of Yuma, Arizona, with no such thing as a paved road.

In June of 1923, Nadine traveled back to Tucumcari, New Mexico to be with her family for the birth of her first child, a son, Roy, Jr. Not long after, she and her son made the long return trip to California. A daughter, Betty Ann, was born in Taft, Calif. in 1925. Roy, Sr. was working in the oil fields and Nadine was a homemaker....... After 58 years of marriage, Roy Sr. died in 1978. Nadine then moved to be near her family, first to Roseburg, Oregon, and then in 1992, to Cedarville, Calif.

Mrs. Phillips is survived by her son Roy Phillips and wife Marge of Cedarville, Calif.; daughter Betty Ann Helmke and husband Virg of Glide, Oregon; four grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and three great-great grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be directed to the Surprise Valley Community Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, Calif. 96104. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas is in charge of arrangements.

Katherine Barry Baalman

The memorial service for former Fort Bidwell resident Kitty Baalman, who died January 15, 2004, will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 24, 2004, at Ashland Bible Church, 400 Dead Indian Memorial Road, Ashland, Oregon. Pastor Nate Shinn will officiate. Interment will be at Ft. Bidwell, Calif. Cemetery at a later date.

Kitty was born August 27, 1915, in Lakeview, Oregon, to Nicholas Patrick Barry and Eolus Lofftus Barry. She was a granddaughter of James Kane Barry of Rockchapel, Newmarket, County Cork, Ireland, and Katherine O'Connor Barry, of San Francisco, who were pioneers in the Lakeview area, and of Christopher Columbus Lofftus of Warner Valley, Oregon (formerly of Ashland, Oregon) and Edith Ewell Brown of Ft. Bidwell, Calif. James Kane Barry, alone with three of his brothers, were instrumental in bringing most of the original Irish settlers to Lake County, Oregon beginning in 1877.

On June 1, 1941, in Reno, Nevada, she married Eugene Henry Baalman, who died November 16, 1998.

Kitty grew up at Adel, Oregon, attended elementary school there and attended high school in Lakeview. She was the Lakeview Rodeo Queen in 1933. She received her Bachelor's Degree from Southern Oregon College, Ashland, Oregon and her Master's Degree from Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. She served on the Governor's Task Force for Special Education and assisted in the development of the Special Education Program in the State of Oregon. The majority of her career was spent teaching in the Special Education program in the Josephine County School District in Grants Pass, Ore.

She had many hobbies. She was an accomplished horsewoman, an avid reader, and a story writer. She also loved to garden and cook.

After her retirement, Kitty and Eugene moved to Ft. Bidwell, Calif. where they were active in the local church and civic activities. They returned to Medford, Oregon in 1997 due to poor health.

She is survived by a son, Nicholas A. "Tony" Baalman, Sr. of Talent, Ore.; a daughter, Judith Shiron, Portland, Oregon; grandchildren Jolinda Baker, Lynnwood, Washington; J. Richard Baalman, Monroe, Washington; Nicholas Baalman, Jr., Talent; and Michele Marthaller, Portland; six great-grandchildren; sisters Nellie Jane Barry Herringer, Clarksburg, Calif. and Betty Barry Fletcher, Spokane, Washington, and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by sisters Ruth Eolus Barry Cox and Edith Barry; brothers Robert James Barry, Nicholas Lofftus Barry, and Franklin Duane Barry.

In lieu of flowers, those who wish may make a contribution in Kitty's memory to Ashland Bible Church, 400 Dead Indian Memorial Road, Ashland, Oregon.

Arrangements: Rogue Valley Funeral Alternatives, Medford, Oregon.

Sports

Modoc dominates Burney invite

Modoc's top-ranked and powerful wrestling team dominated the Burney Invitational last weekend, with eight individual championships and the team title.

The Braves won with 287 points, followed by Lakeview, 162, Corning 149, Gridley 104, Mt. Shasta 98, Bonanza 84, Burned 65, Tulelake 61, Portola 57, Quincy 55.5, Biggs 55, Chester 55, Modoc II 52, Etna 31, Fall River 24, Bishop Quinn 21, Los Molinos 17 and Hamilton City 13.

Winning individual championships were Nick Hawes at 130 pounds, Jaafar Mirlohi at 135 pounds, Travis Wood at 145 pounds, Luke Hammerness at 152 pounds, Jason Jones at 160 pounds, Brad Bell at 189 pounds, Joey Catania at 215 pounds and Cory Bell at heavyweight.

Brad Bell won the award for most pins in the tourney with four and Cory Bell won the Most Outstanding Heavyweight wrestler of the event.

Modoc placed 10 wrestlers in the finals, out of 14 possible and won eight. In addition, Jesse Harer was second to Jones in the 160 pound division and Mark Main placed second at 171 pounds.

Hank Raabe took a third at 112 pounds, Brian Weed was fifth at 119 pounds, Sheridan Crutcher took a fourth at 125 pounds, Bill Hammerness was sixth at 140 pounds.

Cory Bell and Wood retain the number one rank in their weight divisions from MaxPreps, while Jones is ranked number two at 160, Luke Hammerness number four at 152, Mirlohi number four at 135, and Brad Bell number five at 189.

Modoc remains ranked number two in all size school in the north section, behind Red Bluff and is the top-ranked small school in the north section.

Boys atop SCL with 3 victories

Modoc's Braves boys basketball team is 3-0 in Shasta Cascade League play, having beaten Mt. Shasta, Weed and Burney and face Fall River Friday in Fall River.

The Braves will be at Etna Jan. 24 and will meet Weed at home January 27. The Braves beat Weed 62-53, jumped out to a 19-3 first period lead and leading 29-18 by half. The Braves poured in 20 points in the third to take a 49-35 lead after three. Weed put up 18 to Modoc's 13 in the fourth.

Marty Stevens led the Braves with 26 points, Micah Eppler added 12, Zack McKirahan had eight and Skyler Oates added seven.

Modoc beat Burney 49-46 Friday night.

Modoc leads the SCL with Trinity following at 2-0, Mt. Shasta at 2-1, Burney at 2-2, Etna at 1-2, Fall River at 1-2 and Weed at 0-4.

Hornets scare Happy Camp

The Surprise Valley Hornets boys varsity team took the top-ranked Happy Camp Indians to the wire January 16, but came up just short 54-50. According to coach Arnold DeGarmo, the boys got down early by 10, but fought back to lead 27-26 at halftime. In the third and fourth quarters, they trailed by as many as eight, but managed to rally to keep the game close. In the fourth quarter with 2:55 remaining, the Hornets made a 7-0 run and with 2:09 left took a 50-49 lead.

Someone tripped the lights at the McCloud gym, he said, so both teams had to spend 10 minutes waiting for the lights to come back to full power. Happy Camp scored first after a Hornet turnover to lead 51-50 and hit a free throw to lead 52-50 with a minute left.

The Hornets lost the ball on the next possession and Happy Camp called time out with 43 seconds left in the game. The Hornets made a stop with 23 seconds left and DeGarmo called a time out. The Hornets missed a three pointer shot with six seconds left, then Happy Camp went to the line and hit a pair of free throws to end the game. Adam Evans led the Hornets with 15 points, Josh Boneck added 11 and Quick had nine.

The Hornet girls led by as many as seven through the first three quarters, before Happy Camp got hot and outscored them 24-13 in the fourth to win by 56-48 James, Teuscher and Miura led with 30, eight and six points respectively.

The Surprise Valley boys junior varsity won their game. The Hornets are at Butte Valley Jan. 23 and will have Big Valley at home Jan. 28.

Modoc girls lose three in SCL

Modoc varsity girls team lost the first three Shasta Cascade League games and is hoping to rebound in the next few games.

The Braves lost to Mt. Shasta 49-34, to Weed 58-51 and to Burney 49-39. They meet Fall River Jan. 23 and Etna Jan. 24.

Against Weed, Jennifer Davis scored 19, Kristen Taylor added 12, Hannah Hays had nine and Emily Pence added seven.

The Braves played to a 10-10 tie after one and trailed 25-23 at half. By the end of three, the Braves trailed 42-38 and Weed outscored them 16-13 in the fourth.

Against Burney, Modoc trailed 12-7 in the first and 24-19 by half. By the end of three Burney led 34-28 and Burney scored 15 to Modoc 11 in the fourth.

JV boys lose pair of SCL games in fourth

Finishing a game solidly is hampering the Modoc Junior Varsity Boys team and coach Bunk Richardson is trying to instill some finishing instinct in the crew.

Modoc lost to Weed 62-59, after opening up a 19-3 first period lead and leading 29-22 at half. Modoc remained on top 43-40 after three. A pair of technicals and a flagrant foul gave Weed an edge and they scored 22 to Modoc's 16 in the fourth.

Ross Burgess, Zeke Bonham and Grant Hall each had 17 for the Braves. Modoc had Burney, who has only lost one game, on the ropes through three periods, but lost in the final minutes 48-46. Modoc trailed 10-6 after one and took a 24-21 lead at halftime. The Braves had a solid third period and led 35-27 going into the final stanza.

Taylor Dunn had 12 points and Burgess and Hall each added 10. Modoc has Fall River there Friday and is at Etna Saturday.

JV girls beat Burney

Modoc's junior varsity girls beat the Burney Raiders 42-38 Friday night and lost to Weed last Wednesday 35-22.

The Braves got off to a good start, leading 11-5 against Burney in the opening period. Burney fought back and led 21-20 at halftime. Rachel Crosby and Megan Thompson helped pull Modoc to a 27-24 third period lead. In the final period, Tacie Richardson hit four clutch free throws and Crosby scored six to keep Modoc ahead. Crosby led the scoring with 15 and Richardson pumped in 14 points.

Against Weed, the Braves had a common slow start and the Cougars took an 18-5 halftime lead. Coach Bill Hall made some adjustments at halftime and midway through the fourth, Modoc trailed by just five. Weed hit six of seven free shots down the stretch for the win. Marlana Bartram and Mary Nardoni had key steals in the game. Tacie Richardson had nine rebounds and Crosby scored five points to lead Modoc.

January 29, 2004

News

County counsel search on hold

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors put the search for a replacement Modoc County Counsel on hold Tuesday, pending a clearer picture of the budget.

The board has been actively searching to hire a county counsel, but the current state budget crisis is having all counties look very carefully at expenditures and personnel.

Modoc Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell told the board he wanted to have a firmer grip on the budget numbers, and the March 2 bond issue proposed by the governor could have a dramatic impact.

If that bond measure fails to pass the voters of the state, and it is now behind in the polls, it could have drastic effects on local government funding.

According to Maxwell, the costs of the new counsel would also include additional funding for office expense and he wasn't certain that during this budget crisis, those would be funds well spent.

Maxwell said the current situation with outside county counsel services performed by John Kinney is working and will continue. Supervisors Patricia Cantrall, Willy Hagge, Dan Macsay and David Bradshaw were in favor of suspending the search at this time, while Mike Dunn was opposed and wanted an on-board counsel hired.

Maxwell said he and department heads are keeping close tabs on the budget situation at the state level. While the budget picture is not wholly clear, Maxwell said he believes the county has a good handle on the situation as long as there are no major surprises from the state.

Just what the county is going to have to do, department by department, is still in the works, but county officials are working to save funding wherever they can and not make unnecessary expenditures. They are also seeking to secure funding from all applicable sources.

Candidate forums set

The Modoc County Farm Bureau is hosting a Candidate's Night for the County Supervisorial election in Districts Two and Four Feb. 4, 7 p.m. at Alturas City Hall.

District Four's Willy Hagge is facing a challenge from Ray Anklin and District Four's Mike Dunn is being opposing by Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless.

A Candidate's Night for the Alturas City Council election is Feb. 11, 7 p.m., also at City Hall. Incumbents Jack Ochs, George Andreasen and Joe Coffin are running for re-election and are being challenged by Steve Iverson, Cheryl Nelson and John Schreiber.

The election is set for March 2.

Quail Valley Ranch sale to DFG under scrutiny

The directors of the Pit River Resource Conservation District (RCD) and a number of concerned local farmers, ranchers and officials met at the Quail Valley Ranch last Tuesday evening to hear a presentation on the proposed sale of that ranch to the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG). John Siperek, the DFG wildlife program manager for eight northern counties in California made the initial presentation, followed by an impassioned speech by Ed Parrish, Quail Valley Ranch owner, for the idea of creating a self-sustaining "youth oriented, hunting and educational facility" on the ranch.

"We think the facility can generate substantial income to maintain it in the condition that it's been maintained," affirmed Parrish. " We think we can generate extra revenue for youth programs."

"I also want to make it very clear right now that the department has not made any decisions whether we're going to acquire this piece of property or not at this time," asserted Siperek, who then called for an "active partnership" between DFG and Pit River RCD to manage the property. "What we'd be looking for is some assistance in contracting out the work. … We have the ability to contract with you directly to do that work. Again, we don't have the staff to do the work, so we're looking for some help here." Siperek outlined a program wherein the operation of the ranch would be placed under RCD management, ensuring local oversight. He pointed to a "master contract" or "master service agreement" currently under development in Yolo County between the DFG and RCDs there to manage farming activities as a roadmap for the proposed Quail Valley acquisition.

"What our vision would be is that this area would not be the traditional wildlife area," continued Siperek. "It would be an area that would be focused on youth activities for educational activities and hands-on activities. … So, it would be a lot different than our traditional wildlife areas."

The proposed acquisition raises many issues among concerned Big Valley residents. "One of the things that we recognized early on," explained Siperek, "is we had to try to deal with some of these issues instead of just moving forward, buying another piece of property, as the department traditionally does."

Explaining that he did not want to present the details of his proposal at the time, Siperek said, "I think it's better to start at the concept level … getting more of the concerns addressed and issues dealt with … then get the details as we move forward and make sure it's something we all want to pursue. "We think that the operations here are fairly wildlife friendly, and that we'd like to see some of those operations continue with the money that would be generated from those operations helping us staff the area."

Parrish gave assurances that the careful and profitable management of his property would continue as it has, even under DFG ownership. "This property is capable of generating enough income to keep it like it's been in the last 20 years and to make major contributions to hunting and education. And so, I'm willing to … help this effort … personally, at no charge.

"I see it as a tremendous positive for the youth and educational purposes," continued Parrish, "and maybe even trend setting for state-owned properties. So I'm extremely excited about the possibilities and extremely excited about staying involved."

First response to the presentations came from Lassen County Supervisor, Brian Dahle. "I applaud you guys for at least getting the community together and starting to talk about this. I think the dialogue is healthy. "The main thing, I think, that's hard for this community to swallow—and I get around a little bit and talk to a few folks—is that we have a very, very bad example of management right next door," said Dahle, speaking of the Ash Creek Wildlife Area (ACWA). "We have noxious weed issues, and when you don't take care of those they get to be huge and costly (problems) for the neighbors.

"That's the scary part for the community. We love what Ed's doing here; we don't really like what's happening across the street. And, we don't want to see that happening again."

Fear among locals is that the poor DFG management of the ACWA, also in Big Valley, might also be the fate of Quail Valley once it is acquired by DFG. One rancher said, "None of us are impressed by that. As far as I'm concerned, that's what you're bucking here.

"These people right here are the people who knew what this land looked like before the ACWA was here. It wasn't just a swampland full of grass (as it is now)," continued the rancher. "That was a very productive ranch at one time. It ran 2500 head of cattle right here in Big Valley—probably the premier cattle ranch here. And everybody in this room that's local has been able to see it turn out to be what it is today."

Dahle continued, "Since the Pit River RCD has helped with the Ash Creek, I've seen huge improvements. At least we're grazing out there and doing some haying. It took us (the DFG) ten years to get there before you guys (Pit River RCD) got involved."

"As a Modoc County supervisor, I share the same concerns that Brian does—more so because it (the Quail Valley Ranch) is in Modoc County," offered Dave Bradshaw. "As far as in lieu taxes, I know that you're working toward some solutions for that. Special districts are another concern.

"It makes a big difference to me how the Pit River RCD thinks about this, as a board. Modoc County does have an agreement with Fish and Game. I was glad to hear that they're going to bring this process to the Land Use Committee. That will start the process for Modoc County to take a look at this and give more input."

"I understand there's some misgivings about the way Ash Creek is managed. But overall, I think it's a great addition to the community," countered Parrish. "And I think if the community continues to work through the RCD with Fish and Game, I really believe Fish and Game wants to do a better job. And I can promise you, if this concept is allowed to happen here—keeping the money here and keeping the management here and providing for youth and education—that this is a win/win for Modoc, it's a win/win for Fish and Game and it could be precedent setting in the state. And that could be great. But it's got to be given the chance." Objections to the proposed sale ranged from the loss of tax revenue from the land when it moved to state ownership to the loss of jobs and income in the local economy and a fundamental distrust of the agency's ability to stay the course or keep its promises.

Neighbors asked what assurances they have that the youth idea is not simply a ruse, a "smoke screen" to overcome objections among locals to the state's purchase of private property? "I think it's great if the youth thing comes about," said one observer. "But I don't think much of it if it doesn't." "You talk about making all this money (from the operation of the ranch)," said another observer. "Who manages that money? Does it go directly to the state to pay its bills and pay the people and do away with the jobs if they put all the money in the general fund and spend it?"

"If the money doesn't come into the state's control, the RCD would be able to keep it more of a closed system in that we could recycle the money back into the system," replied Siperek.

"That would happen?" was the next question.

"That's what we're trying to pursue here is to see if we can't develop a system where the money would be recycled directly back into the system," answered Siperek. "If that can't be accomplished, then we can't go forward. That's a very key part of the operation."

"I think everybody needs to be very clear on this point because that's the 'A plus' question of the night so far," injected Parrish. "If this revenue goes into the state general fund, you'd be lucky to see half of it back. If the money stays in the Pit River RCD … for the furtherment of this project, the state general fund never sees the money. The reason I'm excited about this thing is because I'm convinced Fish and Game is not going to do this … unless the money is assured to stay in the project, in the valley, in the community (and) in the youth programs. And, hopefully, the Pit River RCD is the controlling entity of that revenue."

In an effort to deflect criticism of the DFG's plans to acquire more prime ranching and farming property in Big Valley, Siperek insisted that the process was just beginning, that all concerns would be explored in the upcoming process of creating a working framework for the proposed program to go with the Quail Valley acquisition.

Siperek proposed forming a group, a steering committee, composed of individuals that represent various interests involved in both the sale of the property and its management afterward "that would look at the development of this area and steering its direction in the future.

"We didn't come here tonight asking for some kind of a resolution from the group," summarized Siperek. "This is just informational."

A closed meeting to present "the finances … of this operation" to the Pit River RCD board members followed the lengthy public discussion.

Sage Stage rolls into 5th anniversary in fine form

This week marks the fifth anniversary of Sage Stage service in Modoc County. "We rolled out service on January 19, 1999," says Pam Couch, transportation manager and the driving force behind the entire operation. In those five years, the familiar busses have become a permanent fixture in the fabric of life in this community as they wind their way through city streets picking up passengers.

"It absolutely amazes me when I look back and remember that we had 215 passengers … or something like that … in the first six months. And now we carry that many in two days," exclaims Couch. "Our growth has been phenomenal."

A brief analysis of the statistics bears out that observation.

Ridership on Sage Stage busses has increased almost 1,800 percent in the last four years and the miles traveled have more than doubled. In year 2000 operations, Sage Stage carried 1,188 passengers and traveled 56,902 miles. The total passengers figure quadrupled in 2001, burgeoning to 4,717. That figure increased only slightly in 2002, but the miles covered had doubled since 2000. By last year, 2003, total fares had almost doubled again to 8,454, and bus mileage jumped to 123,248.

Since its humble beginnings, Sage Stage has clearly expanded its vital role. "The Sage Stage is public transportation," explains Couch. "The premise behind it is to provide access, mobility and move people around—get them where they need to go."

Sage Stage is not your father's bus company, either.

It features thoroughly modern, comfortable busses and schedules that are much more accommodating and flexible than the ordinary public transportation systems so common in large urban areas. Riders no longer have to waste their time and suffer the inconvenience of waiting at bus stops, locked into rigid schedules, as was true in the past.

With dial-a-ride, intra-city service—door-to-door in most cases—the bus can take riders anywhere in town within a ten mile radius. "We bend over backwards to accommodate and to do anything for almost anybody," insists Couch.

Noting that their busses routinely transport three or four persons per hour within the city, Couch says, "The bus is busy all the time. We're setting records for the type of service that we have."

Because Sage Stage is also an intercity service, providing transportation to and from distant cities like Reno, Redding and Klamath Falls, those familiar busses can also be seen on the highways, far from Alturas. "We're here for the community," says Couch, thoughtfully. "You may not need us today, (but) you may need us tomorrow. It is our goal … to make sure that everyone has an opportunity to move about and get to the places they need to go."

For many in Modoc County, the Sage Stage is their sole transportation provider. "If you don't have a car, you've got no way to … get to the places you need to go," Couch observes. "The focus of our operation is to provide lifeline transportation, to get people to basic services and needs.

"We have an aging population—aging in place," Couch continues. "The poverty level is such that many cannot afford to maintain an automobile that's capable of driving the distances that they need to go to get to the doctor or whatever."

Sage Stage is unique among transportation providers across the country, breaking new ground in the transportation business. "Nobody is trying to do what we're trying to do. But the need is so great here, there's nothing for us but to do it," Couch says.

Couch is lavish in her praise of Niki Witherspoon, her capable assistant, who is responsible for the successful day-to-day operation of Sage Stage. "She deals with the clients on a very personable basis, engages them, and figures their problems out. … She has the heart, the ability to chat with people, to bring her staff together, to make solutions, to always be available and ready, to be kind, to be strong. She actually is now shouldering the operation so I can go out and write the next grant."

For her part, Couch is zealously dedicated to building an unparalleled transportation system in this area. "I'm passionate about my work. I really am."

"I think that she's very motivated. She's out for the good of the people," says Witherspoon of her boss. "She brings in a lot of money to this county, and a lot of good things happen with that. She's done a great job, and works long hours."

Of course, some riders will always complain about public transportation fares. "You have to remember, and what people really don't understand—although many of them complain about the fares—the fares are very, very modest. This is funded like a public utility is funded. Ninety percent of our money comes from government subsidy and funding. We get a portion of the quarter percent of local sales taxes collected in Modoc County, and that's directed towards the bus. We have about $135,000 a year (to operate). Period." According to Couch, the remainder of the expenses, by law, must be covered by the fares charged.

Also, some people are unsure about how the Sage Stage operates, thinking that it is much like a taxi or limo service. "They get upset a lot if we can't accommodate them right when they want us to," observes Witherspoon. "It's hard to make them understand that we're trying and that we can only do so much."

"A lot of people ask us things that we just cannot do," Couch adds. "There are limitations that we have."

While prior notice is important to route planning, "Frankly we do accommodate same day service on an as needed basis," explains Couch. "We can't drop everything and come exactly when you want, (and) we can't wait for you while you're in there." However, Couch characterizes their service as "flexible," in that they will make every effort to get riders where they need to go and do it on time.

For those who travel out of town, the four competent, well-trained Sage Stage drivers will make every effort to accommodate their needs. "When we get to the destination city, we bend over backwards to make the connections. We go to all the popular places in all of our destination cities for no extra charge."

Saying, "I've seen people's life change," Couch tells of a neighbor who insisted she would never ride the bus, that she had ample offers of transportation from friends. "She now rides four times a week with us," says Couch, smiling. "She actually gets on the bus and—just for an outing—stays on the bus as it goes to pick up other folks, just to get around and socialize and meet her friends. She (even) gives birthday cards to the children on the bus."

"This is a life-changing thing," echoes Witherspoon. "That's the most rewarding part. There's a young man who lives in Susanville. I think he's under 18. His parents live in Tulelake, and he takes our bus weekly to see them. Without that, he wouldn't be able to see his parents."

Many riders who were largely housebound now regularly use the bus to get around for business and pleasure. "They never got out before. Now they can go when they want, stay out as long as they want, do what whatever they need to do: socialize, meet family and friends, go out to lunch, do all those kinds of things … get there without having to ask somebody and be dependent," Couch says. "And that really makes a difference. We really think that getting people from here to there is really, really important because it gives them more life. It's like a ticket with dignity."

Couch and Witherspoon encourage Alturas residents to avail themselves of the convenience and comfort the Sage Stage offers. "And a lot of people do," says Couch, adding that it is an easy way to make the trip to the airport. "Let someone else do the driving. The fares are extremely reasonable, and it's way more economical than leaving your car parked at the airport or having a motel room. It's much less stressful, and much more economical."

Davis Creek hosts Groundhog Supper

The Davis Creek community will welcome the public to their annual Groundhog Supper on Saturday, Feb. 7. Doors open from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Davis Creek Grange Hall to offer a good time for all ages, with good food and plenty of visiting.

The annual dinner, comes together with solid community effort and will be hosted by the Davis Creek 4-H Club. Dinner is to be served from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Everyone is invited.

Tickets will be available at the door, $6.50 for adults; ages six to 12, $4.50; ages five and under, served free. An auction, games of Bingo and sales of cakes will be included.

The dinner includes freshly grilled sausage patties, mashed potatoes, green salad, green beans, and more.

The hall is set with long tables, seating all who come for the event. The small group of 4-H members receive assistance from family members and their community to make the event possible as a fund-raiser for the .maintenance of the community hall as well as 4-H.

The Davis Creek Grange Hall is located within the Davis Creek town limits. The Groundhog Dinner is a community tradition, which draws folks from throughout Modoc County to enjoy the event.

February 2 is official Groundhog Day in the United States, and bears the prediction of an early or late spring. If the groundhog does not see his shadow on February 2, Spring will come six weeks early.

Obituaries:

Ruth E. Westmoreland

Alturas resident Ruth E. Westmoreland, 94, passed away January 28, 2004 at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif. A Memorial service will be conducted by Pastor Rod Bodmer at the Faith Baptist Church on Carlos Street, Alturas on Saturday, January 31, 2004 at 1 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be directed to the Building Fund at Faith Baptist Church. A private interment will be held in San Bernardino, Calif., where Mrs. Westmoreland had made her home before moving to Alturas some 16 years ago. She was born in McCausland, Iowa on July 17, 1909.

A complete obituary will be published next week.

Sports

Braves head to big Corning tourney

Modoc's Braves will wrestle in a dual meet with Central Valley Friday and then head to the Corning Invitational on Saturday.

Coach Shaun Wood feels the team will be able to place in the top five at Corning's event, one of the major tournaments of the year. Most of the top wrestlers in the section will be at Corning.

"I think we'll do okay, it will be comparable to the Anderson tourney," said Wood. "It would be nice to get in top five. We'll have the seven guys who are ranked do real well, and we'll hope some others can place."

Modoc had last week off and got some kids healthy, but will be without Mark Main and Ryan Carrithers for this week because of injury.

Next weekend, Feb. 6 and 7, the Shasta Cascade League championships will be held at Modoc. SCL duals will be Friday and Saturday begins the regular tournament.

Modoc meets Mt. Shasta, Trinity and Etna Friday in duals, beginning about 1 p.m. Saturday rounds will start about 9 a.m. and should begin the finals about 1:30 to 2 p.m.

Modoc is heavily favored to win the SCL again, with Mt. Shasta and Trinity following.

Modoc's only female wrestler, Samantha Brush will go to an all-female wrestling tournament in Oakland this weekend to compete. She has not had the chance to wrestle another female this year, so this will be a first. If she does well, she could qualify for a state finals. She wrestles at 145 pounds.

Modoc's Travis Wood is ranked number one at 145 pounds in the section and Cory Bell holds down the number one heavyweight ranks. Jason Jones has moved into the number two rank at 160 pounds and Luke Hammerness is ranked third at 152 pounds. Jaafar Mirholi holds down the fourth spot at 135 pounds and Joey Catania is sixth at 215 pounds.

Etna stuns Braves in SCL, tough weekend ahead

Etna's Lions dropped the Modoc Braves 70-49 Saturday night in Etna. Modoc beat Fall River 45-42 in Fall River Friday night.

Coach Mike Martin said the team shooting percentage needs to improve, and the team was simply flat in Etna. This weekend is going to be tough as the Braves travel to Mt. Shasta Friday night and return home Saturday to face unbeaten Trinity. Saturday's games start at 2 p.m.

"It's going to be a brutal weekend and we just need to play well," said Martin. "Mt. Shasta is tough at their place and Trinity is going to go 100 miles an hour the whole game, offense and defense. We need to play our game."

Against Fall River, the Braves got off to a quick start, leading 21-11 in the first period. The Bulldogs clawed their way back into the game and trailed 29-24 at half-time. Modoc maintained a 36-29 lead after three, but the Bulldogs got closer with a 12-9 fourth period. Micah Eppler led the scoring with 20, Kyle Madison and Marty Stevens each added six.

Etna jumped out to a 19-12 first period lead and lead 33-28 at the half. Etna outscored the Braves 17-10 in the third and 20-11 in the fourth. Stevens led Modoc with 15, Eppler added nine Cam Jeffers and Zack McKirahan had six.

The Braves beat Weed 64-40 Tuesday night in Alturas, jumping on the Cougars early, 21-12 in the first period. Modoc led 33-17 at halftime and 53-31 after three.

Stevens led the scoring with 26 points, Shiloh Pierce added 13 and Eppler had nine.

Modoc JVs win:

The junior varsity boys put together two solid scoring gamesd, beating Fall River 74-57 and Etna 64-30. Coach Bunk Richardson said both outings were solid for his charges.

Fall River got up on Modoc 21-15 in the first period and still led 36-35 by the halftime talks. The Braves came out in a different defense and took a 52-35 lead after three and had a solid 22-points for quarter for the win. Ross Burgess led with 24 points and Grant Hall added 19.

Modoc started quickly against Etna, leading 18-9 after one and 32-19 by the half. By the end of the third, Modoc led 47-25 and closed out strong in the fourth.

Burgess led the scoring with 27, Taylor Dunn had nine and Keith Montague had eight.

Tuesday night, Modoc beat Weed 54-44 at home. Modoc led 13-2 in the first and 29-16 by half. The Braves maintained a 43-26 after three periods. Burgess led the scoring with 24 and Hall added 13.

Brave girls lose struggle

Modoc's varsity girls team is struggling this year, trying to put a solid game together in league play. Modoc travels to Mt. Shasta Friday night and plays Trinity at home Saturday, with the junior varsity girls starting play at 2 p.m. and all teams following.

The varsity girls lost to Fall River 69-33 Friday night and Etna dropped them 74-20 Saturday. Both games were on the road. Tuesday night the Braves lost to Weed at home 67-31.

Modoc started with a 9-7 first period lead against Weed, but the Cougars outscored them 24-6 in the second period to take a 31-15 halftime lead. Weed put up 36 points in the second half to Modoc's 16. Emily Pence had 12 for the Braves and Kristen Taylor added eight, with Allison Campagna getting six. Against Etna, the girls got behind 22-5 in the first period and 42-9 at halftime. The Lions outscored Modoc 19-8 in the third period and 13-3 in the final stanza.

Taylor led Modoc with 10 points, Pence added five.

Fall River also jumped on Modoc early, taking a 17-10 first period lead and going up 38-16 at hafltime. Fall River scored 15 to Modoc's 13 in the third but blew them out in the fourth 16-4. Pence led the scoring with 13, Brittany Bartram had seven and Campagna added six.

Junior varsity girls: Modoc's junior varsity girls won a low-scoring game against Fall River Friday night, 18-16. Modoc and Fall River were tied at four after one and Fall River led 9-5 at halftime. At the end of three, the Braves trailed 12-11. Amanda Martin hit two buckets in the third and Alysha Northrup sunk a pair in the fourth, with Tacie Richardson and Jessie Harden each hitting late free shots.

Etna beat the Braves junior varsity 45-31. The Braves started slowly and spotted the Lions a 21-7 lead at halftime. Modoc didn't score in the second quarter. Modoc fought back to close within nine at the end of three 31-22. The Braves came to within five, but were outscored 14-9 in the fourth. The jayvees lost a tight one to Weed 40-38 Tuesday night. The game was tied at 8-8 in the first and Modoc led 18-17 at halftime. The Cougars hit some threes in the second half to take the lead and Modoc came up just short. Richardson led the scoring with 12 points, and Rachel Crosby added seven. Richardson also grabbed nine rebounds.

Hornets win

The Surprise Valley Hornets boys basketball team put up 31 points in the fourth quarter, after only scoring 26 in the first half, to beat the Butte Valley Bulldogs, 86-67, January 23.

Surprise Valley meets Dunsmuir at home Saturday, with game time at 1:30 p.m.

Against Butte Valley, the Hornets had three players still fighting a cold, but four of the six players scored in double figures. Adam Evans and Loren Harris combined for 37 points, 18 rebounds, three blocked shots, and two steals. Josh Boneck and Scott Soletti combined for 38 points, 10 rebounds, and 13 steals. Butte Valley's Shane Cynor led with 18 points.

The Hornet girls were out-hustled by the Bulldogs, according to coach Arnold DeGarmo, and trailed 34-17 at halftime. Butte Valley won the game 54-38. Cara James led Surprise Valley with 24 points and Sara Teuscher added eight points and seven rebounds.

The Hornet junior varsity beat the Bulldogs 57-45. The Bulldogs led 30-23 at halftime.

Hemphill is reserve AA cowgirl

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill earned reserve All-Around Cowgirl honors at the District One California High School Rodeo January 25 in Red Bluff. Hemphill won the breakaway roping event, placed second in goat tying, ninth in pole bending and tied for fifth in girls' cutting.

Alturas' Chris Brown took a second in bull riding.

The next rodeo is in Redding Feb. 14 and 15 and on March 6, the competitors head to the Red Bluff Fairgrounds for the Interdistrict Rodeo. March 19-21 is the Challenge of Champions Rodeo in Plymouth, Ca, and the District Finals will be held in April.

February 12, 2004

News

Snowpack for January above area averages

Snowpack is better than average in most of Modoc County, according to the snow survey just released by the federal agencies. Last year at this time, snowpack was just 40 percent of average.

Blue Lake has 26 inches of snow containing 8.9 inches of water this year at 6,800 foot elevation. That compares to just nine inches of snow last year, containing 3.4 inches of water. The 10-year average for the area is 29 inches of snow containing 7.6 inches of water.

Cedar Pass measures 43 inches of snow with 15.3 inches of water. Last year, only 14 inches of snow was at the spot in January, containing 3.4 inches of water. The 10-year average for Cedar Pass is 39 inches of snow with 12.7 inches of water. That snow survey spot is at 7,100 feet elevation. Barber Creek, south of Eagleville, has 37 inches of snow containing 12.4 inches of water. Last year it had just 12 inches of snow containing 4.5 inches of water and the 10-year average at the 6,500 foot spot is 32 inches of snow and 9.5 inches of water.

Last year at this time 49 Mountain (Nevada) had no snow at all. This year there is 22 inches with 4.8 inches of water. The 10-year average at 6,000 feet is 17 inches of snow and 4.5 inches of water.

Jake Coffey of the Modoc National Forest and Tom Hill of the Natural Resource Conservation Service took the surveys last week.

For the month of January, 2004, .96 inches of precipitation was measured. That's up over .75 inches of precipitation last year, but, well below the average 1.40 inches.

No use permit for Canine Country, appeal is planned

The Modoc County Planning Department will not issue a use permit for Judy Ford's Canine Country and has given the facility 15 days to appeal to the Planning Commission or 90 days to close.

Ford has operated Canine Country west of Alturas for several years and takes in stray animals, working hard to adopt them out and care for their needs.

On Wednesday, Ford said she plans on appealing the decision to the Planning Commission, and further explained that her facility is more of a holding area than long term kennel. She said she tries to get the animals to outside agencies, often out of state as quickly as possible. The question of renovations, or buildings she said, comes down to financial ability.

Modoc Planner Scott Kessler issued his opinion on January 29, stating that he had had multiple complaints from neighbors that "clearly demonstrate that this use is detrimental to the health, safety and peace of the property owners in the vicinity. The fact is your current operation removes all speculation about the matter and it is injurious to the rights and enjoyment of property in the area."

Kessler said after visiting the site, he found it consisted of a series of dog pens on concrete pads with igloo shelters and a series of unfenced dog houses with dogs chained to them. When he visited there were 14 dogs, and he said he's been told there have been upwards of 40 at different times. "There is no doubt in my mind that your care of these dogs provides a service to the community and is the humane thing to do," said Kessler. "It is the right thing to do and I am sympathetic to your cause. However, these conditions are unacceptable for such an operation. A series of open air pens on concrete pads does not constitute a kennel."

If Ford chooses to appeal, Kessler makes the following recommendations: design the facility more like a kennel, with indoor and outdoor pens; reduce the barking noise by putting animals inside a building and regulating the number, hours and mix of dogs outside at any given time; limit the number of dogs; changing operational policies to place an overflow of dogs in homes throughout the county until they can be adopted out; and plant a noise barrier with fast-growing hedges such as Austrees.

"The kenneling and adoption of animals is a community issue that extends well beyond one individual's personal and financial resources," wrote Kessler. "I would encourage you to seek assistance throughout the community to construct a facility that will endure beyond your efforts." Ford has run Canine Country for many years, relying primarily on donations and community support. She has wide support in the county from individuals and entities.

BV irrigators hope state's decision could force Hot Spring's hand

Ranchers and farmers along the Pit River reported mixed reactions to the recent "cease and desist" order the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) issued against Hot Springs Valley Irrigation District (HSVID) in the ongoing dispute over releases of water into the river.

"From the water users down here, it's been a good reaction," said Dave Bradshaw, Modoc County Supervisor. "I think that it's brought things to the forefront that showed that Hot Springs was operating, probably, outside of their licenses."

"The way I understand it," said Peter N. Gerig, a Big Valley water user, "is they don't have the right permits so they can't sell water any more. … I'm sure you couldn't talk to a soul that didn't think the decision was right." "I can't say that it's going to do much because, first thing, there's no enforcement," countered John Fitts, a Lookout resident who sees the decision having little effect. "I don't know that any progress has been made."

"We thought maybe they could go a little bit further … the state could … on the decision," said Dean Leventon, chairman of the Big Valley Water Users, making no effort to hide his disappointment in the decision. "We're just going to, I think, probably wait and see right now … what's going to happen."

The dispute centers on HSVID's sale of stored water to the power utilities downstream. Water users all along the Pit River below Canby insist that the water sold for power generation has historically been theirs to use for summer irrigation. "We used to get quite a little bit of water," explained Fitts. "They didn't used to run their system near as efficient. But, now, when there's money involved … at the far end of the season they hold that water back until we can't use it any more, and then they release it and let it go on down to Malacha Power. That has dried us right up."

"It seems like since all this started, we noticed a definite slowdown in the amount of water that came down here," agreed Leventon.

"There's not all that much water to go around to begin with," continued Fitts. "Both Hot Springs and South Fork (irrigation districts) have tightened up their system, and they've made it much more efficient. South Fork hasn't let hardly any water come on down, and there never is any water in the summertime on the North Fork, anyway."

Several complaints about the practice were filed with the SWRCB. "Landes, Monchamp and Big Valley Water Users … we all filed a complaint," affirmed Fitts.

Hot Spring's position that their release of water to the power companies downstream was within their purview has been ruled erroneous in the SWRCB's most recent ruling, issued early in December.

Bradshaw's view is typical of many Big Valley ranchers and farmers. "Water users in Big Valley the last several years have been shorted water—maybe for that reason, or maybe not. At least the Water Resource Control Board has the scrutiny now. And, hopefully, that will work out in the long run, that we'll get our water back down here … or at least everybody in Modoc County will get the water that they have coming."

Gerig is somewhat optimistic about improved water flow as a result of the board's decision. "I think we're going to see a change this year … we're hoping anyway. I'm sure it (HSVID) will allow more down than has come the last couple of years, for sure."

Fitts is much less optimistic. "I don't think they'll do a thing, the Water Board, until the suits that are pending are settled. I think we're going to have to set kind of tight until they settle them lawsuits that's pending." How badly has the lack of water in the Pit River hurt downstream irrigators? "It's been hard to judge on account of the last three years have been (very) dry years," explained Gerig, referring to the diminished flows in the Pit River during the irrigation season. "I'm sure it's hurt us some on the natural flow, even though it would have been real small. Some of it's been nature's (doing), but I really believe it has hurt us some."

For his part, Bradshaw hopes to see immediate changes. "It's a positive thing. The only thing I'm concerned with is I hope that they get their monitoring started and everything started to help this season … for the water users in this area. But they need to get a long-term solution as far as monitoring."

"If they'd put some teeth into it," added Leventon, "I think we'd see some difference."

"They're not even going to give us a water master this next year," objected Fitts. "The state collected our money for the water master fee. For Big Valley Water Users, that's like $34,000 a year. And this is the last we heard: The state was broke, and they weren't going to give us a water master this summer. And I doubt that they're going to give us the money back, either, you know."

Indeed, Fitts seems to have the best grasp of the situation, as it stands. "Big Valley Water Users … I don't know that they will, as a group, be in favor of a lawsuit. Quite frankly, lawsuits cost money, and we don't have any money to spend."

Moreover, explained Fitts, the outcome of a lawsuit could very well backfire. "I retained counsel … oh … 20 years ago when it first came up. We didn't figure that we were being treated quite right. Basically, I was going to jump up and down and sue the guys at Hot Springs and so forth.

"My attorney said, 'I know where you're coming from. But … you're probably going to lose the suit, number one. And number two, it opens up the adjudication and the whole process by letting everybody have a whack at it again.

"We are an adjudicated district down here, and I don't know if that gives us any clout over the riparian users.

"Quite frankly, if we go to court, we're probably going to all of us lose, you know, and Los Angeles Power or somebody will probably wind up with all the water," says the beleaguered rancher with a knowing chuckle. "That's a little strong, but by the time Fish and Game and everybody gets into it, there wouldn't be any summer water left!"

Speaking of the SWRCB decision, Fitts summarizes, "Basically, as far as I'm concerned, we were given lip service so far. I don't think it's going to have much of an impact. I think it will have to go to court. … And as I said, I think that would change the situation (for the worse). I don't know that it'll help anybody."

Still, Fitts seems to be looking for a solution to the situation. "I wish we could forge some sort of a long-term relationship with the Hot Springs (Valley) Irrigation District and buy up so much water from Big Sage Reservoir. I think that would fly. It is irrigation water, you know. But I don't know that that will ever happen either. It isn't going to happen until a few tempers and so forth calm down."

Then, upon further thought he adds, glumly, "We can't outbid that power company. The water's very valuable. I think this might be kind of the beginning of the end."

Permanent absentee voters do not need new application

The voter registration deadline for the March 2 Primary Election is Feb. 17 and Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said most people are paying attention.

She reminds people who are permanent absentee voters that they do not have to send in a new absentee application.

Madison also said the people need to make sure they are registered correctly -- in the right district, under the correct name and at the correct address.

Madison suggests that anyone who needs more information on the election, contact www.easyvoter.org.

People who haven't voted in several elections should check to make sure they are still registered properly. They might have been taken off the registration list.

For the election, absentee ballot applications can be made February 2-24. Voters may request those ballots by letter, with signature or they can be done using the application on the back of the sample ballots. Many of the local precincts outside of Alturas will vote by mail.

District Two Supervisor Mike Dunn is facing a challenge by Roy Moore and Ron Sharpless. In District Four, Willy Hagge is running against Canby rancher Ray Anklin.

Supervisor Pat Cantrall and Superior Court Judges Larry Dier and Fritz Barclay are unopposed.

In the City of Alturas, councilmen Joe Coffin, George Andreasen and Jack Ochs are seeking re-election. They are being challenged by Steve Iverson, John Schreiber and Cheryl Nelson.

Building slumps in January

Local building activity dropped off to low levels in the month of January, according to the Modoc County Building Deportment.

For the month, only eight building permits were issued, valued at $183,292. A manufactured home on a perimeter foundation made up about half the total and the only other large items were a garage with living quarters above and a hat storage barn.

In December, the county issued 17 permits, valued at $94,798.

The City of Alturas issued seven building permits worth an estimated $10,120 in January. In December, 11 building permits were filed with the City of Alturas in December, worth $65,747.

Curtis watercolors brighten pre-Spring Art Center show

The watercolor paintings of local artist and instructor Margot Curtis will be featured for the 2004 opening reception of the gallery on Friday night, Feb. 6 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The public is invited to preview the new February show and to enjoy punch and hors d'oeuvres.

Margot Curtis is a third generation Californian, a retired rancher's wife and the mother of four grown children. She is a graduate of Pomona College, with later art courses from University of California, Santa Barbara and Western Montana College.

Starting with oils and acrylics and finally exploring the endless and exciting qualities of watercolor, Curtis began taking workshops with nationally known watercolorists. They have included Barbara Nechis, Sue Bennett, Gerald Brommer and the late Richard Yip and Irving Shapiro. Curtis attempts to attend at least one workshop annually and particularly enjoys painting on location.

Currently instructing watercolor classes for Lassen College's Modoc outreach, Curtis credits early encouragement from Sue Bennett and the books and teachings of artist and master teacher, Gerald Brommer, for the impetus to share her enthusiasm for watercolor with students. "Watercolor is a happy medium."

"Although I teach our students the basics, I consider myself still a dabbler. It's hard to limit myself to a single style of painting when there are so many new approaches and techniques developing in watercolor that I've yet to try," expresses Curtis.

The Art Center gallery is located at 317 So. Main Street, Alturas. The non-profit organization offers a gallery featuring the works of local and regional artists, gifts and classes. Those interested in Art Center membership are welcome to join. February is membership month.

Obituaries:

Ruth E. Westmoreland

Alturas resident Ruth E. Westmoreland, 94, passed away January 28, 2004 at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif. A Memorial service and potluck dinner were held at Faith Baptist Church in Alturas, Calif. on January 31, 2004. Pastor Rod Bodmer officiated. Burial took place in San Bernardino. She was born Ruth Ella Lehman to Joseph and Cora Lehman on July 17, 1909 in Solomon, Kansas. Ruth studied the Bible and music at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois and graduated in 1937. While at Moody, she met Leslie A. Westmoreland. They were married on Christmas Eve, 1937 in Davenport, Iowa. It was a double wedding ceremony with her sister, Amy marrying Troy Stipe.

Ruth and Leslie lived in Missoula, Montana where they pastored a church. Later, they returned to Chicago where Ruth was employed at Brachs Candy Company office. They were members of Leavitt Street Bible Church and later Calvary Memorial Church.

Leslie passed away July 5, 1961. Ruth retired from Brachs in 1974. She then moved to San Bernardino, Calif. to care for her aging mother.

Ruth's mother passed away in 1985 and a few years later, Ruth moved to Alturas, Calif., to be near her sister and brother-in-law, Lucille and Warford Green.

In Alturas she was a faithful and much loved member of Faith Baptist Church and of Bible study. Her wonderful soprano voice was appreciated in church where she loved to sing. She also loved flowers and enjoyed her membership at the Art Center, where she sold her watercolor paintings and crocheted baby items. Also an avid reader, the post office and library were frequent destinations as she walked around town.

Ruth is survived by her brother the Rev. Glen Lehman of Grand Rapids, Michigan; sister, Mrs. Dorothy Childers of Bettendorf, Iowa; brother, David Lehman of Burbank, Calif.; brother-in-law Warford Green of Alturas, Calif.; niece Mrs. Phyllis Elliott of Hillside, Illinois and many other nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband Leslie, her sister Amy Stipe, sister Lucille Green, brother Harold Lehman and parents Joseph and Cora Lehman.

The family is thankful, first of all, to the Lord Jesus for their rich heritage of knowing Ruth Westmoreland, being in her family and sharingher faith in God. They are also very thankful to the many friends and loved ones who cared for Ruth through the years.

Memorial donations may be directed to the Building Fund at Faith Baptist Church, 810 West Carlos St., Alturas, Calif. 96101. Kerr Mortuary in Alturas was in charge of arrangements.

Lacene E. Boyd

Long-time Alturas resident and piano teacher Lacene Evadna Boyd, 88, went to be with the Lord on January 31, 2004 in Fortuna, Calif.

A resident of Alturas, Calif. since 1955, she was actively involved with the Alturas First Baptist Church where, for several years, she served in the positions of church treasurer and organist. She also taught piano to many youngsters in the area.

She was born Lacene Evadna Sweangen in Topeka, Kansas on January 12, 1916. She was preceded in death by her husband Russell and two sons, Robert and Gary. She leaves behind two sons, Dan of Alturas, Calif. and John of Fortuna, Calif., their wives, seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. She was loved by her family and friends and will be greatly missed.

Funeral services will be held at the Alturas First Baptist Church on Friday, February 6 at 10 a.m. with interment at the Alturas Cemetery. A time of remembrance for friends and family will take place at the First Baptist Church, following services. Pastor Bud Kirk will officiate.

Vicki Anne Christensen

Former Likely resident, Vicki Anne Christensen of Sacramento, died of natural causes in Carmichael, Calif. on February 1, 2004.

Vicki was born March 2, 1947, in San Francisco, Calif. to C. Brunel "Bru" and Barbara Don Christensen. She lived in Likely while growing up and always considered herself a Modocer. Vicki graduated from South Fork Elementary School and Modoc High School.

She worked as a telephone operator for several years at Citizens Utilities in Alturas.

Vicki moved to Sacramento in 1973, and worked in the answering service business and for the Franchise Tax Board.

Vicki was preceded by both sets of grandparents and her father, C. Brunel Christensen.

She is survived by her loving son, Gerald Watts of Sacramento; her mother, Barbara D. Reavley of Sacramento and sister Jan Christensen of Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

Funeral services will be held at a later date at the Likely Cemetery, Likely, California. Remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

Ruth Flournoy Crew

A memorial service for Ruth Flournoy Crew will be held Monday, February 9 at 9 a.m. at Christian Life Assembly Church, 225 West B Street, Alturas. Burial will be at the Likely Cemetery in Likely, Calif. Mrs. Crew, who had been living in Alturas from 1999 until 2003, passed away of natural causes in Modesto, Calif. on January 30, 2004. She was 78. She was a native of Berkeley, Calif., born August 25, 1925.

Mrs. Crew was the mother of Cindy Marks of Modesto and Wade Crew of Ripon, Calif. She is also survived by her sisters June Lord of Auburn and Claire Goulden of Alturas, Calif. Four stepchildren survive and are Vivian Faust of Milwaukie, Oregon; Valerie Range of Boise, Idaho; LaVonne Oelschlager of Clackamas, Oregon and Hiram Crew of Milwaukie, Oregon; 19 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

A memorial service will also be held today, Feb. 5 at 3 p.m. at Ripon Grace Brethren Church, Ripon, Calif. Salas Brothers Funeral Chapel in Modesto is in charge of arrangements.

Remembrances may be sent to Child Evangelism Fellowship, P.O. Box 981, Modesto, Calif. 95353.

Lucille Retzloff

Services were held on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Dominic's Catholic Church in Orland for Lucille Retzloff, 86, who passed away on January 22, 2004 at Enloe Medical Center in Chico, Calif.

She was born on August 23, 1917 to Antone and Mary Marks. She attended schools in Bayliss and Orland and later married John Retzloff in 1939. She was a homemaker and enjoyed gardening. She lived in Orland for 63 years and was a loving wife, mother and grandmother

She is survived by sisters Clem Ponciano of Willows, Ermaline Azevedo of Sacramento; brother Tony Marks of Oroville; daughters Carmen Brumbaugh of Orland, Sandi Ray and husband Lawrence of Alturas; and son Jack Retzloff, of Covelo. She is also survived by 12 grandchildren and one great-grandchild

She was preceded in death by her husband John Retzloff and sisters Mary Silva of Sacramento and Emily Alves of Bayliss.

Arrangements are under the direction of F.D. Sweet & Son of Orland

Theodore 'Ted' R. Martinez

Funeral services for Theodore "Ted" R. Martinez were held on Sunday, Feb. 1, 2004 at 12 noon at the XL Reservation Cemetery in Modoc County. A wake was held Saturday night at the family residence on Carlos Street, Alturas. Mr. Martinez passed away on January 29, 2004 at 12:20 a.m. at his Redding home, as were his wishes.

Born in Likely, Calif. to Ethel and Teadoro Martinez on September 10, 1932, he graduated from Modoc High School and also attended Shasta College in Redding.

Theodore was a veteran of the U.S. Army, having served as an ammunition technician during the Korean Conflict.

He had currently been employed at Win River Casino in Redding, Calif. He was preceded in death by his mother and father, his son Victor Martinez and brothers Raymond Martinez and John Martinez.

He is survived by his wife Julia of Redding; son and daughter-in-law Ruben and Ana Martinez of Alturas, Calif.; sons Vincent Martinez of Redding; Shaun Martinez of Redding; Anthony Martinez of Redding; daughter Julie Martinez of Redding; three grandchildren, Catalina, Andrew and Edeweechee all of Redding; nieces Carmen Marin of Sacramento; Monique Chacon of Healdsburg; nephew and niece-in-law DeAngelo and Edith Regoles of Shasta Lake City.

The Family of Theodore "Ted" Martinez wishes to express their heartfelt thanks to the Pitt River Tribe and Redding Rancheria for their financial contributions, also to the V.F.W. Honor Guard for their time and dedication and to the numerous relatives and friends for their support through this difficult time.

Memorials may be directed to the American Diabetes Association, Memorial and Honor Program/NCC, P.O. Box 2680, North Canton, Ohio 44720 or to the American Cancer Society, 3290 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA 96002 or call the ACS at 1-800-227-2345 to make a donation with a credit card.

Sports

Modoc Braves hosts SCL Wrestling Championships

Modoc's dominant wrestling team plays host to the Shasta Cascade League Championship Tournament this weekend, with wrestling to start Friday about 1 p.m. and Saturday about 9 a.m. in the Griswold Gym.

The Braves, who just won one of the major tournaments in the north state at Corning last weekend, are heavily favored to win the league title again this year. Last year they won the league title by over 100 points.

"We should have a lot of kids in the finals," said Wood. "Some of our younger wrestlers are starting to peak, and this is the time. We have a few injuries, but should win league convincingly."

The Braves are coming off a win at the Corning Invitational last weekend, the first time ever for Modoc. "It was impressive," said Wood, "and we had some guys who didn't do as well as they could have. We had some other kids really step up."

One of the people who stepped to the front was Ian Jacques who took a third place in the 171-pound division. Hank Raabe took a fifth at 112 pounds. Wood also credited Jared Cox, who took a sixth at 152, Brian Weed who took sixth at 125, Nick Hawes who took sixth at 135 and Sheridan Crutcher who took a sixth. Scott and Chris Buchanan also did well.

Modoc's top wrestlers did their part as usual, with Travis Wood taking a second at 145 pounds and Jason Jones taking a second at 160 pounds. Both wrestlers Wood and Jones lost to were named top wrestlers.

Wood lost to Jeff Gross of Oroville, who was named outstanding middleweight and Jones lost to Nick Hernandez of Pleasant Valley who was named the top heavyweight in the tourney.

Luke Hammerness also took a second at 152 pounds.

Cory Bell took a third at heavyweight, losing a surprise match in the semi-finals. Brad Bell also took a third at 189 pounds and Jaafar Mirholi took a third at 135 pounds. Joey Catania took a fourth at 215 pounds and injured his shoulder in a match.

The team scores for the Corning Tourney were: Modoc 174.5, Paradise 163, Pleasant Valley 156, Willows 125, Corning 121, Durham 101, Foothill 94, Central Valley 92, Golden Sierra 90, Oroville 73, Mesa Verde 71, Etna 68, Clear Lake 66, Mt. Shasta 62, Jesuit (Sacramento) 62, Trinity 61, Tulelake 49, Esparto 39, Willits 38, Chester 37, Quincy 34, Upper Lake 34, Live Oak 33, Burney 32, Corning II 30, Lindhurst 29, Hamilton City 27, Esparto 22, Wheatland 22, Esparto 22, Wheatland 22, Fall River 8, Los Molinos 6 and Portola 4.

Brush places 6th in all-girls meet

Modoc High School's only female wrestler, junior Samantha Brush, placed sixth at the North State Regional All-Female tournament in San Leandro last weekend.

She just missed placing fifth, which would have qualified her for the All-Female State Finals this year. It was also the first time this season that she has gotten to wrestle girls instead of guys.

Brush wrestles at the 150 pound division, and in male competition that's one of the toughest weight classes. She said girls wrestle different than the guys, and the ones she faced last weekend were also tough.

"The guys try to use mostly their upper body strength, but the girls use a lot of legs and hips, and I just wasn't used to that," she said this week.

"Next year, I'll be better prepared for the tourney and I expect to qualify for the state finals. I learned a lot this year."

One of the major differences in the meet is Brush is the only girl on Modoc's team, and one of very few in the Shasta Cascade League. She was astounded that some of the girls she was facing in San Leandro actually were on all girl teams and didn't wrestle the guys. Actually, some of the girls she talked to were probably more amazed that she was the only girl on her team and had to wrestle guys all year. In addition, she said the girls she wrestled in San Leandro were strong, and their muscle structure was well defined. But, she said, most of them had been wrestling for years. "They were a little intimidating," she said.

Brush injured her shoulder in San Leandro and won't be able to wrestle this week for the Shasta Cascade League championships. But that's not going to deter her from next year.

"The first two weeks this season, I was saying to myself, 'Why am I doing this?'" Brush said. "But once I got into it, I really enjoyed it; I got in better shape and it's fun. I definitely will be back next season and I plan on working harder this summer to get into shape. I know what it takes and how hard it is."

She said she also wouldn't mind dropping a few weight divisions to get out of that tough 145-160 pound group.

One thing she knows is that in the middle of the state, there are a lot of girls wrestling in high school. She hopes more girls start out in north section.

Modoc boys drop pair in SCL to mammals

Modoc's varsity boys team fought tough against Trinity Saturday at home, but just couldn't keep pace with the top ranked team in the league, losing 70-58.

The Wolves played a very pressure oriented game, but Modoc played even the first period, trailing just 16-15 after one. The Wolves took a 38-30 lead into the halftime talks. Both teams played nearly even in the third, with Trinity maintaining a 54-45 lead. Trinity slowed the offense down in the final part of the game, using the time up on every possession. They outscored Modoc 16-13 in the fourth for the win.

Zack McKirahan led Modoc with 14 points with Marty Stevens getting 12, Kyle Madison seven and Shiloh Pierce six. Modoc hit just four of 19 three-point shots on the night.

Friday night, the Braves lost to Mt. Shasta, 60-53, in overtime. The boys led 28-20 at halftime, but the Bears tied in it the second half, and in overtime, outscored Modoc 12-5 for the win.

Stevens led the scoring with 21 points, followed by McKirahan with 11. Modoc committed 19 turnovers in the game and shot just 28 percent from the floor.

Modoc girls scare Trinity Wolves

Modoc's varsity girls basketball team put the fear of Modoc into the Trinity Wolves Saturday night, but came up just short, 52-49, in one of the Braves' better efforts.

Modoc and Trinity started even, tied at 10-10 after one. But the Wolves hit 21 and Modoc only seven in the second period, leaving the Braves behind 31-17. Modoc fought its way back into the contest in the third and fourth period, outscoring Trinity 13-11 in the third, and they went on a 19-10 fourth quarter run. The Braves had the last shot, but Kristen Taylor's effort bounced off the rim.

Taylor led the scoring with 19 points, Emily Pence added 14, Danielle Reyes had eight and Hannah Hays had seven.

Modoc got crushed Friday night in Mt. Shasta, 61-26. They were never in the game as the Bears took a 26-4 first quarter lead and built that to a 43-4 halftime lead. The Bears led 56-16 after three.

Taylor led with nine points, while Allison Campagna, Reyes and Maria Duran each put up four.

Modoc meets Burney there Feb. 10 and has Etna at home Feb. 13.

Hornets host Bulldogs for 2004 Homecoming

Surprise Valley basketball will celebrate Homecoming Friday night as the Butte Valley Bulldogs pay a visit to the Cedarville Gym.

The Hornet boys went 2-1 over the last week. They lost in overtime to Big Valley January 28. They trailed 33-30 at halftime and fought back to tie it at 62 before the overtime period. Scott Soletti led the team with 22 points and Loren Harris added 15 and 13 rebounds. Blake Oney led Big Valley with 24 points.

On January 31, the Hornets beat Dunsmuir in Cedarville, 78-65. Adam Evans led the scoring with 25 points and pulled down eight rebounds. Soletti hit for 17 points.

Tuesday, the Hornets beat Tulelake 78-72. Point Guard Mike Quick returned to the team after being out for two weeks. He had 12 points for Surprise Valley.

The Hornet girls varsity found themselves down 22-13 at halftime against Big Valley and lost 37-33, coming up just short on a rally. The Cardinals played a box and one to slow down Cara James, who still managed 18 points. Sarah Teuscher had six points and 14 rebounds and blocked four shots.

Surprise Valley won the junior varsity game 66-38..

The varsity girls lost to Dunsmuir 46-29, after trailing only by two at the half. James led with 14 points, 12 rebounds and one blocked shot. She was double-teamed all night. Teuscher had a big night as she pulled down 16 rebounds and blocked five shots.

The JV game went down to the wire as the Hornets fought back in the fourth to take the lead by one with a few seconds left, but committed a costly foul and Dunsmuir won 51-50.

Against Tulelake Tuesday, the girls lost. James had 19 points and Teuscher added nine. Tulelake won the JV game.

JV boys lose two in SCL

Modoc's junior varsity boys team lost a pair of Shasta Cascade League games this weekend, to unbeaten Mt. Shasta, 65-49, and to Trinity, 64-63. Against Mt. Shasta, Modoc trailed 19-15 after one and 43-28 at halftime. The Braves fought back to within seven, 47-40 at the end of the third, but fell off late in the fourth. Taylor Dunn led the scoring with 14 and Jayce Wheeler and Ross Burgess added nine each.

The Braves had Trinity on the ropes here Saturday, but missed a free three, a layup and a short shot in the final seconds to lose 64-63.

Modoc led 17-12 after one and 29-21 by half. They still had a 43-41 lead after three. Burgess led with 30 points and Grant Hall added eight. Dustin Philpott will be out because of injury the remainder of the season.

JV girls lose 2 SCL games in weekend

Modoc's junior varsity girls team started well against Trinity here Saturday, but foul trouble doomed them, losing 41-25.

The Braves had an 11-6 first period lead, but Trinity hit 11 of 14 free throws in the second period to take a 21-15 halftime lead. In the second half, several Modoc players fouled out. The Wolves outscored Modoc 20-10 in the second half. Jessica Harden led the scoring with seven, while Marlena Bartram pulled down nine rebounds.

Modoc lost a game Friday night to league-leading Mt. Shasta 27-20. The Braves went up 6-0 early but by halftime trailed 15-13. Modoc failed to score in the third period and the Bears took a 25-13 lead into the fourth. The Braves outscored the Bears 7-2 in the final period. Kelly Campagna led with five points, while Megan Thompson had five steals.

February 12 , 2004

News

Two-year-old boy saves family in fire

A Modoc Estates family is very fortunate that their two-year-old son woke up crying early Tuesday morning, allowing them to escape a fully engulfed burning modular home.

According to Alturas Rural Fire Chief Allan Jacques, the two-year-old was sleeping on the couch in the living room and was awakened when he felt heat on his forearm. He got up and ran down the hall towards the adults' bedroom. His father, Joshua Hayes and companion Penny Allen, heard him yelling and when they opened the bedroom door, saw the living room ablaze behind the youngster.

They gathered up two other kids, Paul, age eight, and Celeste, age six, and made it out of the home through the burning living room. Of the five, only the two-year-old was hurt, sustaining third degree burns to his forearm. He was treated and released at Modoc Medical Center.

Jacques said the home was fully engulfed when firefighters arrived. The front and side walls had caved and the roof had fallen. Firefighters did what they could, but the Red Deer Lane home was a total loss. The ARFD was on the scene for about five hours.

"If that little boy hadn't awoken, there's no doubt it could have been a real tragedy," said Jacques. "The fire was burning very hot when we got there and it look liked it just exploded once the air got to it."

Penny Allen said when she went down the hall and looked around the corner into the living room, the fire was rapidly snaking its way up the wall behind a Monitor heater and the television. The cause of the fire is unknown. Allen said the family escaped though the front door, which was surrounded by fire. They got outside and were in their vehicle when the living room picture window blew apart and the fire exploded throughout the home.

"It was scary, like something you only see in the movies," said Allen. The family was sitting outside in their vehicle when firefighters arrived, said Jacques. That was a relief to firefighters.

The family's possessions were completely destroyed. A fund has been set up to help them at TEACH, Inc. In addition to funding, the family needs personal items, from clothing to furniture. Contact TEACH, Inc., at 233-3111.

County's 'Code of the West' draws public ire

In late May, 2003, Modoc Supervisors voted to adopt the "Code of the West," as a county Policy Information Statement.

On Tuesday, those same Supervisors are going to be asked by local realtors and agents and the Alturas Chamber of Commerce to rescind what those groups call an incredibly "negative representation of the County."

When the Board adopted the "Code" it was intended to be distributed to newcomers preparing them for life in rural America. The code has not been freely handed out by some county departments, who privately have said it was not beneficial to the county's stance or future.

Local real estate professionals have called the "Code" a major impairment to economic development and say it gives the wrong impression about living in Modoc.

Many of the lcoal businesspeople would rather see a document, that while it informs, also points out the wide variety of benefits to living in Modoc County. The County's "Code of the West" doesn't say a thing about the positives of living in Modoc County: good schools, low crime rate, clean air and water, affordable real estate, recreation, peace and quiet, and so on.

The Code actually came from Larimer County, Colorado and was tweaked a little to fit Modoc. In the introduction, it states, "It is important for you to know that life in the country is different from life in the city. County governments are not able to provide the same level of service that city governments provide. To that end, we are providing you with the following information to help you make an educated and informed decision when choosing to purchase rural land outside the boundaries of incorporated cities."

For instance, the first issue deals with Emergency Response. The code states: "Emergency response times (sheriff, fire suppression, medical care, etc.) cannot be guaranteed. Under some extreme conditions, you may find that emergency response is extremely slow and expensive."

On roads, the code states, "You can experience problems with the maintenance and cost of maintenance of your road. Modoc County maintains about one thousand miles of roads, but many rural properties are served by private and public roads, which are maintained by individuals or private road associations.

"Additionally, some county roads are not maintained by the county, which means there is no grading or snow plowing . . . Make sure you know what type of maintenance to expect and who will provide that maintenance . . . Extreme weather can destroy roads. Many roads were not built to current standards . . . Many large construction vehicle's cannot navigate small, steep narrow roads . . . In extreme weather, even county-maintained roads can become impassable. You may need a four-wheel drive with chains for all four wheels to travel during those episodes, which could last for several days. If your road is unpaved, it is highly unlikely that Modoc County will pave it in the foreseeable future."

While no one argues that most of what's in the Code may be true, they say the presentation and the overall negativity of the document would scare even the most hardy newcomer and is hardly a "welcome" sign. Some say the Code points out many "worst case" scenarios.

When it comes to the necessities of life, the Code is downright distressing. "Water, sewer, electric, telephone and others services may be unavailable or may not operate at urban standards. Repairs can often take much longer than in towns and cities . . . Cellular Telephone communication can be a problem, especially in mountain areas . . . If you have a private line, it may be difficult to obtain another line for fax or computer modem use . . . If sewer service is available to your property, it may be expensive to hook into the system and may be expensive to maintain the system you use . . . if you have access to a supply of treated domestic water, the tap fees can be expensive. You may also find that your monthly cost of service can be costly when compared to municipal services . . . the most common source of water in rural areas is private wells. The cost of drilling and pumping can be considerable. The quality and quantity of wells can vary considerably from location to location and from season to season."And if someone wants electricity, well be prepared.

"Electrical service is not available to every area of Modoc County . . . it an be very expensive to extend power lines to remote areas. Power outages can occur in outlying areas with more frequency than in more developed areas, a loss of electric power can also interrupt your supply of water from a well. You may also lose food in freezers or refrigerators . . . it is important to be able to survive for up to a week in severe cold with no utilities if you live in the country."

Some other highlights of the Code could be dissuasive. "Fences that separate properties are not always an indication of true property lines . . . chemicals are often used in growing crops. You may be subject to spray drift or overspray . . . if you choose to live among the orchards, farms and ranchers of our rural countryside, do not expect county government to intervene in the normal day-to-day operations of your agribusiness neighbors. . . it is possible that adjoining agriculture uses can disturb your peace and quiet."

The conclusion pretty much wraps up the Code: "Even though you pay property taxes to the county, the amount of tax collected does not cover the cost of services provided to rural residents. In general, tax revenues derived from commercial, industrial, agricultural and forest uses and activities in the county subsidizes the lifestyle of those who live in the country by making up the shortfall between the cost of services received from rural dwellers . . . We at Modoc County have offered these comments in the sincere hope that it can help you enjoy your decision to reside in the country. It is not our intent to dissuade you, only inform you."

It's Snow Fun at Cedar Pass this Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day will be a blast at the Cedar Pass Snow Park, as Rotary hosts its annual free Snowblast '04.

The event will start at 10 a.m. with free skiing and snowboarding for anyone age 18 and under. There will also be free rentals and free lessons for kids over age six. Parental release forms are also required for the rental equipment. Forms are available at the ski hill.

A free barbecue starts at 11 a.m. for all Modoc students 18 years of age and under.

Beginning at 1 p.m., there will be ski and snowboard racing. Skiers and boarders must register at the race table with a $5 race fee. All kids who race must have a release form signed by a parent or guardian. Pick up those forms at Seab's True Value, at the Snow Park, all at all schools, Page's Market and Surprise Valley Motor Parts.

The awards and trophies will be presented following the races and medals and ribbons will be available for racers. The whole day will end when the lift shuts down at 4 p.m.

The event is sponsored by the Sunrise Rotary Club of Alturas, Surprise Valley Rotary, Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce, Modoc Tobacco Coalition, and with donations from the following: Cedarville Cafe and Saloon, The Brass Rail, Modoc Drilling, Ed Staub and Sons, Betsy Ingraham, Frank's Carpet and US Cellular, Carstens Motors, Alturas Chamber of Commerce, Quality by Design, Modoc Engines, United Country Stevenson Realty, Warner Mountain Realty, Brown's Pharmacy, Modoc and Surprise Valley Motor Parts, High Desert Online, Western Irrigation and Pioneer Auto Body.

MJU dedicates new wing, discusses drugs

The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees will dedicate the new Science Wing at Modoc High School February 18, 6:30 p.m.

The regular meeting was moved from Tuesday to Wednesday to accommodate sports activities.

The dedication, including a performance by the Modoc High Jazz Band, will open the meeting at 6:30 p.m. and the regular meeting will start at 7 p.m. Both will be held at Shirley Oxley Hall.

Topics on the agenda will include student drug testing for athletes and students involved in extra-curricular activities, an outdoor graduation for Modoc High School, funding waivers for community day schools, donations, key systems at Modoc High and Alturas Elementary Schools. In addition, there will be a presentation by the MHS Academic Decathlon Team Board policies will be reviewed in the area of all personnel, nondiscrimination in employment.

Hansel & Gretel seeks cast of local youths for special show

For the second consecutive year, Frontier, a Citizens Communications Company will sponsor a special opportunity for Modoc youth, by bringing the Missoula Children's Theater (MCT) to Alturas

On Monday, February 16, a school holiday, all local youths will have the opportunity to audition for the Missoula Children's Theatre production of Hansel and Gretel. Open audition will take place inside the A.C.T. Niles Theater, So. Main Street, Alturas from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., starting promptly at 3:30 p.m. No advance preparation is necessary and there is no cost involved

Actor/director team R. DeAndre Smith and Ivy Ellis will be searching for a cast of 50 to 60 local students, ages five through teen years, to perform in the 2004 production.

MCT is the nation's largest touring children's theatre and has made its reputable mark on Alturas, by returning with a different production annually with a team of actor/directors. MCT is celebrating their 20th year of working with Modoc County youths

Their residency comes complete with costumes, makeup, scenery and props

The show will be rehearsed throughout the week Feb. 16 through 20, after school. Two public performances will be presented on Saturday, February 21 at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the A.C.T. Niles Theater

Among the roles to be cast are Hansel and Gretel, crafty cooks, loyal servants of the Wildwood Witch, modern day campers--somehow lost in time in the wood, lots of nasty critters--creepy denizens of the deep and a flock of cuddly Wallybirds. Rehearsals are held throughout the week each day

This year's Tour Actors/Directors: Ivy Ellis will play the roles of Mom/Mother/Wildwood Witch. A licensed cosmetologist originally from Los Angeles, she is passionate about theater and spent a year in Seattle, tap dancing, taking voice lessons and doing lots of hair and make-up. She plays the trumpet and is an avid reader. This is Ellis' third tour with MCT

R. DeAndre Smith will play the roles of Uncle Wally/Father/Giant Wallybird. He is in his second season with MCT and studied Music Education at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. A veteran of theater productions, he performed in Aida with the Cincinnati Opera and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat with the Covedale Center for Performing Arts. DeAndre has also worked on the film The Siren of Nahler Street, an "urban fairy tale" produced by Scott Wegener to benefit the Children's Home of Cincinnati.

All MCT shows are original adaptations of classic children's stories and fairytales; a twist on the classic stories known and loved. MCT's mission is the development of lifeskills in children through participation in the performing arts.

This local opportunity is sponsored by Frontier, a Citizens Communication Company. The residency is presented by Antonio's Cucina Italiana Restaurant, Alturas Community Theater, Modoc County Office of Education and funded in part by the Modoc County Arts Council, Inc. and California Arts Council.

Performance tickets will be $8 for adults; senior citizens and students, 17 and under, $6 at the door. Pre-sale tickets will be available at Antonio's in Alturas.

Tulelake wins Academic Decathlon

The 2004 Academic Decathlon team from Tulelake High School will compete in the California Academic Decathlon State Finals on March 12 to 14, 2004, at the Radisson Hotel Sacramento and Rio Americano High School, Sacramento.

The eight-member Tulelake High team of Katharine Edgar, Eric Gasser, Jacqueline Macy, Amy Frey, Kyle Naylor, Jeremy Ross, Jessica Harris, Michelle Huffman, Judy Naylor, coached by Martha Hurlburt, scored 29,908 points out of a possible 60,000, last Saturday at the county/district level contest in Alturas. This was Tulelake's second consecutive win. The team competed against Modoc High's team total score of 29,187 and Surprise Valley High's team score of 28,400.

Each team member participates in 10 grueling events in the Academic Decathlon, including economics, mathematics, music, art, language and literature, and science. In addition, the contestants perform prepared and impromptu speeches, write essays on a given topic and are interviewed by a panel of judges. Tulelake's team will now go against the best schools from 42 counties/districts throughout California. The final event, the Super Quiz, an academic relay, will be held at Rio Americano High School, Sacramento, before a cheering crowd.

The California State Championship team will compete in the United States Academic Decathlon in Boise, Idaho in April. Watch the Record for individual medal winners and a photograph next week.

Obituaries:

Beverly Moore

After an incredible, near two-year display of courage and optimism, Beverly Moore finally succumbed to the cancer that had plagued her for so long, by quietly passing away in her sleep in the early morning hours of Sunday, February 8, 2004 in Alturas, Calif.

Beverly Josephine Benner was born December 13, 1932 in Cedarville, Calif. to John and Bessie Benner of Empire, Nevada. She attended school in Gerlach, Nevada throughout her childhood and eventually graduated a year early from Gerlach High.

Shortly after graduating, Beverly met Wayne Moore and on April 1, 1950, the two were married in Reno, Nevada.

They then settled in Alturas and began a family that would ultimately include five children, twelve grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. In her free time, she enjoyed a wide range of different activities, from bowling to water-skiing, reading to motorcycle riding. Everything she did, she did with all her heart and because of it, her passing will leave a deep void in the lives of all who had the pleasure of knowing her.

Beverly was preceded in death by brothers Virgil and Jack Benner, sisters Irene Smith, Jean Tierney and Eleanor Casselman, an infant son Michael Wayne, a grandson Tommy Anderson and great-grandson Travis Madden. She is survived by her husband of almost 54 years, Wayne Moore of Alturas; children and their families, Debbie Anderson of Alturas; Diann Nelson of Elk Grove; Darlene Panner of Cedarville; Donna Hamilton of Alturas and David Moore of Redding. We love you gramma!!

A memorial service will be held on Friday, Feb. 13 at 1:00 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 1450 N. Warner Street in Alturas

Memorials may be directed to the "MWMC Cancer Treatment Center," Merle West Medical Center, 2610 Uhrmann Rd., Klamath Falls, Ore. 97601. Eternal Hills of Klamath Falls is in charge of arrangements.

Donald Lee Rhodes

Alturas resident Don Rhodes, 75, died February 2, 2004, at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Calif.

Don was born June 17, 1928, in Fallbrook, Calif. to Roy Rhodes and LaVon (Orr) Rhodes Burke.

He was raised in Fallbrook and attended Fallbrook High School. During his childhood Don spent eight years in the Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. He attended the National School in Los Angeles for diesel and auto mechanics.

On December 17, 1955 he married Marilyn Ruth (Bergo) Brooks. Don, Marilyn and her children Judy and Bill made their homes in South Gate, CA. September of 1958, they had a daughter, Sharilyn Marie. In November of 1973, they moved to Alturas, CA. where they made their home at California Pines. Don worked as a mechanic until he purchased the Auction Yard Cafe in Alturas, which he and Marilyn operated for several years, until retiring in 1991.

Don was a lifetime member of the Alturas Elks Lodge #1756. He had a great love for his family. In his early years, he enjoyed racing dirt bikes in the Mojave Desert and playing golf. He loved to fish and spend time with his friends at Blue Lake.

He is survived by daughter and son-in-law Sharilyn and Terry McLain of Lakeview, Ore.; step daughter Judy Keeler of Los Angeles, Calif.; brother-in-law and his wife Ed and Mary Bergo of Arroyo Grande, Calif.; grandchildren Cambria and Ryan Amacker of Lakeview, Ore.; and Travis, Amber and Logan McKee-McLain of Gillette, Wyoming.

He was preceded in death by his wife Marilyn; his parents; step father Gordon Burke; brother Russell Rhodes; and step son Bill Brooks. A private memorial will be held at a later date.

Shirley Mae Capps

Shirley Mae Capps, 67, died of natural causes on February 5, 2004, at the Lake District Long Term Care Facility in Lakeview, Oregon.

A funeral service was held at 11 a.m. Monday, February 9, at the Lakeview First Baptist Church, 910 North Second Street. Interment followed at the Sunset Park Cemetery. Desert Rose Funeral Chapel was in charge of the arrangements.

Mrs. Capps was born April 9, 1936, in Alturas, Calif. to Lawrence and Josephine (Pratt) Mills. She was married to Ken Capps on February 16, 1954, in Reno, Nevada.

She grew up in Lakeview and was a 1954 graduate of Lakeview High School. In addition to janitorial work, Mrs. Capps cared for her beautiful yard, enjoyed doing all kinds of needlework, crafts, her kittens and going for rides. She loved to babysit her grandchildren. And she attended the Church of the Open Bible.

Mrs. Capps is survived by her husband Ken Capps of Lakeview, Oregon; daughters and sons-in-law Sheree and Dusty Willis of Estacada and Kathy and Dave Knowles of Lakeview; grandsons Ryan Willis and Cory Willis; granddaughters Kristin Knowles and Melissa Knowles; sister and brother-in-law Marilyn and Ray Bateman of Harrisburg.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Hospital Chapel Fund, c/o Lakeview Ministerial Association, P.O. Box 54, Lakeview, OR. 97630, or to a charity of the donor's choice.

Sports

Modoc's hold on SCL wrestling title firm

Modoc's hold on the Shasta Cascade League Wrestling Championship wasn't threatened Saturday, as the Braves won the title with 241.5 points, over second place Trinity's 142.

The title marks the fifth consecutive year the Braves have won the league wrestling title, nine of the past 10, and it's been several years since it's even been close. Following Trinity, the results were: Mt. Shasta 114, Burney 87, Etna 80, Tulelake 77, Modoc B 72, Bishop Quinn 60.5, Fall River 46 and Mt. Shasta B 18.

While no league team has posed a serious challenge to Modoc's dominance, Coach Shaun Wood said there are teams rebuilding and who are getting stronger. One of those teams is Mt. Shasta, who is coached by Modoc High School graduate Rodney Grier. The Trinity squad is also coming back to form, and Burney is showing progress.

In the dual meet portion of the SCL finals on Friday, Modoc beat Mt. Shasta 63-12, Etna 66-24 and Trinity 55-17.

The Braves placed 11 wrestlers, out of 14 possible, in the finals of the SCL meet, and five of those won individual titles.

Travis Wood won the 145 pound division, Luke Hammerness won at 152 pounds, Jason Jones won at 160 pounds, Brad Bell won at 189 pounds and Cory Bell won at heavyweight.

Coming with strong second places were Hank Raabe at 112 pounds, Sheridan Crutcher at 125 pounds, Nick Hawes at 130 pounds, Jaafar Mirlohi at 135 pounds, Ian Jacques at 171 pounds, and Joey Catania at 215 pounds.

Several Braves won their third place matches, including Brian Weed at 119 pounds, Scott Buchanan at 125 pounds, Chris Buchanan at 135 pounds, Bill Hammerness at 140 pounds, and Jesse Harer at 160 pounds. Modoc now heads to the North Section Small Schools championships Feb. 20-21 in Etna.

The Braves go in as the top-ranked small school by MaxPreps and are the number two ranked team of all school sizes. Wood does expect a serious challenge to the Small Schools title from Durham. Modoc can only take one wrestler per weight class.

Individually, Modoc has Travis Wood and Jason Jones holding down the number two ranking in the North Section, with Luke Hammerness ranked third, Jaafar Mirholi and Brad Bell ranked fifth and Cory Bell ranked fourth.

Modoc Braves drop Burney boys 49-34

Modoc's Braves took advantage of a rest and dropped the Burney Raiders 49-34 Tuesday in Burney. Friday night, they have Etna at home and Fall River comes to town Tuesday.

Modoc fell behind 8-7 in the first period against Burney, and trailed 20-19 by halftime. Burney maintained a 30-28 lead after three, but the Braves jumped on the Raiders 21-4 in the fourth period.

Marty Stevens led the scoring with 16 points, Micah Eppler added 13 and Zack McKirahan had 10.

It's becoming a frustrating problem, as Modoc's junior varsity boys lost another close game Tuesday, 66-63 to Burney.

Modoc allowed Burney a 33-3 first quarter spurt and fought hard to come back. By the end of the first period Burney led 36-13, and Modoc cut that to a 45-32 Burney lead at halftime. Modoc chipped away and trailed 52-45 after three. Modoc finally got a lead by four in the fourth, but a questionable call and free throws gave the Raiders the win. Ross Burgess led the scoring with 18 and Taylor Dunn added 17.

Brave girls beat Burney

Modoc's varsity girls basketball team got into the win column Tuesday, beating Burney 53-48, there. Modoc meets Etna here Friday and has Fall River here Feb. 17.

Against Burney, Kristen Taylor led the way with 20 points, hitting three-of-three, three point shots along the way. Danielle Reyes added nine points and Emily Pence had eight.

Modoc and Burney were tied at eight after one and the Raiders took a 30-19 lead at halftime. The Braves cut that to a 35-33 lead by the end of three and outscored Burney 20-13 in the fourth period.

The junior varsity girls beat Burney 29-20 after jumping out to a 9-4 lead in the first period. Burney cut the lead to 13-11 by half. Modoc played solid defense in the second half and led 18-13 after three. The Braves put up 11 fourth quarter points. Jessie Harden led the scoring with 12 and Kelly Campgna added five.

Hornets whip Butte Valley

The Surprise Valley Hornet varsity boys team pulled out a close one over Butte Valley 66-62, to win their Homecoming game Feb. 6 in Cedarville. Butte Valley had trailwed the score to one by the end of the third period. With over three minutes left in the third quarter, the Hornets lost Adam Evans, who fouled out.

Surprise Valley outscored Butte Valley 22-19 in the fourth quarter. Josh Boneck put in 24 to lead and he, Evans, Loren Harris and Mike Quick pulled down 36 rebounds.

After trailing 15-13 at the end of the first period the varsity girls trailed 35-15 at halftime. The Bulldogs outscored the Hornets 34-32 in the second half to win 69-47. Cara James led Surprise Valley with 33 points, 12 rebounds and four steals. Sara Teuscher added 10 points and blocked five shots.

February 19, 2004

News

March 2 vote could trigger budget action

Modoc County is facing a budget crunch, but just what magnitude that crunch will shake out to will be clearer after the March 2 Primary Election. On Tuesday, the county's Chief Administrative Officer, Mike Maxwell, presented the board with a budget review, citing several options, but stressed the issues on the table could change if Proposition 57, the Governor's $15 billion bond act does not pass.

He recommended the Board study the issue, but put off any budget decisions until the March 9 meeting, when the results of that bond measure are known. The Board agreed. What isn't known, said Maxwell, is just what the Governor's Plan B will do if the bond fails. "We're not sure anyone knows what Plan B is," said Maxwell.

"We are going to work for the best case scenario," said Maxwell Wednesday. "But we're going to have to prepare for the worst case. There are some question marks out there. We may not know what's going to come down from the state on March 9, but we will know that there will be some impacts if that bond measure fails."

Accordiing to Maxwell's recap of the budget, the county could be negatively impacted to the tune of about 1.1 million in the general fund for 2004-05. That breaks down to losses of $205,293 in property tax transferred to the state, a $186,383 increase in PERS retirement contribution, $207,080 in increased health insurance premiums, $60,400 increase in worker's compensation, $30,000 increase in property/liability insurance premiums, $40,000 from the loss of the City's planning contract, $30,000 decrease in funds to be transferred from tax sale and one time funds budgeted in 2003-04 of $397,000.

He said some funding will be available that will cut that negative to $505,365 and possible additional revenues could pull it down to $165,365.

"It is very difficult six months into the 2003-04 budget to provide you with anything other than projections for the 2004-05 budget," Maxwell said. "I can tell you that after review of the mid-year budget printout, we are at and perhaps a little better than where we are normally at this point in the budget year . . . it is a long time until the State finishes its budget, of which we have no control. The negative impact could grow . . . There well could be things that happen that affect those projections, good and bad, over the next five months. Certainly, the $15 billion bond measure not passing would have an impact to us."

Maxwell said cities and counties throughout the state are in the same boat, and the passage of Prop. 57 is hanging over their budget projections and decisions as well. He feels the county has a pretty good handle on the situation at this point, but a failure of Prop. 57 could upset the apple cart. "First of all, based on the projections, our problem could be somewhere between $165,365 and $500,000," he said.

Maxwell told the board that of the $8,419,213 General Fund Expenditure Budget, $5,044,724 (60 percent) is personnel salaries and fringes. Maxwell suggested the budget process for the 2004-05 budget start March 1 with budget requests returned from county departments by April 1. He suggests adopting a preliminary budget by the end of June.

Maxwell has met with department heads and discussed the budget situation with them and will be asking for their recommendations as the budget process continues. He said everyone is aware there could be some serious problems, and that departments have worked hard to save where they could this past year.

There has been no study of lay-offs to date, said Maxwell. There are a variety of options which could be put on the table as time goes on or if a need arises, including employees taking days off without pay.

Right now the county is facing more questions than answers, and the March 2 vote will be decisive. Most polls are showing Prop. 57 trailing.

Jessie Davis alive and well, obituary submitted was false

February 12 was more than just a little different for 18-year-old Jessica Marie Davis. She's one of few people to read her obituary and then call the Editor to find out what's going on?

Davis is alive and well. But there are questions and a police investigation into who would have submitted her obituary.

Last week, the Record received a submitted email along with Jessica's photo, from someone claiming to be Davis' father. The Record emailed back to the sender, twice, and both returning emails added new information over the next two days. Those emails came from someone who claimed to be Jessica's mother, Lynn Uchida, of Alturas with the email address matching the mother's information. But those emails were sent by someone other than Lynn.

The fictitious obituary contains some very personal information that only a few people could know, Jessica said. Oddly, she had been in an accident in September in Grass Valley where she totaled her 4-Runner and was injured. She has recovered. She was on her way home from studying at a friend's house.

That story is eerily close to what was reported in the fake obituary: that she was struck by a drunk driver while walking home from a friend's house where she had been studying.

"We take full responsibility for running the obituary, but we had no idea or reason to believe the information was fictitious," said Editor Rick Holloway. "It takes a pretty sick individual to submit a fake obituary, especially on a young person's death. That news shocks us and the entire community. It's pretty hard to fathom someone doing that and their thought process."

Last Thursday morning, a neighbor of Jessica's in Grass Valley called, and wondered where the Record got the information and what was going on? Then, Jessica talked with Holloway by phone.

Following some discussion with Jessica and her mother, Lynn, the Record opted to submit the emails and other information to the Alturas Police Department that morning in hopes the sender could be identified. Law enforcement is currently tracking down the computer address.

Jessica came to visit the Record on Friday afternoon. She's going to school at Sierra College, majoring in Criminal Justice and Victimology. She was quite calm and composed considering the issue, and had a long drive from Grass Valley to sort things out. She had already planned to come home over the three-day holiday.

"It's been weird," she said. "The experience certainly has made me appreciate life more. A lot of people have called and that's been nice. I don't know of anyone who has something against me or who would do something like this."

Jessica was steadier than a lot of people would have been in the situation, and found out she had a truckload of friends in Modoc. Those friends had emotions go from complete despair to outright joy to anger last Thursday morning. Most people, of the dozens and dozens of phone calls received at the Record, were just glad the news of her death wasn't true. She went to school in Alturas until sixth grade, then transferred to Surprise Valley where she graduated from high school last year.

"We're just pleased that Jessica is alive and doing well," said Holloway. "We're also pretty unhappy with anyone who would submit a fictitious obituary. We have a little trouble trusting email anyway, and will now change our policies concerning obituaries. We need to ensure that no other family has to go through the shock Jessica and her family did. We will still provide the obituary service free of charge and continue to respect the family's rights and privacy during those tough times."

County rescinds Code of the West

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday unanimoulsy rescinded the "Code of the West" it had adopted in May

An outcry from the public over the negative representation the Code made of living inModoc was the key factor in the board's decision. Several people representing real estate, the public and Chamber of Commerce entities were in the audience Tuesday

Supervisor Dan Macsay, of Surprise Valley, who introduced the "Code of the West" said he took the responsibility for bringing it to the board. He said he thought it was just good information for newcomers and didn't see it in a negative light initially. He could, however, see how people could perceive it that way and felt a revision of the information could be in order down the line

When the Board adopted the "Code" it was intended to be distributed to newcomers preparing them for life in rural America

The Code didn't address the positives of living in Modoc County: good schools, low crime rate, clean air and water, affordable real estate, recreation, peace and quiet, and so on.

Local irrigators unhappy with new state water fee

"Everybody's upset about it," says Modoc County supervisor Dave Bradshaw, of the new water rights fees that the state is charging ranchers and farmers.

"It's taxation without representation is all it amounts to," says Dale Albaugh, a Big Valley resident. "It's to replace the money in the general fund in the state of California because they've taken all the money out of the general fund … So they're using fees instead of taxes to get the money back into the state fund."

The focus of all this ire is a newly-created water rights fee enacted last year by the California legislature. It is part of Senate Bill 1049, which imposes $77 million worth of new fees on the citizens of California, including fees for fire protection in state responsibility areas (SRA) and increased water rights fees

By all accounts, operating funds for the State Water Resources Control Board and for the California Department of Forestry were taken by lawmakers to help mitigate the state's budgetary shortfall. New fees were then needed to replace that funding loss.

According to State Senator Sam Aanestad, who "fought hard to stop the passage of SB 1049, it took away the general fund revenue of several state agencies mandating them, rather, to operate programs based on fees. Water users are among the first to feel the effect of that mandate." The question of legality repeatedly surfaces with regard to these fees. "My perception is it's another case of is it a fee or is it really a tax?" questions Bradshaw. "I did put it on the agenda for our next board meeting … for discussion and action. I hope that as a board we'll come up with something … because everybody's certainly objecting to it."

"Everybody's teed off about it because it's just another tax," opines Jay Younger, manager of Alturas Ranches, which got a bill for $900 from the state. "That's what it amounts to. It's just another way of taxing us. Rather than cutting expenses and making do with less like we have to do, they just go out the other door and start jabbing you somewhere else." "It's very similar to taxation without representation," declares Ken McGarva, president of South Fork Irrigation District, which reportedly received a whopping $4800 bill for fees on West Valley Reservoir.

John Flournoy, another South Fork rancher, feels that it amounts to double taxation in some cases. "The district's being taxed on its storage license, and the individuals are being taxed on their water rights. … The same people have to pay both bills!"

"Most of these ranchers and farmers are already paying, in some form or another, a fee for watermaster services, or paying their private irrigation company or what have you. They're already paying for the water. Now this is an additional fee," observes Richard Egan, president of the Lassen County Cattlemen's Association. "It's absurd. I believe even stock ponds are assessed a $100 fee."

"It's all just part of the budget mess. It's certainly going to get worse," says Rod McArthur, a McArthur resident. "I know my dam safety fees have tripled. We're getting hammered pretty hard, especially in these rural areas, between this and … that $70-per-parcel CDF tax."

"It's a new tax liability they've created because of their budget crunch," insists Flournoy, who questions the legality of charging for a water right. "A water right is like a timber right or a mineral right. I never felt we had to pay for them. You apply for them. If there's sufficient natural resources, you're given the right."

"In my view," says Egan, "what they are doing is they're ignoring the sideboards that the public has put on the state's ability to tax—in other words, what Prop. 218 was all about. If the state is going to impose a tax on the public, they have to go to a vote of the people in order to do that. Of course, the legislature doesn't like that … so, their way around it is to call these various things fees."

"The Farm Bureau is suing (the state) … and so is the Cattlemen's (Association), so we need to see what comes out of that. I believe it's a tax, and I think most people do," says Lassen County Supervisor, Brian Dahle. "I just think that it's absolutely ridiculous that the state is ignoring what the public has said, which is if you're going to impose a new tax, you've got to get voter approval. They've basically ignored it," analyzes Egan further. "It's so blatant and so obvious we are kind of all hoping that people are going to come to their senses in the capitol."

Most farmers and ranchers are pessimistic about the state's ability to mend its spendthrift ways. They see no end to this trend, "not until they get a grip on government cost," says Younger, echoing the opinion of many, "not until they take a realistic look at what government is providing and what it is costing and make the necessary decisions. If they don't do that—and I don't have any faith that they will—they can't control it."

"It's having an effect on the ranchers and the property owners," says Egan of the fees, "but I don't think they'll have a significant effect on solving the state's problems, spending more money than they should be."

With wry sarcasm in his voice, Younger adds, "And they always do it for all the right reasons."

Speaking of private citizens, Younger continues, "We have plenty of right reasons to spend more money than we have, too. If we overspend our budget, we lose our home or we lose our farm or we lose our car or anything else we have. When the state overspends their budget, they just come knock on our door, take our home, take our car and take whatever we have that they want. That's what's going on here."

Flournoy observes, "The difficult part is: Where else is California going to get the money? They've either got to tax us or find some new resources of revenue. However, I think they should spend the revenue they have more wisely and try to live within their means like the private citizen has to do. The private citizen can't just drum up new income when they overspend. We are stuck with living within our means. The state doesn't want to live within its means."

New 4-way stop on 4th Street

Drivers will encounter a new stop sign Friday in Alturas at the intersection of Fourth Street and West C Streets.

Alturas Public Works Director Stacy Chase said the intersection will become a four-way stop, at the recommendation of the City Public Works Committee.

Currently, there is through traffic on Fourth Street and the City is hoping to make that intersection safer. Fourth Street is especially busy in the mornings and afternoons as parents and school buses take and pick up students from Modoc Middle and Alturas Elementary School. In addition with spring sports gearing up, the Alturas Youth Park becomes very busy. The City hopes the new four-way stop will make that intersection safer and slow down traffic on Fourth Street.

Frontier sponsors Hansel & Gretel

A cast of 57 local youths has been rehearsing this entire week, after school and evenings, to present the Missoula Children's Theater musical stage production of Hansel & Gretel on Saturday, Feb. 21 at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. in the A.C.T. Niles Theater, Alturas.

On Monday, Presidents' Day Holiday and a no-school day, 84 youths turned out for the open auditions at the theater. The public is encouraged to see what these young people have learned during the week-long residency with the nation's largest international touring children's theatre, the Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT).

Tickets are available at the theater box office: $8 adults; $6 at the door for students and senior citizens, or may be purchased in advance at Antonio's Cucina Italiana restaurant in Alturas.

Costumes, props and make-up are provided with the touring production. The production is sponsored by Frontier, a Citizens Communications Company. The residency is presented by Antonio's Cucina Italiana Restaurant, Modoc County Arts Council, Inc., Alturas Community Theater, Modoc County Office of Education, funded in part by the California Arts Council.

THE CAST:

New Campers: Nathan Fraley, Michel Funk, Denise Winfree, Monica Eppler, Chloe Phelps, Trent McQuarrie, Amanda Wolf, Keturah Bell. Wallybirds: Elizabeth Vass, Chelsea Baldwin, Allie Chapman, Kirsten Jones, Michelle Ward, Jessie Bradshaw, Whitney Vierria, Austin Kresge, Ryan Holloway, Cameron Johnston, Morgan Bagwell, Sienna Shepherd, Sabrina Heuschkel, Kenna Funk.Assistant Directors: Angela Tinnerman, Jordan Alexander, Cody Leslie, Travis Johnston, Brittany Johnston, Sami Schmidt. Nasties: Austin Bagwell, Cody Treat, Madison Ziegler, Benjamin Jones, Carter Alexander, Courtney Yamagiwa, Jesse Silva, Rachel Colt, Alex McQuarrie, Landon Aarstad, James Alexander, Ashlie Conner, Timothy Eames. Witch: Megan Billingsley. Hansel: Jonathan Jones. Gretel: Stacy Main. Cooks: Shannon King, Jennifer Beck, Amber Vucina, Krysten Welt, Samantha Ward, Aurora Hall, Danielle Moriarity, Amber Gallardo. Old Campers: James Budmark, Dejah Montague, Sarah Jo Montague, Heather Markson, Holly Bradbury.

The earlier MCT show times will allow the theater to also offer the motion picture "Along Came Polly" beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Something new for Spring: Home Show to offer ideas, local resources

The First Annual Modoc County Home Show set for Saturday, March 27, 2004, is promising to be a one-stop-shop for anyone pondering a remodel, a real estate purchase or construction of a new home.

From home project start to completion, the Home Show will allow established local businesses and professionals throughout Modoc County to come together to show and talk about what they have to offer, in one easy location for the public, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Modoc High Griswold Gym, Alturas.

Every resource from landscape contractors, real estate and insurance professionals, building contractors, plumbers, electricians, cabinet makers, surveyors, home interior concepts, appliance businesses, bank representatives, and more will offer information. Door prize give-aways, throughout the day, will be provided by the participating businesses.

The local show concept and organization is the brainchild of Paula Henckel of U.S. Bank who approached Rendy Cockrell, Manager of Modoc County Title & Escrow and newcomer Brooke Fredrickson, owner of the newly business, Handmade Haven in Alturas.

"We're excited about the concept and looking forward to it. We believe it will give people ideas and let them learn about the resources they have here in Modoc County," said Cockrell.

"We want this to be a quality, professional, well organized Home Show that offers ideas to Modoc residents," offered Fredrickson. "And Spring will be a great time to do it."

Admission will be free to the public and participating entities. Food concessions will be operated by a local non-profit organization. The public will also have the opportunity to show their support for the High Plateau Humane Society by participating in a raffle.

Information/registration packets for those interested in participating, are now available from Brooke Fredrickson at Handmade Haven, (530) 233-1161; Rendy Cockrell at Modoc County Title, 233-3471 and U.S. Bank in Alturas

Obituaries:

Mary Laudine Allen

Mary Laudine Allen passed on peacefully on February 13, 2004 in Emmett, Idaho.

Graveside services will be conducted at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 21, 2004 at the Emmett Cemetery. Visitation will be Friday from noon until 6:00 p.m. at the Potter Funeral Chapel in Emmett.

Mrs. Allen was born in 1916 in Washington County, Oklahoma, the daughter of Clyde and Goldie Mills. She attended Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas.

The Allens operated the Madeline Service Center at Madeline, California, a business of general store, Chevron Station, motel and trailer park. Mrs. Allen also served that community as Postmaster and as County Librarian. She was involved in many activities on the Madeline Plains. She started the Friday night movies at the Madeline school and breakfast was always ready at 5:00 a.m. for the cowboys going into the Red Rock. She always had time to make a dress or hem the slacks for the girls and boys going to the school dance. Her home was open for all to use for weddings, memorials, and other gatherings.

Laudine was known to many, young and old alike as "Aunt Deane." She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles Earl Allen, an Emmett native.

She is survived by her sister Willa Utt of Janesville, Calif.: nephew Paul Utt of Willows, CA., and his sons Jason of Reno, Nevada and Timothy of Janesville, Calif. and the Emmett family she called her own, Mike and Rhonda, Brunson and their children Jeff, Mikey and Lisa. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her.

Sports

Modoc wrestlers head to small schools to defend championship

Modoc's wrestling team, ranked number one in small schools, will put that ranking on the line at the Division III Championships in Etna Friday and Saturday

Modoc won the Shasta Cascade League title easily last week, and Modoc Coach Shaun Wood expects a challenge for the Small Schools title from Durham. Both teams come into the event with ranked wrestlers and solid programs

Modoc won small schools with Willows, second, and Durham, third, last season. The Braves then went on to shock the entire North Section Masters Tournament with a second place finish behind Shasta of Redding

Modoc sophomore Travis Wood will enter the tournament as the number one ranked 145-pound wrestler in the section. Jason Jones has a solid hold on the number two spot at 160 pounds. Luke Hammerness is ranked fourth at 152 pounds and Brad Bell is ranked fifth at 189 pounds. Corey Bell comes in with the number four ranking at heavyweight and Jaafar Mirholi is ranked sixth at 135 pounds

The following Braves will also compete at the small schools this weekend: Martin Corns at 103 pounds, Hank Raabe at 112 pounds, Sheridan Crutcher at 125 pounds, Nick Hawes at 130 pounds, Ian Jacques at 171 pounds, Joey Catania at 215 pounds, Brian Weed at 119 pounds and Bill Hammerness at 140 pounds

The top four in each weight class will qualify for the Master's Tournament in Redding Fed. 27-28

Coach Wood will start his youth wrestling program for grades five and under March 1, 5 p.m. with practice in the Modoc High Wrestling Room.

Varsity boys beat Etna, Fall River, Trinity next

Modoc's varsity boys team beat the Etna Lions 53-34 Friday night, getting on track after a slow first period

The Braves trailed 10-9 after one, but led 24-18 by halftime. They outscored Etna 14-10 in the third and 15-6 in the fourth. Micah Eppler led the scoring with 22, hitting six of 11 treys and Marty Stevens added 17. Zack McKirahan had eight

McKirahan exploded for a 27-point night Tuesday against Fall River here, hitting five of nine three pointers and six of 12 two-point shots as Modoc won 62-51

The Braves got off to a good start, leading 17-13 after one and held 32-24 lead at halftime. Fall River jumped back in the game in the third period, leading 46-44 after three. Modoc's defense held Fall River to five points in the fourth and the offense pumped in 18 for the win. Stevens added 20 points for the Braves

Modoc finishes the regular season Friday night at Trinity and will await the playoffs

Modoc junior varsity boys put together two solid games, beating Etna 61-35 and Fall River 58-46

Against Etna, Modoc led 19-7 after one and 35-15 by half. The Braves poured it on with a 50-27 lead after three and finished well. Ross Burgess led the scoring with 22 and Zeke Bonham had 10 points

Fall River used a solid first quarter to lead the Braves 18-15 and held a 26-25 lead at halftime. But the Braves came out of the break hungry and took a 52-32 lead after three and cruised for the win. Burgess had 24 points, Bonham and Grant Hall each added six.

Modoc girls lose double

Modoc's varisty girls basketball team shot 21 percent from the floor against Etna Friday night, losing 70-22.

Etna got on top early, leading 23-6 in the first and held a 35-15 halftime lead. The Lions outscored the Braves 35-7 in the second half. Kristen Taylor had seven points and Emily Pence and Dominic Hall each had five

The varsity lost to Fall River Tuesday night, 52-37, stung by a poor second period. Fall River led Modoc just 12-11 after the first period, but added 10 points in the second to Modoc's four and took a 22-15 half-time lead. The Braves outscored the Bulldogs 14-12 in the third period, but got blown out in the fourth when Fall River scored 18 to Modoc's eight

Taylor led the Braves with 14 points and Emily Pence added 10

Modoc's junior varsity girls let one slip away against Etna, losing 26-24. The Braves led 10-8 after one and it was tied at 14-14 by half. The Braves came out flat in the third and Etna went up 24-18. Modoc fought back, but a last minute shot missed

Jessie Harden and Tacie Richardson each scored nine points to lead the Braves while Kelly Campagna had seven steals. The Braves have one game left, at Trinity, Feb. 20

On Tuesday, the jayvees shot just 17 percent from the floor and lost to Fall River 31-16. Modoc trailed 6-5 after one but didn't score a point in the second period. Alysha Northrup led the scoring with five points, while Richardson had six rebounds and six steals. Modoc's final game is Friday at Trinity.

Big Valley trips Hornets

The Hornet Varsity boys, after trailing 42 to 30 at the end of three quarters against Big Valley, made a run in the fourth quarter and with 16 seconds left in the game the Hornet Varsity boys attempted a full court pass; the referee missed a foul call and made a traveling call instead against the Hornets

On the next play, the Hornets fouled immediately which sent the Cardinals to the line. They hit their first free throw and missed the second to take a 52 to 49 lead. With eight seconds left the Hornets called a time out to set up a play centering around Adam Evans to shoot a three point shot with nine seconds left on the clock. He was fouled outside the three point line and sent to the free throw line for three shots

Evans hit the first and missed the second. Evans' next attempt was to hit the rim and hopefully the Hornets would get a tip-in off that attempt. The Hornets did touch the ball but were unable to put the ball back up and lost by a score of 52 to 50 in Big Valley. Evans led the Hornets with 20 and Big Valley was led by JC Hunsacker with 17 points

Big Valley Cardinal Varsity girls, after trailing for three quarters, outscored the Hornet girls in the fourth 24 to 10 to take a 62 to 54 win in Big Valley. Hornet Freshmen Emma Ruiz and Patricia Soletti pulled down 11 rebounds and both had two block shots apiece. Cara James put in 25 with 10 rebounds followed by Sara Teuscher with 16 points, seven rebounds and three block shots to lead the Hornets. Cyndie Juranits led the Cardinals with 25

Tuesday, February 17 the Hornet Varsity Boys played the unbeaten Happy Camp Indians in McCloud. Happy Camp jumped to a 28 to 9 lead and never looked back as they outscored the Hornets 83 to 53. Josh Boneck and Loren Harris combined for 14 apiece and Harris also pulled down 10 rebounds to lead the Hornets. Happy Camp was led by Burnett with 22. The loss puts the Hornets in third place in the Evergeen league and they now await to see if they will make the playoffs

The Hornet Varsity Girls finally got in the win column by beating the Happy Camp Indians 36 to 25. Cara James, the leading scorer for the Hornets, had very limited playing time as she is coming off a severe left ankle sprain and only scored 10 points. The rest of the team all picked up their game knowing that James would have very little playing time. Sara Teuscher was the leading scorer for the Hornets with 11; she also pulled down 14 rebounds and had four block shots. Happy camp was led by Jaclyn Goodwin with 10.

The Hornet JV boys won their game 72 to 37.

Hemphill wins All-Around Cowgirl

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill earned All-Around Cowgirl honors at the District One California High School Rodeo in Cottonwood, Feb. 14-15. Hemphill won the breakaway roping event and the pole bending event. She placed third in goat tying, fifth in barrel racing, eighth in girls cutting and was seventh in team roping

Alturas' Michael Sphar took second in bull riding.

Sign up for Little League

Little League sign-ups will be held March 1 and 2 at the Alturas Elementary School from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. each night and on March 8 at the Cedarville Elementary School from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m

Please bring a copy of your child's Certificate of Live Birth. The Little League will keep this copy on file. If you have already turned in a copy to the League, you do not need to bring one. Little League International does not accept hospital birth certificates

Registration fees are $30 for one child and $40 for two children and a $45 maximum for three children or more per family

A child who turns five before August 1 and will not be 16 (girls) or 17 (boys) before August 1, 2004, is eligible to play. All children will be placed on a team and all will play.

March 4, 2004

News

Anklin unseats Hagge, runoff in District 2

Canby rancher Ray Anklin unseated Modoc County District 4 Supervisor Willy Hagge handily in Tuesday's primary election, getting 54.79 percent of the vote. Anklin received 395 votes and Hagge 292.

In District 2 , challenger Roy Moore earned the most votes (314) with 42.43 percent. He'll face a run-off in November with incumbent Mike Dunn who received 30.14 percent (223) of the vote. Ron Sharpless got 23.38 percent (173) of the vote cast. Moore had to receive 50 percent plus one vote to win outright in the primary.

In the Alturas City Council race, incumbents George Andreasen and Jack Ochs were re-elected and Cheryl Nelson will take the place of recently deceased Joe Coffin. The vote tally in the city election was as follows: Andreasen 473, Ochs 434, Nelson 421, Steve Iverson 388, John Schreiber 334 and Coffin 150.

On the state propositions Modoc voted against Proposition 55, the schools bond by 68 percent (2,143 votes) to 27.76 percent (871 votes). The issue barely passed statewide by 50.6 percent.

Modoc also voted against Prop. 56, the state budget majority issue by 71.16 percent (2,233 votes) to 24.44 percent (767 votes). The issue failed statewide with a 65.9 percent "no" vote.

Modoc voters were just barely against Prop. 57, the economic recovery bond. Modoc voted 48.60 against (1,525 votes) to 47.98 percent in favor (1,505 votes). The issue passed statewide by 63.3 percent.

Modoc voters favored the balanced budget issue by 59.50 percent (1,867 votes) to 36.97 percent against (1,160). It passed statewide by 71 percent.

In the Presidential Primary, Modoc Democrats favored John Kerry by 45.62 percent. John Edwards received 283 votes, Howard Dean 53, Wesley Clark and Dick Gephardt 23, Joe Lieberman 19, Dennis Kucinich 19, Carol Mosley Braun 16 and Al Sharpton 15.

While statewide voter turnout was low at 38.8 percent, Modoc came in at 60.49 percent. That's low for this county, but higher than all but four of the state's 58 counties: Alpine 64.3 percent, Humboldt 63.3 percent, Amador 63.1 percent, and Sierra 62.5 percent.

Local highway projects stalled

Five local highway improvement projects may be postponed from two to four years, as funds were appropriated to help solve the state budget crunch

Pam Couch, Modoc County Transportation Commission Executive Director is concerned that these projects, although needed and approved by the local commission, will be on hold and residents will have to deal with degraded roads a while longer

There will be a MCTC special public hearing March 30, 6 p.m. at Alturas City Hall to take public comment on the situation

Couch points out that $3.33 million were allocated to five Modoc County projects over the next four years. "Because the majority of transportation funds were appropriated to solve the state budget crisis, the MCTC must re-schedule and re-phase the project construction to fit funds availability worked out by the 'higher-ups' in Sacramento," she said. "So folks will need to deal with rough roads, potholes and deteriorating bridges awhile longer." According to Couch, the Warner Street Truck Route in Alturas, at $1.63 million could be postponed until 2007-08. It was originally scheduled for this summer. A replacement of the bridge on County Road 60, at $130,000 could be delayed until 2005-06. Renovation of 3.7 miles of County Road One in Surprise Valley ($735,000) delayed until 2005-06. A new priority was placed on the agenda, which would be replacement of the Stone Coal Valley bridge on CR 85 in 2005-06

A project covering 4.9 miles of County Road 114 in Newell ($745,000) could be canceled as well as a project to build a State Route 299 truck escape ramp one mile west of Cedarville ($2.07 million total).

Couch is urging citizens to send written comment to the MCTC or show up at the public hearing and voice concerns. For more information or to comment, contact Couch at 233-6422.

State budget cuts take out local DUI program as of March 1

State budget cuts have taken out the Modoc County Driving Under the Influence program as of March 1

Public Health Department Director Phil Smith said the department will continue to assist the people currently in the program through to completion, but will not accept referrals from the courts after March 1

He explained that the state cut his department's discretionary spending budget from $112,500 to about $32,000 over the past two years. His department was insuring the DUI program remained available here

The lack of the program could have a serious impact on DUI offenders. In order to get their driver's license back, first time DUI offenders have to go through an "intake" week and 12 weeks of the DUI program at a cost of $460. The 12-week program includes education, group counseling and meetings. DUI programs for enhanced first offenders or repeat offenders can be from six months to 18 months long. The fees are paid by individuals on a sliding scale, based upon income

With the cut in funds, people with DUI convictions will now have to travel out of county weekly for the service. The closest probable place is Lassen County, said Smith

"We realize this is going to create a problem for some people," said Smith. "But, we just don't have the money to run it any longer."

Smith is working with other north state counties to come up with a consortium to add some flexibility in all aspects of their funding. In addition, he said there is a private individual now looking to secure a license to operate the DUI program here

"We're supportive of someone doing it here, but it's going to take a minimum of two or three months before it's set up and running," said Smith.

MJUSD adopts student drug diversion program

On Monday, the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees adopted a new drug diversion program for students.

The program is designed for first offenders being under the influence of a non-controlled substance. It is not available for students with a criminal charge who have been adjudicated.

If students enroll in the program, they will be allowed to continue school and participate in sports, band or other extra-curricular activities. But, the rules are strict and the student must complete a 13-week diversion program.

Basically, if a student is suspected of being under the influence, law enforcement and the Modoc County Drug Task Force will be notified to conduct field testing.

If the field test is positive, the student will be referred to the drug diversion program. The parents will be notified immediately and must sign forms to have the student enter the program. If the field test is negative, the student will return to normal school activities.

If a parent doesn't want the student in the drug diversion program, that student will face immediate suspension from the school site and be placed in the Community Day School or on Independent Study until an expulsion hearing before the Board.

If the students and parents agree to the diversion program, it would start immediately. The student would be assessed by the Modoc County Alcohol and Drug Services and a MJUSD diversion flow sheet would be filled out. In addition, the Modoc County Probation Department would be notified that the student needs an immediate urine/chemical analysis. After that test, the student would be released to parents and suspended for the rest of that school day. The following day the student would report to the appropriate site principal to receive instruction and return to school.

The student would then adhere to serious restrictions and will be under a Behavior Contract with the school. Random urine/chemical tests, at least six, would be conducted during a 13-week period.

The 13-week diversion program would include weekly one-hour counseling sessions with a Drug and Alcohol Service specialist, weekly family education meetings, attendance at monthly meetings of the Board of Trustees. If the student is successful, the Board may add incentives and if the student is not successful, sanctions may be imposed, including suspension, community service work days, detentions and restarting the entire program.

Wet February, but below record water

The past month of February was filled with storms which dumped 1.58 inches of precipitation in Alturas.

That's well above the 1.2 inch average, but below the record of 5.08 inches in 1986.

In 1986, the heavy rains caused pretty extensive flooding in Alturas and throughout the valley.

March started out like a lion as well, with .61 inches of precipitation on March 1, with about three inches of very wet snow. The temperatures remained cool as the mercury dipped to 14 degrees and only moved up to 38 degrees as a high Monday.

The good news is that warmer weather is supposed to arrive this weekend and stay through the middle of next week.

Temperatures are supposed to climb into the 60s by next week, with lows still at the freezing level.

Modoc jobless rate up to 11.3%

Modoc's unemployment rate increased to 11.3 percent in January, up from December's 9.1 percent. The actual number of unemployed individuals increased from 390 in December to 500 in January.

In January last year, the county's unemployment rate was 12.2 percent. Modoc is well above the state unemployment rate of 6.7 percent and the federal rate of 6.3 percent, The county ranks 41st out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen County ranks 30th at 8.6 percent and Siskiyou County ranks 45th at 14.3 percent.

The highest unemployment is in Colusa County at 29.1 percent and the lowest is San Luis Obispo at 3.3 percent.

These figures come from the California Employment Development Department.

BLM announces Seasonal Road closures

The Bureau of Land Management's Alturas Field Office has announced seasonal road closures in Lassen and Modoc Counties. The closures begin March 12, and are designed to protect muddy areas from motor vehicle damage. Closures will be lifted when the areas dry later in the spring.

In Modoc County, the Delta Lake Road will be closed to vehicles at the north end of the Bayley Reservoir Dam. Vehicle access to Nelson Corral Reservoir in Lassen County will be limited to existing roads.

"These annual restrictions were initiated in 2000 following extensive public discussion," said Tim Burke, manager of the BLM Alturas Field Office. "The travel restrictions protect public lands from damage while still allowing reasonable springtime access to these popular fishing reservoirs."

Current road information is available by calling the Alturas Field Office at (530)233-4666 or from the website.

Sandhill Cranes have returned to Modoc

February 18 marked the return of the greater sandhill cranes to the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge. These large, beautiful and graceful birds are the oldest species of cranes in existence today.

On their migration north, many cranes will stop to use fields and wetlands throughout the area, while many others will stay to nest and rear their young.

Modoc County supports a large and very successful breeding population of greater sandhill cranes. Much of this success can be attributed to the abundance of irrigated pasture, hay meadows and natural wetlands throughout the County. Preferring shallow marshes, cranes become territorial during nesting and will defend their nest area which ranges anywhere from three to fifty acres in size.

Generally two eggs are laid per year, of which only one will usually survive to join the flock. Crane chicks, called colts, hatch in early to mid-April and should be visible in May. Come view these magnificent birds which will become more abundant in the weeks to follow. For more information, please contact the staff at the refuge at (530)233-3572, or by email at modoc@fws.gov.

Obituaries:

Harold C. Ascherman, Jr

Harold Calvin Ascherman, Jr., age 80, passed away in his Cedarville, Calif. home on March 1, 2004. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, March 5, 2004, at the Cedarville Community Church, followed by a private graveside service.

Mr. Ascherman was a 38-year resident of Surprise Valley. He was born on September 2, 1923, to Cal and Nell Ascherman of Petaluma, Calif. He was in the military service in the Army Air Force during World War II as a private first class. He married Ruby Kathleen Hope of Illford, England June 27,1945. They were married for 58 years and had four children.

Harold and his family moved to Fort Bidwell, Calif. in 1966, and to Cedarville, Calif. in 1985. Harold was a retired grocer. He was a long-time member of the Fort Bidwell Volunteer Fire Department, the local Veterans of Foreign Wars and an active member of the Seniors Valley 50 Club.

Preceding Harold in death were his sister Marjorie Genola of Calistoga; his son Eric John Ascherman who passed in 1963, and two granddaughters, Faith Leann Ascherman (1995) and Hope Leann Ascherman (1979). He is survived by his wife Ruby, sons Butch and Guy Ascherman of Redding, Calif.; daughter Evelyn Reeves of Lake City, Calif.; seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Donations can be made to the Surprise Valley Hospital District, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104 or to the Valley 50 Club. Kerr Mortuary is handling arrangements.

James 'Randy' Lybarger

James Randall "Randy" Lybarger passed away peacefully at his home in Portland, Oregon on February 25, 2004.

Randy was born on July 22, 1950, in Alturas, Calif. and graduated from Modoc High School in 1968. He worked various jobs, including working for the University of Oklahoma in Stillwater, Oklahoma. He went to work at Pacific Northwest Bell, now Qwest, where he was also active as a union steward, until his disability retirement in 1996.

Randy loved rock hounding and was always in pursuit of antiques and collectibles. His house is a myriad of exciting, unusual and sometimes rare objects.

Randy is survived by his three sons, Richard, Chad and Evan of Lowell, Oregon; two grandchildren; brother Larry Lybarger of Puyallup, Washington; and his beloved Candy Monegan.

Chesley Hillman DeForest

Chesley Hillman DeForest died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Loma Rica, CA. on February 21, 2004. A service will be held at the Adin Community Church, Adin, CA. on Saturday, March 6 at 1 p.m. Rich Bath will officiate. Friends, neighbors and family members are invited to attend a potluck gathering at the Adin Community Hall, following the services. Ches was born in Johnstonville, California on November 11, 1916 to Charles Vaden and Christine Violet Hill DeForest. He was one of 13 children. He attended grammar schools in Standish, Johnstonville, and Buntingville, all places where his parents had ranches, and he attended high school in Susanville.

Upon graduation, Ches' father took him to Ash Valley to work for an old family friend, Thad Bath.

He spent four years in Ash Valley and then went on to work for Masten Ramsey at Madeline, and later Allie Clough at Los Molinos.

In 1941, Ches volunteered for military service and became one of the 196 men of Company E of the 161st Army infantry regiment. He was on the first boat to leave Fort Lewis, Washington heading for Hawaii when Pearl Harbor was bombed. He fought at Guadalcanal, New Caledonia, Vella Larela, and New Georgia Island. When his company was granted rest in New Zealand, there were only 70 men left in the company. Ches was never seriously injured, but did contact malaria. He was discharged in 1945. Because of a fire and loss of records at Army headquarters, Ches finally received his war medals in the mail on February 11, 2004.

On November 24, 1945, he married the love of his life, Grace Margaret Bath. They raised a wonderful family of five children.

Throughout the years, Ches, with pride and dedication, worked on ranches for Masten Ramsey and the Flournoys of Likely, T.H. Richards of Oregon House, and Bob Obrien of Loma Rica. Upon retiring in 1987 he and Grace moved to their own place on the Loma Rica Road. Here, Ches continued to raise registered Hereford cattle and America Quarter Horses. In recent years Ches and Grace enjoyed their summers in Adin and winters in Loma Rica.

As a respected member of the communities he lived in, and strong supporter of youth activities, Ches served on the Oregon House School Board, President of the Yuba County 4-H Council, Community 4-H Leader, and Livestock Superintendent at the Yuba County Fair. He supported the Yuba Sutter and Intermountain Fairs' 4-H and FFA Livestock Auctions. Ches and Grace were members of the Loma Rica Community Church. Ches loved to rope and be on horseback. In his earlier years he was a fierce competitor in team roping. He loved to rope at brandings. He knew cattle and was a great cowman. He enjoyed being with family and friends, both new and old. And he adored his grandchildren.

Ches is survived by his wife, Grace of Loma Rica and Adin, CA.; daughter Cheryl DeForest, Loma Rica, CA.; daughter and son-in-law Beverly and Darrell "Bo" Tipton, Loma Rica; sons and daughters-in-law Tom and Kathy DeForest; Paul and Karin DeForest, Ash Valley, Calif.; and Charles and Becky DeForest, Wheatland; brother Gilbert DeForest, Cottonwood; brothers and sisters-in-law Ralph and Nancy DeForest, Likely; and Gay and Sunny DeForest, Empire, NV.; sister Bonnie DeWitt, Elko, NV. sister and brother-in-law Flora and Donald Genkinger, Sparks, NV. and 12 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father, Charles Vaden DeForest; mother, Christine Violet Hill DeForest; brothers Lawrence Vaden DeForest, Jesse Levoy DeForest, Charles Jr. DeForest, and Thomas Frazier DeForest; and sisters: Betty Jo DeForest Yeakey, Helen Marie DeForest Beterbide, and Marjel Christine DeForest.

A service was also held at the Loma Rica Community Church, Loma Rica on February 25.

Contributions in memory of Ches DeForest may be made to the Intermountain Cattlewomen Scholarship Fund, Box 161, McArthur, CA. 96056, or to a charity of choice.

Edrie Leona "Teddy" Hays

Edrie Leona 'Teddy' Hays, 99, Bonanza, OR. died February 22, 2004, of natural causes in Klamath Falls, OR.

A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at Bonanza Memorial Park in Bonanza with the Rev. Billy Hamblin officiating. Visitation is until 5 p.m. today in O'Hair and Riggs Funeral Chapel.

Mrs. Hays was born February 11, 1902, in Coos Bay to Charles Eugene and Julia Etta (McGee) Gallop.

She also lived in Coos Bay until moving with her family in 1910 to Fort Bidwell, where she enjoyed many of the community activities and met her future husband at a function in nearby Lake City.

After graduating from Fort Bidwell High School, she moved to Los Angeles and attended a business school there.

She later returned to the Surprise Valley and in 1927 married William J. "Bill" Hays in Lake City. They made their home on the Lake City Ranch, living there until moving to Ashland in 1944.

When all of her children had reached school age, she went to work as the school cook for Bellview Elementary School.

In 1959, she and her husband purchased a ranch at Malin, where they grew hay and grains and raised sheep and cattle.

They retired in 1964 and moved to Langell Valley.

Mrs. Hays then worked for several seasons sorting potatoes for L.K. Produce.

Her husband preceded her in death in 1976.

She was a member of Klamath County Home Extension for more than 50 years. While living in the Surprise Valley, she enjoyed gardening and canning produce. At the annual Modoc Fair, she won numerous awards for her canning, baking and sewing projects. In Langell Valley, she was active in the Langell Valley Sewing Club.

She enjoyed reading and crocheted a countless number of afghans that she gave as presents to friends and family members. She also enjoyed attending sports activities, especially baseball and basketball, of her children and grandchildren and watching birds that visited her yard.

Survivors include her daughter Lois Jean Struve of Bonanza; son William J. "Bill" Hays of Soldotna, Alaska; grandchildren and their spouses Vicky and Charles Ward of Wasilla, Alaska, Cindy Hays of Soldotna, Jeannie and Larry Bopp of Modesto, CA. Ray and Chris Struve of Malin and Carol Matense of Bend; great-grandchildren Jevon Struve and his wife Merridith, Lawson Struve, Kevin Mauseth, Kenny Bopp and his wife Becky, Roger Bopp and his wife Debbie, Tyler Brown, Emily Brown, Chayna Ward and Charles Ward Jr.; great-great-grandchildren Jon, Mike and Justin Bopp and Jordan and Anna Struve.

In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her sister Vida Hanks and brother Everett Gallop.

Memorial donations may be made to Bonanza Ambulance, P.O. Box 363, Bonanza, OR. 97623.

Ruby L. Marx

Modoc native and frequent visitor to Alturas until last year, Ruby Marx, 80, died unexpectedly of a massive stroke on January 29, 2004, while talking at her dining table. But, she got her wish. She died on a beautiful sunny day in her Redding, CA. home, with her things and in the arms of her son.

Ruby Lorraine Marx was born July 23, 1923 in Cedarville, CA. The third child of seven, born to William Jesse Cannon and Edna Frances Royce. She moved to Alturas in 1926, was educated in the local schools and graduated from Modoc Union High in 1941.

On October 9, 1940, in Alturas, Calif., she married Clifford Marx. When the war broke out, Cliff went into the U.S. Navy and she went to work at Ralph Smith Lumber Company. She went to work for the Post Office in 1944, one of the first three ladies to do so. They moved to San Diego after the war and later moved to Redding in 1947 and remained there until her death.

She was reinstated with the Post Office in 1948; with the exception of three years with the State Offices of the Division of Highways and the Board of Equalization, became the Personnel Assistant and retired from that position on November 1, 1983 with a combined total of 37 years service.

After retirement, she was a homemaker. But, not to waste time, she ran the Redding Hotel for several years, and helped run Golden Umbrella for Seniors. She went to college to learn formal flower arranging and loved to bake wedding cakes, especially for those who thought they could only afford a cup cake. They would end up with a three-tiered cake.

She traveled for several years. One of her most rewarding experiences was on a trip to Ireland when she went to the Cannon ancestral home which was built in 1696. After a few more trips to islands of the Pacific she just stayed home, with the exception of coming to Alturas for Memorial Day and going to the Bay Area once a year.

She loved her family. Her heritage. Dearly loved her grandchildren. Loved ones who survive are son Bill of the home, daughter Carole Smith of Dinuba, CA., her dearest friend Ted Boczkowski of Redding, five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. She also leaves aunts Ruth Royce and Lucille Gysin Chandler, both of Alturas, and one sister Jessie Genung of Redding. Several nieces, nephews and cousins.

She was preceded in death by her husband, granddaughter Kimberle Denney, her parents and her siblings; Opal "Babe" Smith, Irene Blevins, Edna "Cissy" Meredith, Bob Cannon and Lodeana Burmister.

Her memorial mass was held at Our Lady of Mercy on February 5. Her burial was at the Redding Cemetery. Out of town persons attending were Carole Smith, Carole's son Kevin and his wife Angela, their sons Little Kevin and Prestin of Dinuba, CA.; Jolean and Patrick Alexander of Rocklin, CA.; Delwon and Gloria Cannon, Gary Blevins and Marion Smith of Alturas.

Virginia J. Terry

Memorial Services for Virginia J. Terry will be held Friday, March 5 at 10 a.m. at Grace Bible Church, First and College Streets, Bieber, CA. Pastor Kent House will officiate. Mrs. Terry passed away February 24, 2004 in Adin, CA. She had been a Modoc resident for the past 10 years.

Born Constance Virginia Jumper on February 26, 1923 in Covina, CA., Los Angeles County, she graduated from Covina High School, Covina and was married to James Donald Terry on March 29, 1947 in Las Vegas, Nevada. James passed away on their 45th wedding anniversary on March 29, 1992.

Mrs. Terry was active in her community, as a member of Grace Bible Church, Native Daughters of the Golden West, Big Valley Garden Club and 50+ Club. She was also a homemaker.

She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law M'Lou and Matt Hunsaker of Adin, CA.; grandson J.C. Hunsaker of Adin, CA.; granddaughter Kelsey Hunsaker of Medford, OR.; daughter and son-in-law Mindy and Jim Stuhler of Chino, CA.

A second Memorial Service will take place on Sunday, March 21, 2004, at 1 p.m. with a meal following at Gateway Community Church, 5885 Schaefer Ave., Chino, CA. 91710 (909) 628-6598. Senior Pastor Lynn Thrush officiating. Donations may be made to Grace Bible Church, Bieber, CA.

Melvin 'Mutt' Vermillion

Melvin Frank "Mutt" Vermillion, 75, a near lifetime Modoc resident, passed away March 2, 2004, in Cedarville, CA. A Memorial Service will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra on Saturday, March 6 at 11 a.m. at the Four Seasons building on the Modoc District Fairgrounds, Cedarville. A fellowship gathering will follow. Mr. Vermillion was born in Davis Creek, CA. on March 11, 1928. A complete obituary will be printed at a later date. Kerr Mortuary is handling arrangements.

Sports

Bell, Wood on way to state wrestling finals this week

Modoc's heavyweight Cory Bell and 145-pounder Travis Wood are heading to the California State Wrestling Championships in Bakersfield this week and winning individual titles in the North Section Masters Tournament held last weekend in Redding.

In addition to sending two wrestlers to the sate finals, done only one other time, the Braves finished the North Section tourney in third place, surprising several schools, but not Modoc coaches.

The teams scores were as follows: Red Bluff 156, Willows 123, Modoc 119.5, Pleasant Valley 113.5, West Valley 112, Durham 110, Shasta 99, Orland 89, Corning 87, Paradise 77.5, Foothill 69, Sutter 57, Anderson 54.5, Lassen 41.5, Tulelake 39, Chico 38, Las Plumas 36, Oroville 34, Enterprise 33, Central Valley 28, Trinity 26, American Christian 22, Quincy 22, Burney 19, Winters 17.5, Mt. Shasta 16, Etna 15, Chester 8, Gridley 6, Wheatland 5, Portola 3, Hamilton 1 and Los Molinos 1.

Bell, a senior, whipped Central Valley's Schuyler Wilson, 6-4, in a tight match for the heavyweight crown. Wood, a sophomore, had little trouble beating West Valley's Josh Dame 18-2 in the title match. Only the first place finishers at the Masters Tournament qualify for state finals.

"Bell wrestled well both days and that finals match was tough," said Modoc Coach Shaun Wood. "Travis had a tough first match, only winning it 7-5 in overtime, but then destroyed everyone all the way through the finals. I think that first match woke him up."

The pair will head to Bakersfield the middle of this week, with wrestling starting Friday morning. Wood said he has no real idea how the two will do at the state finals, but knows they have both beaten a couple of state-ranked wrestlers along the way.

Wood said Modoc's 160-pounder, Jason Jones, had a great tournament, coming in second with a 10-3 loss to Nick Hernandez of Pleasant Valley. Wood said Hernandez is ranked in the top seven in the state. Jones is a junior and will be back next season.

Modoc's Luke Hammerness also had a good day, placing fourth at the very competitive 154-pound division, and Brad Bell took a solid fifth at 191 pounds, while Joey Catania finished strong with a fifth at 217 pounds. Two other Modoc wrestles, Ian Jacques and Sheridan Crutcher, did very well but finished just out of the medals.

In addition to Modoc's wrestlers heading to state, Tulelake's John Luscombe, qualified by winning the Master's title 6-4 over Shasta's Lenny Marandino. Luscombe is coached by Shaun Wood's brother, Shane. Of this year's starting lineup, Modoc only loses Cory Bell and Hammerness to graduation.

Modoc's Braves fall to Pierce

The Pierce Bears knocked the Modoc Braves boys varsity out of the North Section playoffs last Wednesday, 51-36.

Modoc shot just 34 percent and let Pierce get off to a good start. The game was close in the first period with Pierce leading 11-9, but the Bears put up 20 and Modoc just six to take a 31-15 halftime lead. Pierce led 40-24 after three. Marty Stevens led the Braves with 15 points and Zack McKirahan added 10. "We didn't play real well, but Pierce was aggressive and kept the pressure on," said Modoc Coach Mike Martin. "They were the most disciplined team I've seen all year. They just didn't make mistakes."

The Braves' season was successful overall, finishing at 8-4 in the Shasta Cascade League, with two of those losses coming in overtime. Those losses were to league champion, Trinity, and runner-up Mt. Shasta, and both were on the road.

Martin loses a bunch of seniors this season including: Stevens, McKirahan, Cam Jeffers, Skyler Oats, Shiloh Pierce, Raf Sevilla and Bob Martinez. But he does have a solid core of sophomores coming up from the junior varsity.

The Modoc High Basketball Banquet is scheduled for March 8, 6:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge in Alturas.

Hornets fall to Lions

The Surprise Valley Hornets fell victim to a solid Redding Christian Lions team 66-49, last Thursday in the first round of the North Section CIF playoffs.

"All the scouting reports about the Lions were true and they'll surely be back in the playoffs the next two years," said Hornet coach Arnold DeGarmo. "Their quick hands had the Hornets turn the ball over 16 times by halftime."

The Lions led 41-20 at half, and the Hornets were able to outscore them 17-9 in the final period. Josh Boneck led Surprise Valley with 20 and Kyle Russell led the Lions with 10.

On March 5, Redding Christian will face the number one seed, Happy Camp.

Snow brings in baseball season

March 1 brought in a wet winter snowstorm, the general harbinger of Modoc High School baseball season.

The Braves played Lassen March 3, and head to the Enterprise tournament in Redding this weekend where it should be warmer. The Surprise Valley Hornets will meet Modoc in Alturas for a double-header March 9.

Modoc will be coming into this season defending last year's Shasta Cascade League title. Coach Brad Server said he has nine returning players and solid pitching to contend for league and wants to advance further in the playoffs this season. Server said the team is playing a tougher pre-season schedule this year to prepare for those playoffs.

The team is coached by Server and assistant Tim MacDonnell. Team members are: Joey Catania, Henry Correa, Rich Culp, Cam Jeffers, Josh Kendell, David Kolvoord, Kyle Madison, Skyler Oates, Shiloh Pierce, Travis Potter, Danny Randazzo, Adam Server, Marty Stevens, David Toaetolu and Cody Widby.

March 18, 2004

News

River Watershed Alliance wants quality program

For irrigators in the Pit River watershed, who are faced with the state's new monitoring and filing requirements, the water quality monitoring program of the Pit River Watershed Alliance may be a godsend.

"The primary focus of our monitoring program is to get a comprehensive look at the main stem of the Pit River as well as the tributaries that feed into it, just to accurately describe biologically what's going on in the system," says James Rickert, watershed coordinator. "We have eleven main-stem Pit River sites, ranging from the North and South Fork near Alturas to our lowest, most downstream site … at the Pittville Bridge . . . in the Fall River Valley."

Funded by grants from state agencies, the Alliance was created specifically to assess the status of water in the Pit River and its tributaries. "The main goal of our program is to really just take a snapshot of what's going on in the watershed," Rickert explains. "We really don't have much water quality information for our area. Where, in the future, we're going to need to meet all these water quality regulations, it would be nice to know what some of our baseline information is."

A data collection and dissemination program designed to focus on the Pit River, Rickert's alliance is positioned to be of considerable assistance as the irrigated lands waiver program comes up to speed. "We want to be ahead of the curve instead of behind the curve," affirms Rickert. "I guess, indirectly, we are the watershed group for this area because we're going to be able to supply the monitoring data.

"The Pit River Alliance is working to fill the role for this watershed with our monitoring program.  This would mean that agricultural producers would not have to pay any more out of pocket expenses for water quality work (for now).  They've already got enough to pay for. Our monitoring is funded by the state primarily, and we hope to expand our program to fill the role for the entire watershed," observes Rickert.

The Sacramento Valley Water Quality Coalition, the largest of the irrigators' groups formed to answer the demands of the new ag waiver program, covers the entire Sacramento Valley watershed, of which the Pit River basin is a part. "They're basically going to be the lead organization taking care of the watershed program," says Rickert. "What we want to do . . . is send them our data and they can take care of the rest. This is the umbrella organization that will ultimately take care of everything. So, (Pit River area) farmers and ranchers are already included in this group. Whether they know it or not, they're being included."

The benefits for irrigators in joining a coalition may be considerable. "If each landowner were to have to do this individually, do all these things that we're doing, it might cost them anywhere between $7,000 and $14,000 per ranch," Rickert asserts. "That's tough for a farmer to cough up . . . just for something they don't get any benefit from. It's just another added layer of expenses."

Rickert notes that many irrigators see his Alliance as an arm of the state and its enforcement of regulations—a perception he rejects. "I'd like to see it geared more towards farmers and ranchers to get their input. They're the people that have grown up in this area. … They know the area better than anyone else. That's my personal position. I grew up on a ranch here in the Fall River Valley. I'm really interested in the natural resources here. I think we're in one of the most pristine areas of California. I'd like our water to show it as well.

"One thing that we're hoping to show with our monitoring program is that the Pit River is not an impaired waterway," continues Rickert.

Interestingly, Rickert's studies have found it likely that agricultural intervention has significantly improved the river's health. Based on solid, scientific data obtained from tree ring studies, it is clear that the Pit typically dried up in the summer months before the changes irrigators made

"We're looking at historic flows," says Rickert. "The Pit River is a runoff-based watershed. It's not, primarily, stream fed. And, actually, the reservoirs that have been created in this area . . . supply more water in the summer than the Pit River has historically seen."

Therefore, man-made storage on the Pit and its tributaries actually serves to maintain summer stream flows, creating a healthier stream environment than has been true historically. "In ways, yes," admits Rickert. "If you're looking at water flow in the summer, then definitely." Do irrigators need to worry about the heightened attention to return water flows? "There may need to be some changes made down the road, but I think for now," says Rickert, thoughtfully, ". . . status quo."

What do waivers mean for individual irrigators in this area? "I think, for now in our area, not much at all . . . and I'd like to keep it that way. I think that's the way it should be."

What is Rickert's take on the irrigators' reaction to the ag waiver program? "They're uneasy . . . as anyone would be. A lot of people that I work with want to do whatever they can to make sure that they don't have any impact on the river. And if the data can prove it . . . if we have determined that the Pit River is in as good of shape as it can possibly be, then people don't have to worry about it. And so, I think that's a way people would like to work with us and help steer our group.

"I'm just trying to do what's best for everyone, including farmers and ranchers," insists Rickert. "I identify with them. I know exactly what they're doing. I do farming on the side as well."

Where the new ag waiver program is concerned, Rickert wants to allay most fears. "They don't need to worry about dealing with all these state regulations. I hope that our group can take care of that headache for them. They don't even need to see it. They know that they're being taken care of. They know that all of these things in this program are being satisfied. They don't need to worry about it in their day-to-day ranching life."

Perhaps more ominous for irrigators are potential restrictions looming for the future, explains Rickert. "If we had a TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) established for the Pit River, I think that's going to be pretty tough for some people to comply with. That will, supposedly, be established in 2011, if the Pit River continues to be on this (EPA) list. We're hoping, with our data, to show that we can take the Pit River off this list before we reach that point. And if that's the case, that our data can prove it, then it will be status quo for the farmers and ranchers here on out."

For more information about the Pit River Watershed Alliance, its web page can be found at www.pitriveralliance.net.

Prescribed burning begins on the Modoc National Forest

With the onset of spring, prescribed burning is being scheduled throughout the Modoc National Forest. These burns vary in size from a few acres to approximately 2,000 acres and have a variety of goals and objectives associated with them.

The primary objectives are to reduce the size and severity of wildland fire, reduce suppression difficulty and cost, protect investments, and improve forage and grazing.

The Devil's Garden Ranger District is planning to burn in the Hacamore and Washington Mountain area. Prescribed burning will occur beginning on March 17, 2004 and run until projects are completed.

The Big Valley Ranger District is planning to burn in the Long Bell and Rush Creek areas.

The Warner Mountains Ranger District is planning to burn in the Sugar Hill area.

The Doublehead Ranger District is planning to burn in the Bench area west of Tionesta.

For more information on planned burning activities, contact Keith Bryan on the Big Valley Ranger District at (530)299-3215.

Modoc Home Show offers something for everyone

People who want to know what's available in Modoc County for home building, remodeling, decorating or landscaping will be in for a treat with the first Modoc Home Show, set for Saturday March 27, in the Griswold Gym.

"We're excited and it's coming together really well," said Modoc Title's Rendy Cockrell, one of the organizers. "The businesses involved are going to have excellent displays and information. They are going all out on their displays. I believe people are going to be impressed with what's offered."

Organizer Paula Henckle, of U.S. Bank, also pleased with the business response, said the whole idea is to focus on Modoc businesses; just to show residents what is available here without going out of the area

"We want to showcase our businesses and what they have to offer," said Henckle. "Everything from starting a foundation to building, remodeling to landscaping will be featured. People will get a chance to see what the opportunities are and deal with businesses who can show them a variety of options and ideas."

Brooke Fredrickson, of Handmade Haven, also an organizer, said she's thrilled with the response of the business people and hopes the community will take advantage of the chance to meet and discuss their plans with the professionals. She feels people will be able to get some new and different ideas

Everything from home decoration, furniture makers, insurance, banking, general contractors, plumbers, hardware, home entertainment, window coverings, landscaping, computers, electricians, backhoe service, asphalt, rock and gravel, insulation, rental equipment, roofing, fencing, garages and sheds, engineering, Internet access, design, real estate sales and service and escrow service will be under the gym roof

"People will be able to talk about home building and decorating from start to finish with these people," said Henckle. General contractors point out that planning early makes a big difference, and also allows them to schedule work to suit both the customer and their needs

The new design possibilities are endless, say the organizers, and computer aided design demonstrations will allow some real time options and ideas to be shared

Admission to the Home Show is free and about 40 door prizes will be offered throughout the day. Refreshments will also be available and a raffle will be staged to benefit the High Plateau Humane Society

The businesses involved in the Home Show are as follows: Handmade Haven, Modoc County Title, U.S. Bank, Quality by Design, Woodworks of Alturas, Perry Clark Backhoe Service, Maxwell's Nursery, Walt Smith Landscaping, J-Mar Construction, Michael Church Voth, J.S. General Contracting and Roofing, Tony Darst, Janie Erkiaga Real Estate, Larranaga Construction, True Green Lawn Service, Dean Neer Modoc Realty, Modoc Insurance Services, John Wisser Plumbing, North State Homes, Ace 4-Seasons, G&M Marketing, Phillips Appliance, Guy Williams Construction, Randall Electric, United Country Stevenson Realty, Computer Haven, Warner Mountain Realty, Wild Mustard, A&M Pump and Plumbing, Jim's T.V., High Desert Online, Gift Gallery, Davis's Gallery of Gifts, Richardson Insulation, Modoc Fire Safe Council, Eagle Peak Rock and Gravel, Copp's Irrigation and Misunderstood Einsteins Unite and the National Society for ADA Transportation.

Jobless rates still climbing

Modoc County's jobless rate continues to be high as 11.5 percent of the county's workforce is unemployed. That's up from January's initial 11.3 percent, but that number has been revised upward to 11.7 percent

In February, 510 people were unemployed, that's up from last year when 480 people were on the unemployment list

Modoc ranks 41st out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment rate. Lassen County is ranked 32nd at 8.7 percent and Siskiyou is 45th at 14.0 percent

The state jobless rate is 6.5 percent.

13th Squirrel Round-up weekend

About the third week in February, fields in Surprise Valley come alive as local Belding ground squirrels emerge from six months of hibernation. They are quickly followed by the annual influx of plinkers and hunters intent on reducing the numbers of these pesky rodents variously known as "sage rats" or, in Surprise Valley, "bobby squirrels."

Saturday, March 20, marks the beginning of spring as well as the 13th annual Squirrel Round-Up. Sponsored by the Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce, this annual event draws eager participants from throughout the western states

This year, the 97 hunters who pre-registered will enjoy a full day of hospitality and hunting on local ranches, followed by a sumptuous dinner, door prizes and silent auction at the fairgrounds. The social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. Dinner tickets are $10

This year, the silent auction promises to be a highlight of the day with fierce bidding wars likely. Several major items have been donated, including a unique squirrel trophy, a custom-built shooting bench, and a fishing trip for two. Local businesses and crafters have also generously contributed items or services

The Chamber has received two recent phone calls and a letter questioning the event from a humane standpoint. The expressed concerns have been discussed at meetings. However, even a superficial investigation of the annual problems and expenses brought about by these seemingly small and harmless animals quickly shows the necessity of reducing their rapidly growing numbers

Ground squirrels are native to the Modoc County area. They have been spotted at 7,500 feet in the Warner Mountains as well as in the nearby deserts close to water sources, reports local naturalist and rancher Ray Page. However, in their natural habitat, their colonies are much more sparse than those found in the valley

"Alfalfa fields are a totally artificial habitat for this animal. They find plentiful food as they destroy young alfalfa plants and gorge on tender roots and leaves. They have very few local predators in cultivated fields so their numbers multiply virtually unchecked," says Page. In their natural habitat, the squirrels are rarely a nuisance because predators and cyclical deprivations keep their numbers in balance

Fields where squirrels are allowed to breed unchecked soon produce little of value and must either be renewed or abandoned. Ruined fields would inevitably reduce the population of the pests while causing catastrophic economic damage to local towns. Already, annual costs of equipment repair, eradication efforts, and field management or renewal are significant

Controlling the damage done by ground squirrels is an unending and expensive job for local alfalfa growers. The local species burrows fifteen feet or more into the ground, digging complex tunnels with numerous escape holes. These holes lead to equipment damage during haying season. Field flooding, used in the past more than in recent years, does little to eradicate the squirrels. Many ranchers resort to poisoning, even though it is very expensive and labor-intensive.

Shooting the squirrels is actually a humane method of partially controlling their exponential growth. It has the added benefit of attracting bald eagles. They enjoy the easy pickings after hunters have had a good day, reports Page. And visitors and locals alike greatly enjoy sighting the majestic birds

Surprise Valley welcomes the hunters who revel in the beautiful scenery and warm hospitality they find here while enjoying their sport. The ranchers appreciate any help they can get in controlling the "sage rats" that cause so much aggravation

For more information on the annual Squirrel Round-Up or activities planned for Saturday, March 20, please call the chamber office at 279-2001.

Sandhill Cranes forum at Modoc Wildlife Refuge

Coming soon-Green Eggs and Long Legs: The Sandhill Story. Everything you ever wanted to know about Sandhill Cranes if you could get close enough to ask one will be discussed at the Modoc Wildlife Refuge Saturday, April 3

Wildlife Biologist Shannon Ludwig will present a forum on one of the most entertaining species in the refuge. The reigning sopranos of Modoc's morning choir are also dancers, performing their graceful ballet throughout the spring. Find out why, then take a tour with Ludwig to see them in their natural habitat

The 9 to 11 a.m. event, sponsored by the Refuge and the River Center in Alturas, is free and refreshments will be provided. Participants are advised to bring binoculars, cameras, and wear hiking shoes.

Modoc RAC seeks projects and replacement members

The Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a meeting on Monday, April 5 in the Modoc National Forest Supervisor's Office at 800 West 12th Street from 6 to 8 p.m.

The RAC is actively seeking applications for projects seeking funding in 2005. Projects may include, but are not limited to road, trail and infrastructure maintenance or obliteration; soil productivity improvement; improvements in forest ecosystem health; watershed restoration and maintenance; control of noxious and exotic weeds. Fifty percent of all approved projects must be for road maintenance and obliteration or watershed improvements and restoration.

Currently there are two replacement member vacancies on the RAC. Replacement members are needed in the Outdoor Recreation, Affected Public at Large and Minerals/Energy groups.

For information about the Resource Advisory Committee positions available or how to submit a project contact Louis Haynes at (530)233-8846.

Obituaries:

Kermit 'K.C.' Tierney

Kermit Collins "K.C." Tierney, 83, of Alturas, Calif. passed away peacefully, with his family at his bedside, on March 13, 2004, at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas.

Born on the Fourth of July, 1920, in Alturas, Calif., he was the youngest son of William and Daisy Tierney. K.C. lived his life and served his community and Modoc County, residing in Alturas.

He was a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and spent two and a half years in service to his country during WWII. He fought at Guadalcanal and was the only survivor from his division.

He married Rose Marie Wilson in May of 1952. Five children, six grandchildren, and two step- grandchildren survive him: son Bevin Tierney of Quincy, daughter Michele T. Goralnick and husband Burt of Los Angeles, son Kermit Collins II (Bing) Tierney of Susanville, daughter Kim T. Gentry and husband Mark of Alturas, and daughter Angela T.

Alexander and husband Stephen of Atlanta, GA; grandchildren: Joshua Smith, 21, of LaGrange, NC, Casey Smith, 20, of LaGrange, NC, Nathan Tierney, 19, of Susanville. Amy Gentry, 19, of Chico, Shannon Smith, 18, of Provo, UT, Jacob Smith, 17, of LaGrange, NC; step grandchildren Amber Gentry, 25, of Spokane, WA. and Luke Gentry, 22, of Tumwater, WA.

Rose passed away in 1990. K.C. began a loving relationship with Deanie Weldin in 1991, and they were together for 13 years. Deanie was at his side during his final hours.

Known as the one who spearheaded the Rotary Fish Derby for Modoc youths, K.C. was also honored to be Grand Marshal of the Modoc Fair and Fandango Parades and was instrumental in the organization of the Fandango Parade for years. He owned and operated Tierney Ford Sales in Alturas and Skateland North from 1979 until 1983 in Alturas and later opened Mr. K.C.'s Used Cars.

K.C. was a devoted member of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Alturas. He was involved in many service organizations within the community such as the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756, Modoc and later Alturas Chamber of Commerces, and Alturas Rotary.

K.C. had a generous heart, always thinking of others. His love and concern for the community was evident in the service he rendered throughout his entire life.

Public Visitation is to be held at Kerr Mortuary in Alturas on Friday, March 19 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Liturgy of the Word, Catholic funeral services to be given by the Rev. Patrick Henry at Sacred Heart Catholic Church on Saturday, March 20, 2004, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, East Fourth St., Alturas at 10:00 a.m. Interment will follow at 11:15 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery, with military honors conducted by the Veterans' Organizations of Alturas. A reception will be held at the Veterans' Memorial Hall in Alturas.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations in his honor to the following: Sacred Heart Catholic Church, The Elks Lodge, Rotary or the Chamber of Commerce. The viewing is to be held at Kerr Mortuary on Friday. March 19 at 4:00-8:00 p.m. Following the services, there will be graveside full Military service put on by the Veteran's Organization of Alturas. The reception will be held at the Veterans Hall in Alturas.

Beauford Buster Bouse

Services for respected and long-time Big Valley resident Beauford Buster Bouse will be held at the Adin Community Bible Church, Adin, Calif. at 1 p.m. today, Thursday, March 18. Pastor Harold Luke will conduct the service with military honors to follow at the interment at the Adin Cemetery. A time of fellowship will follow at the Adin Community Hall.

Mr. Bouse passed away March 14, 2004 at his home in Adin. He was 79. Born in the southern California town of Piru to Vivian Bouse on March 23, 1924, he arrived in Big Valley in 1929 where the family (six brothers and sisters) lived on a homestead out of Lookout. He attended Widow Valley School through the eighth grade and attended Adin, Bieber and Fall River High Schools while living on the Kramer Ranch where he started working when he was 14 years old, living with Ward and Dorothea Kramer and her father Charlie Gerig.

On November 2, 1944, he joined the U.S. Army and served in the 82nd Airborn, specializing in demolitions, paratrooping, and gliders in the South Pacific. He fought with honor and bravery in a naval battle at the Marianas, where many lives were lost. Then, was sent to Luzon in the Phillipines, where he jumped and fought. He came back to the U.S. and was stationed at Ft. Benning, Georgia, when President Roosevelt died in Warm Springs, Arkansas. Honor Guards were needed to place Roosevelt on the train to Washington and Buster was one of these proud and honored few. He received his discharge on November 17, 1946, and returned home to marry his sweetheart, Ruth Babcock of Bieber, on June 12, 1948 in Reno, Nevada.

Buster and Ruth worked, lived and reared their three children on the Kramer Ranch, where they remained for 37 years of their 55 years of marriage. Their family did everything together which attests to how close they are to one another today. A special outing was a visit to their favorite campsite at Widow Valley.

Buster loved to hunt and fish and had a passion for flying airplanes. He received his pilots license after finishing school in Fall River Mills. He owned an interest in the airplane that was at the Kramer Ranch. In November 1984, Buster and Ruth moved into Adin. In 2000, they were honored to be the Grand Marshals for Big Valley Summer Festival.

Together, they have been involved in Veterans of Foreign Wars, assisted the blood bank drives and community events. Buster helped with search and rescue operations with the East Shasta County Flying Sheriff's Possee. He also attended the GI Agriculture school in Bieber two nights a week for two years. The organization eventually became Future Farmers of America.

He and Ruth helped build Grace Bible Church while living in Bieber and were active in fellowship and as Sunday School teachers. For the last 20 years they attended Adin Community Bible Church. They have given praise and honor to God for all the blessings they have received in their lives. Mr. Bouse leaves his loving wife Ruth of Adin; their children Dan Bouse of Adin; Dorothy Hutchison of Adin and Jean Breakfield of Adin; 11 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, with another on the way; his brother Henry Bouse of Adin, Calif.; sister Louise Taylor of Phoenix, Ariz.; sister Eleanor Cannon of Antioch, Calif. and brother Robert Carmichael of Gilchrist, Ore., and many friends whom they consider family as well. He was preceded in death by his sisters Norene Stroud, Elsie Thompson and Juanita Bouse.

In Mr. Bouse's memory, remembrances may be directed to the Big Valley Endowment Foundation, P.O. Box 356, Adin, CA 96006.

Patricia Petersen Gaylord

Patricia Elizabeth Petersen Gaylord peacefully passed from this life to the next after a short illness, on March 11, 2004, in Folsom, California. Pat was born to Carl and Claire Petersen, July 8, 1935, in Oakland, Calif. She spent her adolescent years in Downey, Calif. After Claire's marriage to Ted Tyrrell, they moved to the "ranch" north of Adin, Calif., in the Spring of 1950.

She graduated from Adin High School in 1953, continuing her education at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. While growing up, she enjoyed riding horses, helping cook meals for the haying crews in Ash Valley, singing for various events, community plays and participating in all school activities.

On November 27, 1954, she married Omar F. Gaylord, Jr., and to this union, four children were born. In 1956, she went to work for the U.S. Forest Service on the Devil's Garden Ranger District, later transferring to the Big Valley Ranger District where she retired from federal service in 1995. She worked in many capacities with the Forest Service, first as a fire lookout and district clerk, then as a district budget and finance officer and on many teams and task forces from local to national level.

Starting with her children and continuing with grandchildren, she supported many school and sporting events, as well as livestock and horse shows, keeping track of their progress and final point standings. One of her greatest passions was horses. In this capacity, she served as the Modoc Horseman's Association secretary for many years. She was involved in creating and running the trail class at the Modoc District Fair in Cedarville, as well as helping run the Adin Summer Festival Horse Show. She did not miss any of the horse events and greatly enjoyed watching her granddaughter participate in these shows.

For as long as anyone can remember, she crocheted blankets and created a beautiful flower garden. She also worked at Adin Automotive Products for the past four years.

She is survived by her spouse, Omar Gaylord; son and friend Bill Gaylord and Diane Schwebach of Adin; daughter and son-in-law Laurette and Kent Van Tassell of Dietrich, Idaho; daughter and son-in-law Vicki and Brad Jeppson of Adin; grandchildren Christopher and Robert Gaylord of Adin; William Gaylord of Canby; Quincy Menning of Moscow, Idaho; Lacey Menning of White Swan, Washington; Colton and Mary Jeppson, who are expecting Pat's first great-grandchild, due to make her arrival any day soon, of Reno, Nevada; and Deidra Jeppson of Weed, Calif. Also surviving are her two step-brothers Dick Tyrrell and Norman Tyrrell, step-sister Lois Brewer and half-brother Ted Tyrrell.

Preceding Pat in death were her mother, E. Claire Tyrrell; step-father Ted Tyrrell; father Carl Petersen; and youngest son Richard Gaylord

Services will be held at the Adin Cemetery, Saturday, March 20, 2004, at 11:00 a.m., with a potluck luncheon following at the Adin Community Center. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Modoc Horseman's Association, P.O. Box 513, Alturas, Calif. 96101

Louis J. 'Buck' Barker

Services for Louis Joseph "Buck" Barker, Jr., were held on Wednesday, March 17 at 2 p.m. at the Alturas Cemetery. Branch President Butch Hess conducted the graveside service, as Mr. Barker was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Alturas

Mr. Barker, 82, of Alturas, passed away Monday, March 15, 2004, at Modoc Medical Center's Skilled Nursing Facility, Alturas, Calif., where he had been a resident for the past three years

Born June 30, 1921, in Loyalton, Calif., Louis was one of three children and left Loyalton at a young age with his parents, Louis, Sr. and Rava Barker. His father worked for the railroad and the family moved from Klamath Falls, Oregon down to Alturas, Calif. in 1932. Louis graduated from Modoc High with the class of 1940. He attended Sacramento City College for a year, where he majored in Forestry, until he joined the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. He fought in many battles in the South Pacific arena including Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan and Tiana before his discharge as a Pvt. 1st Class. He settled in the Springfield, Oregon area where he was in insurance sales for many years in Eugene, Oregon. An avid reader of western novels, he also loved fishing and hunting and had become an avid Bingo player. He most recently had returned to Modoc County three years ago.

From his marriage to Maddona Kerksieck, two children were born. She preceded him in death. His later marriage to Marilyn Fulcher of Alturas gave him six children. She also preceded him in death, as did his parents and his brother Phillip Barker

Mr. Barker is survived by his seven children: Brooke Park of Battleground, Wash.; Jolie Ramsey of St. Louis, Mo.; Michael Barker of Lorraine, Ore.; Steven Barker of Hillsboro, Ore.; Leslie Hubert of Eugene, Ore.; Bruce Barker of Eugene, Ore.; and Christi Barker of Eugene, Ore. He also leaves his sister Thelma Barker of Alturas, Calif., 19 grandchildren, 24-great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas is in charge of arrangements

Dorothy Louise Coombs

Alturas resident Dorothy Louise Coombs, affectionately known as "Grandma" and "Dot" to many local residents, passed away of natural causes on March 11, 2004, at 2 p.m., after a short stay at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif.

Born in Portland, Oregon to Albert and Lilly Sahli on April 22, 1921, Dorothy was reared in Gervais, Ore.

She helped her family harvest hop crops, traveling throughout Oregon as a young girl until she graduated from high school in Salem, Ore. She developed a strong work ethic.

Dorothy was later employed at a greenhouse in Oregon where she learned to start plants and later became known among her family and friends for her green thumb, nurturing numerous house plants.

She married Darwin "Buck" Coombs on August 9, 1943, in Salem, Oregon, and they reared two daughters, Nancy and Susan, making their home in the Corvallis area. Growing plants was something Dorothy continued to enjoy throughout her adult life. While her daughters were growing, Dorothy had many plant and yard sales.

When her husband passed away on Dec. 11, 1982, after 39 years of marriage, Dorothy moved to Eugene to be near her daughter Nancy, for 11 years. When Nancy relocated to Alturas, Calif. seven years ago, Dorothy also relocated and began helping in the family business, 4Corners Market. Dorothy enjoyed her early morning walks to help at the store, where customers enjoyed her courteous manner and friendly smiles. She, in turn, enjoyed the customers and the many friends she made while in Alturas. An avid Bingo player, she enjoyed playing Bingo at Veterans' Bingo nights and the Desert Rose Casino and also enjoyed the crowd at the Country Jam on Monday evenings in Alturas. As were her wishes, she was laid to rest near her husband at Benton Memorial Park, Benton County, Corvallis, Ore., with a private burial. A memorial service in Alturas will be announced at a later date.

Mrs. Coombs is survived by her close knit family which includes daughter Nancy and son-in-law Richard Yarbrough of Alturas, Calif.; granddaughter Heidi and husband Bill Hall of Alturas and their children Grant and Cam, Alturas; grandson Brenden and wife Jan Yarbrough and their children Kayla and Jalyn of Eugene, Ore.; grandson Mike and wife Star Yarbrough of Alturas, Calif. and their child Devon; grandson Jared Yarbrough of Eugene and his son Garcia of Hawaii; Mrs. Coomb's daughter Sue and husband Bill Farmer of Alturas, Calif.; grandson Chase and wife Kelly Farmer and their children Isaac and Chloe of Alturas; grandson Colby Farmer of Redding and granddaughter Shay Farmer of Alturas. She is also survived by all of her "Family" at 4Corners Market and the many customers she loved talking to.

Remembrances may be sent to Country Music Jam Flag Fund, care of Plumas Bank, 510 N. Main Street, Alturas, CA 96101.

Della Lucille Heard

Della Lucille Heard, 96, died March 15, 2004, at her home in Litchfield, Calif.

She was born in Fort Bidwell, Calif., May 5, 1907, to George and Emma Stiner of Lake City, CA. She married Claude Heard in 1923. They first lived in Cedarville where Claude worked in his first store. They were partners in a store in Gerlach, NV. from 1929 to 1931. They bought their second store in Standish, CA. in 1934, and sold it to their niece, Glenna Winchell, in 1946. Fifteen months later, they bought the store three miles away in Litchfield. Heard's Market has been in operation in Litchfield for the past 56 years. Della worked in some part of the store up until she was in her late 80's. She also drove her car, cooked her own meals and was self-sufficient until a few years ago.

Della Heard was the oldest member of the Lake City Baptist Church for over 80 years. She attended the Standish Bible Church while in Standish and Litchfield.

Della Heard was preceded in death by her husband of 58 years, Claude Heard, in 1982; two baby brothers, an older sister and her twin sister. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law Everett and Sharon Heard, of Litchfield; five grandchildren, Tonja Tilstra of Standish, Howard Heard of Litchfield, Gena Meier of Susanville, Justin Heard of Reno, NV., and Shaun Heard of Susanville; seven great-grandchildren, Beau and Trever Meier, Jordan Tilstra, Myranda and Stevee Heard, Devin Heard and Rebeka Heard. And by numerous nieces and nephews.

Graveside services for Della Heard will be held at the Lake City Cemetery, Lake City, CA. at 11:00 a.m. March 20, 2004. Pastor Jerry Geotsch (the former Pastor of the Standish Bible Church) will conduct the vices. Donations may be made in Della Heard's name, to the Standish Bible Church, Standish, CA. 96128.

Walton's Colonial Mortuary of Susanville is in charge of arrangements.

William LeRoy Ogle

Local resident William LeRoy Ogle, 61, passed away at his Alturas, Calif. home March 10, 2004

A talented craftsman and outdoor enthusiast, Mr. Ogle had retired to Modoc County 10 years ago from the Bay Area. Born June 25, 1942, in Newark, Ohio, he grew up in Poway, Calif. He graduated from high school in Escondido, Calif. and DeAnza College, Cupertino, Calif.

He served in the U.S. Army as a Sp4 until his discharge Sept. 13, 1963. Employed at General Motors Fremont plant for a number of years, he later retrained as a computer technician, after the GM plant closed

Considered good at computer work, he was employed with several companies, the longest of which were with Zilog and Iicon in the San Jose area. Mr. Ogle was also a model train enthusiast and enjoyed working with wood. In addition, he was an able handyman.

Married on January 12, 1980, to Barbara Jean Specker in Zephyr Cove, Lake Tahoe, Nevada, both retired early and relocated to Modoc County, where they had owned property for 20 years.

Mr. Ogle is survived by his wife Barbara of Alturas; son William LeRoy Ogle, Jr. and wife Desiree of San Jose, Calif.; daughter Deborah Moore and husband Jeff and grandsons Jeff and Joshua of Fresno, Calif.

Pastor Case Admiraal will conduct a memorial service on Saturday, March 27, 2004, at the Emmanuel Christian Reformed Church, 517 Orange Ave., Ripon, Calif.

Memorials may be directed to the Hugh Currin House of Merle West, 2610 Uhrmann Rd., Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601.

Death Notices

William Kenneth 'Bill' Cockrell

Eagleville resident William (Bill) Kenneth Cockrell passed away March 16, 2004, at Merle West Medical Center in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Graveside services will be held Friday, March 19 at 2 p.m. at the Eagleville Cemetery, with fellowship to follow at the Eagleville Grange Hall.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to any charity of the donor's choice. A complete obituary to follow next week.

Chester O'Dell 'Chet' Tice

Chester O'Dell "Chet" Tice, age 61, departed this world on March 13, 2004 in Reno, Nevada. He was born July 29, 1942 in Hanford, Calif. Private family services are pending. Kerr Mortuary has charge of arrangements. Mr. Tice's obituary will be published next week.

Edward Puchalski

Edward Puchalski, a native of Poland and long-time resident of Lake City, Calif. died at his home on March 11, 2004.

He was born on October 25, 1906. He was an independent man at the age of 97. Bereaved are his many friends and neighbors in Surprise Valley. He will rest at the Lake City Cemetery. Kerr Mortuary has charge of arrangements.

Sports

Modoc girls 2nd in Etna tourney

Modoc's girls varsity team placed second in the Etna tournament last weekend, losing the title game to Central Valley 8-1.

Modoc beat Happy Camp 11-1 to open the tourney and then beat Etna in a thriller 3-2 in the semi-final.

"I was pleased with how we played overall," said coach Dennis Banister. "Central Valley was a solid team, but our girls show a lot of promise and I think we'll be fine."

Kristen Taylor was named the Most Valuable Defensive Player in the tourney and Allison Campagna was named All-tourney.

Against Happy Camp, Modoc went out 1-2-3 in the first, but pounced on the Indians with four runs in the second, three in the third and four in the fourth.

Amy Ridgway got the win for Modoc, striking out five. Campagna was three-for-three at the plate, Brittany Berchtold and Jamie Fain were both two-for-three, while Rose Wingate, Megan Thompson, Ridgway, Taylor and Brittney Bartram had one hit.

In the Etna game, The Lions went up 1-0 in the first and Modoc scored twice in the third. The Braves' Campagna scored the winning run in the top of the seventh on a Bartram bunt.

Taylor got the win, going 6 2/3 innings. She struck out eight. Taylor led the hitting, going two-for-three, Campagna, Bartram, Emily Pence, and Jamie Fain each had a hit.

Central Valley jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the first and Modoc scored one in the third. Central Valley added a run in the fifth, two in the sixth and one in the seventh. Taylor led the hitting going two-for-three and Campagna had one hit.

Modoc lost to Lakeview Tuesday 6-1 in Lakeview. Lakeview went on top 1-0 in the third, and 3-0 in the fourth. They added three more in the six. Modoc scored one run in the seventh.

Taylor got the loss, allowing 13 hits, while striking out three and walking one.

Taylor also led the hitting, going two-for-three. Lakeview's pitcher fanned 10 Braves. Campagna, Berchtold and Megan Thompson each had a hit.

JV girls win Etna tourney

Modoc's junior varsity softball team won the Etna tournament last weekend, beating Happy Camp 13-3, Trinity 24-4, Etna 12-6 and Etna 13-1 in the title game.

Coach Keith Jacques said the girls played extremely well and feels his squad has solid talent throughout.

Freshman Tacie Richardson was on the mound in both the final games against Etna and struck out 12 batters in the wins.

Jacques said in addition to Richardson, Alysha Northrup, Lauren Bushey, Mandy Davis and Darcie Holloway each played exceptionally well and everyone played good, consistent softball.

The remainder of the team includes Olivia Pierce, Jennifer Joyce, Tanesha Almanza, Samantha Ward, Marlena Bartram, Patricia Gilbert and Janelle Hughes.

Modoc lost a tight game to Lakeview Tuesday, 9-8.

Modoc golf team tops Lakeview

The Modoc High School Golf Team beat Lakeview 466-482 March 16 at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

For the Braves, DJ Northrup shot 86, Charles Knox shot 88, Keith Montague shot 96, Dustin Philpott and Dustin Oates had 98, and Taylor Dunn shot 99. Matt Williams shot 109.

Other members of the team are Micah Eppler, Ross Montague and Brian Weed.

Coach Harold Montague said he kept some of his top players out of the match against Lakeview to give the younger players a chance. He said he was pleased with the young players' performance.

"We do have a lot of work to do as our target score (best five scores of team) for nine holes is 205 and for 18 is 410," said Montague.

Modoc opens Shasta cascade League play at Eagle Point in Medford March 18. They'll be competing against Mt. Shasta (favored in the SCL), Weed, McCloud and Etna.

Modoc Little League tryouts set March 20

Little League Tryouts will be held on March 20, at the Youth Park in Alturas.

Girls minor and major tryouts will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and boys minor and major tryouts will be from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Following tryouts, coaches will meet at the Black Bear to draft players and equipment will be distributed.

It's not too late to sign up for Little League. Call Rick Malcolm at 233-3578 for registration details.

Little League Officials are asking that dogs not be taken to the baseball fields because of the mess they leave.

Modoc hosts youth wresting invite

Modoc will host its 11th Annual Youth Wrestling Tournament Saturday in the Griswold Gym with between 200 and 300 young wrestlers expected. Weigh-ins will start at 7 a.m. and the under six wrestlers will take to the mats about 9 a.m. The remaining age groups, from under eight through under 14, will start about 10:30 a.m. and run through most of the day. Modoc coach Shaun Wood said about 50 Modoc wrestlers will be competing. The Modoc High School team will handle the refereeing at this event. Last weekend, the Modoc Middle School and Youth team competed at Burney. The following wrestlers took first place: Alex Valencia, Kris Carrithers, Joshua Fletcher, Tyler Ewing, Marlehna Torres, Troy Culp, Matt Fletcher, Tyler Lancaster, Tyler Wood, and Josh Wood.

Second places went to the following: Riley Larranaga, Alex Moreo, Trent Wishart, and Mike Torres.

Placing third were: Travis Northrup, Patrick Bell, Jessie Holloway, Wyatt Valena, Kyle Voth, Justin Valena, Devin Fieguth, Neil Mohr and Justin Estes.

Fourth places went to: Josh Padgett, Felicia Torres and Drew Culp.

Sign up for spring soccer

The Alturas AYSO is sponsoring a spring soccer league for all age groups (U-6 to U-19). Registration is set for March 23 and 25 at the Child and Family Resource Center, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. each night.

Games will take place on Saturdays, running from April 17 though May 22. This is designed as a developmental league to have short-sided teams so that all kids get plenty of touches.

Any interested coaches or for more information, contact John McQuarrie as soon as possible at 233-4304 or 233-3429 evenings.

March 25th , 2004

News

PG&E, irrigator agreement is a 'win-win' for all

Irrigators in the Pit River watershed can breathe a sigh of relief. Their prolonged struggle with Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) appears to be over. In a formal letter to the State Water Resources Control Board, Randal S. Livingston, lead director for power generation at PG&E, withdrew the power company's complaint against 10 major water right holders on the Pitt River above Lake Britton

After more than 20 years of legal wrangling and finger pointing, all parties to the dispute seem pleased with the outcome. Upstream water users have secured their rights to the water they store for irrigation rather than letting it go downstream to generate power for PG&E, and the power company has asserted its early water rights, securing sufficient water in the Pit to turn its generators

In the letter withdrawing the complaints, Livingston noted, "None of the settlements increase, decrease or in any other way modify any existing water rights." This, in effect, leaves these water rights along the Pit River as they presently stand

According to Jay Younger, ranch manager for Alturas Ranches, a primary member of the South Fork Irrigation District, this agreement as a model of cooperation between business, private parties and government agencies. "This is a whole bunch of really diverse people from really different places with really different problems coming together to solve a huge problem. What we've managed to do is completely solve a 90-year-old problem."

"I think it was a pretty substantial victory," adds Sean Curtis, resource analyst for Modoc County. "It tied everybody together, from the South Fork folks clear down to Burney."

"It's a win, win, win!" says the spokesperson for PG&E, Lisa Randle. "It's a win for the consumptive water rights users upstream, it's a win for the environmental aspect in terms of flows and it's a win for power generation as well. When you cooperatively work together, through that type of teamwork, you often achieve a better end result. And I think that's the case, this time in particular."

The two-decade-old issue turned on water rights, where the axiom "first in time, first in line" applies

PG&E obtained water rights to operate a power plant on the Pit River in Burney in 1921. In the nearly 60 years that followed, many upstream irrigators began water conservation and use programs. "So, we had a situation where many of the reservoir rights were junior to PG&E's claim for hydropower. (But) for fifty years there was never any assertion by PG&E that their rights were prior to ours," explains Younger

In 1980, during a periodic re-licensing process, PG&E once again asserted its 1921 rights over those of irrigators in the upper Pit watershed in order to forestall what appeared to be an impending loss of the water it needed to turn its generators, and the battle was joined

Originally, there were ten complaints filed by PG&E, though the outcome of the contest would decide the fate of hundreds of water users, some large, some small. "There were lots of battles that went on," recalls Younger, the acknowledged lead in brokering the final agreement. "Then, it kind of came to a head in the early 90s."

Younger relates that there was an early defector from the irrigator ranks that made it more difficult for the others. "As we were working our way through the battle, Hot Springs began to believe that they had a stronger case, a better case than some of the other reservoirs—South Fork in particular … because they have less infringement on PG&E's rights than South Fork."

As a result, Hot Springs Valley Irrigation District entered into a separate agreement with PG&E. "The problem with that was that it more or less set precedence of cutting a deal," explains Younger. "It ruined our united front. I understand why they did it, and I even agree that they may have done the right thing for themselves, but it was not the right thing for the big picture and definitely not a good thing for us."

It appeared that, one by one, the irrigators, like Hot Springs, would have to reach their own agreement with PG&E. "Because the amount of water we were talking about was huge, in the system up here, our (potential) loss, our downside was devastating—particularly for South Fork," explains Younger, adding, "because South Fork supplements the entire river, particularly on a good year, it actually has a huge cascading effect downstream. Anything you take out at the top (becomes) worse as you get downstream."

More surprising still was the fact that Younger chose to ignore the advice of his legal counsel and follow his own instincts instead. "All the way through, I'm getting calls from the lawyers saying, 'Settle, settle, settle. Cut South Fork off. Make a settlement. You will never put this together.' That's what my lawyers were telling me. And I'm saying, 'I don't have any traction by myself. I can't do this by myself. As soon as they separate me out, they're going to slit my throat,'" observes Younger, adding, " …and they would have."

Just when things looked most bleak for upstream water users, they caught a break. "We realized, somewhere in the mid-90s, that PG&E was up for re-licensing," says Younger. "PG&E agreed to go through a public input type licensing, where it was a negotiated outcome. So, what South Fork did was, we went into the Federal Energy Regulator Commission (FERC) re-licensing process. We managed to get in because … we were a public agency, being a water district."

"Actually, it was kind of fortuitous because that re-licensing thing provided an opportunity for all the upstream users to come together," reports Curtis. Still, PG&E and FERC were disinclined to address the upstream water users dilemma. "When we got there, they had no willingness to listen to us or consider the problem," relates Younger. "We had a terrible time getting them to look back."

It was repeatedly pointed out to Younger that theirs was a water rights issue, that since FERC had no say in such matters, they could be of no help to him. "I battled for a year, (and) went to a meeting every month," explains Younger, who was dejected by the irrigators' lack of persuasive power. "It just stumbled and stumbled and stumbled."

As Younger explains it, he began to realize the root of the irrigators' problem. "When we first went in, we went in thinking only about South Fork's problem. But as we got into the process, I began to realize that we didn't have any power as South Fork because we were one entity asking for a specific solution to our problem without regard for others."

So, Younger sought to garner the support of all the individual irrigators. "There were some people that were tough to get to come, but most of them really came willingly."

"If you don't have the network, you can't make this stuff work," injects Curtis.

Throughout the process of gathering support, Younger struggled with indifference and ambivalence. "I think that you just had to convince them that what South Fork was doing wasn't going to hurt them. It's not that they didn't want to solve their problem. They were just afraid that we were doing something else."

Younger cajoled, coerced and ultimately convinced those he needed to aid in his quest. "And I got trapped into it too. As you pull more people into the process, you make commitments to get them to come in that you couldn't back away from. So, I got stuck; I got way stuck. And for a long time I didn't think it was going to work—especially when you call your lawyers and they're telling you it isn't going to work."

In addition to the irrigators, Younger also enlisted the assistance of many interested agencies, whether private or public, state or federal, to protest the possible effects of losing upstream water

"We developed some environmental data to show the agency people that this wasn't just an economic issue," says Curtis, who joined the irrigators' effort. "This was an environmental issue. If we pulled some water out of the upstream watershed, there were going to be some serious impacts to wildlife and fish."

In effect, they argued that taking a substantial amount of water out of the upstream watershed to satisfy power generation downstream would have a substantive, adverse environmental and wildlife impact upstream. "I've really got to credit the Forest Service's Hat Creek Ranger District folks who were the lead on that," adds Curtis. "They really worked closely with the upstream people, particularly with the county."

According to Younger, Curtis knows "where to find the resources to get the information and the support needed to get these things done."

Curtis' prior experience with such issues told him that arguing the economics of the situation would not allow them to prevail, that the convincing data would be the environmental effects of their actions. "That's really probably the piece that I contributed. You have to somehow find the environmental piece that will make them stop and think. If it's just dollars, they don't seem to care."

"In the end, we got tons of help from Forest Service, Department of Water Resources in Sacramento, Fish and Game, and the river coalition up here," observes Younger enthusiatically. "It really became a huge community issue. When we got it framed large enough and got enough interests in there, then PG&E began to back off."

"Jay was just superb," notes Curtis, "at pulling the agency people along—particularly the state people—into really understanding that there really was a serious upstream issue."

The happy result was a settlement that apparently met everyone's needs. In fact, virtually all the upstream irrigators, large or small, benefit from the resulting agreement. "We all got really good settlements," says Younger, exultantly. "Really good!"

But the resolution seems to go even further than the irrigators anticipated. "I thought that we were only going to wind up with a commitment that was going to be for the life of this re-licensing," says Younger. "But there are no closing dates on any of these commitments. So, what we wound up with was a commitment that goes into perpetuity, which was very cool!"

How did the agreement set with PG&E? "I think PG&E found a place where they felt that their priority rights were protected," Younger notes, "and recognized the value to the upper river's economic and environmental concerns."

Says Curtis, "PG&E, I think, saw the handwriting on the wall and said that what's upstream isn't worth us hanging our license out for a long time to try to beat this down. I think this is one of the few licenses that's probably going to get resolved within the actual time frame that these things are proposed for."

Hogsback Quarry issue will come back in April

The proposed Hogsback Quarry, near Cedar Pass, will come back for hearings and possible action April 21.

The issue was on the Modoc County Planning Commission agenda March 17, but commissioners did not have all materials available concerning reclamation plans, financial assurances and use permit conditions to take action and continued it to a later date.

The quarry proposed by Eagle Peak Rock and Paving, Inc. (formerly Fitch Sand and Gravel), has been in the works since January, 2000. A contract planner, Bruce Steubing, has been handling the project for the county. According to Eagle Peak's Tony Cruse, the business employs 30 people during peak construction season and has 14-full time employees, with an annual payroll of about $900,000. Cruse said the company is in dire need of the new gravel pit as the others are petering out of material.

While planning commissioners appeared generally in favor of the project, they were advised by legal counsel that they didn't have the necessary documentation to approve it last week. A packed house of local residents came to the public hearing to voice their support of Eagle Peak and its continued operation. Most expressed concern about the possibility of losing the local business and the employees.

On April 21, the Commission will be asked to certify the Environmental Impact Report, and approve the reclamation plan and Conditional Use Permit. Steubing said he would have copies of those documents available to commissioners well before the meeting date.

The project is located about three miles east of the Intersection of State Route 299 and U.S. 395 (The Cedarville Y) and about 3,800 feet from SR299. It's estimated that the total volume of material would be 2,500,000 tons with a maximum permitted amount of 100,000 tons per year over a 50-year life of the project.

About 49 acres would be mined and 64.54 acres would be reclaimed. In addition to the mining operation, the project would include a rock crushing/screening plant, a washing operation, a concrete batch plant and an asphalt batch plant.

According to official records, because of public concerns the project was substantially reduced in terms of acreage disturbed and the operating season to mitigate significant impacts identified in the EIR. Some of those issues include wildlife, noise and visual impacts.

Pot growers found guilty

Two local suspects in the 2002 discovery of the largest marijuana garden ever found in Modoc County have been convicted in Federal Court. According to the Modoc Interagency Narcotics Task Force, Esequiel Quesada Garcia, age 48, of Alturas and Trinidad Sanchez Chacon, 56, Alturas were found guilty of manufacturing marijuana, conspiracy to manufacture marijuana and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug crime. They are facing sentencing of from 15 years to life.

The Drug Task Force made the marijuana farm discovery in September, 2002, on private and Forest Service land in the Witcher Creek drainage west of Alturas.

Over 6,500 mature marijuana plants were seized at the time, along with additional evidence, drug manufacturing equipment and other items. The two suspects were arrested at that time.

Additional suspects have been identified in the case and are being sought by law enforcement. Federal warrants have been issued for two fugitives and more suspects are under investigation.

The wholesale value of the marijuana seized in that case was estimated to be $20 million.

Skateboard park scheduled to open with new, safer surface

The Alturas Skatepark will open its gates this summer, hopefully before schools lets out the first week in June.

According to TEACH Executive Director Carol Callaghan, the reason it has been closed is because of the wood surface on the ramps. One of the major concerns, said Callaghan, was splinters.

She said she has made arrangements to purchase a new surfacing material that becomes available in late April. The material will make the surfaces much safer and should last much longer.

Callaghan said once the new surface is applied, she expects the skatepark to open. From that point forward, she said the park should remain open for the public. She is fairly optimistic that the park will be opened the first week in June, but the weather will have some impact.

She said she has had excellent volunteer assistance in finding the new surface material and volunteers are offering to the keep the facility open, maintained and operating.

The park has been idle more than it's been used since it opened, and Callaghan is hoping this latest repair will take care of most of the issues.

BLM Surprise Field Office plans spring prescribed burns

Several prescribed burning projects, most designed to reduce wildfire danger, are getting underway in Surprise Valley.

Bureau of Land Management Fire Management Officer Garth Jeffers said the projects will be carried out only on days when weather conditions and other factors allow for safe and successful burning and smoke management.

Work will continue through spring on the following burns: • Emerson Project: Crews will complete a mile-and-a-half-long fuel break project in the Eagleville and Emerson Canyon areas. Piles of Juniper and slash created during construction of the fuel break, will be burned. The project, started last fall, will help protect private property and residential areas from wildfire and improve wildlife habitat. The Devil's Garden Conservation Camp crew continues to provide important assistance, Jeffers noted.

• Cedarville Project: Work is underway on a joint project involving the BLM Surprise Field Office and the Cedarville Volunteer Fire Department. It connects a new fuel break to a BLM fuel break completed in 2002 at the mouth of Cedar Canyon along the west edge of Cedarville.

• Lake City Project: Crews have begun cutting brush and burning piles south of Lake City. The project area extends from County Road 18, north along County Road 17 to about a mile south of landowners to remove vegetation in a 30-foot strip along the road, reinforcing the effectiveness of the road as a fire break.

• Fort Bidwell Fuel Breaks: Work will begin in late March or early April on two fuel breaks along the Indian Reservation boundary. The BLM, Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Devil's Garden Conservation Camp are cooperating on the brush burning project, which includes maintenance of a fuel break completed along the Reservation's eastern boundary in 1991.

• Cow Project: The BLM fuels crew will be cutting and burning brush in a 60-acre area about six miles northeast of Fort Bidwell. The project is designed to slow the spread of wildfire, providing protection for private property and structures. Work began last year and will continue this spring.

• Snake Lake Project: BLM crews plan to initiate a 400-acre burn to reduce medusahead, an invasive weed, in the Snake Lake area about ten miles south of Eagleville. The project will improve livestock grazing and wildlife habitat conditions.

Jeffers said that for safety reasons, members of public should stay out of the project areas when burning is underway.

For more information, contact the BLM Surprise Field Office in Cedarville, (530)279-6101.

L.A. warrant arrest made in Ft. Bidwell

Modoc County Sheriff's Deputies arrested Shawn J. Friedman, 35, of Santa Ana, March 20, 6:45 a.m. on warrants out of southern California and Oklahoma.

According to Sheriff Bruce Mix, Friedman, considered dangerous, was arrested without incident. He was wanted on an $80,000 warrant from Oklahoma for transportation of multiple pounds of marijuana and on a warrant out of Los Angeles County for possession of cocaine. Mix said a warrant is also pending on sexual offenses with a minor girl, age 15, out of Newport Ca.

He was booked into the Modoc County Jail, then transferred to Shasta County where he will be transported to Los Angeles.

Burn barrel restrictions in place

On January 1, 2004 The California Air Resources Board (ARB) regulation restricting the use of burn barrels to dispose of residential waste became effective. This regulation was originally intended to ban the use of burn barrels throughout the entire State of California.

The Modoc County Air Pollution Control District (APCD) was successful in obtaining an exemption for all areas of Modoc County except for areas within the limits of the City of Alturas. The exemption allows the burning of dry non-glossy paper and cardboard as well as untreated lumber and natural vegetation in all areas of the county outside of the Alturas City Limits.

Prohibited materials include, but are not limited to: diapers, tires, plastics, rubber, coated wire and demolition debris. A full copy of the regulation order may be obtained by contacting the Modoc County APCD at 202 West Fourth Street in Alturas.

Burn permits and fire regulations continue to be under the jurisdiction of the local fire authority in your area.

Burn permits from the Modoc County APCD are required for broadcast burn in excess of 10 acres or piles larger than 10 (ten) feet in diameter.

Home Show set for big Saturday

The first Modoc County Home Show is set up for a big day on Saturday, March 27, in the Griswold Gym.

"Everything is all set and people seem to be pretty excited about the show," said Rendy Cockrell, manager of Modoc County Title and one of the organizers. "We think it's going to be very special and can't say enough about the business response."

Cockrell, Paula Henckle, of U.S. Bank, and Brooke Fredrickson of Handmade Haven, organized this fist show.

Henckle said it's a chance "to showcase our businesses and what they have to offer. Everything from starting a foundation to building, remodeling to landscaping will be featured. People will get a chance to see what the opportunities are and deal with businesses who can show them a variety of options and ideas."

Fredrickson feels people will be able to get some new and different ideas. Everything from home decoration, furniture makers, insurance, banking, general contractors, plumbers, hardware, home entertainment, window coverings, landscaping, computers, electricians, backhoe service, asphalt, rock and gravel, insulation, rental equipment, roofing, fencing, garages and sheds, engineering, Internet access, design, real estate sales and service and escrow service will be under the gym roof.

Something new will be the addition of the Alturas Rural Fire Department, who will be selling reflective address signs for rural homes.

Admission to the Home Show is free and about 40 door prizes will be offered throughout the day. Refreshments will also be available and a raffle will be staged to benefit the High Plateau Humane Society.

The businesses involved in the Home Show are as follows: Handmade Haven, Modoc County Title, U.S. Bank, Quality by Design, Woodworks of Alturas, Perry Clark Backhoe Service, Maxwell's Nursery, Walt Smith Landscaping, J-Mar Construction, Michael Church Voth, J.S. General Contracting and Roofing, Tony Darst, Janie Erkiaga Real Estate, Larranaga Construction, True Green Lawn Service, Dean Neer Modoc Realty, Modoc Insurance Services, John Wisser Plumbing, North State Homes, Ace 4-Seasons, G&M Marketing, Phillips Appliance, Guy Williams Construction, Randall Electric, United Country Stevenson Realty, Computer Haven, Warner Mountain Realty, Wild Mustard, A&M Pump and Plumbing, Jim's T.V., High Desert Online, Gift Gallery, Davis' Gallery of Gifts, Richardson Insulation, Modoc Fire Safe Council, Eagle Peak Rock and Gravel, Copp's Irrigation and Misunderstood Einsteins Unite and the National Society for ADA Transportation.

Green Eggs and Long Legs: The Sandhill Crane Story

Spring in Modoc County may be short on blossoms and long on bluster, but even if snow blows sideways and icicles hang long off the barn, it's spring when the Sandhills arrive, according to local ranchers.

Skirring in from hundreds of miles away, the proud crimson-hatted lords and ladies of bird land settle in and around the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge near Alturas to begin another cycle of birth and migration.

Where do they come from? Why are they here? The shadowy cranes, lofty and mysterious as they breeze by overhead or stalk through sagebrush on long, slender legs, leave many unanswered questions in the minds of their observers. That's why the Refuge, along with the River Center in Alturas, is holding a special event to help answer those questions.

Green Eggs and Long Legs: The Sandhill Crane Story, will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 3, at the Refuge. For the first half hour or so, Wildlife Biologist Shannon Ludwig will tell the story of the Sandhills, talk about the Refuge's efforts to band and keep track of the birds, then answer questions from those attending. The question answering will continue during a walking (or driving) tour of the refuge where Ludwig will guide participants to particularly good places to watch the cranes.

With a bit of patience, participants may get to see the oldest crane recorded on the refuge, a real survivor, who is 19 years old. Cranes have a life expectancy of about 20 years, Ludwig said, so it will be interesting to see how many seasons he'll return.

"The refuge started banding in 1984 and this bird is wearing a 1985 band," Ludwig said.

The old crane and his companions in Modoc are called Greater Sandhills because there are other, smaller varieties also hitting the flyways through the United States. Sometimes it is hard to distinguish the varieties from a distance, Ludwig said, although few of the lesser cranes stop off here. This time of year, Sandhills are busy nesting on the refuge, re-claiming territory left last fall when they migrated to a milder climate in the Sacramento Valley. If a young pair comes in and tries to settle on already-claimed land, they are run off like unwelcome squatters, Ludwig said. The birds are very territorial, and a pair can claim, as their private reserve, 100 to 200 acres. With about 40-60 nesting pairs on the refuge, that means a lot of space is needed for the birds.

There are more nesting pairs outside the refuge in Modoc County as well, with some living in the hayed or grazed land of ranchers in the area, and others in irrigated meadows. The cranes love Modoc because practices here provide ideal habitat, Ludwig said.

"That's just one example where agriculture helps our wildlife here," he added.

Other nesting pairs have been spotted on Devil's Garden, and Ash Creek National Wildlife Refuge hosts many of the stately birds. There are also Sandhills in Surprise Valley, where "we hope to do some research this year and get a better feel for what's there," said Ludwig.

Although other refuges along the flyway may have larger numbers of nesting pairs, Ludwig says, "we fledge out more here." That means there are more colts, as the baby Sandhills are called, who survive to migrate with their parents in the fall. Ludwig will go into the reasons for that during his program.

Spotting scopes will be set up on the tour route during the crane event, and there is a good chance participants will be able to see some of the nesting pairs.

"The birds here are pretty well habituated to being observed; that doesn't seem to bother them unless people get too close," Ludwig said.

It is advised though, for participants to bring binoculars, cameras, preferably with telescope lenses, and wear comfortable shoes if walking around the tour route. The walking tour will be about a quarter of a mile and refreshments will be provided. The program is being offered free, as a public informational service, by the Refuge and the River Center.

Obituaries:

William Kenneth Cockrell

Surprise Valley rancher, William (Bill) Kenneth Cockrell passed away March 16, 2004, at Merle West Medical Center in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Bill was born to Lewis and Ferne Cockrell on December 6, 1930, in the A.K. Sweet house, south of Cedarville, Calif. He lived at Duck Lake, but the family moved to Reno, when he was age five, so Bill could attend school. After two years, they moved to the Hornback Ranch at Eagleville, Calif. where he was reared with his brothers Bob and Jim. Bill graduated from Surprise Valley High School, Cedarville in 1949.

He then went to the University of Nevada at Reno and graduated with a degree in Animal Husbandry and a minor in Range Management. On June 10, 1951, he married Betty Harris. They have four children and 10 grandchildren: Jo and her husband Dan Henningsen of Twin Falls, Idaho; Carol and her husband Tom Wulfekuhle and children Julie and Sean from Billings, Montana; Jean and her husband Craig Spratling and children Gwen and husband Glen Uhlig, Justin, Amanda and Amelia from Dooth, Nevada; and Will and his wife Debbie and children Cassie, Ashley, Wayne and Weston from Cedarville, Calif.

Bill was a fourth generation rancher in Surprise Valley, where he ranched on the Barber Ranch, Cottonwood Ranch and Allen Ranch, where he and Betty lived. He was a cattleman and a buckaroo, and active in the Cattlemen's Association, the Farm Bureau and the Federal Land Bank. Graveside services were held Friday, March 19 at 2 p.m. at the Eagleville Cemetery, with fellowship at the Eagleville Grange Hall.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to any charity of the donor's choice.

Ruth M. Cantrall Royce

Beloved Mother and Grandmother, Ruth Molinda Cantrall Royce, born May 16, 1910, to Thomas Icabod and Harriet Barbara Morgan Cantrall, passed away at the age of 93, on March 18, 2004 in Alturas, Calif.

Ruth was born at home at her parent's ranch on Cedar Pass, Calif. She attended school in Cedarville at the Alpine School, which was also a church. At the age of 16, she met and married her husband Joseph Herman David Royce. They were married on October 9, 1926. Joe and Ruth moved to Alturas where they both spent the rest of their lives.

Ruth worked as a maid and waitress at the Niles Hotel from the early days of the Depression until sometime in the 1970s. During the Depression, a sign was posted close to their home, which stated "If you are hungry, go to the white house, and they will feed you." People passing through would come to the Royce house, and Ruth would feed them. Sometimes it would only be a sandwich and a cup of coffee, but no one was ever turned away. Through the years, this has held true. If anyone went to "Grandma Ruth's" house, she wouldn't let them leave until she had fed them.

Ruth loved working in her yard and spending time with her daughter, her grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great grandchildren. Ruth's last days were spent at the Modoc Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Alturas, Calif. All the nurses and staff called her Grandma. She was such an inspiring woman that she captured the hearts of all who knew her. She was a strong and caring woman and will be missed dearly by all who knew her.

Ruth is survived by her daughter Pauline Josephine Royce Lloyd of Alturas; grandchildren David and Diana Lloyd, Alturas; Barbara and Danny Baker, Alturas; Daisy and Bob Schwyhart, Red Bluff; Sharon and Gordon Rouse, Alturas; Janis Rouse, Mineral Wells, Texas; Jimmy and Lori Lloyd, Alturas; Delinda Gover, Alturas; Calvin and Debbie Lloyd, Alturas; Brenda and Rick Johnson, Alturas; 18 great-grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her father Thomas Icabod Cantrall; mother Harriet Barbara Morgan Cantrall; son Herman Leldon Cantrall; husband Joseph Herman David Royce; four brothers Henry, Elmer, William and Johnnie and one sister, Martha.

Pastor Jerry Chilson conducted services at the Cedarville Cemetery on Tuesday, March 23 at 2 p.m.

Alfreida C. Dwyer

Alfreida Clare Dwyer, 68, passed away peacefully at Merle West Medical Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon, on March 22, 2004, after a lengthy battle with cancer.

She was surrounded by her children and loved ones, when the quiet end came.

Alfreida was a most loved and loving mother, a Christian and a homemaker. She will be missed by her family and friends. A woman with a quiet demeanor, she was a private person and was kept busy with raising her family through the years.

She is survived by brothers Ed and Raymond Allen of Alturas, CA.; her children Dan Dwyer of Everett, Washington, Debra McGuire of Stockton, CA., Diane Marcuerquiaga of Modesto, CA., Dawn Dwyer of Issaquah, Washington, Dennis Dwyer of Alturas, CA., Doug Dwyer of Hillsboro, OR.; four grandchildren, Brian McGuire, Melissa Redding, Cody Helgerson and Jessica Dyer and two great-grandchildren, Jacob and Caitlin.

Alfreida's greatest joys were her grandchildren. She was especially close with granddaughter Jessica Dwyer of Alturas, with whom she shared a deep bond. She also leaves behind loved ones, Mike McGuire and Barb Rush, Steve Helgerson, in addition to Alfreida's many nieces and nephews, whose children also had a warm place in her heart.

Alfreida was born to Rollen and Elvira Allen on November 1, 1935, in Alturas, CA. She was the first of five children. Although she was born and reared in Modoc, and attended Modoc High, she had lived for a time in Alaska and Nevada. She had returned 28 years ago, to make Alturas her home.

At Alfreida's request, a graveside service at the Alturas Cemetery will be conducted by Pastor Curtis Barber at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 27. A potlach gathering (potluck) will follow at the Alturas City Park. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas is handling arrangements.

Memorials may be directed to the Hugh Currin House of Merle West at 2610 Uhrmann Rd., Klamath Falls, OR. 97601.

Chester 'Chet' O'dell Tice

Private services were held on Friday, March 19, at 5:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. Norman Forrest.

Mr. Tice, of Alturas, CA., passed away at the age of 62, March 13, 2004, at Washoe Medical in Reno, Nev.

Born January 29, 1942, in Hanford, CA., "Chet" came to Modoc around 1969 to work and raise a family. He was drawn to Modoc County, where he loved to hunt, fish and camp. He loved the mountains, the nature of the people, and the relaxed way of living in Modoc.

He was preceded in death by his first son Marcus Allen Tice; a second son Michael G. Tice, who left him a grandson Justin Tice of Klamath Falls, Ore.; his parents Houston and Ruby Tice of Brownsville, CA.

Mr. Tice is survived by daughter Debbie (Deborah) McNeal of Pendleton, Ore., granddaughter Jennifer Davis, great-grandsons Collin Timothy and Tyler Dean, of Pendleton, Ore., granddaughter Kristi Irene Herinckx, stationed with U.S. Navy in Japan, great-granddaughter Bailey Jewel, second daughter Rhonda Williams Moore and granddaughters Brooke E. Williams and Ashley T. Moore of Boise, Idaho, third daughter Sherri L. Tice, grandson Robert Tice, granddaughters Marie A. Budmark, all of Alturas, CA.; brothers Hubert Tice of Mississippi, Jerry Tice of Nevada, and numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.

Charles (Carlos) Ramos

Former Alturas resident, Charlie Ramos, passed away accidentally on March 12, 2004, in Penfield, New York. Charlie and his family had relocated there in 2000, after his retirement as an Alcohol and Drug Counselor for Modoc County, a position in which he served in for 20 years. Charlie was born July 17, 1938, in Oxnard, CA., to Salvador Amado Ramos and Marina Espinosa Ramos. He grew up in Southern California, and following high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, serving for eight years in Texas, California, Washington, Frankfort, Germany, and Puerto Rico. After military service, Charlie worked in Southern California.

He earned an AA degree from Shasta College and studied counseling at UC Davis. He served as a substance abuse counselor in Red Bluff, CA.

In 1980, Charlie came to Alturas, CA. to serve as the Substance Abuse Counselor for Modoc County Alcohol and Drug Services. He received his certification in Chemical Dependency Counseling from California State University, Sacramento. He also was certified as a counselor, group facilitator, group educator and program administrator by the California Association of Drinking Driver Programs.

Although hard of hearing, Charlie was a great listener and possessed a large reservoir of wisdom for anyone who sought his advice. Being a recovering alcoholic himself, with over 32 years of sobriety, he understood the difficulties of achieving and maintaining sobriety. Charlie began the Brownbagger's AA group, which still continues to meet today.

Charlie served as a youth minister at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Alturas, and enjoyed cooking Mother's Day breakfasts with the teens and organizing camping trips, as well as teaching. A favorite story is when one of the teens caught him on the chin with a fishing hook, and he had to go to the local hospital to have it removed. He was the subject of many "catch of the day" jokes from the hospital staff.

Charlie had a great love for the outdoors and enjoyed fishing and wood cutting for recreation. In recent years, although blind, he still enjoyed fishing and boat rides with his family on Lake Ontario. Even in failing health, Charlie never lost his enthusiasm for life.

Charlie leaves his wife, Eileen Drechsler Ramos, and daughters, Laura, Zulet and Marina Ramos, all of Penfield, New York; sons Richard Ramos and wife Lisa of Orlando, Florida; Charles Ramos of Colorado; Jerry Ramos of New Hampshire; his sisters and brothers: Mary and Russell Baker of Oxnard, CA.; Rachel and Manuel Larralde of Paso Robles, CA.; William and Miriam Ramos, Raul and Ruth Ramos of Lake Forest, CA.; Henry and Monti Ramos of Canyon Lake, CA.; Amato Ramos, and Louis and Anita Ramos of Ventura, CA. He is also survived by three grandchildren, 17 nieces and nephews and many grand nieces and nephews.

A funeral mass was held at St. Louis Church in Pittsford, NewYork on March 15. Burial was in Pittsford, N.Y. Contributions in his memory may be made to American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 2680, North Canton, OH. 44720; the National Kidney Foundation, 3300 Monroe Ave., Rochester, N.Y. 14618; St. Louis Church Memorial Fund, 64 South Main Street, Pittsford, N.Y. 14534; or to Sacred Hearth Catholic Church, Alturas, CA. 96101. Charlie was a strong and humble person with deep faith and wisdom. His favorite prayer was The Serenity Prayer: "God grant me the serenity to change the things that I can; accept the things I cannot change; and the wisdom to know the difference."

He is greatly loved and missed by all those who knew him and hold on to rich and loving memories of Charlie.

As his brother, Henry, says: "He came to serve, and serve he did."

Hazel Dell Wertz

Services for Hazel Dell Wertz, 95, of Day, CA. will be at 11 a.m. Friday at the Day Community Hall. A potluck will follow services. The Rev. Don Canright will officiate. Arrangements are being handled by Allen and Dahl Funeral Chapel in Redding.

Burial will be at the Pine Grove Cemetery in McArthur.

Mrs. Wertz died Sunday, March 21, 2004, at Shasta Healthcare in Redding. Born May 4, 1908, in Lookout, she was a lifelong resident of Shasta and Modoc Counties. She was a homemaker.

Survivors include daughter Nola Shoup of Ono, Evelyn McArthur of McArthur, and Audrey Barber of Yreka; sister Nettie Hendrix of Day; six grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and two great great-grandchildren.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Fort Crook Historical Society, P.O. Box 397, Fall River Mills, CA. 96028.

Sports

Modoc opens league with Weed sweep

Modoc opened the Shasta Cascade League baseball loop by sweeping a weak Weed Cougars team 14-1 and 17-3. They travel to Etna March 26 for another league double-header

The doublebill will be Etna's SCL opening series. The Braves expect a tougher game than the Weed opener. Modoc has to travel to Etna. In Weed, the Braves had little trouble. In the opening game they scored one in the second, nine in the third, and four in the fifth, while Weed scored just one in the fourth

Travis Potter got the win, allowing just three hits and striking out seven. Leading hitters for the Braves were Marty Stevens with three, including a double and home run, Rich Culp had three and Joey Catania had a pair. In the second game, Modoc scored one in the second, two in the fourth, one in the fifth, three in the sixth and 10 in the seventh. Weed scored three in the third

Kyle Madison went three innings on the mound striking out eight and not allowing a run. Adam Server went three, allowing three runs and stuck out six. Leading hitters were Server with four hits, including two home runs, Potter had three hits, including two doubles, Catania added three hits with a double and Culp had two hits

Modoc got beat 9-0 by a solid Henley team March 17. Henley scored three in the second, two in the third, one in the fourth and three in the sixth. Henley held Modoc to just four hits, while 16 Braves struck out. Getting one hit each were Stevens, Culp, Catania and Potter

Modoc is now 4-4 on the season and 2-0 in the SCL. They meet Lost River here March 30 and Trinity comes to visit April 2.

Modoc spits in SCL opener with Weed

Modoc's Braves split a double-bill in the Shasta Cascade League softball opener against Weed Friday. They travel to Etna March 26.

The Braves blasted the Cougars 19-6 in the first game, collecting 22 hits along the way. Modoc scored six in the first, two in the second, four in the third, two in the fourth and five in the fifth for the win.

Allison Campagna led the hitting with four, Kristen Taylor, Rose Wingate and Jessica Correa each had three, Megan Thompson, Brittany Berchtold and Emily Pence had two each.

Taylor got the win, giving up just seven hits.

In the second game, Modoc went up 3-2 in the first, and led 4-2 in the second. Weed exploded for seven runs in the third to go up 9-4. Modoc fought back to tie it with one in the fourth, two in the six and two in the seventh. Weed countered with one run in the bottom of the seventh for the win. Pence had four hits while Campagna and Amy Ridgway had three each, and Taylor had two.

Eppler fires 79 in SCL golf opener

Modoc's golf team placed fourth overall in a Shasta Cascade League match, March 18, at Eagle Point Golf Course in Medford

Micah Eppler shot a 79, which tied him for the best round of the day. Modoc's team score was 239 on the front nine and 251 on the back nine. Brian Weed shot a 94 for ninth, Rose Montague and Taylor Dunn shot 103, Dustin Oates shot 111 and Keith Montague shot 121.

Fall River shot 246 on the front nine and 233 on the back, Mt. Shasta shot 236 on the front and 239 on the back and Weed shot 250 on both.

The SCL plays two nine-hole matches counting the best five of six scores per nine holes.

Modoc meets Burney and Trinity March 25 at the Mt. Shasta Resort in Mt. Shasta with play beginning at 12 noon.

Local youths do well in wrestling invite

There were 47 young wrestlers from Modoc who participated in the 11th annual Modoc Youth Wrestling Tournament in the Griswold Gym Saturday, and they all did quite well.

According to Modoc Coach Shaun Wood, there were hundreds of wrestlers in the event, which had kids from all over the region. Modoc's youth team travels to Tulelake this weekend. Wood is also taking Jason Jones, Justin Estes, andTravis, Tyler and Josh Wood to the huge Reno World of Wrestling Tournament. That tourney draws the top wrestlers from all 50 states.

Former Modoc High School Wrestler Blake Wilson, 197 pounds, wrestled in the NCAA Division 2 national finals for Western Colorado and went 1-2, coming off an injury.

Another former Modoc High grappler, Robert Flournoy, 157 pounds, wrestling for San Diego State, went 3-2 in the NCWA Nationals in Dallas. Local wrestlers who did well in Saturday's tourney were as follows; First places, Jarrett Royce, Duncan Hansen, Kris Carrithers, Stone Mocilac, Joshua Fletcher, Tyler Ewing, Troy Culp, Jacob Starkel, Brennden McTyre, Jess Picotte, Alex Valencia, Dustin Barlese, Justin Estes, Brandon Veverka, Josh Wood (2), and Neil Mohr.

Second places went to: Kyle Voth, Dustin Barlese, Matt Mayes, Justin Estes, Tyler Wood, Miguel Torres (2), Riley Larranaga, and Patrick Bell. Taking third places were: Alex Valencia, Kyle Voth, Trent Wishart, Gabe Fletcher, Tyler Wood, Kyle Fletcher, Wyatt Valena (2), Drew Culp, Riley Larranaga, Patrick Bell, Travis Northrup, and Devin Fieguth.

Fourth Places were to: Jarrett Royce, Josh Padgett, Gabe Fletcher, Ben Starkel, Rob Bartram, Brandon Veverka, Clark Mocilac, Brian Northrup, Blake Williams, Wesley Williams, Justin Valena and Dustin Rosenthal. Taking fifth paces were: Adam Pence, and Wyatt McIntyre. Sixth places went to Austin Kresge and Jessie Holloway. Felicia Torres took seventh while Brett Moore and Ian Berner took eighths.

Hunter Safety course now requires form for minors

A California Hunter Safety Training, certified by the Department of Fish and Game, State of California, will be sponsored by the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756, for anyone who plans to obtain a hunting license.

The classes are scheduled for three nights, April 13, 15 and 16, and begin at 6 p.m. in the Alturas Elks Lodge, 619 North Main St., Alturas. Participants must attend all three nights to receive credit for the course, which is required for a first time California hunting license.

A donation of $3 will be accepted to help cover the cost of course materials. Newly-required this year, is a permission certificate for minors, to be signed by a parental/legal guardian, prior to the minor's participation in the course. The form allows the Hunter Safety Training Instructors to furnish a firearm to the minor for the purpose of instructing him in the safe handling of firearms and safe shooting.

Pre-registration and the consent form will be available from Sports Hut in Alturas or at the Elks Lodge on the first night of class. Anyone up to age 18 must have the form signed by the parent/guardian, prior to the start of the class.

Another Hunter Safety Training session will be offered May 18, 20 and 21 at the Elks Lodge, Alturas. Pre-register or gain further information at the Sports Hut, Main St., Alturas.

April 1, 2004

News

Skaters may be banned from park after vandalism

Skate boarders and skaters may be banned from using Alturas Memorial Park, the result of about $25,000 to $30,000 damage over the past several months.

According to Modoc County Public Works Department's Rick Hironymous, the damage is continuing and the lack of respect shown by the suspect group will put the issue to the Board of Supervisors to pass an ordinance prohibiting their activities at the park.

The list of damages is incredible. And the County has had enough. According to Hironymous, the following vandalism has occurred: 13 picnic tables destroyed; fires set at numerous places; six newly planted trees destroyed and others damaged; about 50 sprinkler heads broken; destruction of rock walls, 30 rose bushes, Vets monument, the kiddy yard apparatus and fence; sprayed graffiti all over; broke locks off breaker boxes, glass off meters and broke 28 outlets twice; stole lumber and equipment from the shop; tore down signs; destroyed garbage cans and lids; spread feces on the floors, walls and ceilings of the restrooms; plugged toilets and sinks to flood floors; hung on basketball hoops until they broke; and have no respect for others using the park as evidenced by their music, language and actions.

Hironynous said the issue just kept getting worse and something has to be done.

Grassroots effort to save local taxes

The perceived chaos engendered in the present state budget crisis has spawned a grassroots initiative to halt the state government's historical practice of appropriating local taxes to supplement the state's expenditures. A group calling themselves "Californians to Protect Local Taxpayers and Public Safety" has begun a campaign to place an initiative on the November ballot that would serve to insulate local city and county budgets from state budgetary considerations.

"It puts the voters in charge of deciding whether the state politicians can continue to take local tax money to fund state services instead of leaving them at the community level for local services," explains Chris McKenzie, executive director for the League of California Cities, one of several grassroots organizations pressing for the initiative.

Historically, the state has dipped into cities' and counties' revenues to offset shortfalls in the state's budget, leaving local officials with the unpleasant task of cutting back services or raising taxes for things such as police, fire and emergency medical services, as well as public health care, roads, parks, libraries and utilities delivery.

McKenzie notes that the state is projected to take $5.2 billion from local revenue this year, though Governor Schwarzenegger's proposal may push that to as much as $6.5 billion.

"The legislature has shown no willingness to limit how big they want to grow state government at the expense of community services," notes McKenzie. "City, county and special district officials have been frustrated with this system for over twelve years since the state started doing it. We got so fed up that we started doing the research about three years ago, and we ultimately developed this measure."

George Andreasen, the mayor of Alturas said the City Council recently sent a letter of support for the initiative to the League of California Cities. "We realize that these are hard times, budget wise, and we all have to bite the bullet, so to speak," says Andreasen. "But, there are other ways, for sure, besides taking away funds that are so desperately needed."

"What we set out to do as a group was to put a measure on the ballot. That's what we're now circulating the petition for," says Jim Chapman, a Lassen County supervisor who has over 20 years of experience with this problem. "You'll be seeing a number of communities throughout the state working aggressively to get the 600,000 signatures we need to qualify it for the November ballot. We have a mid-April deadline right now."

At present, the issue seems to be dividing elected officials largely along party lines with Democrats opposing the measure while Republicans support it

"We're … basically at the political whim of Sacramento," Chapman explains. "Regardless of which party is in control and who the personalities are, this has been the reality of the last 25 years."

Opponents of the measure assert that it will force tax increases and reduce funding to education and other state programs. They call it "ballot box budgeting," since under its provisions voters must approve any state appropriation of local funds

Chapman takes issue with that view, insisting, that current state practices are just that—ballot box budgeting. "Everybody and their brother have gone to the voters at one time or another and have sliced off their piece of the pie… at our expense. … Basically, there's nothing left. What we're saying is that we want our part back. Leave us alone. What we want to do is take the local government's core services and cut them out of the state budget altogether. We have no business being part of the state budget in that respect."

Local officials in charge of law enforcement and firefighting seem generally supportive of the initiative

"We've been waiting to see the language that's actually going to be in the ballot measure," says Modoc County Sheriff, Bruce Mix, who is also president of the California Sheriff's Association. "We're supportive of the idea and the concept, but we want to see what the actual language is going be."

Robert May, a fire chief of the Burney fire protection district that strongly supports the initiative, has some advice for area residents. "If they see somebody with a petition, locally, we need to support it so it gets on ballot in November."

Laying out his reasoning, May adds, "What the legislature has done for years is balance the state budget on the backs of local governments, cities, counties and special districts. In the last ten years we've lost over $350,000 in local tax money being shifted to the state."

McKenzie summarizes the initiative for voters, saying, "The services that they rely on day in and day out to keep them safe, to protect their property and to maintain a good quality of life in their communities are at risk unless this measure is passed."

"Just like the guy in the movie 'Network,' screaming out, 'We're mad as hell, and we're not going to take it anymore,'" Chapman notes, "the voters have made it real clear: They don't want taxes being raised. So, if they have a shortfall at the state level, then they need to be responsible and … reduce their expenditures."

The initiative also provides a means for local government to ignore unfunded state mandates—those programs imposed on local governments by the state that come with no funding—which will relieve local governments of additional financial burdens.

For more information about this initiative, go to www.protectlocalservices.com.

Burn barrels not permitted in city

Burn barrels are no longer permitted in the city of Alturas for the disposal of waste, effective immediately.

Alturas Fire Marshal Joe Watters said there was some confusion generated over last week's article relating to open burning in the city. He's out to help residents comply with the new California Air Resources Board regulations.

"Only natural vegetation such as cut dry grass, cut brush, cut weeds, leaves and tree trimmings no larger than two inches in diameter and untreated lumber can be burned," said Watters. "Burn piles shall be no larger than four feet in diameter."

Watters stressed emphatically that burning treated lumber and plastics, among other items, is strictly prohibited.

Burning hours are restricted to 6 a.m. to 12 noon, and burn permits will be required as of May 1 through December 1. Residents may call the Alturas Fire Department at 233-4500 for more information.

Green Eggs and Long Legs: The Sandhill Crane Story

By Lynda Demsher

Special to The Record

Spring in Modoc County may be short on blossoms and long on bluster, but even if snow blows sideways and icicles hang long off the barn, it's spring when the Sandhills arrive, according to local ranchers.

Skirring in from hundreds of miles away, the proud crimson-hatted lords and ladies of bird land settle in and around the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge near Alturas to begin another cycle of birth and migration.

Where do they come from? Why are they here? The shadowy cranes, lofty and mysterious as they breeze by overhead or stalk through sagebrush on long, slender legs, leave many unanswered questions in the minds of their observers. That's why the Refuge, along with the River Center in Alturas, is holding a special event to help answer those questions.

Green Eggs and Long Legs: The Sandhill Crane Story, will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 3, at the Refuge. For the first half hour or so, Wildlife Biologist Shannon Ludwig will tell the story of the Sandhills, talk about the Refuge's efforts to band and keep track of the birds, then answer questions from those attending. The question answering will continue during a walking (or driving) tour of the refuge where Ludwig will guide participants to particularly good places to watch the cranes.

With a bit of patience, participants may get to see the oldest crane recorded on the refuge, a real survivor, who is 19 years old. Cranes have a life expectancy of about 20 years, Ludwig said, so it will be interesting to see how many seasons he'll return.

"The refuge started banding in 1984 and this bird is wearing a 1985 band," Ludwig said.

The old crane and his companions in Modoc are called Greater Sandhills because there are other, smaller varieties also hitting the flyways through the United States. Sometimes it is hard to distinguish the varieties from a distance, Ludwig said, although few of the lesser cranes stop off here.

This time of year, Sandhills are busy nesting on the refuge, re-claiming territory left last fall when they migrated to a milder climate in the Sacramento Valley. If a young pair comes in and tries to settle on already-claimed land, they are run off like unwelcome squatters, Ludwig said. The birds are very territorial, and a pair can claim, as their private reserve, 100 to 200 acres. With about 40-60 nesting pairs on the refuge, that means a lot of space is needed for the birds.

There are more nesting pairs outside the refuge in Modoc County as well, with some living in the hayed or grazed land of ranchers in the area, and others in irrigated meadows. The cranes love Modoc because practices here provide ideal habitat, Ludwig said.

"That's just one example where agriculture helps our wildlife here," he added.

Other nesting pairs have been spotted on Devil's Garden, and Ash Creek National Wildlife Refuge hosts many of the stately birds. There are also Sandhills in Surprise Valley, where "we hope to do some research this year and get a better feel for what's there," said Ludwig.

Although other refuges along the flyway may have larger numbers of nesting pairs, Ludwig says, "we fledge out more here." That means there are more colts, as the baby Sandhills are called, who survive to migrate with their parents in the fall. Ludwig will go into the reasons for that during his program.

Spotting scopes will be set up on the tour route during the crane event, and there is a good chance participants will be able to see some of the nesting pairs.

"The birds here are pretty well habituated to being observed; that doesn't seem to bother them unless people get too close," Ludwig said.

It is advised though, for participants to bring binoculars, cameras, preferably with telescope lenses, and wear comfortable shoes if walking around the tour route. The walking tour will be about a quarter of a mile and refreshments will be provided. The program is being offered free, as a public informational service, by the Refuge and the River Center.

Modoc Drug Task force reports arrests

The Modoc County Interagency Narcotics Task Force has been busy and has several reports covering recent activity.

On March 22 and March 23, agents were called to Modoc High School to interview and investigate two separate juveniles who were found to be in possession of marijuana. The juveniles were turned over to the school resource officer for further proceedings.

Over the past six months, Task Force agents conducted an undercover operation involving the purchase of methamphetamine and marijuana involving four suspects.

That investigation culminated in the arrest of Michael Godfrey, 34, of Alturas, and Christopher Banister, 21, of Alturas alleging sales of methamphetamine. Warrants have also been issued for the arrest of Larry Holdaway, 21, Alturas, and Ricardo Quesada, 21, Alturas. Those two have fled the area. The case has been turned over to the Modoc County District Attorney's office.

In mid-February, Task Force agents, with assistance from Cal Met (Multi-jurisdictional Methamphetamine Enforcement Team), Modoc Sheriff's Office, California Highway Patrol and Siskiyou County Narcotic Task Force, executed three search warrants in the Tulelake-Newell area. One warrant was in the city of Tulelake and two in rural Modoc County, located on County Road 106 and 107A.

Leonardo Martinez Castenada was arrested near his residence in Modoc County and charged with possession of methamphetamine. Veronica K. Holder was arrested at her County Road 107A residence alleging possession of methamphetamine for sale. Not present at the time, but later charged was Barry D. Eldredge. He was charged with possession of methamphetamines for sale and felon in possession of a firearm. Eldredge remains a fugitive. The case has been forwarded to the Modoc County DA. That case was the culmination of an undercover operation.

Illegal ferrets seized from Alturas owners

The Alturas Animal Control Officer has encountered several cases where residents are keeping ferrets as pets, which is illegal in California. According to Jerry Shea, one ferret was caught outside, on its own and another was turned over to a local animal person after it had been lost. Two other pet owners were advised that keeping a ferret was against the law and they moved their ferrets back out of state. The other two ferrets were euthanized, as is required by state law.

Shea explains that ferrets are legally kept in Nevada and Oregon, so some people don't realize it is illegal to possess them in California.

"I'm trying to get the word out," said Shea. "It appears we're having more of these incidents, and we just want to make sure people are aware of the law."

The penalty for possessing a ferret is not less than $500 or more than $10,000 per violation.

Classes of '68-'69 holding reunion

The Modoc High School Class of 1969 will be joined by the Class of 1968 for a 35 and 36 year reunion at the Brass Rail July 3.

The reunion, organized by Lester and Chris Porter of Alturas will start with cocktails at 6 p.m. followed by dinner and dancing. The price is $25, which includes dinner, tax, tip and the band.

The classes are still looking for addresses, especially of those people who may have moved since the last reunion. Class of '68 may contact Mary Busby at 233-4068 or Rick Holloway at 233-2632. For the '69 class, the Porters can be reached at 233-3762 or 233-6245.

Obituaries:

Mary P. Young

Mary P. Young passed away March 24, 2004, in Alturas, Calif., at the age of 100 years.

Born January 5, 1904, in Green County, Wisconsin, Mary's parents were Martin Cook and Margaret Dunphy Croak. Mary grew up on the family farm with three brothers and five sisters. Her education began in the local county school, and after high school she attended the Lyceum Arts Academy in Chicago, where she studied acting.

After graduation she joined the Ellison-White Company of the Chautauqua play circuits. There she met G. Guy Young, a company director on the seven-day circuit. In 1928 the two married in San Jose, CA. Live theatre was no longer thriving after the advent of the "talkies," so Mr. Young went into the insurance business and came to Alturas in 1930 as an agent. Originally planning to stay for just one year, they remained 74 years. G. Guy and Mary worked together in the insurance business until his death in 1965. Mary was the last surviving charter member of the Alturas Garden Club, of which she was also a past president. She was deeply involved in the negotiations with the Southern Pacific for the purchase of the Whistle Stop station as a meeting place, as well as the land for the Alturas Garden Club, whose meetings continue there to this day.

The Alturas Cemetery District was another focus of Mrs. Young's energies from 1950 to 2001. Much of the current landscaping configuration of the cemetery is a result of her input.

Mary is survived by her son, Superior Court Judge Guy Martin Young and wife Gloria, of Alturas, CA.; daughter, Mary Colleen Lowe and husband Maurice of Taos, New Mexico; five grandchildren: Margaret and Michael Goben, of Sparks, NV.; Marilyn and Robert Baker, of Janesville, CA.; Janet and Michael Server, of Alturas, CA.; Lisa and Dennis Reed Jr., of Alturas, CA.; and Nathaniel and Denise Lowe, of New York, N.Y. There are nine great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by an infant daughter and an infant great-granddaughter.

Mary had always cared deeply for the people and the history of Modoc County and felt herself blessed to have lived here.

Services were conducted by the Rev. Patrick Henry at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas on Wednesday, March 31 at 10 a.m. Interment followed at the Alturas Cemetery.

Remembrances may be directed to the Alturas Garden Club, Alturas, CA 96101.

Ila Morine Wistos

Ila Morine Wistos, a long-time supportive community volunteer and Modoc resident, passed away March 29, 2004, in Redding, Calif. at the age of 84. Born Ila M. Colton on September 18, 1919 in Kimball, Nebraska, she had three sisters and one brother. Ila moved to New Pine Creek in 1928 and had been a Modoc County resident since 1933. She graduated from elementary school in Alturas and Modoc Union High School

During World War II, she worked in Washington for Boeing Aircraft as a riveter.

She returned to Modoc and spent many years as a steam presser for Clint Old's Dry Cleaning. She and Stephen Wistos were married in Reno, Nevada on November 11, 1950, and during their 50 years together, Ila enjoyed camping, fishing, hiking and hunting (mostly arrowheads) with him and the family. Their extensive arrowhead collection is displayed at the Modoc County Museum. Ila was a supportive and active B.P.O.E. Elk's wife and assisted with Elks Lodge functions. She volunteered to work for many years at the Irwin Memorial Blood Drives in Alturas, when the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 sponsored the community blood drives. An excellent cook, immaculate housekeeper, and seamstress, she was also a long-time member of Beta Sigma Phi sorority in Alturas.

She is survived by her son John Wistos and daughter-in-law Louisa of Alturas, CA.; her daughter Gee-Gee Taylor of Redding; brother Eugene Colton and sister-in-law Maryann of Condon, OR.; sister Letha Morley, Alturas, CA.; granddaughters Brenda Anderson, Sandy, OR., Tammy Strickland, Severn, MD, Reneé Clark, The Woodlands, Texas; great-grandchildren, numerous nieces, nephews, grand and great-grand nieces and nephews. Ila's husband preceded her in death on April 10, 2000. At Ila's request, there will be no services. The family requests any donations be made to the American Cancer Society or a charity of choice. Interment was at Alturas Cemetery.

Sera Rico Taylor

Sera Rico Taylor, 83, a long time resident of Modoc County, who lived over 40 years on her ranch south of Cedarville in Surprise Valley, passed away of natural causes on March 20, 2004.

A memorial service will be conducted by Pastor Charles May on Saturday, April 3, 2004 at 3 p.m. at Living Water Fellowship Church, 481 Main Street, in Cedarville. A fellowship gathering and dessert will follow at the church after the graveside burial in Cedarville.

Sera was born on February 15, 1921, in San Jose, CA. to Guadalupe and Isabel Rico.

During World War II, she drove a bus to and from Treasure Island in San Francisco. Later, after buying the ranch and moving to Surprise Valley, Sera and her husband, Bill Taylor, adopted three children, Melvin, Sandy and Terry. Much later, Sera raised two of her grandchildren, bringing to her ranch: Christy, age 2 from a foster home in North Carolina, and Brent from Arizona.

Sera enjoyed sheep, rabbits, chickens, and peacocks, and sold eggs, lambs, and rabbits locally. Sera was also an earnest gardener. During one of her last times to enter produce in the "Modoc Last Frontier Fair," the Modoc Record published a feature article about her because she had over 400 entries that year. Sera enjoyed fishing and had a sign under her homemade mail box, selling worms. When the Cedarville Farmers' Market began, her home-made enchiladas and ice cream cones were popular favorites among customers.

In 1974, Sera traveled with friends, Elaine and Shirley Lee, to attend a Basic Youth Conflicts Seminar in Portland, OR. and the World's Fair in Spokane, WA. At age 60 she went on an eight-day "Survival Backpack For Women Who Feel Over 30" out of Christian Encounter Ministries Ranch, belaying and rappelling on a major cliff successfully. Another memorable trip for her was a flight with Christy to San Diego for Brent's graduation from the Marine Corps Boot Camp. Later she traveled with friend Jeanne Emerson to Jeanne's family reunion in Sequim Bay State Park, WA. She thoroughly enjoyed weekly visiting, witnessing and praying with residents in long-term care in Alturas and Cedarville, and took great joy in telling them about Jesus. She especially loved her church--Living Water Fellowship and all her church family.

Sera is survived by her son Melvin Taylor of Palo Alto; granddaughter Chris (Christy) Bailey and Christy's husband Stuart of Quincy, CA.; great grandchildren, Timothy, 11 years, Jonathon, 10 years, Elizabeth, seven years; her daughter Sandy in New Mexico with three grandchildren; and her son Terry Taylor, whose whereabouts are unknown. She is also survived by her younger sister, Agnes Boulade of Alturas, and numerous nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by an older sister and brother, and by her grandson Brent. Memorial donations may be made to Living Water Fellowship Church, P.O. Box 447, Cedarville, CA. 96104, or to Christian Encounter Ministries, P.O. Box 1022, Grass Valley, CA. 95945.

Benjamin Calvin Casad

Benjamin C. Casad, 80, died at his residence in Tulelake, CA. on Friday, March 26, 2004, after a long battle with cancer. He is at peace and pain free with his Lord.

Memorial services were held at the Tulelake-Butte Valley Fairgrounds Home Economics Building, in Tulelake, CA. on Tuesday, March 30, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. with Pastor Gary Jones officiating. Davenport's Funeral Home of Klamath Falls was in charge of arrangements. There will be no graveside services.

Mr. Casad was born March 22, 1924, in Yakima, Washington to Benjamin Cecil and Dora Leona (Hileman) Casad. He was a 1942 graduate of Bremerton High School. He joined the Army in 1943 and served his country in WWII as radio operator and rifle sharpshooter as Staff Sergeant of the Army's 3187th Signal Service Battalion. He was decorated with the American Theater Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Victory Medal, and European African Middle Eastern Service Medal upon his honorable discharge in 1946.

He attended Olympic Jr. College in Bremerton for two years, 1946 and 1947. On September 13, 1947, Mr. Casad became the husband of Roberta McCoard. He continued with his education at the University of Washington, Seattle, 1947-1950, while the couple began their family. Benjamin, Jr. was born in 1948, Robert in 1951, and Steven in 1955. Ben's career in forestry began in 1950, taking the family to various towns in Northern California. In 1970, Tulelake, CA. became the family's home as Ben was stationed there. He worked for the U.S. Forest Service for 29 years as a ranger and an instructor. He retired as District Ranger in 1979. Ben Casad was active in many organizations and societies throughout the years. He became active as a square dance caller beginning in 1973, calling for Scott Valley, Fall River, and Alturas clubs. Ben and Roberta are best known through the Tule Twirlers Square Dance Club where they were a driving force behind the organization and performed at many regional events.

After his retirement, Ben worked as a station attendant at Dave's Chevron in Tulelake from 1979-1983, and drove the van for the Tulelake Senior Citizen's Nutrition Site from 1984-1986. He was a member of the Lone Pine Lions Club (serving a year as zone chairman), Tulelake Rotary Club, Tulelake Volunteer Fire Department, Ambulance Service, First Aid Instructor, Organization of Professional Employees Department of Agriculture, National Association of Retired Federal Employees, International Association of Square Dance Callers, and life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

He served as director of the Tulelake-Butte Valley Fair Board from 1988-1993, helping especially with the parade, museum and entertainment. In 1994 he was honored with the fair's highest "WFA Blue Ribbon" achievement award.

Survivors include his wife, Roberta; son, Benjamin C. Casad, Jr., of Fallon, NV.; son and daughter-in-law, Steven R. and Molly, of Bend, OR.; son, Robert, of Red Bluff, CA.; granddaughter, Emily and her husband Thomas Sims, of League, TX.; grandson, Timothy Casad, of Salem, OR.; granddaughters Maggie and Allison Casad, of Bend, OR.; brother and sister-in-law Frank and Peggy Casad, of Sequim, WA.

Memorial donations may be made to Klamath Hospice, the American Cancer Society, and Saddle Mountain Christian Camps, c/o Basin Bible Church, 500 Glendale Street, Tulelake, CA. 96134.

Sports

Braves trip up Etna in SCL

Modoc has yet to face the meat of the Shasta Cascade League, but beat the Etna Lions 9-0 and 4-2 Friday night. They face Trinity here Friday. Marty Stevens led the way in Etna, getting a home run in each game. Travis Potter got the win in the opener while Adam Server got the win in the second game.

In the first game, Modoc scored in the first, fourth, fifth and sixth, while Potter held Etna to four hits and no runs. Modoc collected 10 hits in the game.

Stevens and Server homered, with Rich Culp and Server also doubling. Stevens, Server, Danny Randazzo, Cody Widby each had two hits. In the second game, Modoc scored in the first, three times in the third. Etna scored on a home run and double in the second inning. Culp and Randazzo each doubled for the Braves, with Stevens, Joey Catania and Shiloh Pierce each getting two hits.

On Tuesday, Modoc beat Lost River 7-6 and 3-2 on a cold a windy day in Alturas.

The Braves' Rich Culp tied the first game in the bottom of the seventh with a two-run home run and Cody Widby slammed a home run in the bottom of the eighth to give the Braves the win. Modoc was down 5-0 in the fifth. Danny Randazzo got the win, striking out eight and allowing one earned run. Widby was two-for-three, Adam Server was two-for-four and Joey Catania had a pair of runs batted in.

In the second game, Shiloh Pierce got the win, striking out 10 batters and allowing just one earned run and three hits. Leading hitters for Modoc were Catania who was three-for-three and knocked in all the Braves' runs and Marty Stevens who went two-for-three.

Modoc girls split in Etna

Modoc's girls softball team split a twinbill with Etna last weekend, and will face Trinity here April 2.

Modoc lost the opening game 5-3 against Etna, but came back to win the nightcap 9-6. Kristen Taylor pitched both games.

In the opener, Etna scored five runs on seven hits, while Modoc scored three on six hits. Etna led 2-1 after two and Modoc tied it a 3-3 in the third. Etna added one in the fifth and one in the sixth.

Taylor led the hitting with a double and single, while Megan Thompson had a pair of hits.

In the second game, Modoc scored two in the first and two in the third. Etna tied it at 4-4 in the fourth. Etna went up 6-4 in the fourth, but Modoc tied in the fifth and then scored three in the seventh for the win. Modoc had 10 hits in the game and Etna had 11. Taylor, Thompson and Allison Campagna each had doubles, and Emily Pence, Campagna and Thompson had a pair of hits each.

On Tuesday, Henley beat the Braves 15-3 in Henley. Henley scored three in the first, one in the second, four in the third, four in the fourth, three in the fifth. Modoc scored three in the fifth.

Henley's pitcher struck out 13 Braves and allowed six hits. Christine DeLeon led Modoc going two-for-three, while Brittany Berchtold, Taylor, Amy Ridgway and Megan Thompson each had a hit.

Bears trip Braves in league golf match

The Mt. Shasta Bears beat the Modoc Braves golf team last week at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas. The match was played in windy and wet conditions. The next match is against Bishop Quinn and Fall River at Mt. Shasta Resort.

As a team, Mt. Shasta shot 444 and Modoc shot 474. Burney fired a round of 526 and Trinity shot 527.

The Bears' Jesse Kasten led all players with an 81, with teammate Jason Hanson shooting an 82. Tyler Eastman shot a 87.

Modoc's Micah Eppler and Taylor Dunn each shot 91. They were followed by D.J. Northrup with a 94, Brian Weed with 100, Keith Montague, Matt Williams with 101 and Ross Montague with a 105.

The leading golfer for Burney was Shane Prigmor with an 84 and Trinity's best round was by Travis Wills with a 97.

April 8, 2004

News

Budget cuts force layoffs in MJUSD

Facing a possible budget shortfall of between $235,000 to $450,000, the Modoc Joint Unified School District is looking at laying off some employees. The issue came to the Board of Trustees at its April 7 meeting. The proposed layoffs include two administrative assistants, a Computer Technician II, and the Operations Director. All layoffs would be impacted on the 2004-05 school year.

Superintendent Doug Squellati said the district is now negotiating with the teachers' union to come to terms on the health benefit package. If they can agree, the shortfall will be in the $235,000 range. If not, it could be higher and closer to the $450,000 total.

Squellati said the issue involves a higher deductible for individuals and family and a co-pay. He said all sides are working towards a solution. "No one likes lay-offs, but we don't have a choice," said Squellati. "We're trying to do this with the least negative impact to the district, while still providing high quality service to the students and community."

Squellati said the classified employees, under the Teamsters Union, have a health contract that's in force through January, 2005. At that time, it too will have to be re-negotiated.

The school district is in the same sort of shape as many local governments, and is relying on the best estimates concerning impacts of the state budget crunch.

While there won't be any teacher layoffs this next school year, the district may not fill be able to fill some open positions.

Squellati also said student enrollment was down this year, and the district is projecting a drop of 34 students for next year, which impacts the overall budget in average daily attendance rate payments.

Lookout man dies in SR299 accident

Edward J. Haas, 66, Lookout, died in a single-vehicle accident Saturday afternoon on State Route 299 near the Day Bench road.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Haas was eastbound at approximately 50 m.p.h. when for unknown reasons he allowed his utility truck to drift onto the right shoulder. He overcorrected sharply to the left, lost control, crossed the westbound lane, went down and embankment and the vehicle overturned onto its top. Haas died at the scene.

Minor injuries were reported by the California Highway Patrol in a single vehicle accident April 3, 4 a.m. on Hilltop Road west of Baldpate Road. The CHP reports that Nathaneal Clevinger, age 25, was driving a 1983 Ford Ranger eastbound on Hilltop at 20 m.p.h. when he lost control. The vehicle left the south edge of the road and overturned. A passenger in the vehicle, Greg Hoover, age 22, sustained minor injuries and was transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas. Seatbelt use probably prevented more serious injuries.

There were no injuries in a deer versus pickup accident April 4, 9:45 a.m. on State Route 299 west of the Canby bridge.

According to the CHP, Patricia Ann Gentry, 50, Irvine, Ca., was driving a 2000 Dodge Ram eastbound at approximately 55 m.p.h. when she observed a deer running down an embankment. The deer was moving away from the road, and Gentry slowed but lost sight of the deer. For some reason, the deer turned completely around, headed back to the road and leaped into the driver's side of the pickup. The impact caused damage to the windshield, driver side mirror and side doors.

On April 30, a rollover on SR299 resulted in major damage to a 1988 Mitsubishi pickup, but only minor injuries to the driver, Shanna L. Munyon, 33, Likely.

The CHP reports she was eastbound at approximately 60-65 m.p.h. when she reached down to pick up some groceries that had fallen off the seat. She allowed the pickup to drift off the road, quickly turned back and lost control. The vehicle rolled to its roof and she was able to climb out.

Bird banding a valuable tool in wildlife work

Banding is for the birds at the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, where a staff of five manages over 7,000 acres of habitat for about 76 species of waterfowl, including Canada geese, greater sandhill cranes, migrating ducks and other marsh and upland birds.

"It's just one of those management tools that we utilize," says Shannon Ludwig, wildlife biologist at the refuge, speaking of their banding program. Putting little metal or plastic bands around the legs or necks of birds is a scientific way of designating each individual bird, much like giving each one its own name. No matter where that bird may go, spotters can "read" the color codes or numbers on the tag to identify that specific bird

"The most visible program that we have is the greater sandhill crane banding program. That was established in the early 80s as part of a program to try and track where these greater sandhill cranes were going and what type of habitats they were using," explains Ludwig.

"Our little population of sandhill cranes in this part of the world is extremely productive and a key component of the overall population," adds refuge manager, Steven Clay, a native Californian who has nearly 18 years of service with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Once banded, the birds are easily tracked by wildlife specialists to learn migratory habits and population size as well as sex and species ratios. Some might wonder if the bands interfere with the bird's natural behavior. "They don't affect the bird at all," asserts Ludwig. "On Canada geese, we actually put collars around their neck. They have a series of numbers on them. The same with the cranes, we put bands on their legs."

The cranes are banded when they are young "colts," as they call them. "They have to be the right size to hold those bands, Ludwig notes, adding that the banding is usually done at night using an airboat and leg power to catch them. "We capture most of our young cranes on foot. We're actually running as fast as we can to catch those cranes."

Canada geese, which change their feathers all at once, are easier to catch in the molting season when they are flightless, a period lasting anywhere from two to four weeks during the summer. "We are also banding waterfowl," adds Ludwig, "any of the duck species during that time."

Natural mortality rates among the birds hampers the data gathering process. "That's the real difficult part," says Ludwig. "You might be able to band a bunch of these young birds, but those that actually survive to a fledgling is not a very high percentage."

Clay notes that of the 40 to 60 nesting pairs on the refuge, there are only about 12 successful bandings per year—actually an excellent record when compared to the success ratios at other refuges.

Of course, banding is only the beginning of the process. Sighting and reporting the birds over their lifespan is the longer part of the process. Called "band returns" those reports from all over the country go to a Maryland clearing house.

Over the years, considerable information about the birds on the Modoc refuge has been gathered. They found that the cranes winter in the south-central delta region, south of Sacramento. "This particular population of sandhill cranes that breed here will winter down there. We haven't received any band returns beyond those regions," Ludwig says, adding, "They don't do a lot of stopping between here and the central valley." According to the refuge manager, there are about 50 nesting pairs of greater sandhill cranes, or between 100 and 120 birds, that actually breed there.

"We just started a new program last year collaring Canada geese," says Ludwig. "We wanted to find out when and where these breeding populations were going and their local distribution."

What they found surprised them.

Accepted wisdom said that the Modoc refuge geese wintered in Bay Area lakes with others of their species. However, preliminary findings indicate that the 143 Canada geese on the refuge seem to stay put. "Most of our returns are local. These birds are staying within this area throughout the winter, which contradicts what you would have thought based on past banding data," says Ludwig, clearly excited about this development. "So, it's something we're learning. We're going to band another 157, hopefully, this summer … track them, and hopefully get more sightings data … from other areas to put this picture together."

The staff at the refuge is putting together an "Adopt the Pit" program in conjunction with the Alturas Elementary School to give children the opportunity to set up their own project on the refuge. Clay is anxious that the community appreciates the unique and invaluable asset the refuge represents, and wants them to "get a good understanding of what's in their backyard."

Says Clay, "If anyone has an interest in learning about banding or wildlife management, we would very much welcome them to contact us and take part."

Upcoming "get acquainted" programs include a refuge exhibit at the Children's Fair, May 15, the Migratory Bird Festival, August 27-29 and an open house during Refuge Week, October 11-15.

Anderson crowned 'Beef Princess'

Modoc County Cattlemen and CattleWomen crowned Ashley Anderson as the new 2004 Modoc County Beef Princess.

The March 27 competition was held at the Modoc District Fair grounds in Cedarville, where a full house watched the evening unfold.

This year the Cattlemen and CattleWomen had two deserving applicants, Meghan Binning and Ashley Anderson. Both contestants were asked to participate in an evening of personal interviews, and a speech on the topic of how they would address the mad cow problem in the United States, all the while being judged on their personality, appearance, and poise. Both gave the audience an opportunity to learn more about the issue, while enjoying their excellent prime rib dinner prepared by Lynn and Ron Schluter. After the contestants had concluded their speeches, the audience had the chance to see some of the many talents of Modoc residents, Onalea Sweeney with a poem and JoAnn White, Patty Bell, Donna Cooley and Jerry Cooley entertained in three-part harmony "sounding like a group of angels," described some listeners. The "exceptional cowboy poetry" of Leon Flick gave the evening some humor.

As the evening came to a close and the scores were tabulated, the announcement that everyone had been waiting for was given. Ashley Anderson a 16-year-old sophomore at Surprise Valley High School was named as the second young woman to earn the title of Modoc County Beef Princess. Ashley is an active member of 4-H, Junior Show Board, Volleyball team, Cheerleading and Junior Horse Show. She was chosen to represent the Modoc County Cattlemen and CattleWomen, and to promote the Modoc beef industry for the year of 2004. She will attend the Modoc District Fair and Parade, "Ag in the Classroom" day in May, Lakeview County Fair and use her speaking ability to share her knowledge of the beef industry with all whom she meets.

The committee thanks 2003 Modoc County Beef Princess, Nicole Frutuozo for her outstanding performance for the Cattlemen and CattleWomen and for "setting a great example for all the princesses to follow." She was given a $435 scholarship from United Country Stevenson Realty, Plumas Bank, Dean Neer Realty and DJ Ranch, to help her with her future plans at Lassen College.

One hundred-seventy-five guests were served by a "wonderful group of 4-H volunteers." The Modoc County Cattlemen and CattleWomen would like to extend their gratitude to the many 4-H, volunteers, committee members and most of all, the people and businesses which made donations to make the evening a success.

Building moves up slightly

Modoc County building activity remained constant with 15 permits issued, but the value increased to $195,777.

Most of the permits were for minor items and no new homes were included.

The county issued 15 permits for February, valued at $102,330. In January, eight building permits were issued, valued at $183,292.

The City of Alturas issued 13 permits, with an estimated value of $68,730. Most of the projects were also on the small side.

Last month, the city issued seven building permits worth an estimated $10,120.

Ecomonic workshop set for BV

The Big Valley Chamber of Commerce has set a community economic development workshop to explore the possibilities of creating new businesses to revitalize the local economy in the wake of the devastating lumber mill closing in Bieber nearly three years ago.

"I'm inviting everybody that I come across," says Jim Kilcrease, enthusiastically, hoping many area residents respond to his invitation.

The vice president of the chamber and a retired firefighter, Kilcrease points out that they are trying to connect potential businessmen with workable projects to create new jobs and utilize existing local resources. "I want people to come in there and listen to what these folks have to say."

Targeted at "forest resources and economic diversification in Big Valley," the daylong workshop will "explore ideas and project proposals to diversify, modernize and revive the use of forest resources as an important foundation of the area's economy," according to Merle Anderson, a community development consultant hired by the chamber to assist with this project. "The area to be considered in this workshop is the vicinity of Big Valley in Lassen and Modoc Counties including the 'working circle' of the Big Valley Federal Sustained Yield Unit."

"People are rightly concerned with the fact that as their children grow up and graduate from high school, there are no jobs for them here," says Kilcrease of the present employment situation in the valley. "So, they go elsewhere to get jobs."

The morning session will feature guest speakers from economic development programs in rural communities similar to Big Valley and from the U.S. Forest Service. The afternoon will be given over to group discussion of projects, plans and possibilities

The workshop will be held at the Veterans Memorial Building in Bieber on April 22. It is scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 4:00 p.m. A community potluck lunch will also be available.

"I think the main target here is forestry, for right now," says Kilcrease, noting that utilizing natural resources seems the most likely way to go. In addition, he hopes that the workshop will "set a fire under some folks. There are plenty of people around here in the valley already (with) … the talent, the knowledge—even a lot of the equipment needed."

"The most obvious thing," Kilcrease continues, "is the work that the Forest Service would like to do as far as cleaning up and making the forest here in and around the Big Valley less of a fire hazard than it is right now."

As an example of another project that might be viable in this area, Kilcrease explains, "There's an outfit out of Klamath Falls that's going great guns right now by harvesting juniper and making a resalable product out of juniper. They are developing ways to utilize this stuff. They're making (marketable) product out of what used to be just stacked and burned."

Kilcrease, who enjoys the supportive assistance of the boards of supervisors from both Lassen and Modoc counties, stresses that they are looking for entrepreneurs who will take ideas and turn them into viable industries. He cites two examples of present business ventures in the valley, a transmission remanufacturing operation in Adin and a candy maker in Bieber. "There are guys out there that want to go in and do stuff like that. They just aren't really sure how to get it going."

Anderson, who created the action plan for the chamber using a Forest Service grant to explore potential avenues of diversification says, "The workshop will stimulate ideas and encourage project proposals to support revitalization of the local economy and job creation through diversified use and management of forest resources."

For more information contact Jim Kilcrease at 530/949-9458 or Lillian Arnold at 530/294-5700.

Obituaries:

Francis Adrian Roberts, Sr.

Services for respected, long-time Alturas businessman Francis Adrian Roberts, Sr. will be held Friday, April 9, at 12 noon at the Cedarville Cemetery. The Rev. Patrick Henry will conduct the graveside service. Mr. Roberts passed away Saturday, April 3, 2004, in Chico, Calif. He was 86. Born March 22, 1918, in Lakeview, OR., he was the first child of Ollie Verl Thruston Roberts and William Harold Roberts of Cedarville, CA.

His grandparents, Frank Lora Roberts and Bertha Woods Roberts, were early settlers in Cedarville where they owned a small farm, south of town. Adrian spent much of his teen years helping on the farm and attending Surprise Valley High School, from which he graduated in 1937.

He then worked on different ranches, for the Flournoys in Likely, and Jess Stiner in Cedarville. It was there that he met his wife, Marie Dalla Lasta of Dunsmuir, who was teaching at the high school. Adrian worked for Mack Word, hauling freight from Ft. Bidwell to Alturas and back. For a few years he lived in Ft. Bidwell before moving to Alturas, where he worked for Farmers Exchange repairing and delivering machinery.

He worked for the City of Alturas Water Department and Fields Plumbing, before opening his own business in 1957. He operated his business from his house until he purchased the Bowman building on Main Street in 1967. Mr. Roberts was knowledgeable about plumbing and pumps, and often worked long hours to help people with their water problems. He retired after 40 years as owner/operator of A&M Pump and Plumbing in Alturas, and sold the business to his son, Bill Roberts, who worked for his father, helping solve the many problems concerning water and drainage.

He leaves his wife Marie, to whom he was married for 58 years; son Adrian, Jr., his wife Alice, and their daughter Amelia of Chico, CA.; daughter Mary Jeffers, her husband David of Dallas, TX and their son Jim of Norman, OK.; son Bill, his wife Marlene, and their son Brandon and daughter Charlene of Alturas and Chico, CA.; daughter Kathleen Gentry, her husband Dan, and their daughter Andrea of Chico, CA.; brother Arlen and his wife Betty, of Magalia, CA.; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father Harold, who died at age 40, his mother Ollie and his sister, Kathleen Roberts Ritchey.

Meera Myrl Pratt

Meera Myrl Pratt, age 84, of Roseburg, OR. passed away February 16, 2004 in Roseburg, Oregon.

She was born on July 13, 1919, in Quincy, CA. to Augustus Milton and Mary Myrl (Hunt) Elam with birth weight being 2-1/2 pounds.

Her mother died several days after giving birth, at the age of 23. Meera was adopted and raised by her father's sister and her husband, Gertrude Augustine (Elam) and Leonard C. Remick. Her brother, Edward Milton Elam remained with "Papa Gus" in Eureka, CA.

Meera was born and grew up living at the Plumas County Hospital where her father was manager and her mother was a nurse. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Quincy. Her great-grandfather, Dr. Willard Pratt, founded Prattville, CA., located on the west side of Lake Almanor. She had many adventures with cats, dogs, chickens, riding cows, donkeys, and horses, tap dancing and playing with many children in the water fountain located in front of the hospital. She hiked to the top of Mt. Lassen three different times, the third time being in 1976.

She graduated from Western School of Business in Sacramento. On October 12, 1946, Meera married honorably-discharged WWII Veteran Virgil Pratt of Alturas, CA. He had just graduated from Strutz School of Watch Making in Sacramento, including jewelry design and repair, and later from the Gemological Institute of America, Los Angeles.

Virgil and Meera moved to Redding, CA. and soon to Weaverville, CA. and opened the first of their four stores, Pratt Jewelers. They owned and operated their Alturas store for 14 years. Their largest store was in downtown Nampa, ID, which they operated for five years. Burney, CA. would be the home of their fourth store in 1968, which they sold for retirement in 1977. Next stop for hunting and fishing was Hamilton, MT., back to California, where they settled in Anderson, and moved to Roseburg, OR. in 1999. Upon Virgil's retirement, Meera worked for J.C. Penny and retired from Target in Redding in 1999.

Meera was a member of Order of Eastern Star and VFW Auxiliary, serving as District President. She enjoyed hunting purple bottles and arrowheads, antique shopping, crocheting, family barbecues, ocean and creek fishing, and being the official camp cook on hunting trips. She was full of fun and adventure, always ready to travel, and loved to laugh. The Pratts donated framed pictures of Captain Jack and tribe with arrowhead designs to the Modoc County Museum.

Meera is survived by her devoted husband of over 57 years, Virgil Pratt; daughter Suzanne Myrl Dean who was born in Modoc, grandsons, Ryan and Nathan, granddaughter and grandson-in-law, Sherah (Dean) and Carlos Gonzalez, all of Roseburg, Oregon; daughter and son-in-law Deanne and Michael Regan, granddaughter and great-grandson, Lynne and Sean Carrera, six step- grandchildren with families, all of the Sacramento area; brother and sister-in-law Edward and Maria Elam of Morris Plains, New Jersey; nephews, Robert and Thomas Elam, niece, Suzanne (Elam) Riggio and families; cousins, Elsa (Remick) Odermott of Hamilton, MT.; Jean Keeny and her husband, Albert of Grass Valley, CA.; Jere Hunt and sister, Sidra (Hunt) Pauly of Redding, CA. and families. Other loved ones are Mildred (Pratt) Jones of Cedarville, CA. Felix F. Styler of Salem, OR. John Fisher of Klamath Falls, OR. Edward Dean of Grants Pass, OR. Michael Gilbert of Anderson, CA. Karen Schmidt and Scott Fulton, both of Roseburg, and families. Preceding her are her parents and niece, Lisa Anne Carrera..

A private gathering celebrating her life was held at their home in Wilbur, OR. on February 21, 2004. Memorial contributions may be directed the American Diabetes Association or the Alturas VFW. Condolences may be sent to Meera's husband, Virgil Pratt at 1100 Oak Hill Road, Roseburg, OR 97470, (541) 464-0478. A Pratt Reunion is scheduled for Memorial weekend in Cedarville.

Edward J. Haas

Long-time Modoc County resident Edward J. Haas of Lookout, CA., passed away on Saturday, April 3, 2004. Services will be held at the Adin Community Hall at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, April 9. A complete obituary will be published in next week's Record.

Sports

McMaster breaks '74 MHS shot put record

Scott McMaster took just one meet this year to break the Modoc High School shot put record held since 1974 by Tom Massey at 53-2. McMaster heaved the steel ball 53-7.75 in Lakeview Friday.

The event was Modoc's first taste of action this season. They travel to Mt. Shasta today and head to Redding for the John Frank meet April 17. Freshman Danielle Moriarity won the 1500 meters and the 3000 meters for Modoc. She clocked a 6:17.00 in the 1500 and a 13:49.59 in the 3000.

Scott Joyce picked up two second places for the Braves. He was second in the 1500 meters at 4:38.33 and in the 3000 meters at 10:40.06.

Max Wise took a second in the high jump at 5-5, Brad Bell was second in the 200 meters at 23.07, Joyce was second in the 800 meters at 2:33.31 and John Yeier was second in the intermediate hurdles at 51.88.

Third places went to: Grant Hall in the discus at 105-11; Clint Nardoni in the triple jump at 34-3.5 and the 400 meters in 57.88; Matt Wilke in the 100 meters at 12.42; Brandon Anderson in the 800 meters in 3:07.76; Yeier in the 110 high hurdles at 19.6, Bell in the intermediate hurdles in 54.30.

Taking fourth places were: Jake Gray in the discus at 99-8; Nardoni in the high jump at 5-0; Wise in the 400 meters in 58.48; Wilke in the 200 meters in 26.42; Bell in the high hurdles at 20.19; and Len Gladu in the intermediate hurdles at 59.99.

Coming in fifth were: Gray in the shot put at 32-7.25; Gladu in the long jump at 14-2.75; Gladu in the triple jump at 29-2.5; Robert Spedding in the 100 meters in 14.71; Wise in the 200 meters in 27.40.

Sixth places went to Hall in the shot at 32-7; McMaster in the discus at 90-10.5; Morgan Davis in the long jump at 13-1.75; Brett Joyce in the triple jump at 28-2; Joyce in the 100 meters in 14.8; Scott Joyce in the 400 meters in 59.17; and Davis in the 200 at 31.13.

For the girls, Sadie Harrison placed second in the 100 meters in 14.47 and the 400 meters in 1:10.44 and the 200 meters in 32.06.

Jess Gray was second in the 300 meter hurdles in 1:02.50, in the 800 meters at 3:28.21 and the intermediate hurdles in 21.67.

Other Modoc results by event: shot put, Ann Sanchez fifth at 25-0, Kim Crnkovic sixth at 22-3; discus, Sanchez fourth at 80-2, Christina Abbott sixth at 76-2; long jump, Kelly Campagna fourth at 9-7.5, Marielle Nardoni fifth at 9-4; 100 meters, Campagna sixth at 15.43, Helen Jones seventh at 16.56; 400 meters, Gray fourth at 1:20.42, Nardoni fifth at 1:22.78; high hurdles, Abbott third at 22.26, Sanchez fourth at 32,24; 800 meters, Nardoni fourth at 3:38.38, 200 meters Campagna fourth at 33.61, Jones fifth at 35.12.

Braves beat Trinity, Fall River looms

Modoc's Braves beat the Trinity Wolves Friday, 10-4 and 12-10, in a slugfest, and the Shasta Cascade League may be decided when Fall River comes to town April 20.

The Braves are ranked number one in Division III in the North Section and Fall River holds the number one rank for Division IV.

The Braves face Burney today and Fall River faces Mt. Shasta this week. In the opening game, the Braves scored three in the first, added two in the second, three in the fourth, one in the fifth and sixth. Trinity scored once in the first, one in the fourth and two in the sixth. Travis Potter got the win for the Braves, giving up five hits, while striking out 11 and walking just one. Rich Culp, Joey Catania, Shiloh Pierce and Skyler Oates each hit a home run in the first game. Culp and Catania each had a pair of hits. In the second game, Modoc scored two in the first, added two in the fifth, four in the sixth and two in the seventh. Trinity scored in the first, three in the fourth, four in the sixth and tied it at 10-10 in the seventh. In the bottom of the eighth, Marty Stevens was hit by a pitch and Catania came up with a game winning home run.

Culp had two home runs in the second game, while Catania, Potter and Stevens each slammed one. Stevens, Culp and Adam Server had three hits while Potter, Catania and Kyle Madison had a pair of hits.

Several pitchers took the mound in the second game, giving up a total of 15 hits, with Potter on the mound the last two innings for the win.

Girls drop pair to Wolves

The Trinity Wolves handed the Modoc girls softball team a pair of losses here Friday afternoon, 5-0 and 9-4. The girls are at Burney today

In the opening game, the Wolves scored one in the third, two in the fourth and one in the fifth. Modoc was held to four hits with Brittany Berchtold getting two

In the second game, Trinity scored five runs in the eighth to beat the Braves. Trinity had opened with a 3-0 first inning lead and Modoc tied it at 3-3 in the fourth, Trinity added a run in the seventh, but Modoc matched it for a 4-4 tie. Trinity then exploded for five in the eighth

Kristen Taylor led the hitting for Modoc, getting two doubles. Allison Campagna and Amy Ridgway each doubled

Jennifer Davis got the loss in both games. She allowed seven hits in the second game after giving up five in the opener.

Bell wrestles tough at High School National finals

Modoc High's heavyweight Cory Bell wrestled very tough at the National High School finals in Cleveland last week, according to assistant coach Tim MacDonnell.

Bell got a couple of tough draws. He faced the number one wrestler in the nation in his opening match, and was pinned in the second round after being the aggressor.

In his second match, he faced the Wyoming state champ, and was leading 6-2 in the third round, before getting pinned.

"Cory was very competitive and they were both good matches," said MacDonnell. "He just made a mistake in the second match, or would have won that one. We were proud of his efforts . . . it was tough."

Big golf match set for Modoc.

Modoc's golf team will have a big match today at Lake Shastina, which could go a long way in determining the playoff picture.

The top three teams in the Shasta Cascade League (Mt. Shasta, Modoc and Weed) will face off for the last time. The top two teams advance to the North Section Small Schools Playoffs. There are only two weeks left in league play. Mt. Shasta is leading the league now, with Modoc in second and Weed nipping at their spikes, one-half match behind.

Last week, Weed improved its standings in a match at Mt. Shasta by finishing ahead of Modoc. Mt. Shasta won with a combined 425, Weed was second with a 461 and Modoc third with a 480. Fall River shot 507, Trinity had a 518, Burney a 535 and Bishop Quinn a 538.

Bishop Quinn's Chris Chitwood won individual honors with a 75 and Mt. Shasta's Tyler Eastman shot 76. Modoc's D.J. Northrup shot an 88. Other scores for Modoc were: Brian Weed 91; Taylor Dunn 92; Ross Montague 103 and Matt Williams 118.

Modoc's Micah Eppler is currently in seventh place individually in the north section with Northrup ninth.

Arrowhead hosts golf tourney

Alturas' Arrowhead Golf Course is hosting the first tournament of the year April 10, with tee-off at 11 a.m.

Entry fee is $15 per player, plus green fees for non-members. The event will be a two-person best ball. Call 233-3404 to sign up or sign up at the clubhouse.

April 15, 2004

News

Layoffs in MJUSD delayed, wait for budget certainty

While layoffs were on last week's Modoc Joint Unified School District agenda, at least two of them have been put on hold by the Board of Trustees pending better budget certainty.

"The superintendent was premature in announcing the layoffs of two administrative aides," said board President Ken Fogle. "We chose not to enact those layoffs last week and want to see the results of negotiations with employees concerning the benefit package."

Fogle said the board discussed the layoffs, which are on the table, but said the board wasn't certain those layoffs would be necessary or wise. Last week, Superintendent Doug Squellati attended a meeting discussing those benefit packages and will report to the board soon.

The MJUSD is facing a possible budget shortfall of between $235,000 to $450,000.

Proposed layoffs of a Computer Technician II, and the Operations Director are probable.

If employee negotiations are fruitful, the shortfall will be in the $235,000 range. If not, it could be higher and closer to the $450,000 total.

The benefit issue involves a higher deductible for individuals and families and a co-pay.

While there won't be any teacher layoffs this next school year, the district may not be able to fill some open positions.

Drought rearing head in Modoc

While most of the west is suffering moderate to severe drought, Modoc is just on the fringes and is in the "abnormally dry" designation of the U.S Drought Monitor.

News from Big Valley Ranger District in its April snow survey indicates the snowpack is tenuous. According to U.S. Forest Service's Ken Romberger, there are 22.4 inches of snow at Sweagart Flat, containing 10.2 inches of water. The average since 1935, is 36.4 inches of snow containing 13.9 inches of water. The current snowpack represents only 73 percent of average.

There was a snow survey taken in the Warners, but the results were not released. They should be out next week.

Only patches for city streets this summer

Alturas Public Works Director Stacy Chase told the City Council Tuesday night that street funds had pretty much dried up for the coming year and not to expect anything other than patching potholes.

"The state has effectively taken most of the funds and the street fund scene is dismal," said Chase. "There is little carryover from last year and much of that will have to be reserved for winter snowplowing. There will be no major work, and we'll try to put base in the worst potholes. We are in a world of hurt for street funds."

He said the previously approved Carlos-Warner Street Project has been put off until the summer of 2008 or 2009. Chase said funding from both the state and federal levels will be low.

In other action, the council approved a plan to move the Animal Control function back under the Alturas Police Department and out of Public Works. There was little objection to the idea and the council felt it was more of an enforcement issue than a public works issue.

The council also noted that Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes is now at the FBI Academy for a 10-week training course and will graduate in June. Lt. Sid Cullins is in charge during his absence.

The council was also advised of an Economic Development Seminar scheduled April 27, 9 a.m. to 12 noon at the Niles Hotel.

Man arrested following high speed chase on Highway 395

A Phoenix, Arizona man, Daniel Ray Tharp, was arrested Wednesday afternoon following a vehicle chase spanning about 22 miles and involving the California Highway Patrol, Modoc Sheriff's Office and Alturas Police Department.

According to the CHP's Pat Greene, officers tried to stop Tharp for speeding on U.S. 395 south of Sagehen Summit Wednesday before noon. He refused to stop and kept going north.

The CHP set out spike strips on U.S. 395 at Jones Lane and police put another set before entering the City of Alturas, in an effort to insure the speeding vehicle did not get into town. The vehicle never reached the area where the strips were placed.

Greene said officers boxed him in near the Lyneta Road cutoff and Tharp left the road, rammed his 1994 Ranger two-wheel drive pickup through the perimeter fence. He made it about a half-mile through the rocks and sagebrush before the vehicle was disabled.

Greene and Sheriff Bruce Mix drove a four-wheel drive to the vehicle and talked Tharp out of the vehicle. He was booked into the Modoc County jail alleging resisting arrest and reckless driving. Greene said he was not intoxicated and was not hurt.

Alturas Councilman questions the integrity of fellow councilmember

On Tuesday, Alturas City Councilman Jack Ochs presented other councilmembers with court documents he said shows that fellow Councilman Jerry Smith had defrauded individuals in Washington state in a 1983 real estate investment.

Ochs said he questioned Smith's honesty and integrity and wanted the council to see the case for themselves. Smith was not at the council meeting.

Smith was ordered by courts in Cowlitz County, Washington to pay restitution to the victims in that real estate investment case in 1986, and the court dismissed the actions when they considered restitution was complete in 1994.

On Wednesday, Smith said he was involved in the investment, but that it was not deceitful. He said that he was developing property on the Lewis River, but the Mt. St. Helens eruption had destroyed that property. In addition, he said his real estate business in Washington was wiped out by the Mt. St. Helens aftermath. Smith said he paid those investors under court order and the issue is closed.

Ochs showed a letter from one of the individuals who had invested $14,000 and the court ordered $8,000 be repaid in restitution. That individual, Allen Shade, of Washington, said that Smith never offered to pay the remaining $6,000.

The council took the issue under study and made no comment. Smith will discuss the situation with the council, he said.

Casino offers something new -- Comedy Club

In its continuing effort at progressive entertainment in Modoc County, the Desert Rose Casino is offering something new and exciting this month -- the Joker's Wild Comedy Club.

And the first headliner is pretty special. He's David Iannaci, a career comedian who is also the manager of the "Just for Laughs" comedy club at the Sands-Regency in Reno.

He'll put on two shows at the Alturas Casino, one April 26 and a follow-up on April 27. Each show will start at 8:30 p.m. and tickets are available at $10 each at the Casino. Seating is limited, so people should get their tickets early.

Bob Nay, the Gaming Commissioner of Desert Rose Casino, said he and his wife had the chance to see Iannaci at the Sands recently, and he had them in tears of laughter throughout the show.

Iannaci bills himself as: "Half Jewish and half Italian. That means 'If I can't get it from you wholesale, I'll steal it from you.'"

Fellow comedian Rich Little said that Iannaci is "one of the few comics in the business who really makes me laugh." He has opened shows for Frankie Avalon, Bobby Gentry, Bob Anderson, Dondino, Melba Moore, Jack Jones and Buddy Rich and has appeared on major stages everywhere in the U.S. including Alaska and Canada, and in Europe and Japan.

In his starring role in "Playboy Girls of Rock and Roll" at the Maxim Hotel in Las Vegas, he was voted "best comic" two years in a row.

He has also appeared in dramatic roles in television: in "Crime Story", "Elvis and Me", "Las Vegas Cast Party", and the documentary, "The Art of Comedy."

His cast of characters include: the old Italian fiddle player, Guisippe; the Indian rainmaker; cool cat from the 50's Vinnie Varoom; and the Chicken (who really lays an egg).

According to the Casino, Iannaci has committed himself to coming up here to open the "Jokers Wild Comedy Club" just so he could "see what the crowd was like." He is also going to recommend the venue to other comedians. He says he's also coming to get out of the city for awhile and check out a small town.

The Desert Rose Casino management says it is excited about this opportunity to bring something new to Modoc County and can't believe their good luck in getting a comedian of this stature as its opening act.

"If you want something different to do on Monday and Tuesday the last week of April, and if a good laugh is what you need after tax time, come and join the fun at the Iannaci show," said Nay this week. "It's going to be well worth your time."

Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis, and doors will open both nights at 7:30 p.m. The Lions Club will serve beer and wine, so the Casino will only be open to customers age 21 and over.

Modoc RAC seeks projects and replacement members

The Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a meeting on Monday, May 3, 2004 in the Modoc National Forest Supervisor's office at 800 West 12th Street from 6 to 8 p.m.

The RAC is actively seeking applications for projects seeking funding in 2005. Projects may include, but are not limited to, road, trail and infrastructure maintenance or obliteration; soil productivity improvement; improvements in forest ecosystem health; watershed restoration and maintenance; control of noxious and exotic weeds. Fifty percent of all approved projects must be for road maintenance and obliteration or watershed improvement and restoration.

Currently there are two replacement member vacancies on the RAC. Replacement members are needed in the Outdoor Recreation, Affected Public at Large and Minerals/Energy groups.

For information about the Resource Advisory Committee positions available or how to submit a project contact Louis Haynes at ljhaynes@fs.fed.us or by phone at 530-233-8846.

Obituaries:

Edward J. Haas

Lookout resident, Edward J. Haas, died in a single-vehicle accident, on April 3, 2004.

Eddie was born June 1, 1937, in Woodland, California. He came to live with his Uncle John and Aunt Marge Poytress and their two sons, Jack and Tom, permanently, at the age of 10. Eddie had many jobs, using his many talents. His Uncle John taught him how to saddle a horse, hook up a team, milk a cow, roping, respect for horses and people, rounding up cattle and nights in cow camp.

Graduating from high school in 1955, his life changed when he enlisted in the Navy and married Lydia Kelley Haas. He was very proud to have served his country as an Aviation Ordinanceman Second Class.

Much of his time was served overseas, flying in P2V surveillance aircraft off the coast of Russia.

Upon completion of military service, he moved back to northeastern California where he went to work for Blacks Canyon Ranch in 1966, and eventually purchased the grocery store in Canby. He was District Supervisor for District 4 for five years. During his term, he was instrumental in establishing the Lookout park, and many other Modoc County improvements.

During this time, he became a pilot and worked at Cedarville Airport, flying to many meetings around the state. Flying was something he really enjoyed

In 1976, he joined the Modoc County Sheriff's Posse and became captain in 1980. He enjoyed the jeep rides, dinners, dances and other activities he did with good friends. He moved to Lookout, California in 1978 and worked for Modoc County Road Department.

In 1984, he changed careers and went to work for Tom Pearson Trucking and on to Del Logging. He was a truck driver for both companies, among many other jobs such as operating the chipper, cat and any job that was asked of him.

Wherever he was, he always enjoyed a joke, quick remark, and his hearty laugh was known by all. His last job was as a service mechanic, which was something he enjoyed doing. Working on a piece of equipment, fixing it and watching it drive away, made him feel good.

Residing in Lookout with his loving wife, Elaine, of 20 years, he found much joy with house boat trips on Lake Shasta, and was looking forward to retirement, doing a lot of fishing and some traveling. He especially enjoyed helping others whenever he was needed.

Eddie went ahead to "blaze the trial for the rest of us," leaving behind his loving wife, Elaine; his sons Dan Haas, daughter-in-law Kathy, granddaughters Danelle and Megan of Jermyn, PA.; Joe Haas of Panama City, FL.; daughter Kate Haas, granddaughter Emily and grandson Ethan of Alturas, CA.; step-daughter Jan Masters, son-in-law Dennis, granddaughters Jennifer and Tami, great-granddaughter Madisen of Union City, CA.; step-son David Hicks, daughter-in-law Jill of Sacramento, CA.; brother Ted Haas of Salinas, CA.; and many nieces and nephews. Services were held at the Adin Community Hall at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, April 9.

Kenneth Lee Parsons

Kenneth Lee Parsons, 80, of Alturas, Calif., passed away at his home Saturday, April 10, 2004, at the age of 80. Mr. Parsons had moved to Big Lakes Camp in Modoc County, at the age of 15, in 1937. A veteran and Alturas resident for most of his life, he was born in Mitchell, Nebraska on March 2, 1925, to Clifford and Hazel Parsons.

Service arrangements with Kerr Mortuary are pending. Mr. Parson's obituary will be published inThe Record next week.

Catherine O'Donnell Neer

Catherine O'Donnell Neer was born June 10, 1918, in Bristol, Pennsylvania, and passed away April 12, 2004, in Auburn, CA.

"Cathy O," as she was known, was a physical therapist during World War II. She and her second husband of 30 years, Jack Neer, who was the love of her life and a wonderful partner, owned their own company before retiring to a ranch in Alturas, CA. After he passed away in 1994, Catherine moved to Auburn, Calif. where she had lived for the past 10 years.

Cathy O is survived by four children: Kathy Richardson of Auburn, Alturas and Davis Creek, CA.; Michael Bellinger of Petaluma; Mark Bellinger of San Rafael and Pat Bellinger of San Diego and seven grandchildren including grandson Tyghe Richardson who grew up on his family's ranch in Davis Creek. She also leaves her brother-in-law Dean Neer and wife Marie of Alturas, CA.; brother Phil O'Donnell of Chicago and a multitude of nieces, nephews and cousins

Cathy O will be buried next to her beloved "Jack" Neer on Saturday, April 17, 2004, during graveside services at 10 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery

She was preceded in death by her husband Jack in 1994 and then on April 10, 2004, her older sister Fran Rodgers of West Orange, with whom she was very close.

Martha Bath McNeall

Adin and Ash Valley native, Martha May Bath McNeall passed away in Reno, Nevada, on April 9, 2004, following complications from hip surgery.

Born in Adin, Calif. to Thad and Amy Bath on December 2, 1925, Martha grew up on the family ranch in Ash Valley and graduated from Adin High School. Martha's sense of adventure took her to flight school in Reno, Nevada, not long after finishing high school. There she met her sweetheart and future husband, Charles L. (Mac) McNeall.

Their life together took them to Quincy, Illinois, Flagstaff, Arizona, and back to northern Nevada, where they settled for life in 1954.

Mart and Mac had four children, Bruce, Carole, Connie and Susie. The family has many wonderful memories of exploring ghost towns throughout Nevada, camping in the Sierras and along the Oregon coast. Martha wanted her children to know ranching life as she did, and she sent them to spend every summer and school vacation with their grandparents in Ash Valley.

Mac died very young, leaving Mart to support and raise her children alone. A strong and independent woman, Martha set upon her career in the real estate business and remained involved in it to the end of her life.

Mart maintained close ties to her hometown, and attended the Big Valley class reunions at every opportunity. She also loved to come back to the ranch to ride, drive cattle and brand. Martha enjoyed traveling throughout the country, as well as abroad, and her travels took her to Ireland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, England and Scotland. She was a dedicated gardener and animal lover.

Martha was preceded in death by her parents, Amy and Thad Bath, brother Fred Bath, husband Charles and grandson Brian McNeall. She is survived by her four children, Bruce McNeall of Reno, Nev., Carole DeAngeli of Tucson, Ariz., Connie Douglas of Sparks, Nev., and Susan McNeall of Reno, Nev.; grandchildren Bradley, Justin and Amy; great-grandchildren Jessica, Levi, Devan, Joshua and Raji; sister Grace Bath DeForest and brothers Richard and John Bath; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

A Memorial Service will be held in Adin at the Adin Community Church, at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 24, 2004. A gathering of friends and family, with potluck supper, will follow at the Adin Community Center.

Services today for Zora E. Lyons

Graveside services for former Bieber resident Zora E. Lyons, 100, of Emmett, Idaho, will be held at 2:00 p.m. today, April 15, 2004, at Hillside Cemetery in Nubieber, CA. Zora Conklin was born Jan. 9, 1904 in Chico and moved as a young girl to Adin, CA. She passed away Friday, April 9, 2004, in Emmett. A complete obituary will be published next week.

Sports

Braves lead baseball loop, next up is FR

Modoc's Braves are sitting on top of the Shasta Cascade League baseball loop, with a 8-0 record, but still have to face the toughest two teams in the SCL, Fall River and Mt. Shasta. Fall River comes to Alturas, April 20, and Mt. Shasta comes to town for the last game April 30.

Last week, Modoc trounced a weak Burney Raider squad, 19-1 and 21-0. The Braves collected 14 hits in the first game, including home runs by Travis Potter and Rich Culp. Culp also had two doubles to go with five runs batted in. Adam Server had three hits while Marty Stevens and Potter each had a pair. Potter got the win for the Braves.

Modoc collected 22 hits in the second game, on the way to 21 runs. Server got the win for Modoc, allowing just two hits in a shut out.

Culp, Danny Randazzo and Skyler Oates each had three hits in the game and Shiloh Pierce and Joey Catania had a pair. Catania also tripled. Culp and Catania each had four RBI in the game.

Modoc takes over SCL golf top spot

Modoc's golf team used a good day at Lae over the Shasta Cascade League lead by a half-game.

The Braves split both nine-hole matches with Weed and swept both Mt. Shasta and Etna. DJ Northrup led the Braves with a combined 83, followed by Micah Eppler's 86 and Brian Weed's 89. Taylor Dunn shot a 90, with Ross Montague and Dustin Philpott each shooting 92.

Individually, Chris Chitwood of Bishop Quinn had the best score of the day (at Fall River) at 74, while Weed's Bobby Wyatt shot 77 and Weed's Colby Toms shot 82.

Modoc shot a 225 in the front nine, and had its best round of the year, 213, on the back nine.

On Tuesday, Lassen defeated Modoc at Diamond Mountain in Susanville under very windy conditions.

Coach Harold Montague said since the match was non-league, he was able to play some of this younger players.

Scores for Modoc were: Eppler 86, Weed 104, Philpott 103, Matt Williams 117, Keith Montague 110 and Dustin Oates 116.

Modoc is at the Running Y with Henley April 19. The next league match is in Fall River against Trinity and Burney April 22.

Modoc girls drop SCL pair to Burney

Modoc's softball team dropped a pair of games to Burney last week, and will face Fall River April 20 in Alturas.

The Raiders opened with a five-run first inning the first game, but Modoc scored seven in the second to take a 7-5 lead. The Braves added one in the fifth, but Burney tied it at 8-8 in the sixth. The game went one extra inning where Burney scored for the 9-8 win.

Megan Thompson and Allison Campagna led the Braves with two hits each, while Jennifer Davis, Rose Wingate and Jamie Fain each had a hit. Thompson got the loss for Modoc.

The Braves lost a run-fest in the second game 19-13. Modoc scored three in the first, and Burney came up to score four. The Raiders added two in the second and five in the third. Modoc added seven in the third and three in the fourth. Burney came up with five in the fourth, two in the fifth and one in the six.

Kristen Taylor and Campagna each went three-for-four in the game and each scored three runs. Jennifer Davis got the loss for the Braves.

Fall River is leading the Shasta Cascade league with a 6-0 record, followed by Etna 5-1, Trinity 4-2, Burney 5-3, Mt. Shasta 2-5, Modoc 2-6 and Weed 1-9.

Arrowhead tourney opens season

The first tournament of the year at Arrowhead Golf Course saw Jim Tillett and John Wall shoot a low net of 61 for the win.

There were 18 two-person teams in the best ball tournament, which was played in great weather.

Taking second place were Jay and Micah Eppler with a 62, Brian Weed and Gerald Widby shot 63 for third, and fifth place was a tie at 64 between Harold and Ross Montague, DJ and Rex Northrup, Phil and Ivy Smith and Mark Cummings and Mike Phillips.

The next tournament will be the Mother's Day Scratch and Scramble, May 9.

Wrestlers do well in Reno

Modoc coach Shaun Wood took five wrestlers to the huge Reno World Wrestling invitational recently, and three of them placed. The Reno tournament brings the top young wrestlers in the nation.

Travis Wood took a third in the 145 pound division, going 10-2, and Jason Jones took a fourth at 160 pounds, going 8-2. Josh Wood took a 5th in his age group, going 5-2.

Also competing at Reno were Tyler Wood and Justin Estes who wrestled in very tough divisions.

The Youth wrestling team traveled to Chester last week with Riley Larranaga, Willy Mohr, Josh Wood, Justin Estes and Wyatt Valena each winning firsts. Miguel Torres took a second and thirds went to Justin Valena, Devin Figus, Trent Wishart and Felicia Torres.

April 22 , 2004

News

County seeks recovery of $455,000 overpayment

Modoc County is asking Fitch Sand and Gravel to repay about $455,000 from an overpayment in July, 2001 for work on the Cedarville Airport.

The issue came up during public comment at Tuesday's Board of Supervisors meeting and Chairman Pat Cantrall asked that the matter be placed as the first item of business at the April 27 meeting. It will be on that agenda.

Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said the overpayment was finally caught at the County Department of Public Works when they were trying to close out the grant package and realized the huge mistake.

Maxwell said in July 2001, Fitch had billed the county for $240,641 as a part of the Cedarville Airport project. For some reason, said Maxwell, the county misread the invoice. The amount billed was in the middle part of the invoice, while the total amount of the grant, $695,769, was at the bottom. The county wrote a check for $695,769 and then paid subsequent invoices on the grant project.

"There's no doubt the county screwed up," said Maxwell. He said he feels Fitch Sand and Gravel holds some responsibility as well.

Fitch agrees it owes the county the funds, said Maxwell, and arrangements are now being negotiated to repay the funds, plus about $35,000 in interest. He said the warrant went through public works, the auditor's office and two audits and wasn't picked up. The amount was being carried as a negative balance for two years, which should have piqued someone's interest.

Maxwell explained that the funds came out of the "county pool" held under the Treasurer's office. That's where funds from a variety of entities are held, including roads, grants, schools and so on. The loss would not have been discovered through the normal annual adoption of operating budgets, explained Maxwell.

The recovery of the funds plus interest does not go back into the county general fund, so it really won't have any impact on the county's current budget crunch. But, it will be placed back into the pool to balance that account.

Currently, Modoc's County Counsel, John Kenny, is working with lawyers for Fitch to come to terms on repayment.

Mixed bag in snow survey

The April, 2004 snow surveys on the Modoc National Forest are showing a mixed bag, with only Cedar Pass looking in good shape.

According to the survey, Cedar Pass has 33 inches of snow, containing 14.6 inches of water. That's up from last April when 14 inches of snow was on Cedar Pass, containing 5.2 inches of water. The 10-year average for the area is 25 inches of snow containing 16.7 inches of water.

Blue Lake has only eight inches of snow now, containing 3.7 inches of moisture. That's pretty much the same as last year when the area had nine inches of snow with 3.4 inches of water. But it's down significantly from the 10-year average of 29 inches of snow containing 10.1 inches of water.

Barber Creek, south of Eagleville had 20 inches of snow containing 8.1 inches of water this month. That's up from last year's 12 inches of snow containing 4.5 inches of water. The 10-year average is 32 inches containing 10.4 inches water.

49 Mountain in Nevada has no snow this April and it had no snow last year at this time. The 10--year average is seven inches of snow with 2.6 inches of water.

The snow surveys are taken by Tom Hill, Natural Resource Conservation Service and Jake Coffey, U.S. Forest Service.

In January's snow survey, Blue Lake had 26 inches of snow containing 8.9 inches of water. Cedar Pass measured 43 inches of snow with 15.3 inches of water. Barber Creek had 37 inches of snow containing 12.4 inches of water. 49 Mountain (Nevada) had 22 inches of snow with 4.8 inches of water.

Blue Lake recreation area closed for logging safety

The Blue Lake Recreation Area is temporarily closed to the public during Blue Fire salvage logging operations

The recreation area is closed from the turn off for Blue Lake at Forest Service Road 38N30 and County Road 64 all the way into and throughout tbe recreationa area.

It is anticipated the area will be open prior to Memorial Day. For further information, contact the Warner Mountain Ranger District at 530-279-6116.

Local tax initiative garners necessary state signatures

by Anthony Larson

Special to the Record

More than one million signatures were submitted to county elections officials across the state last Friday in support of placing an initiative on the November ballot that would halt the flow of city and county tax and fee revenues to state coffers.

"We're just delighted," said Lassen County supervisor, Jim Chapman, who is an active proponent of the measure. "I think the supporters of the initiative are obviously pleased by the public's awareness, understanding and appreciation of the issue and their willingness to support getting it on the ballot."

Called the Local Taxpayers and Public Safety Protection Act, the initiative would require voter approval statewide before California legislators could take local government funds for state expenses. It would also require more timely reimbursements from the state whenever it mandates a program or service locally.

"For the past two months, we have been asking voters to sign the blue petition to give voters, not Sacramento politicians, more control over their local tax dollars," said Paul Stein, Calaveras County supervisor and president of the California State Association of Counties. "Voters responded enthusiastically to this call to action. More than one million voters said 'enough is enough.' It is time to change the system and keep local dollars where they belong."

"For too long, Sacramento has been stealing local dollars and ignoring the impact these thefts have on public safety," said Dan Terry, President of California Professional Firefighters. "We think voters clearly understand that the best way to protect vital fire and law enforcement services is to keep our local tax dollars in local hands."

Patricia Cantrall, Modoc County supervisor, is even more adamant about the injurious effects of siphoning away money from local services. She explained that this fundamentally puts lives at risk. "They are thwarting the purpose … of saving lives," said Cantrall, emphatically, noting that this is local government's primary duty. "It's jeopardizing lives to the nth degree. … When somebody dies and there is a big lawsuit against the state of California, maybe then they'll (the legislators) wake up and listen."

Supporters of the initiative point to the state's penchant for taking a growing portion of local revenue to cover budgetary shortfalls at the state level. This forces local city and county governments to either raise fees and taxes to maintain local services or to cut back on critical services such as fire protection, law enforcement, emergency health care, parks, libraries and public transportation.

"It makes my job difficult," Cantrall explained, "because I have to tell the people of (Modoc County) that they're not important enough … to save their lives, that this money has been taken by the legislature of California."

According to supporters of the initiative, the state has taken more than $40 billion in local property taxes to fund state obligations over the past decade. "If we really value our local services, this is an essential, necessary step to protect local taxes or local funds for local services," said Chapman to his constituents. "We are serious about this—the firefighters, the law enforcement, your public health officials as well as your cities and counties."

Opponents to the measure insist that the initiative would force tax increases, given the state's present budgetary woes, and reduce funding for education and highway maintenance. Calling it "ballot box budgeting," detractors insist the measure would tie the hands of legislators as they sought to meet the fiscal demands of state programs.

The initiative is jointly sponsored by the League of California Cities, the California State Association of Counties and the California Special Districts Association. It is also supported by numerous public safety and community organizations, including the California Professional Firefighters, California Police Chiefs Association, California Fire Chiefs Association, Peace Officers Research Association of California and Fire Districts Association of California.

 "The submission of these signatures puts us one step closer to protecting our local services," said Bill Miller, general manager north of the River Municipal Water District and president of the California Special Districts Association.  "We are prepared to wage an aggressive campaign between now and November to educate the voters about this initiative. We are confident that, come Election Day, the majority of California voters will vote 'Yes' to protect local services and keep more of their local tax dollars at home."

"I think we've got the grassroots capabilities, and that's what is going to be our strongest asset," Chapman added. "We may not have the bucks that the big players have, but we have the grassroots opportunity to exchange and dialog."

"We are sworn to 'uphold and protect' the people as the Board of Supervisors," elaborated Cantrall. "Right now, as far as I'm concerned, Modoc County and the state of California have no enemy except the domestic enemy: our own legislature of California."

The coalition needed only 598,105 valid signatures to qualify for the November ballot. Official initiative qualification is expected to be forthcoming from the Secretary of State in June.

Eve with MPAT, prizes Friday eve

Modoc Performing Arts Theater and Desert Rose Casino will present "Evening with MPAT" on Friday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Alturas Elks Lodge, 619 N. Main St., Alturas. General admission, $5 per person at the door. Intermission will include refreshments.

"Evening with MPAT" is an opportunity to showcase some of the talent in the group, and this year's show should prove to be a "great show." The evening includes an original one-act play, "Royal Shades," by Nancy North-Gates of Alturas is about five different historical queens. In an original vignette, "You've Got Male," by David Cohen and Gerry Gates, both of Alturas, they will take to the stage before a scene from "Odd Couple" by Neil Simon, with Cohen and Gates. A number of musical selections will be performed by MPAT members.

Evening includes prizes:

At the end of intermission there will be drawing for the Membership Drive Raffle. Tickets for the raffle are only available to those who have joined MPAT at the $25 Supporter Level, the $50 sponsor level or the $75 Patron level. The Raffle tickets are an additional benefit for joining MPAT, and those who join still receive the benefits of membership, including two tickets to see Evening with MPAT. People will still be able to join MPAT and receive their raffle ticket(s) the night of the performance.

"We are very pleased with the donations by the local businesses for our raffle," says Brian Hubble, Co-Vice President of MPAT. "Because of their generosity, we have been able to put together five great prize packages."

"Grand Prize" includes an air cleaning from Phillips Appliance, 10 lbs. of country sausage from Walt's Market, scrapbook supplies from Scrapbook Store and More, a Home Interiors Candle from Dandelion Wishes, decorative wooden sign from Splinter's Auto Glass and a mini AM/FM pocket radio from Jim's TV.

"Second Prize" includes a one-night stay in one of the standard villas from Surprise Valley Hot Springs, a candle and a Boyd's Bears gift basket from The Flower Shoppe, wash and detail from Carstens Motors, gift certificates from Nipa's California Cuisine, Johnnie Busch at Kaleidoscope, and Faye's Jewelry, as well as a decorative bird house from Susan's Flowers.

"Third Prize" includes auto detailing from ABC Auto Detailing, auto alignment from Les Schwab, magnetic gloves from Four Seasons Supply Center, and a California car duster, car wash mitt, plus two umbrellas from Modoc Motor Parts.

"Fourth Prize" includes a 13-inch color TV from Seab's Mini Mall - Radio Shack, a framed picture from Frank's Carpets, King Me game and stuffed Audubon Parrot from Phoenix Feathers, four free movie rentals from Top Hat Video, and a gift certificate from The Auction Yard Café.

"Fifth Prize" includes a large pizza, four salads and soft drinks from Antonio's Cucina Italiana, four movie passes to The Niles Theater, gift certificates to Hair Designers, and Lucy's Ceramics and Hobbies, and a decorative wooden sign from Splinter's Auto Glass.

Remit membership dues to MPAT, P.O. Box 1048, Alturas, CA 96101 or join at "Evening with MPAT." Karen Hays, President; Brian Hubble, co-vice president.

Plan for Fandango '04

"Celebrating Old Memories and New Beginnings," is the theme chosen for Fandango 2004 parade and festivities set for Saturday, July 3 in Alturas. Parade entry forms are now available at the Modoc County Record, Modoc Business Supply, Seab's True Value and the Alturas Chamber of Commerce office, Alturas.

The theme will celebrate the 130th anniversary of Modoc County. The Alturas Chamber of Commerce organizes the event each year with donations from local businesses. The Chamber is an all-volunteer organization.

The Alturas Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the Fandango Grand Marshal will be Likely resident Patricia Demick Cantrall, a Modoc County Supervisor.

The Saturday, July 3 parade down Main Street, Alturas will be followed by activities at the park, to include but not limited to food and game booths, the Lions Club Barbecue, games provided by the South Fork Assembly Youth Group, the Chamber's Cowpie Bingo, music by Heartless in the park, and new this year, a Climbing Wall for adults and kids outdoors at the park.

Obituaries:

Kenneth Lee Parsons

Kenneth Lee Parsons, 79, of Alturas, Calif., passed away at his home Saturday, April 10, 2004. Memorial Services will be held Saturday, May 1 at 1 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Hall in Alturas. The Veterans Groups of Alturas will conduct the service. Family and friends will gather at the hall, following the service. A Modoc resident for 67 years, he was born in Mitchell, Nebraska on March 2, 1925, to Clifford and Hazel Parsons and had moved to Big Lakes Camp in Modoc County, as a young teen in 1937.

He attended Modoc High School and enlisted in the Armed Forces with the Army Engineers in 1943 during World War II. He was a PFC and was discharged on December 2, 1946. Upon his return to Modoc County, he was familiar with the logging industry having worked two years in Canby with Big Lakes Lumber Company. He continued in the logging industry for many years and learned skills which he considered his hobbies such as repairing small engines, chain saws and many other things. He had a love of the outdoors and enjoyed fishing, hunting, prospecting and the company of his small dog Fluffy. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars 3327 in Alturas. Known as "Kenny" to his many friends and his family, he was quick with a wonderful smile and enjoyed talking about the heydays of Modoc's logging.

He is survived by his brother Howard Parsons and wife Bertha of Anderson, CA.; sister Connie McBride of Anderson; nephews David and Dennis Parsons of Anderson; Jack Durante of Sacramento; nieces Shelley Holloway of Alturas, CA; Sherryl Ireland of Hawkins Bar, Kathy Hammond of Battleground, Washington; Mary Hoehn and Linda Custer of Redding, CA.; and many great and great-great nieces and nephews. In his family's words: May the path before you have a gentle slope, large timber and take you where the fish always bite and the streams are full of nuggets. See ya later.

Kaye McIntyre Johnson

Kaye McIntyre Johnson was killed in a tragic accident April 16, 2004. She and her husband of 31 years, David Johnson, were traveling with friends and family in a commercial shuttle from Flagstaff, Arizona to Lee's Ferry, Arizona, when the driver lost control of the vehicle. Kaye's seatbelt failed and she was thrown from the vehicle. She died instantly.

Two other passengers were seriously injured and remain in critical condition at the Flagstaff Medical Center. The group was traveling to begin a 17-day raft trip through the Grand Canyon. Full obituary to follow and memorial service information will be announced soon, but is tentatively scheduled for May 8, 2004, at Pioneer Presbyterian Church in Burns, Oregon. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the service. The Johnsons have been a vital part of the Modoc community.

Lisa Nicole Aegerter

Former Alturas resident, Lisa Nicole Aegerter, 33, passed away April 18, 2004, in Springfield, Illinois.

Daughter of Helen Holden and Larry Holden, Lisa was born December 16, 1970, in Ventura, CA. She had lived in Modoc for five years, where she graduated with the class of 1988, from Modoc High School, Alturas. A resident of Beardstown, Il., she was employed with the Illinois State Employment Department.

Her Services will be held Monday, April 26, at 2 p.m. at Christian Life Assembly in Alturas, CA. Burial will follow at the Alturas Cemetery. Visitation will be held at Kerr Mortuary on Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Monday, 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

Lisa is survived by her mother Helen Holden of Alturas, CA.; father Larry Holden of Lake Chapala, Mexico; brother Jim Holden of Olympia, WA.; sister Diane Iworks, Buckley, WA.; daughter Mya Aegerter, age 10, and son Jordan Elliott, age 3. She was the niece of Sylvia Lawson of Alturas, CA., Eppie Hitt, Huntington Beach, CA., Pat Mendoza, El Centro, CA., Paul Ruby, Beeville, Texas, Gilbert Ruby, Santa Paula, CA.

Martha Bath McNeall

Adin and Ash Valley native, Martha May Bath McNeall passed away in Reno, Nevada, on April 9, 2004, following complications from hip surgery. Born in Adin, Calif. to Thad and Amy Bath on December 2, 1925, Martha grew up on the family ranch in Ash Valley and graduated from Adin High School. Martha's sense of adventure took her to flight school in Reno, Nevada, not long after finishing high school. There she met her sweetheart and future husband, Charles L. (Mac) McNeall.

Their life together took them to Quincy, Illinois, Flagstaff, Arizona, and back to northern Nevada, where they settled for life in 1954.

Mart and Mac had four children, Bruce, Carole, Connie and Susie. The family has many wonderful memories of exploring ghost towns throughout Nevada, camping in the Sierras and along the Oregon coast. Martha wanted her children to know ranching life as she did, and she sent them to spend every summer and school vacation with their grandparents in Ash Valley.

Mac died very young, leaving Mart to support and raise her children alone. A strong and independent woman, Martha set upon her career in the real estate business and remained involved in it to the end of her life.

Mart maintained close ties to her hometown, and attended the Big Valley class reunions at every opportunity. She also loved to come back to the ranch to ride, drive cattle and brand. Martha enjoyed traveling throughout the country, as well as abroad, and her travels took her to Ireland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, England and Scotland. She was a dedicated gardener and animal lover.

Martha was preceded in death by her parents, Amy and Thad Bath, brother Fred Bath, husband Charles and grandson Brian McNeall. She is survived by her four children, Bruce McNeall of Reno, Nev., Carole DeAngeli of Tucson, Ariz., Connie Douglas of Sparks, Nev., and Susan McNeall of Reno, Nev.; grandchildren Bradley, Justin and Amy; great-grandchildren Jessica, Levi, Devan, Joshua and Raji; sister Grace Bath DeForest and brothers Richard and John Bath; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. A Memorial Service will be held in Adin at the Adin Community Church, at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 24, 2004. A gathering of friends and family, with potluck supper, will follow at the Adin Community Center.

Barbara Rae Schock

Barbara Rae Schock was born to Cecil and Rhoda Walker on August 29, 1957 in Alturas, CA. She fell asleep in death at her home in Alturas, CA. on April 16, 2004.

Barbara was a very special kind of person as she showed kindness to a fault to everyone. She has touched and helped many people. She was a very loving and loyal companion to her husband of 29 years and will be immensely missed, but never forgotten. He learned many fine qualities from her. She loved and enjoyed all of the Creator's works, especially the animals he created. She adored her loving Father and Mother and would do anything possible for them as well as anyone else. She loved and served her loving compassionate God Jehovah and wished everyone would know him as she did. She had full faith in his promise of living forever on earth in peaceful conditions with out all the hurt, injustice and death we have now. Her family and friends eagerly await to welcome her back as she awakes in that new world.

She is survived by her husband, David A. Schock of Alturas, CA; Father and Mother Cecil and Rhoda Walker of Anderson, CA; brother Mike Walker, sisters Linda Patricelli and Judy Brazo.

Private family services were held under direction of Kerr Mortuary of Alturas.

Hershell 'Tex' Benner

Hershell "Tex" Benner, 81, passed away on April 9, 2004, after a battle with cancer, informs his son Stuart Benner of Texas.

Tex was born in Moody, Texas and reared in the Waco Methodist Home for Children, along with his three siblings, following the untimely death of his mother.

He met and married Patricia Kloepfer, just prior to serving four years in the Army Air Corps during World War II.

After discharge, he and Patricia reared their family in Pittsburg, CA. Tex was employed with U.S. Steel as a metallurgist for 35 years. After retiring, he and his wife moved to Ft. Bidwell, CA. where her parents, Harold and Pearl Kloepfer, had retired in the 1960s.

Tex was preceded in death by his wife of 50 years, Patricia; son Brent, two brothers and a sister. He is survived by his son Stuart of Dallas, Texas, where he resided for the past 10 years. He also has three grandchildren, Beau Benner, Alissa Fee and Mathew Vieira, and four great-grandchildren: Savanna, Bayley, Jake Fee and Isabella Benner. Tex loved his family, friends, golf and a good meal. He lived a full life and will be missed by all who knew him. Condolences may be directed to the family, care of Stuart Benner, 1210 Lariat Circle, Red Oak, Texas 75154.

Lilly Ruth Burgess

Alturas resident Lilly Ruth Burgess, 62, who had struggled with her health over the past few years, passed away April 16, 2004, in Alturas, CA. Her family will hold graveside services at 12 noon on Tuesday, April 27, 2004, at the Alturas Cemetery.

Lilly Ruth Fleenor was born in Texas on August 27, 1941. She was a Licensed Vocational Nurse for many years, employed in hospitals in Oroville and Alturas, CA. and elsewhere throughout the years. She had enjoyed living in many different locations during her life, but had returned to Alturas, calling Modoc her home over a 25-year period.

She is survived by her common law spouse of 22 years, Robert E. Sloan of Alturas, CA.; her son Billy Burgess of Sacramento, CA.; her daughter Dawn Mortimer and son-in-law Dennis of Alturas; three brothers and their wives, a step-daughter and two step-sons and 10 grandchildren. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Zora E. Lyons

Long-time Big Valley resident, Zora E. Lyons, 100, of Emmett, Idaho, passed away Friday, April 9, 2004, at Emmett Care Center. Graveside services were held at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 15 at the Hillside Cemetery in Nubieber, CA. Local arrangements made through the Potter Funeral Chapel.

Zora was born on January 9, 1904, at Chico, CA. As a young girl she moved to Adin, CA. where her father owned the Conklin Mills.

Zora learned and worked all facets of the mill, from operating the planer to maintaining the boiler. She lived all her childhood days at the Conklin sawmill site on Adin Mountain and attended Winter School until 1918 in Stone Coal.

On January 21, 1921, she married Rubert Lyons while he was employed at the mill. When they left the mill in the 1930s, they bought farm and ranch land and lived in the Bieber area most of their lives. Their two sons, Otis and Walter were born there. When Rubert died in 1978, Zora purchased a house in Bieber, where she lived until moving to Emmett, Idaho for the last two years of her wonderful life.

Zora was always busy volunteering for community activities. She had been a member of Native Daughters of the Golden West, Mt. Lassen Parlor #215, since June 6, 1930. She enjoyed and served a long time association with the sisters of the Order. She earned her 50-year pin and a lifetime membership. She was usually the winner in their spring event of most unusual hand-crafted Easter Bonnet; the most memorable one was fashioned in 1948 from paper plates and cups. She chose to wear it again for a dress up party in 1998. Zora participated in the annual card parties and helped with refreshments until moving to Idaho. She was an original member of the Ladies Pioneer Club in Nubieber. Zora and her sister Ivy were charter members of the Big Valley 50-plus Club and were the volunteer backbone in the Senior Lunch Program. Their years of dish washing, cooking and supporting the bus were what got the program on the firm footing it enjoys today. Many times they rode the bus just to assure the expenses for the trip were met. Zora was always willing to help when there was a need and could easily call everyone she met a friend. She used her 100 years on this earth to make it a better place to be. She moved to Emmett, Idaho in 1999 to live with her son.

Zora was the eldest of five sisters and a brother who all preceded her in death. Her son Otis also preceded her in death on May 19, 1981, in Redding, CA.

She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law Walter and Ellen Lyons of Emmett; six grandchildren, nine great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews, including an adoring niece in Alturas, Wilma Andrews. She will be missed by all. She was the best of the best.

Bob Cicle

Word was received this week, that friends and alumni are sorry to learn of the passing of Bob Cicle, former Modoc High School Athletic Director, who passed away April 20, 2004, in Twin Falls, Idaho, where he was residing. No other details were known at presstime.

Sports

Modoc sweeps Bulldogs to claim league title

Modoc's varsity boys baseball team swept a doublebill from the Fall River Bulldogs Tuesday, on a very cold and wet day, to guarantee a Shasta Cascade League title.

Modoc won the first game, 5-4, going extra innings and the second game 11-5.

In the opener, Modoc scored in the first, one in the second, one in the fourth, one in the seventh and 1 in the ninth. Fall River scored one in the fifth, one in the sixth and two in the seventh.

Cam Jeffers scored the winning run in the ninth on a squeeze bunt by Travis Potter. Potter also got the win for Modoc going all nine innings and fanning 18 batters.

Shiloh Pierce led the hitting, going two-for-four, Adam Server was one-for-four and Potter was one-for-three.

In game two, the Braves scored one in the first, two in the third, one in the fourth, three in the fifth and four in the sixth. Fall River scored one in the first, two in the fifth and two in the seventh.

Rich Culp led the offense with two doubles in three at bats, with Marty Stevens going two-for-four and Danny Randazzo two-for-four. Server got the win for Modoc, going all seven with nine strike outs.

. Modoc is 10-0 in league and 14-4 overall. Every other league team has at least three losses. Mt. Shasta comes to play Modoc April 30. The Braves are trying to win out the rest of the season, which would guarantee home field throughout the playoffs.

Girls split with Fall River

Modoc's girls softball team used a five-run seventh inning to beat the Fall River Bulldogs 6-5 and split a double bill, losing the other game 7-3.

In the win, Modoc trailed 3-0 after two and 3-1 at the end of four. Fall River added two runs in the top half of the seventh to lead 5-1, but Modoc exploded in the last half of the seventh. Emily Pence led off with a single, then Jamie Fain was hit by a pitch. Kristen Taylor brought Pence home with a single. Allison Campagna drew a walk and Jennifer Davis doubled. Amy Ridgway was hit by a pitch and Rose Wingate drew a walk. Pence, Fain, Taylor, Campagna came across the plate and Davis scored the winning run. Campagna was two-for three in the game, while Taylor, Davis, and Megan Thompson each had a hit.

The Braves lost the other game when Fall River scored two in the first, and five in the fifth. Modoc scored three in the third. Taylor was two-for-four, Campagna was one-for-two and Pence was one for three.

McMaster 2nd in shot put

Modoc's Scott McMaster took second in the varsity shot put at the big John Frank Memorial meet in Redding April 17. He's ranked second in the north section

Scott Joyce took a fifth in the 3200 meters and the varsity boys were sixth in the 4x400 relay. Micah Eppler took a third in the junior varsity boys long jump.

Berchtold dedication is April 30

A dedication of the new Toni Berchtold Memorial at the Modoc High Girls Softball Field on Eighth Street will be held April 30, just prior to the Modoc-Mt. Shasta softball game.

The dedication will start at about 1:30 p.m. Toni Berchtold died in a tragic automobile accident on April 21, 2003. She was an employee of the Modoc Joint Unified School District and a softball coach and supporter.

Joyce 15th in Pear Blossom

Modoc's High School runner Scott Joyce ran in the Medford Pear Blossom Festival Run April 10 and placed 15th out of 549 runners, at 58:34. Joyce was second in his division and the first Californian to cross the finish line.

April 29th, 2004

News

County sees how $455,000 overpayment occurred

While it remains embarrassing, Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday were able to see how a $455,000 overpayment to Fitch Sand and Gravel occurred. In addition, Tony Cruse, President of Eagle Peak Rock and Gravel, explained to the Modoc Record this week that Eagle Peak Rock and Paving is not responsible or involved in that overpayment.

Cruse said Eagle Peak was formed as an employee-owned corporation in January, 2003, and no longer is associated with Fitch Sand and Gravel and Hardrock, out of Redding.

Cruse said he was 15 percent owner in Fitch Sand and Gravel at the time the overpayment occurred, so he believes he'll bear 15 percent of the repayment. He said he agrees there was an overpayment, and will pay his share once the attorneys come up with an amount.

Cruse also explained that the county wasn't actually "invoiced" by Fitch when the overpayment occurred. He said the County received a monthly payment estimate summary on the Cedarville Grant project from the engineer in charge.

Supervisors on Tuesday also got to see the engineer's statement and saw where the mistake was made. In the middle of the June 4, 2001 statement was the net payment of $240,641.28 due. Near the bottom was the total of the contract, $695,769.

The County Deputy Director of Roads and Public Works, Rick Hironymous, signed an order for the county auditor to draw a warrant for $695,769 and Auditor Judy Stevens signed the check to Fitch Sand and Gravel.

The overpayment was not discovered until December, 2003 when the grant was being closed out at Public Works. The mistake had gone through the Modoc County Auditor for two years as well as two outside audits.

Once the mistake was found, Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell contacted County Cousel John Kenny and the effort to recover the money began. That effort is ongoing at this time.

Hogsback Quarry Use Permit contingent upon state approval

While the Modoc County Planning Commission approved the Hogsback Quarry Use permit last week, it was contingent upon the state signing off on the Reclamation Report.

Planning Commission Chairman Rich Hamel and Vice Chairman Jim Hays explained this week that the Use Permit will not be issued until Eagle Peak Rock and Paving complies with all requirements from the state. The state had indicated last week that it did not have the time to study the Reclamation Plan prior to the advertised meeting of the Planning Commission.

"Not a rock or wheel can be turned until the state signs off," said Hamel this week. While some local residents have accused the Planning Commission of holding up the project, Hamel pointed out that it had only came to the Planning Commission twice since its inception in the year 2000. It came for hearing last month and for approval this month.

The project was actually taken out of the county planning department's hands by Eagle Peak (then Fitch Sand and Gravel) and turned over to an outside planner, Resource Design Technology, Inc. of Folsom. Eagle Peak was required to pay for the outside planning services.

Hamel pointed out that the county planning staff nor the Commission have had much to do with this quarry issue.

The issue did go before the Environmental Review Committee several times over the four-year period and Eagle Peak actually changed and reduced the size of the operation and agreed to shorter time limits of actually mining to mitigate some environmental issues. A lot of that had to do with antelope migrations and kidding grounds in the area.

When the Commission approved the use permit last week, it had several conditions, including that Eagle Peak Rock and Paving, Inc. shall incorporate any revisions to the Reclamation Plan or Financial Assurance required by Modoc County based on recommendations by the Department of Conservation Office of Mithe planning commission may be appealed to the Board of Supervisors.

FPPC Correction:

The Fair Political Practices Commission Consultant Linda Moureaux has contacted the Record and stated that a part of her original letter to the Record concerning Mike Dunn and Vickie Cochran was in error.

The Record quoted her letter verbatim in Thursday's issue, stating: "After discussing the matter with Supervisor Mike Dunn and County Counsel Vickie Cochran, it appears they failed to disclose the source of income on their Statements of Economic Interests, since they believed the arrangement was an exchange of services. Since both Mr. Dunn and Ms. Cochran have agreed to amend their Statement of Economic Interests, Form 700, to reflect the income we have decided not to initiate enforcement action in the matter."

Moureaux told the Record Thursday afternoon that that part of her letter was not factual. She said since the funds were paid to Mr. Dunn's business, his ranch, and did not amount to more than $10,000, there was no amendment to the Form 700 required. The Record has asked her to submit a correction to her letter.

She also said that there was no evidence submitted that proved a conflict of interest had occurred.

FPPC won't fine Dunn in Cochran conflict issue

The Fair Political Practices Commission will not take formal enforcement action against Modoc Supervisor Mike Dunn, but has advised Dunn on a probable conflict of interest involving business dealings with former County Counsel Vickie Cochran

The Modoc County Record filed a complaint alleging conflict of interest against Dunn with Modoc County District Attorney Jordan Funk last year and Funk forwarded that complaint to the FPPC. That Record complaint alleged a conflict of interest if Dunn participated in personnel decisions involving Cochran because of their personal business dealings

In a letter dated April 20 to the Record, the FPPC states it is closing the issue "without instituting an enforcement action."

The FPPC states that Dunn had provided Cochran with corral space for her cattle in exchange for one of her cows and that Cochran also purchased about $2,400 worth of hay from Dunn. The sources of income were not disclosed on either public official's Statement of Economic Interests, Form 700, as required by law

"Government Code Sections 87100 and 87103 prohibit a public official from participating in a government decision when it is reasonably foreseeable that the decision will have a material financial effect on the official or the official's economic interests, including sources of income of $500 or more ($250 prior to January 1, 2001)," the FPPC states. "After discussing the matter with Supervisor Mike Dunn and County Counsel Vickie Cochran, it appears they failed to disclose the source of income on their Statements of Economic Interests, since they believed the arrangement was an exchange of services. Since both Mr. Dunn and Ms. Cochran have agreed to amend their Statement of Economic Interests, Form 700 to reflect the income, we have decided not to initiate enforcement action in this matter." As to the question of Dunn's conflict of interest, the FPPC had the following decision:

"With regard to the conflict of interest issue, it appears after consulting other colleagues, Ms. Cochran advised Mr. Dunn that he did not have a conflict of interest

"However, after discussing the matter with Ms. Cochran and Mr. Dunn, it was clarified that since Ms. Cochran is a source of income to Mr. Dunn, any future personnel matters regarding Cochran could result in a conflict of interest on the part of Mr. Dunn. Since it appears there was some confusion regarding the application of the conflict of interest provisions of the Act, and Mr. Dunn has agreed to abstain from any future matters relating to Ms. Cochran's personnel matters, we have decided to close this matter without formal enforcement action. We will, however, send an advisory letter to both Mr. Dunn and Ms. Cochran."

The FPPC's decision is actually mute, since Cochran resigned her position as County Counsel, but she has since filed a formal action against the County of Modoc.

Aquatic Center issue heads to LAFCO process

The Modoc Aquatic Center is taking a big step forward this week as it begins the Local Agency Formation Commission process to form a special district and move the project forward.

Modoc Supervisors Tuesday voted to adopt a resolution to begin the LAFCO process.

The first step is the formation of the Modoc Parks and Recreation District, which includes property within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District, excluding properly north of Sugar Hill and the Willow Ranch and New Pine Creek areas.

The entire project will depend on voters approving the formation of the district in the November election as well as approving a $25 per property owner assessment in that district

If the voters approve the district and assessment, the county has agreed to allocate $800,000 from Proposition 40 (State Parks and Recreation Grant Funding) and the City of Alturas will allocate $180,000 of its share of Prop. 40 funds.

Overall, the plan is to build and operate an Aquatic and Recreation Center at the Corner of Fourth Street and Warner Streets in Alturas, just north of the existing Alturas swimming pool.

In addition to the $980,000 allocated by local governments, the facility, including an indoor pool and gym, will be financed by a combination of loans, or grants, and the yearly $25 property assessment.

The Recreation District, when formed, would be operated by five directors, elected at a special election in March, 2005.

In addition to the LAFCO application, the Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee presented a business plan, which indicates the facility can be successfully operated.

The district plans to build and manage an indoor heated swimming pool, 75 feet long. That pool will be used for physical therapy in the water for residents recovering from injury or illness, swimming lessons, exercise classes, lap swims, family and youth nights, swimming competitions as well as open swimming for the public.

One of the keys to the new center, state the organizers, is that the gym and pool facility will be open all year round, and can be used as a community center for training sessions, plays and drama, overflow sport activity, community dances and other services desired by the community. Currently, outside of the Griswold Gym, which is booked mainly for school activities and sporting events, there is no public facility available in the winter months.

According to the business plan, the facility revenues will come from grants, membership fees, the $25 per property owner assessment, individual activity participation fees, private and public rental fees, and physical therapy fees.

"The Modoc Parks and Recreation District is committed to improving the health, fitness, wellness and recreation choices of Modoc County Citizens and visitors from cradle to grave. Our mission is to construct and maintain an Aquatic and Recreation center open year-round for the entire community," the committee states.

If voters come on board in November, the plan is to begin construction in January 2006, with actual operation in September, 2006.

The first cause of action will still have to be convincing the voters in the new district to support the project.

Some charges dropped in Brown theft case

Following a recent preliminary hearing in Modoc Superior Court involving grand theft charges against Mike and Cameo Brown, charges against Cameo Brown were dismissed and eight of the 12 charges against Mike Brown were dismissed.

Mike Brown was held over for trial on the four remaining counts, all felony grand theft charges.

District Attorney Jordan Funk said there was insufficient evidence in Mrs. Brown's matters and he felt there was insufficient proof in eight of the 12 issues involving Mike Brown.

Funk said the case remains under investigation and it's possible he may refile charges in the case against both individuals.

The original case filed in Modoc Superior Court against the Browns involved more than $200,000 stemming from several acts alleged to be grand theft by embezzlement, or grand theft, or grand theft of personal property by false pretenses. All the charges involved ranching operations.

MJUSD will interview for MHS administrators

The Modoc Joint Unified School District will interview for Modoc High School Principal May 5 and for vice-principal May 14.

There were 15 individuals for both positions, with nine applying for the principal and nine applications for vice-principal. Three of the people who applied for principal also applied for the vice-principal slot.

There will be four individuals interviewed for principal and three will be interviewed for vice-principal.

Annual Rabies clinics offer low cost vaccinations

It is the law to have your dog(s) and cat(s) current on rabbies vaccination. In order to make it affordable for all pet owners the State of California, Modoc County and Local Veterinarians will work together to provide low cost vaccination clinics. Protect yourself, the public and your animals by attending one of the following clinics

May 4--Tuesday

Canby Fire Hall 9:00 to 10:00 a.m.

Likely Fire Hall 11:00 to Noon

Alturas Fire Hall 4:00 to 5:30 p.m.

May 5--Wednesday

Cedarville Fire Hall 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.

May 6--Thursday

Adin, Big Valley Vet Clinic Noon to 1:00 p.m.

May 7--Friday

Lookout Fire Hall 5:00 to 7:00 p.m

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact our office, (530)233-6310, Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Burn permits required in Modoc in Surprise Valley

As of May 1, burn permits will be required for all types of burning. In Surprise Valley, the Cedarville offices of the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service will issue burn permits. Burning will be from 7 p.m. to 10 a.m. Burning permits will be suspended July 1. Before burning it is encouraged to check the local weather forecast and pay attention to wind speed. For further information contact BLM at 279-6101.

A BLM representative will issue burn permits at the Fort Bidwell Tribal Community Center from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and at the Eagleville General Store from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on April 30.

Obituaries:

Services for Ken Parsons

A Memorial Service for Kenneth Lee Parsons, 79, of Alturas, will be held Saturday, May 1 at 1 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Hall in Alturas. Veterans Groups of Alturas will conduct the service. Family and friends will gather at the hall, following the service.

A Modoc resident for 67 years, he moved to this area as a young teen in 1937. He was a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3327, Alturas. Mr. Parsons passed away at his home Saturday, April 10, 2004.

He is survived by his brother Howard Parsons and wife Bertha of Anderson, CA.; sister Connie McBride of Anderson; nephews David and Dennis Parsons of Anderson; Jack Durante of Sacramento; nieces Shelley Holloway of Alturas, CA; Sherryl Ireland of Hawkins Bar, Kathy Hammond of Battleground, Washington; Mary Hoehn and Linda Custer of Redding, CA.; and many great and great-great nieces and nephews.

Kaye McIntyre Johnson

Former Alturas resident, Kaye McIntyre Johnson was killed in a tragic accident April 16, 2004 while headed on vacation with friends and family in a commercial shuttle from Flagstaff, Arizona to Lee's Ferry, Arizona, Arizona.

Kaye McIntyre Johnson was born November 29, 1953 to Rosemary and Charles McIntyre in Murphysboro, Illinois.

Her family moved her at a young age to Las Vegas, Nevada where she grew up and attended school. She graduated from Western High School in 1971, and worked as a Dental Assistant while she attended the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in pre-nursing. In 1972, she became engaged to David Johnson who was serving in the U.S. Navy in Vietnam. On August 24, 1973, they were married and together celebrated 31 years of love and adventures that took them all over the world.

After the Navy, they moved to Missoula, Montana where their children, Brandon Travis and Alyssa Brooke were born. Kaye attended the University of Montana but was unable to complete her nursing degree before 1978, when the family moved to Ely, Nevada where David worked for the BLM. One year later they moved again to remote Ruby Valley, Nevada where Kaye home taught both children while David worked at the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)

Four years later they moved to North Park, Colorado and Kaye worked in the town of Walden as a Teaching Assistant and as a Dental Assistant. In 1983, Kaye's family moved to Burns, Oregon where she worked at the hospital and at the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) office while her husband worked at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. The family was very happy here, but other adventures called them away.

In 1989, Kaye and family moved to Corvallis, Oregon where she was finally able to complete her studies and received a Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health. Shortly after her graduation, David transferred the family to Alturas, California. Kaye was immediately hired by Modoc Indian Health Project as the Director of Health Education. She very much enjoyed working with the staff and Modoc tribal members to implement family support programs for the community. During this same period she completed her Master of Science degree in Family Support Studies from NOVA Southeastern University.

By 1998, both children were away attending college, so Kaye and David moved to the island of Oahu, Hawaii where Kaye became the Assistant Director for Hawaii Family Support Center--Healthy Start, Kapio'lani Medical Center for Women and Children in Honolulu. Here she had the opportunity to oversee a very large program for early intervention and family support. Kaye thrived in Hawaii and loved to sail with her husband and friends on their boat, The Koae. However, they moved back to the mainland in 2001 to be closer to family again and settled in Great Falls, Montana. In this community, Kaye served as the Director of American Red Cross, Big Sky District, overseeing disaster and community services for several counties. She also became the Director of the Cascade County office of Public Assistance for the State of Montana where she supervised 35 employees and managed the family support programs. She loved her job and made many friends in the community.

Kaye and David made what they intended to be their last move back to Burns, Oregon where they had plans to retire. Kaye and her daughter-in-law, Kristen Johnson, opened the Antonio's Italian Restaurant and Kaye quickly adjusted to being a competent waitress. She loved to serve people, as it is what she had done in many other ways, all of her life.

Kaye was tragically lost at the young age of 50. She had many plans for the future that included becoming a grandmother in June. She led a full, productive life and those who love her can only assume that she was needed for bigger and more important tasks. She will be followed by her loving husband David, son Travis and daughter-in-law Kristen, daughter Alyssa Sexton and son-in-law Jason, mother Rosemary Proctor and her husband Bruce, father Charles McIntyre and his wife Lyn, brother Robert McIntyre and his family.

Services are planned for May 8, 2004 at 11:00 a.m. at the Pioneer Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra of Cedarville, CA. will preside. In lieu of flowers, donations are requested for the Boys and Girls Club of Harney County, as this supports families and children, which is what Kaye worked for all of her life. The address is 267 South Egan Street, Burns, OR. 97720.

Earl H. (Buck) Buchanan

Earl H. "Buck" Buchanan passed away at Progressive Hospital in Las Vegas, Nevada on April 27, 2004. A memorial tribute will be held at Silvercrest Residence, 2801 E. Equador Avenue, North Las Vegas, Nevada, on Saturday, May 1, 2004 at 1:00 p.m. At his request, private services will be held at a later date in Modoc County, CA.

Born in Guerneville, CA. August 30, 1923, to Paul Revere Buchanan and Lily Lea Lunsford, Earl spent most of his formative years in Modoc County. He attended elementary school at the lower end of Surprise Valley near the Bare Ranch.

He was a buckaroo on local ranches in Surprise Valley, Gerlach and Winnemucca and grew to love the great outdoors and beauty of the Warner and Sierra Mountains.

Mr. Buchanan joined the U.S. Navy in 1941 and proudly served his country during World War II aboard the USS Concord CL-10 and USS Recruit. After his honorable discharge from the Navy in 1946, he married Juanita, and they traveled to Montana, California, Alaska, and Reno and Yerington, Nevada where he worked on ranches, in construction, mining, and auto repair. He obtained his pilots license and became a flight instructor for Silver State Flying Service in Reno. In the 1960's, Earl moved to Mangla, West Pakistan where he was a construction superintendent on a major dam project. He eventually returned to Fairbanks, Alaska where he flew as a bush pilot for Interior Airways from 1968 through 1972 and continued to teach others to learn to fly. Earl owned and operated several successful businesses, and was an avid outdoorsman where he nurtured his love of flying, hunting and fishing in the Alaskan wilderness for 16 years. He was a Golden Age member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles for more than 50 years, member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Moose International, and the Elks.

His vagabond spirit and love of traveling took him and his motor home back to Modoc County, the north coast of California, Parker, Arizona, Cal Nev Ari, Nevada and eventually Las Vegas. He frequently attended annual reunions of the USS Concord where he renewed friendships with shipmates from WWII. Earl made many friends throughout his travels and although he will be missed by his family and friends, his life story will live on through his children and grandchildren who love him very much. Buck never met a stranger and was true to his own philosophy to treat others as he would want to be treated.

Earl is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, Rick and Louella Buchanan of Albuquerque, N.M.; daughter, Pamela Mosher of Rio Dell, CA.; daughter and son-in-law, Denise and Larry Pennell of Wasco, CA.; grandchildren Tammy (T.J.) Semones and her husband, Brent of Georgetown, Kentucky; Melani Buchanan-Farmer, Albuquerque, N.M.; and John Kelley, Georgetown, Kentucky; three great-grandchildren, Ryan, Keelie and Royce; uncle and aunt, John and Eldeen Fisher of Klamath Falls, OR.; aunt, Sadie Fisher-Anderson of Klamath Falls; dear friends Marge and Pete Pederson of Las Vegas; and numerous family members and special friends throughout the country. He was preceded in death by his father, Paul Buchanan, mother, Lily Mabrier, and brothers Donald, Robert and Wilson.

Condolences may be sent to the family in care of Denise Pennell, 1109 Cypress Avenue, Wasco, California, 93280.

Charles A. Redding

Charles Alfred Redding passed away April 20, 2004, at Mayers Memorial in the Burney Annex Facility.

He was born to Frank Redding and Mabel Turner Redding in Paris, MO. May 9, 1927.

Preceding him in death were his parents, brothers Frank, Jr. and Harvey Redding, a sister Clara Holmes, a son Ronald Redding and daughter Valerie Marquardt and his wife of 55 years, Eleanor Redding, who passed away August 8, 2003 in Alturas, CA.

He leaves behind a son, Charles Redding of Alturas, CA.; daughters Sandra Kincaid of Medford, OR. and Carla Ritchie of MacDoel, CA.; grandchildren Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Ritchie of Long Beach, Ms. Tammi Hood of Merced, CA., Amanda, Dan, Samantha and Ian Ritchie of MacDoel, CA., Jason Marquardt, Tina, Richard and Ronaele Clark of Alturas and Ronald Redding II of the Bay Area; great-grandchildren Jordan Marquardt, Ronald Redding III, Isaiah, Aubrianna and Shelly Hood; a sister Patricia Bland and a sister-in-law and long-time friend Lorretta Redding and many nieces and nephews.

Dorothy Bettenhausen

Dorothy Mae Bettenhausen (McKanna), age 84, of Coal City, Illinois, passed away Monday, April 12, 2004 at Morris Hospital with her family by her side. A resident of Alturas for several months, while she was convalescing, she was able to be with her sister Doris Knight and brother-in-law Ed of Alturas and enjoyed her time in Modoc.

She was born October 2, 1919 in Minooka, Illinois, a daughter of Leon and Esther (Vickery) McKanna. Dorothy was raised and educated at McKanna School in Plattville, and on February 23, 1942, she married Hubert John "Red" Bettenhausen at the Richards Street Methodist Church in Joliet. Dorothy drove for Crawford Bus Service for 17 years, was a member of the VFW Ladies Auxiliary #367, and assisted our country's service men in the Army by refueling planes. Dorothy enjoyed gardening and food canning. Survivors include her four children, Richard (late Regina) Bettenhausen of Shorewood, Donna Wills of Coal City, Barbara (Joseph) Rodriguez of Coal City and Roger (Jeanie) Bettenhausen of Shorewood; three brothers and a sister Vernard "Scotty" McKanna of Plattville, Gerald (Beryl) McKanna of Newark, Doris (Ed) Knight of Alturas, CA. and Russell (Pat) McKanna of New Lenox; 11 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren; as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

Dorothy was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Hubert; a sibling at birth; a brother, Donnie; and a daughter-in-law Dolores.

Funeral services were held April 14, 2004 in Coal City with Deacon Jack Schimandle officiating. Burial was at Elmhurst Cemetery.

Preferred memorials are gifts in Dorothy's name to the American Heart Association.

Sports

Modoc on top of SCL golf

Modoc's Braves are sitting on top of the Shasta Cascade League golf loop, and are hanging tough to a slim lead. They will meet Mt. Shasta, Fall River and Bishop Quinn at Arrowhead next week.

Modoc leads the league with a 20-3-1 record, with Weed in second at 20-4 and Mt. Shasta third at 19-4-1, followed by Fall River, 13-11, Trinity 9-14-1, Bishop Quinn 8-16, Burney 5-18-1, and Etna 0-24.

Individually, Modoc's Micah Eppler shot 81, DJ Northrup shot 83, Brian Weed shot 96, Dustin Philpott and Keith Montague shot 99 and Ross Montague had a 101. Eppler was third overall and Northrup sixth. Modoc's team shot a 238 on the front nine at Fall River and a 220 on the back nine. Burney shot 252 on the front and 253 on the back, while Weed had a 229 on the front and a 216 on the back. Mt. Shasta shot 228 on the front and 224 on the back.

For the week's play, Chris Chitwood of Bishop Quinn claims the lowest round with a 76 and Weed's Bobby Wyatt shot 79.

Modoc girls fall to Bonanza

Modoc's softball team lost a pair of non-league games to Bonanza and will meet Mt. Shasta here in the final league doubleheader April 30, at 2 p.m. In Bonanza, a strong team from Oregon, the Braves lost 13-7 and 13-6. In the opening game, Bonanza scored two in the first, added seven in the fifth and four in the sixth. Modoc scored one in the second, added four in the fifth and one in the seventh.

Bonanza's pitcher limited Modoc to just six hits. Jennifer Davis went two-for-three, Allison Campagna was two-for-four and Amy Ridgway and Brittany Berchtold each had a hit.

Modoc started the second game with a 4-2 first inning lead, but Bonanza added five in the second, five in the third and one in the fifth. The Braves scored one in the third, one in the fourth and one in the sixth.

Modoc had only five hits in the game, Ridgeway led the way, going two-for-two, while Campagna, Jamie Fain and Berchtold had a hit.

MHS softball field dedication is Friday

A dedication of the new Toni Lynn Berchtold Memorial Field on Eighth Street will be held April 30, just prior to the Modoc-Mt. Shasta varsity girls softball game.

The dedication will start at about 1:30 p.m. Berchtold died in a tragic automobile accident on April 21, 2003. She was an employee of the Modoc Joint Unified School District and a softball coach and supporter.

A new drinking fountain with a bronze plaque was constructed by John Bagwell, Dennis Banister and Brent and Robbie Bartram and the new backstop sign was created by the Ron and Tonya Davis family. The rock was donated by Larranaga Trucking. A new redwood backstop will be installed in the near future and trees are being planted along the parking lot fence. "Toni loved softball and was a talented player," her friends say. "She supported her daughters, Brianna and Brittany, and all other children in our community as they played ball." Brittany is on this year's Modoc High team.

She was remembered especially for her warm and outgoing personality, her quick smile and her sense of humor.

The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees approved the request to honor Berchtold with the softball field memorial.

Hemphill is runner-up

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill earned second runner-up status at the California High School Rodeo Association Rodeo in Red Bluff April 24-25. The District Finals Rodeo will be held May 1-2 in Yreka.

Hemphill placed second in goat tying, second in breakaway roping, eighth in pole bending and ninth in girls cutting.

Michael Sphar, of Alturas, placed third in bull riding.

MMS PE instructor out to make sure kids are in shape

Modoc Middle School Physical Education instructor Kenny Demick is out to make sure his students aren't a part of out-of-shape America.

And he's making the extra effort. His goal is to put together a weight/exercise room at the school. It has been a work-in-progress over the past three years and he wants to have it up and functioning by next school year.

"The problem we face is there is no money to help, so fundraising and donations are important," said Demick. "So far, things gave been donated by parents and Shaun Wood at the High School. I've also raised funding through our recycling programs."

Demick said he has the room, some weights, some cardio equipment and mats. What he's now looking for is donations of weights of any type, equipment such as stationary bikes, ab machines, any stationary fitness equipment, fitness videos or anything else that would fit into a weight/exercise room.

"The key is safety in the equipment," said Demick. "I will need to look at the equipment to see if it meets safety standards. This is going to be a great help in our program. It will also help in the fitness level of our students and in our sports programs. The fitness/exercise room will teach kids a life-long activity for a healthier life."

Anyone wishing to donate or help in either the fitness/exercise room or wants to help in the recycling program can reach Demick at 233-7201, ext. 324.

May 6 , 2004

News

Pair arrested on murder conspiracy

A pair of Modoc residents, Wesley Brister, age 44, and Gin Padgett, age 33, have been arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit murder and solicitation of murder. They were arraigned in Modoc Court Tuesday.

According to District Attorney Jordan Funk, the two were conspiring to kill Padgett's husband, Royal Padgett. The pair allegedly approached another individual with an offer to commit the crime.

They were arrested Friday in Modoc Estates and booked into the Modoc County Jail.

Vets' flags missing from storage room

Last year, stored extra big flags flown on the high pole at Plumas Bank disappeared from the Veterans' Memorial Hall in Alturas. They were allegedly taken from a storage area.

Arlie Brown, Veterans of Foreign Wars District 19 Commander, reported this week that more flags were discovered missing on April 30. He said the replacement costs of the flags is $1,889.85.

Brown said he noticed the flags were missing on April 30 from a storage room in the hall. That room is kept locked, he said.

He said the flags missing include the VFW Post 3327 flag, the American Legion Post 163 flag, two state flags, two POW/MIA flags, the U.S. Flag and AMVET Post 2003 Flag.

In addition, the flags flown on the flag pole at the Veterans' Park in front of the Hall are missing.

Brown said veterans are requesting the return of the flags, no questions asked.

Alturas Police are investigating the disappearance and report no evidence of a break-in to the storage room.

Minor injuries in Cedarville mishap

The California Highway Patrol reports minor injuries in a two-car accident at State Route 299 and County Road 1 in Cedarville May 2, 9:20 a.m.

The CHP states that Robert J. Cox, age 23, Alturas, was driving his 1998 Plymouth eastbound on SR299 at a high rate of speed while approaching County Road 1. Letitia N. Conklin, 18, Cedarville was also eastbound on SR299 in a 1993 Acura and was slowing to stop at the intersection.

Cox, who was behind Conklin, was unable to stop and rear-ended the Conklin car. Cox was wearing his seatbelt and was not injured. Conklin suffered minor injuries as did passenger Phillip Brooks, Jr. age 19, who was not wearing a seatbelt. Cox was arrested for suspicion of driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage.

Minor injuries were also reported in a single vehicle accident May 4, 5:10 p.m. on County Road One south of County Road 15.

The CHP reports that Edward J. Drew, 69, Ft. Bidwell was driving a 1999 Chevy northbound on County Road One about 5:10 p.m.. For unknown reasons, he allowed his vehicle to drift onto the dirt shoulder. He turned the vehicle back on the road, overcorrected and lost control. The car rotated approximately 180 degrees and left the road where it overturned, coming to rest on its top. Drew and his passenger, Donna Drew, age 67, Ft. Bidwell, were transported to Surprise Valley Medical Center in Cedarville, treated and released.

The CHP had to provide traffic control near Fisher Hill on State Route 299 May 3, 11:35 a.m. when a semi-truck and trailer hit a guardrail.

According to the report, Ranit Sanopal, 37, Surrey, British Columbia, was eastbound in a 2004 Freightliner at 55 to 60 m.p.h. and drifted off the south shoulder and hit a guardrail. He was not hurt.

SV Land Judgers return as State Champs

Surprise Valley FFA may be small in number, but the Land Judging Team is mighty in their knowledge of land quality -- so much so that they were named the State Champions of Land Judging last weekend in San Luis Obispo.

Known as the smallest chapter in the state, Surprise Valley's team of sophomores Alex Melgar, Wayne Cockrell and junior Scott Soletti, beat Duncan Polytechnical High School of Fresno, which boasts the second largest FFA chapter in the state with 580 students. Madera has the first largest FFA chapter.

Having judged soil from one end of the state to the other has paid off in experience for the local trio. For the State competition, Surprise Valley competed at four different sites timed for 40 minutes each with 13 teams from Red Bluff to Santa Maria participating.

In his 40 years of teaching and FFA, Clayton Oilar remembers when his first Land Judging team 37 years ago, placed 34th out of 34 teams, his first year of taking over Land Judging as an FFA Advisor. "I told the kids someone had to lose."

The State Champions received the honor, an engraved silver bowl and a passle of ribbons. "It's the first time Surprise Valley has won anything at the State Championship level," said a pleased Oilar Tuesday.

The S.V. FFA Land Judging Team has earned the right to attend the National Finals in Oklahoma next year. Last year's team qualified at the state finals as one of the top five teams and earned the right to attend Nationals this year, but those students (foreign exchange and seniors who graduated) have gone their own ways. Oilar already has the funding for this 2004 team to travel to Nationals in May of 2005. Nationals started May 2 and it would have been too costly to purchase airline tickets for the group to travel, with so little notice.

Learning Land Judging and traveling for competition since last September, hasn't been easy.

"It's a challenge to keep up with school work, sports, S.A.T. testing and Star testing with nearly 11 days away from home for just these last two competitions," described Soletti who also broke his leg in baseball and sports a walking cast.

Nothing was going to keep Melgar from making it to state, as far as he was concerned, even with painful dental issues getting in the way of his leaving, just prior.

"We've been so close every year," described Oilar. "We just had to get over a hump. It's such a good feeling now to be true state champions. These kids can judge soil from one end of the state to the other."

Cal Poly and the Soil Conservation Service sponsored the State-wide event with 92 schools represented.

The State FFA Land Judging Contest had two parts; the first, April 17, in Fresno in which Duncan of Fresno placed first with 918 points and Surprise Valley placed second with 846 points. The second part, May 1, in San Luis Obispo found Duncan with 746 points and SVHS with 829 points for a total of 1675 and Duncan with 1664 total.

Land Judging requires teams to judge soil on texture, improvements needed to correct major problems, irrigation, classification (8 elements) good to poor, slope, erosion, soil depletion, water holding capacity, amount of rocks- if so; underlying materials, what the best use for the land would be; Urban land limitations, foundations, local roads and streets, septic systems, shrink swell; limitation to top soil if too sticky or too rocky.

Wayne Cockrell, a 2-year FFA member, earned the Second High Individual award; Scott Soletti, a 3-year FFA student, Sixth High Individual and Alex Melgar, a 2-year FFA member, earned Seventh High Individual at San Luis Obispo. In turn, they earned high marks on each site's "Pit" award. "We may be the furthest place away and have the smallest population, but these kids are tops in Land Judging and the other great thing is, they'll be back next year," said a pleased Oilar.

Big Valley Power LLC purchases Bieber Mill power plant

Big Valley Power LLC has completed the purchase of the 6-megawatt (MW) power plant facility and mill site located in Bieber, CA. from Capital Crossing Bank. The facility and site were previously owned by Big Valley Lumber Company.

Big Valley Power LLC has been formed to own and operate the power facility. The company plans to immediately employ one full-time employee and has an arrangement for consulting services with another individual. Both these individuals live in Big Valley.

The power plant has historically operated on wood fuel obtained from the Modoc National Forest and private landowners.

Glenn Zane, Big Valley LLC Manager, emphasizes that the company has been careful to not overstate positions during the nearly one year transaction negotiations have been in progress.

He states, "We expect Big Valley Power to become a significant employer, but there are many hurdles yet to cross before the plant can start operations. We look forward to being a part of the Big Valley business community."

Zane indicates that the company is making arrangements to position itself to purchase National Forest and private timber for manufacture, as well as making arrangements to purchase wood fuel.

For more information contact Glenn Zane (530)246-2455.

MHS Class of 1964-65 seek members

MUHS classes of 1964 and 1965 have a planned combined reunion set for Saturday and Sunday, August 21 and 22, 2004. It will be held at the Brass Rail Restaurant in Alturas.

Do you know where these people are? Jim Beattie, Susie White, Kathy (Malitz) Ortega, Leta (Rhodes) Redford, Harry Smith, Nellie Duran, Dorothy (Gysin) Shaeuitz, Kathy (Sawyer) Goodwin, Charlene (Aldridge) Kenyon, Mary (Williams) and Danielle (Rouse) Floyd for class of 1964. Class of 1965 is looking for Jim Donnelly, Martha Foy, Cindy (Gysin) Fields, Donna (Kiley) DeJohg, Denny Martin, Rodney Neilson, Robert Thompson, Diane (Weisman) Miller.

If you have any information please contact Betty (Clark) Vaughn at 541-883-8150, Alice (Mattson) Sisemore at 541-884-0866, Hazel (Henson) Looper at 530-233-2871, or Charlotte (McDowell) Ford at 530-233-3465.

Obituaries:

R.P. Baker

Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix reports that Alturas resident Roy Paul (R.P.) Baker, age 50, was found deceased on property he owned south of Alturas Tuesday evening. He had been missing since last Thursday. Funeral services will be held at the Faith Baptist Church, on Carlos Street, Alturas, Friday, May 7, 3 p.m. A full obituary will be published next week.

Services for Kaye Johnson

Services for former Alturas resident, Kaye McIntyre Johnson will be held May 8, 2004 at 11:00 a.m. at the Pioneer Presbyterian Church, Burns, OR. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra of Cedarville, CA. will preside.

In lieu of flowers, donations are requested for the Boys and Girls Club of Harney County, as this supports families and children, which is what Mrs. Johnson worked for all of her life. The address is 267 South Egan Street, Burns, OR. 97720.

Bob L. Cicle

Former Alturas resident, Bob L. Cicle, 73, of Twin Falls, Idaho, formerly of Buhl, passed away Tuesday, April 20, 2004, in his home. He was born April 26, 1930, in Bowlegs, Okla., the son of Roy and Mary Cicle. He grew up on a farm in Buhl and graduated from Buhl High School in 1948.

He attended college at Albion on a football scholarship then transferred to Westminister College in Salt Lake City, Utah.

He served his military duty in the United States Air Force with an honorable discharge. He went back to Westminister, then graduated with a degree in education in 1956.

He met his future wife, Janice Elaine Miller, in a coffee shop in Sugar House, even though Jan didn't drink coffee. They were married January 26, 1956, and he was offered his first teaching job in Parma, Idaho. He continued teaching in California, including Alturas and retired in 1973. His career as a teacher included the subjects of history, geography, civics, government, and health.

He coached football, basketball, baseball and boxing. He was primarily a basketball coach and so successful that several offers were made from colleges and universities but he felt that he should stay with athletes in small communities at the high school level.

When he retired, he continued to coach as a volunteer in the Twin Falls area in Babe Ruth baseball and City Recreation basketball and baseball. But the coaching he loved the most was coaching his four grandsons.

For the past 27 years he was a licensed Idaho State Hearing Aid Specialist, and his clients always appreciated his patience and honesty. He was always someone who would help anyone in need and never hesitated to give kindness and care to others. Those who knew him will remember him as a man of few words, but with deep emotions. Everyone respected him for his strength.

Bob is survived by his wife, Jan; daughters, Debbie (Vic Watkins) of Layton, Utah, and Robyn (Jack Barnes) of Twin Falls; sister, Edna Bryan of San Antonio, Texas; grandsons, Chris Watkins and Craig, Charlie and Matt Barnes; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Services were held at 10 a.m. Thursday, April 22, 2004, at Parke's Magic Valley Funeral Home. The family suggests donations to be made to Twin Falls City Recreation Department.

Ellen May Haas

Ellen May Haas, 78, of Grants Pass died Monday, April 26, 2004, at Royale Gardens Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Private cremation was held at Chapel of the Valley--L.B. Hall Funeral Home.

Haas was born March 29, 1926, in Alturas, CA. She grew up in the Foots Creek area near Grants Pass. She enjoyed knitting and making crafts. Survivors include a daughter, Betsy Thompson of Grants Pass; three sons Jerold Farber of Newton, NC., Thomas Farber of Adin, CA., and Terry Farber of Alturas, CA.; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Her husband Ivan Haas, died before her.

Sports

Modoc wins 4th SCL golf crown

Modoc's Braves came out Thursday and shot the best two rounds of the season, a 212 and a 216, to win the Shasta Cascade League golf title. This title is the fourth in a row for the Braves.

The match was played at Arrowhead in Alturas with Modoc and Mt. Shasta competing against Fall River and Bishop Quinn. Conditions were ideal, with temperatures in the lows 70s and just a slight breeze. The same day Weed and Etna competed against Burney and Trinity at the Mt. Shasta Golf Resort.

DJ Northrup led all golfers last week with an 81, while Micah Eppler shot 82, Brian Weed had an 83, Ross Montague had an 89, Dustin Philpott shot 93 and Charles Knox had a 99.

The Braves finished the season at 24-3-1, ahead of Weed at 24-4, Mt. Shasta 23-4, Fall River 13-15, Trinity 11-18, Bishop Quinn 8-20, and Burney 7-20-1. "This has been one of the most satisfying coaching experiences in my time as a coach," said Harold Montague. "This group of young men worked hard to achieve this goal. At the beginning of the season, we figured to be a middle-of-the-pack team and hopped to finish second so we could take a team to the Division II championships. Finishing on top with this group was an unexpected surprise. What's really nice is that we only lose one player to graduation (Charles Knox) and will return a more mature team for competition next year."

The team is at the league individual tournament today at Lake Shastina. The top 10 individuals from league play will play for league honors, which include a Most Valuable Player and six All-league slots. The qualifiers by ranking are: Chris Chitwood, Bishop Quinn, one; Bobby Wyatt, Weed, two; Micah Eppler, Modoc, three; Brandon Beck, Fall River, four; Colby Toms, Weed, five; Tyler Eastman, Mt. Shasta, six; Jesse Kasten, Mt. Shasta, seven; DJ Northrup, Modoc, eight; Adam Zwanziger, Weed, nine; and Brian Weed, Modoc , 10.

"Micah and Brian have just beautiful natural swings and DJ has just been crushing the ball as of late. Their biggest challenge will be controlling both their emotions and managing the course because they can all strike the ball well."

Modoc and Weed qualify for team competition in the Division II Championships May 11 at The Dragon at Gold Mountain in Graeagle. The top team and top four individuals, plus ties and anyone who shoots below 80, qualifies to compete at the North Section Championships May 17 at Lake Almanor.

Modoc hosts playoff game Friday, 4 p.m

Modoc's baseball team, seeded second in the North Section CIF Playoffs will host Etna in the first round Friday, with game time set for 4 p.m.

Rio Vista got the top seed in the tournament with Modoc two, Hamilton City three, Mt. Shasta four, Durham five, Delta six, Etna seven and Quincy eight.

The Braves are going into the playoffs having lost two of their last three games, but coach Brad Server believes the team will respond well in the tournament. He said errors have been a problem in the latter part of the season.

They split the last regular season league doubleheader against Mt. Shasta last week, losing the first game 6-1 and winning the second 12-9.

In the opener, Modoc scored one in the fifth, while Mt. Shasta scored one in the fifth, one in the sixth and four in the seventh. Travis Potter got the loss, and Modoc committed five errors in the infield. Cody Widby hit a solo home run in the first inning.

In the second game, Modoc scored one in the first, two in the second, one in the third and eight in the fifth. The Bears scored two in the first, two in the third, one in the fifth and four in the seventh. Adam Server got the win for the Braves. Rich Culp went three-for-three, Marty Stevens was two-for three, Danny Randazzo was two-for-three, and Joey Catania hit a home run.

Girls sweep Bears

Modoc's girls softball team closed out the Shasta Cascade League season with a sweep of the Mt. Shasta Bears Saturday, 7-6 and 15-9.

In the opener, the Braves started with a two-run first inning, then added three in the second and two in the fourth. The Bears scored one in the fourth, one in the fifth, three in the sixth and one in the seventh.

Jennifer Davis got the win, allowing six hits, walking five and fanning five. Allison Campagna led the offense, going three-for-four with a double. Davis was two-for-three with a double, while Amy Ridgway, Brittany Berchtold, Megan Thompson, Rose Wingate and Jamie Fain each had a hit.

Modoc jumped out early in the second game and didn't look back. They scored three in the second, seven in the third, one in the fourth, two in the fifth and two in the sixth. Mt. Shasta scored two in the first, three in the third and four in the fourth.

Davis got the win, striking out nine, allowing nine hits and two base-on-balls.

Berchtold was three-for-three with a double, Kristen Taylor was two-for-three with a double, Emily Pence was two-for-three, Wingate was two-for-four with a double, Campagna was two-for-five and Davis was two-for-four. Fain, Thompson and Ridgway each had a hit.

The Braves finished league play with a record of 5-7.

Modoc boys win Burney track invite

The Modoc varsity boys track team won the Burney Invitational Track meet, with Butte Valley second, and Big Valley, third.

Leading the way for the Braves were Scott McMaster and Scott Joyce who won two events each. McMaster topped the shot put with a 48-2.5 effort and the discus with a toss of 134-7. Joyce won the mile in 5:01.78 and the two-mile in 11:00.

Max Wise won the high jump with a 5-8 leap. Micah Eppler took a second in the tripe jump at 36-6. Brad Bell was second in the 110 high hurdles at 19.0 and Cory Bell was third in the shot at 40-3. Wise was fourth in the 440 at 58.28. Carrithers was fifth at 59.53. Sixth places went to Eppler in the high jump at 5-2; Clint Nardoni in the 440 at 60.99 and in the 300 hurdles at 50.31. Modoc's varsity girls placed third in the event, with Sadie Harrison winning the 440 in 1:08.48 and Jennifer Joyce winning the 880 in 3:01.72. Ann Sanchez took a third in the shot put at 25-3.25 and in the discus at 80 feet. Harrison was third in the 200 meters in 31.13 and in the 100 meters in 14.60. Joyce took a third in the 440 at 1:13.74. Kim Crnkovic was fifth in the shot at 23-3 and Joyce was sixth in the 200 at 32,68.

Modoc's junior varsity girls took third in Burney. Danielle Moriarity led the way by whining the mile in 6:38.47 and the two-mile in 14:44. Chris Abbott won the shot at 26-10. Abbott also was second in there discus at 70-7. Marielle Nardoni was fourth in the 440 at 1:24.09 and fifth in the 100 low hurdle at 21:41. Nardoni was fifth in the 880 at 3:37.22. Kelly Campagna took a sixth in the 200 at 33.75.

Grant Hall led the junior varsity boys to a second place finish by winning the discus at 115-2.5. Hall also placed third in the shot at 39-2. Matt Wilke was third in the 100 meters at 12.47. Jake Gray took fourth in the discus at 97-3 and Len Gladu was fourth in the 300 low hurdles at 54.28. Wilke was fourth in the 200 at 26.86 and fifth in the 110 hurdles 21.0. Branden Anderson took a fifth in the two mile at 13:16. Justin Mason was sixth in the long jump at 15-8. Brett Joyce was sixth in the triple jump at 29-0, and Sheridan Crutcher was sixth in the 880 at 2:37.92.

Modoc's Scott Joyce took in a second last weekend in Lakeview in the 3,000 meters, clocking a 10:09.94. The winning time as 9:45.21. Joyce also placed fourth in the 1,500 meters at 4:33.11.

Locals on way to state rodeo

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill earned All-Around Cowgirl honors at the District I California High School Rodeo finals in Yreka, April 30 to May 1. Alturas' Michael Sphar had the top bull ride of the event, scoring an 82. The next event is the state finals rodeo in Red Bluff starting June 14, and both Hemphill and Sphar will be competing.

Hemphill won the goat tying event, she teamed with Chad Bidwell of Hat Creek to win the team roping competition and placed second in breakaway roping and in pole bending. She was third in girls cutting and eighth in barrel racing.

Next week, the fnalists competing at the state level will be announced.

May 13th , 2004

News

2 young men from Modoc perish in Nevada accident

Blake McGarva, age 18, of Likely, and William Zane Baird, 20, of Tuscarora, Nevada, were killed May 9 when McGarva lost control of a pickup on State Route 226, about 55 miles northwest of Elko, Nevada. Baird was born in Modoc County.

According to a report in the Reno Gazette Journal, the accident occurred about 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The preliminary investigation indicates that McGarva allowed the Chevrolet pickup to drift off the highway, then over-corrected, sending the truck into a skid before it overturned several times.

McGarva and Baird were ejected and pronounced dead at the scene. Another passenger in the vehicle, Jed Hirschi, 24, Rexburg, Idaho had multiple injuries and was taken to Northeastern Nevada Hospital in Elko. Another passenger, Eli Burr, 21, from Victor, Idaho, was not hurt.

The accident remains under investigation. All four young men were employees of a ranch near Tuscarora.

Locally, the California Highway Patrol reports moderate injuries in a single-vehicle accident May 10, 3 p.m. on Devil's Garden, west of Goose Lake.

According to the CHP, Rebecca Ruiz, age 44, Alturas, was driving a 1998 Caravan eastbound at 30-35 m.p.h. looking for rocks. While her head was turned, she allowed the vehicle to drift off the road, where it rolled. The unrestrained passengers in the vehicle were injured as they were tossed around inside the vehicle. Ruiz and a passenger, Colena Stafford, age 44 sustained moderate injuries.

There were minor injuries in a single vehicle accident May 10, 5:45 p.m. on US 395 north of Madeline.

The CHP reports that Rosa Cryts, age 60, Ogden, Utah, was southbound at between 65-70 m.p.h. when she allowed her 2003 Chevy Cavalier to drift off the highway. She over-corrected and overturned on the shoulder. A seatbelt held her in place, keeping injuries minor.

Raffle for Quad spurs Modoc Aquatic Center ballot effort

A raffle for a Polaris 600 Sportsman Quad 4x4 will kickoff the campaign to get the Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Center approved by the voters in November.

Funds raised by the raffle will help offset costs of the coming ballot measures to establish a local Recreation District and build a Recreation Center in Alturas. The boundaries of the Modoc Parks and Recreation District would be roughly the same boundaries as the Modoc Joint Unified School District. Properties north of Sugar Hill in the Willow Ranch and New Pine Creek areas would be excluded.

A dozen local businesses stepped in this week with $500 each to sponsor the Quad; J&S General Contractor, Black Bear Diner, Les Schwab Tire Center, RMS Real Estate, Modoc Veterinary Center, K&K Produce, the Modoc County Record, The Wagon Wheel, B&D Electric, Dolby Insurance, Heard Plumbing and Modoc Drilling and Seab's True Value. The Quad was purchased from Lakeview Motorsports

On Tuesday, in a special drawing, Black Bear Diner won a $1,000 prize

Tickets for the Quad are available starting Friday at $25 each or five for $100. The drawing will be held at the Modoc Fair Grandstand Show Sept. 21

Tickets are available at Seab's True Value, Black Bear Diner, Les Schwab, RMS Realty, and from Kip Lybarger, Mike Mason, Debbie Mason, Vanston Shaw, Joe Catania, Rod Bodmer, Teresa Jacques, Gavin Kleiman and Ann Francis. For tickets or more information contact Mason at 233-2499

The entire project will depend on voters approving the formation of the district in the November election as well as approving a $25 per property owner assessment in that district.

If the voters approve the district and assessment, the county has agreed to allocate $800,000 from Proposition 40 (State Parks and Recreation Grant Funding) and the City of Alturas will allocate $180,000 of its share of Prop. 40 funds.

Overall, the plan is to build and operate an Aquatic and Recreation Center at the Corner of Fourth Street and Warner Streets in Alturas, just north of the existing Alturas swimming pool.

In addition to the $980,000 allocated by local governments, the facility, including an indoor pool and gym, will be financed by a combination of loans, or grants, and the yearly $25 property assessment. Members of the committee are meeting with state representatives this week in hopes of securing more grant funding.

The Recreation District, when formed, would be operated by five directors, elected at a special election in March, 2005.

The issue is now in the LAFCO application phase. The Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee presented a business plan, which indicates the facility can be successfully operated, to the Modoc County Board of Supervisors last month.

The district plans to build and manage an indoor heated swimming pool, 75 feet long. That pool will be used for physical therapy in the water for residents recovering from injury or illness, swimming lessons, exercise classes, lap swims, family and youth nights, swimming competitions as well as open swimming for the public

One of the keys to the new center, state the organizers, is that the gym and pool facility will be open all year round, and can be used as a community center for training sessions, plays and drama, overflow sport activity, community dances and other services desired by the community.

According to the business plan, the facility revenues will come from grants, membership fees, the $25 per property owner assessment, individual activity participation fees, private and public rental fees, and physical therapy fees.

"The Modoc Parks and Recreation District is committed to improving the health, fitness, wellness and recreation choices of Modoc County Citizens and visitors from cradle to grave. Our mission is to construct and maintain an Aquatic and Recreation center open year-round for the entire community" the committee states.

If voters come on board in November, the plan is to begin construction in January 2006, with actual operation in September, 2006.

Modoc Children's Fair an 'Adventure' in fun opens here Saturday

Watch as the theme of "Bookland Adventures" comes alive at the 17th Annual Children's Fair, which swings into action this Saturday, May 15, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the grounds of Modoc High School.

The Children's Fair promises something for everyone. A wide assortment of entertainment and fun-filled booths are being set up on Friday in time for the official opening of the Children's Fair at 9 a.m. on Saturday. Booths offer either food and beverages, or activities at low or no cost.

Here is a chance for young and old to participate in a variety of activities, hear some good music and watch dancers perform or take part in activities as diverse as rock climbing, bungee jumping, riding a camel or fishing for a prize, Bingo, painting one's face, and petting animals. If the weather cooperates, a dunk tank will be a lively spot to stop and watch the fun.

New entertainment and games have been added this year for the fair-goer's pleasure. They include three dance groups, On the Move, Center Wheeler dance group and Wocus Bay Nation Singers. A rock-climbing wall built in the center of the green is the place to test one's skill and courage.

A Bungee Run, Human Spheres and Sea Serpent Maze are new this year and are coming from out of the area. A small charge will be made to participate in these.

Alturas FFA will have a petting zoo and High Plateau Humane Society will demonstrate grooming your dog. Other demonstrations include a traveling black smith, a spinner, an archeologist using flower pots, how to make kites, ceramics, a puppet show, smoking cessation and remote control cars, a chess challenge and Smokey the Bear.

Emergency vehicles will be staffed on East Street with Bureau of Land Management, California Department of Forestry, U.S. Forest Service, Alturas City Police and California Highway Patrol, Cal Pines Fire Department, Mountain Life Flight and Modoc Ambulance crews available to answer questions.

Favorites from other years include the camels, and Garry Smith, who loves to create balloon creatures. Rogue Radio and Heartless bands will keep the music flowing. A special event at 11 a.m. is the local talent show on the main stage.

On the menu at the Children's Fair are hamburgers, prepared by JV baseball, pozole soup and tacos from Migrant Ed, Oriental appetizers from I'SOT, tacos, tostadas and nachos from Los Amigos, frito chile pie from Canby Clinic, ice cream cups from Alturas Emblem Club, ice cream, nachos and sodas from Canby Hot Springs 4-H, pie and bottled water from Alcohol and Drug Services, hot dogs from Modoc CARES and snow cones and strawberry shortcake from Modoc Aquatic and Recreation Committee.

Activities at the booths include Wheel of Fortune from Modoc Fire Safe Council, photographs from Modoc Crisis Center, hand washing from Public Health, kids' safe ID booklet from US Bank, ball toss from BLM and Canby Clinic, and bubbles and birdseed from Alturas Elementary School. A game called fire prevention Jeopardy will be organized by Forest Service staff.

Both Mental Health and CAC/RAINBOW will present fishing booths and First 5, Early Head Start will offer rock painting. There is a dime toss and shopping booth for kids. Alturas Pre-school presents a large area with various activities for the toddler set. A tot lot and sand pit will be organized by Modoc CARES; Modoc Child Care Council and Child Care Providers.

All the booths and demonstrations open at 9:30 a.m., after the opening ceremony. Fair-goers are asked to leave the family pets at home. There will not be a 50/50 raffle this year, partly because of the generosity of Warner Mountain Group Home, who won last year's raffle and donated the proceeds back to the Children's Fair. Admission is free.

Alturas and Santa Barbara have state's highest priced gas

According to a survey compiled this week by AAA, Santa Barbara has the highest priced gas, at $2.35 per gallon for self-service unleaded regular, right along with Alturas at $2.35. Midgrade gas is going at $2.45 here and premium sets a driver back $2.55 per gallon. The Texaco Station at 12th and Main is lower, at $2.33 per gallon for regular.

According to AAA, the gas prices in California have set record highs this week, and the forecast is that high prices will remain through the summer driving season. The average price for unleaded regular in the state is $2.44. Nationally, the price of unleaded regular was $1.89, also a record.

The lowest metropolitan area to buy gas is in Sacramento where the price is averaged at $2.16. Redding shows an average price of $2.22. In Nevada, the average price is $2.19 and in Oregon it's $2.16.

California typically will have higher priced gas because of its clean air requirements and taxes. In addition, the lack of increased refinery capability and impacts to the world oil supply are creating havoc.

Skatepark work set set to start

The material to resurface the ramps at the Alturas Skatepark has been ordered and should be here the week of May 17.

Carol Callaghan, Director of TEACH, Inc., said if everything goes well, the work will be done the weekend of May 22.

"The material we're using is a relatively new product, made of recycled materials, and is supposed to withstand harsh weather conditions" said Callaghan. "Chiddo Luna and John Wisser have volunteered their time and equipment to help with the project, and Gary Spicer, of Ace Four Seasons Supply Center is going to allow us to store the material in their lumberyard and have donated the use of a truck and forklift to transport and offload when we get ready to do the work."

The Skatepark at Fourth and West C Streets in Alturas has been closed more than open because of safety concerns since it was built. The new surface material should make the ramps much safer for skaters and boarders, said Callaghan, and will hopefully serve to keep the facility open for use by the public.

Classes of '68-'69 holding reunion

The Modoc High School Class of 1969 will be joined by the Class of 1968 for a 35 and 36 year reunion at the Brass Rail July 3

The reunion, organized by Lester and Chris Porter of Alturas will start with cocktails at 6 p.m. followed by dinner and dancing. The price is $25, which includes dinner, tax, tip and the band

The classes are still looking for addresses, especially of those people who may have moved since the last reunion. Class of '68 may contact Mary Busby at 233-4068 or Rick Holloway at 233-2632. For the '69 class, the Porters can be reached at 233-3762 or 233-6245.

Obituaries:

Blake Colby McGarva

Blake Colby McGarva was born in Alturas, CA. on January 6, 1986. He was the first baby born in Modoc County in 1986. Blake grew up mostly in Likely, learning the "cowboy way" until he was nine. He moved to Bishop, CA., then to Tracy, CA. for a brief period, followed with a year-long stay with his mother in Reno, NV. before finally moving back to the McGarva Ranch in Likely.

Blake was an excellent athlete, excelling in baseball, wrestling and rodeo. Blake eventually gave up all the other sports to focus on rodeo. He was a member of the high school rodeo team and rode saddle broncs. Blake wasn't into school much but attended at his parents' request. Blake loved his family and friends; the only thing that could compare with his loyalty to them was his love for the "cowboy way" and the open range. Since Blake was fifteen, he has been moving from ranch to ranch in Nevada, California, and Oregon. He traveled often, but his home and heart were in Likely at the family ranch. Blake was an excellent roper and could ride well, too.

Blake consumed himself with history, cowboy poetry and art. He was also an avid trader.

Blake was working as a cowboy at the IL Ranch in Northern Nevada, when his life was claimed in a single car accident, May 9, 2004, in Northern Nevada near Tuscorora. The same accident also claimed the life of his friend and former Modoc resident, Zane Baird.

Blake lived a happy, full life, full of friends and family; doing what he loved to do. Blake had a heart for God, but lived life hard. He had planned to return to Likely, in the summer, finish his high school education and enlist in the Marines.

He will be missed by all those left behind. He is survived by his father and stepmother, Shane and Corinna McGarva of Likely; mother and stepfather, Monica and Steve Banks, of Reno, NV.; brother Jared of Likely; sisters Richelle and Andrea of Reno; grandparents Ken and Jackie McGarva, Likely; Joanie and Doug Cummings, Bishop, CA.; Steve and Karen Rose, Alturas; great-grandparents Oscar Haise, Likely; Esther Russell, Alturas; Floyd DeWitt, Alturas; and great-great-grandmother Lala Curl of Redding, CA.; uncles and aunts: Ross and Kelly McGarva and Rhonda and Clark Morris, Lakeview, OR.; Staci and Dan Martin, Reno; Gordon Russell, Jr., Alturas; Stephanie and Dan Nessling, Alturas;Wayne and Marilyn Russell, Marysville and Dr. Craig Russell, Brian and Lisa Russell, Yuba City. He is also survived by many other aunts, uncles and cousins. He will be missed but not forgotten, until we meet again. God says time is but a blink of an eye, until we see you again we cry.

Services will be held at the Likely Fire Hall, Friday, May 14, 2:00 p.m., followed by interment at the Likely Cemetery, Likely, CA. A potluck will follow the services at the Likely Fire Hall.

Memorial contributions may be made to District 1 of California High School Rodeo Association, c/o Debbie Bidwell, 42770 Bidwell Rd., Hat Creek, CA. 96040.

Arrangements under the direction of the Kerr Mortuary in Alturas where friends may call Friday morning from 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

Roy Paul Baker

Roy Paul Baker of Alturas, known to his friends and family as "Paul" was born June 13, 1953 in Sacramento, CA. to Paul Billups Baker and Teresa Frances (Hardesty) Baker.

His date of death was May 4, 2004, in Modoc California. He was 50.

He married Cary Lynn Privette on February 20, 1982, in Alturas, where he and Cary have made their home. Together they have a daughter, Whitney, who was born in 1988. Paul referred to his beautiful daughter as his "Princess."

Paul spent his entire life in Modoc. He graduated from Modoc High School and shortly after, attended college for a few years.

Known for his exceptional carpentry skills, he was a building contractor for several years. More recently, Paul became a Commercial Truck Driver. He enjoyed playing the guitar and had performed as a member of a band in the Tahoe area as a young man.

Paul enjoyed hunting and fishing, more than likely, since birth. Paul spent his time fishing and hunting in several different locations throughout the United States, and his friends and family were always more than happy to be a part of his avid lifestyle. He spent many hunting trips out in the wilderness with life-long friends and family.

Paul served in the Rotary Club in Modoc County for several years. A well-liked and honest person, he will be greatly missed by his family and friends.

Memorial services were held at Faith Baptist Church in Alturas on Friday, May 7 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Rod Bodmer officiating. Paul was laid to rest at the Alturas Cemetery.

He is survived by his wife Caryl L. Baker of Alturas, CA.; daughter Whitney L. Baker of Alturas, CA.; mother Teresa Baker of Gold River, CA.; brother Tom Baker and wife Carol of Fair Oaks, CA.; brother Tim Baker and wife Susan of Fair Oaks, CA.; brother Steve Baker and wife Cheryl of Alturas, CA.; sister Chris Favor of Chico, CA.; sister Therese May and husband Steve of Arnold, CA.; sister Gigi Raymond and husband Tom of Folsom, CA.; God-daughter Alisha Simonson of Bend, OR.; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his older brother John P. Baker in 2002 and father Paul B. Baker in 1987.

Wilma E. Norris

Wilma E. Norris passed away May 7, 2004, after a short illness, at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, CA.

Wilma was born January 5, 1921, in Alturas to Ellen (Toreson) and John Ballard. She was the youngest of three daughters and spent most of her life in Alturas. Wilma graduated from Modoc Union High School in 1938, then married C. Donald Kerr on December 16 of the same year.

In 1945, after Don's service in the U.S. Navy, Wilma and Don purchased Kerr Mortuary, Alturas. They owned and operated Kerr Mortuary serving the people of the Modoc area for almost 30 years. Don passed away on July 5, 1972.

On April 28, 1975, Wilma Married Carl Norris in Carson City, Nevada, then moved to Sacramento to live until his retirement from PG&E in 1976, when they returned to Alturas to live. On May 16, 1990, Carl passed away.

Wilma continued to make her home in Alturas until moving to Redding in 2000. In April of 2003, she returned to live in the care home of Cindy and Don Deiter.

She was a 50-year member and active in Eastern Star, was a member of the Native Daughters of the Golden West, and the Federated Community Church. She loved playing cards, especially Bridge. She also loved traveling. She and Carl, along with Wilma's sisters, Lillian Renner and Iva Simpson, traveled across the United States and back by automobile after Carl's retirement. She also enjoyed several senior bus tours, going to Branson, Missouri, the Lawrence Welk resort, and of course Reno. Wilma loved music, she played the violin and loved to dance.

She is survived by two sons, John Kerr and wife Pat of Alturas; Jim Kerr of Corning; stepson Gary and Lois Norris of Sacramento; and stepdaughter Cheryl and Gary Crossley of Redding.

Grandchildren include Jeff Kerr of Bend, Oregon; Cheryl Knoch of Alturas; Jami Thibodeau of Redding; Shani Kerr of Red Bluff and seven great-grandchildren: Gabriel and Sierra Kerr; Jordan, Tristan and Logan Thibodeau; Courtney and Melissa Knoch.

She was preceded in death by both of her sisters as well as her husbands.

Services were held Monday, May 10, 2004 at 2:00 p.m. from the Kerr Mortuary Chapel and interment followed at the Alturas Cemetery. Dr. Ben Zandstra officiated.

Sports

Modoc hosts North Section title game Saturday, noon

Modoc will host Durham Saturday for the North Section Division III Baseball Championship, with game time set at 12 noon.

Durham beat top seeded Rio Vista 5-4 in 12 innings this week and Modoc beat Hamilton City.

The Modoc Braves had a scare in the opening round of the section baseball playoffs here Friday, but came back to beat Etna 4-2.

Etna jumped up first with a run in the first and a run in the second. Modoc scored one in the second, added one in the fourth to tie and two in the sixth for the win.

Travis Potter got the win for Modoc. Cam Jeffers had a double for the Braves while he, Rich Culp and Marty Stevens each had a pair of hits. Modoc met Hamilton City here Tuesday, winning easily 13-2. The Braves scored eight runs in the fourth and added five in the sixth. Hamilton City scored its two in the fourth inning.

Adam Server got the win for Modoc, giving up just two hits. Culp was three-for-four at the plate, with a double, and Stevens was three-for-three with a double. Shiloh Pierce was three-for-four with one home run and Server was two-for-four.

Modoc coach Brad Server says errors are still an issue, but his starting pitchers have not given up an earned run in the playoffs. The Braves are favored in Saturday's game.

Eppler wins MVP in league golf event

Modoc's Micah Eppler used a very solid back nine to win the Shasta Cascade League's Most Valuable Player in golf last week.

Eppler shot an 83 for the day, four strokes better than second place's Chris Chitwood of Bishop Quinn. Eppler had come into the final tourney ranked third out of the 10 top players and Chitwood was ranked number one.

Modoc's DJ Northrup came in ranked seventh and Brian Weed was ranked 10th. Northrup finished with a 94 and eighth place while Weed had an 84, finishing in 10th. "Eppler started the day in third and his front nine was shaky," said coach Harold Montague. "But he was sticking about every approach shot within about 10 feet of the cup on the back nine."

Montague explained that players began the day ranked 1-10 and awarded up to 100 points for their finish in league. They competed in two nine-hole matches with a maximum of 50 points each. The points from league and the individual tourney were tabulated to come up with the MVP and six others who made All League.

Montague pointed out that this marks the fourth consecutive year that Modoc has won the league team crown and the MVP.

Modoc, with players Eppler, Northrup, Weed, Taylor Dunn, Ross Montague and Charles Knox, and Weed High School will represented the SCL at the North Section Division II Mid-School Golf Championship in Graeagle Tuesday.

The Braves placed third in the event, with a team score of 400. Colusa won with a score of 487, and Pierce was second with a 490.

Individually, Modoc's scores were: Eppler 87; Weed 96; Northrup 97; Montague 110; and Knox 121.

None of Modoc's golfers qualified for the section finals, and they had to shoot at least an 83.

Modoc plays host, in Weed, to SCL Track championships

Modoc High School will host the Shasta Cascade League Championships at College of the Siskiyous in Weed today, starting at about 11 a.m. The boys meet will come down to Trinity and Modoc for the top spot and the girls favorite may be Mt. Shasta with Modoc right there.

Our apologies to the track squad and coach Craig Flournoy last week for failing to get their results in the paper. We'll have those results, plus all the updates in this story. The Modoc varsity boys track team won the Burney Invitational Track meet, with Butte Valley second, and Big Valley, third.

Leading the way for the Braves were Scott McMaster and Scott Joyce who won two events each. McMaster topped the shot put with a 48-2.5 effort and the discus with a toss of 134-7. Joyce won the mile in 5:01.78 and the two-mile in 11:00.

Max Wise won the high jump with a 5-8 leap. Micah Eppler took a second in the triple jump at 36-6. Brad Bell was second in the 110 high hurdles at 19.0 and Cory Bell was third in the shot at 40-3. Wise was fourth in the 440 at 58.28. Ryan Carrithers was fifth at 59.53. Sixth places went to Eppler in the high jump at 5-2; Clint Nardoni in the 440 at 60.99 and in the 300 hurdles at 50.31.

Modoc's varsity girls placed third in the event, with Sadie Harrison winning the 440 in 1:08.48 and Jennifer Joyce winning the 880 in 3:01.72.

Ann Sanchez took a third in the shot put at 25-3.25 and in the discus at 80 feet. Harrison was third in the 200 meters in 31.13 and in the 100 meters in 14.60. Joyce took a third in the 440 at 1:13.74. Kim Crnkovic was fifth in the shot at 23-3 and Joyce was sixth in the 200 at 32,68.

Modoc's junior varsity girls took third in Burney. Danielle Moriarity led the way by winning the mile in 6:38.47 and the two-mile in 14:44. Chris Abbott won the shot at 26-10. Abbott also was second in the discus at 70-7.

Marielle Nardoni was fourth in the 440 at 1:24.09 and fifth in the 100 low hurdles at 21:41. Nardoni was fifth in the 880 at 3:37.22. Kelly Campagna took a sixth in the 200 at 33.75.

Grant Hall led the junior varsity boys to a second place finish by winning the discus at 115-2.5. Hall also placed third in the shot at 39-2. Matt Wilke was third in the 100 meters at 12.47. Jake Gray took fourth in the discus at 97-3 and Len Gladu was fourth in the 300 low hurdles at 54.28. Wilkie was fourth in the 200 at 26.86 and fifth in the 110 hurdles 21.0. Brandon Anderson took a fifth in the two mile at 13:16. Justin Mason was sixth in the long jump at 15-8. Brett Joyce was sixth in the triple jump at 29-0, and Sheridan Crutcher was sixth in the 880 at 2:37.92.

Scott McMaster is nursing an injury, but will be competing in the league meet today and is expected to be at full form.

At the Mazama Invitational, Joyce took a fifth in the 3000 meters, clocking a solid time of 9:37.50. Wise tied for third in the high jump at 5-8.

Modoc's Scott Joyce took in a second May 1 in Lakeview in the 3,000 meters, clocking a 10:09.94. The winning time was 9:45.21. Joyce also placed fourth in the 1,500 meters at 4:33.11.

Amanda Moriarity and Jennifer Joyce led the Modoc JV girls to first place in Lakeview. Moriarity won the 1500 meters in 6:09.47 and the 3,000 meters in 13:44.56. Joyce won the 400 meters in 1:09.58 and the 800 meters in 3:07.33.

Marielle Nardoni took second in the 400 meters in 1:22.46 and fourth in the 800 at 3:45/03. Chris Abbott tied for first in the 110 high hurdles at 20.24, placed third in the shot put at 29-4.75 and second in the discus at 77-10.5. Kelly Campagna was fifth in the 200 at 32.6 and sixth in the 100 at 15.56.

Modoc junior varsity boys were third in Lakeview. Matt Wilkie won the 100 meters in 12.53 and the 200 meters in 25.10. Jake Gray won the shot put at 35-7.5 and the discus at 998-4.

Len Gladu was second in the hurdles at 54.68 and Brett Joyce was third at 57.21. Brandon Anderson was third in the 3000 meters in 12:15.30. Sheridan Crutcher took fifth in the 800 meters in 2:26.21 and David Ervine was sixth at 2:31.09. Gladu was sixth in the long jump at 14-2.75. Taylor Dunn placed third in the high jump at 4-10 and Justin Mason was fourth at 4-6.

In the Westwood meet, Scott Joyce won the 1600 meters in 4:58.9 and the 3200 meters in 10:47.3. Max Wise won the high jump at 5-7.5. Ryan Carrithers took a second in the 1600 meters in 5:32 and placed third in the 3200 meters in 12:24.2. Wise was third in the 200 meters in 25.45. Clint Nardoni was third in the 400 meters at 58.06. Carrithers was fourth in the 800 meters in 2:20.6 and Brad Bell was fourth in the high hurdles at 19.75.

For the JV boys, Wilke took a second in the 100 meters in 12.49. Jake Gray was third in the shot at 42-2 and fifth in the discus at 94-4. Cox was fourth in the high jump at 4-10. Wilkie was sixth in the high hurdles at 19.86.

For the varsity girls, Joyce won the 800 meters in 2:50.7 and was second in the 400 meters in 73.22. Jessica Gray was second in the 110 hurdles at 21.6. Sanchez was second in the discus at 76-2 and third in the shot at 25-9. Gray was fourth in the 300 hurdles at 62.58 and was sixth in the 400 at 77.86.

For the JV girls, Moriarity won the 1600 meters in 6:14.9 and the 3200 meters in 13:56.4. She was also second in the 800 meters at 3:02.9. Abbott was second in the hurdles at 20.8. Campagna was third in the 400 meters in 76.3 and fourth in the 100 meters in 15.37. Abbott was third in the shot put at 27-4 and in the discus at 71-10.

Modoc fisher folks asked to support hatchery finding bill

With cutbacks, seemingly annually at the California Department of Fish and Game, Modoc County has no in-county game warden and trout plants have all but vanished this season.

Local sportspeople are urging locals to support Assembly Bill 2280, by Assemblyman Dave Cogdill, of Modesto, that would dedicate a portion of the sportfishing license revenue directly to hatcheries and fish planting facilities programs.

According to Cogdill, the DFG receives about $45 million per year in fishing license revenues and it's only fair that some of that money be earmarked to support the hatcheries and fish plant programs.

Most anglers believe their license fees are used for raising and planting fish they catch, states an article in Western Outdoor News, but that is just not the case. The funds go into the DFG's Fish and Game Preservation Fund which is used for a wide variety of programs that have little, if anything, to do with fishing.

AB 2280 would dedicate an amount of money from fishing license revenue to support the hatcheries and planting programs at an amount that would level the funding needed to maintain existing hatcheries.

Write a letter supporting the legislation to: The Honorable Dave Cogdill, California State Assemblyman, State Capitol, Sacramento, Ca. 95814. And do it now.

Ride Safer--Don't forget Alturas bike rodeo Friday

Don't forget the Bicycle Rodeo May 14 at Alturas Elementary School, starting at 2 p.m.

The Alturas Police Department, California Highway Patrol and Alturas BoyScouts Troop 56, are sponsoring the rodeo. Participants should bring their bike and bike helmet. There will be a helmet check as well as bike equipment check and safe riding demonstrations.

The rodeo will be a major benefit for bike riders as it will stress traffic laws and safe bicyle riding. It will also be a fun event.

In addition, there will be a drawing for four free bicycles. TEACH, Inc. is also providing hot dogs and sodas.

Winners of Arrowhead Mom's Day tourney shot 63

The winners of the Arrowhead Mother's Day Scratch and Scramble golf tournament was the team of Micah and Jay Eppler, Jim Barney and Lillian McKenzie who shot 63.

In second place with a score of 64 was the team of Kathie and Bradley Widby, Gary McClellan and Marv Conner; third place with a 66 went to Nona Vance, Marlene Blevins, Kelly Bagwell, Morgan Bagwell and Jim Widby.

May 20th , 2004

News

City will lose chunk of its street money

The City of Alturas will lose $45,000 of its annual $161,000 in motor vehicle license fees, under deals made by the new Governor.

According to City Treasurer Kathie Alves, the loss of funds will have a negative impact on the street department. Residents will only see pothole repairs, she said.

That loss of the funds comes on the top of the cancellation or postponement of several large street improvement projects that had been approved in the city. The most notable of those was the improvement of Warner Street from State Route 299 to Carlos Street.

Alves also said that the state is changing its payment of sales tax from a monthly basis to two time per year. That will create come cash flow problems for the City, she said. Alturas generally receives about $450,000 in sales tax during a year.

Alves said there are other hits to the City budget, but none as serious as those above.

Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said on the surface, it looks as though the county will fare better than anticipated earlier this year.

He said the state will take some of the vehicle license fees for two years and will then guarantee the county keeps its share of property taxes. Maxwell said the County Road Department will face some hits in road funds, and other departments have indicated they will be able to adjust and make it through these budget times. Projected major impacts to Social Services and public and mental health are not as severe as originally anticipated.

The California State Association of Counties, CSAC, praised the budget package unveiled by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as it relates to counties.

"We've been working closely with the Governor on this agreement and we are truly happy to see our dream of long-term state and local government fiscal reform becoming a reality," said Paul Stein, CSAC president.

."Counties are willing to do our part to assist the state during this time of fiscal crisis by agreeing to short-term pain, because this package definitely contains long-term gain for California Counties."

The package includes a temporary two-year local government reduction of $1.3 billion annually and makes the current vehicle license fee cut permanent. This package also comes with the Governor's promise to support a constitutional amendment that would guarantee revenue stability and mandate reform of local government.

Five Alturas Park trees to be removed

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors has approved the removal and replacement of five trees along Main Street in front of the Veterans' Memorial Hall and Alturas Chamber of Commerce

According to the Modoc County Department of Public Works, the poor health of the trees, their proximity to power lines and overall appearance were the reasons for their removal

Pacific Power will remove the trees and provide funds to purchase replacement trees at no cost to the county. Pacific Power is also providing funds to replace trees which were removed earlier on the north side of the park along Water Street

"Modoc County appreciates the efforts of Pacific Power to improve the appearance of the Memorial Park," states the Public Works Department.

New administrators take on Modoc High

Modoc High School will have new administration for the coming year. The Modoc Joint Unified School District has hired a new principal and vice-principal

Ron Handel, of Ripon, Ca., will take over the principal's duties as of July 1. He comes to Modoc with solid experience as a principal and in administration

The vice-principal position will go to Lane Bates, a Modoc High School teacher and coach, who has also served in administration. He has the support of the teaching staff. Bates also takes over July 1.

Modoc jobless rate dips to 9.5 percent

The unemployment rate for April dipped to 9.5 percent in Modoc County, down from March's 11.8 percent

The labor force was tagged at 4,340, which is down from March's 4,400. In March, 520 people were reported as unemployed, while in April, the number was 410. Last year, Modoc's unemployment rate in April was 9.4 percent.

The State unemployment rate for April was 6.1 percent and the national rate was 5.4 percent

The biggest increase for April was the seasonal hiring of farm labor, which went from 330 employees in March to 430 employees in April

Modoc is ranked 39th out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen County has a 6.6 percent unemployment rate, ranking it 27th and Siskiyou has a rate of 11.2 percent, ranking it 43rd. The highest jobless rate is in Imperial County at 20.1 percent, and the lowest is in San Luis Obispo at 3.2 percent.

Fort Bidwell gets set for Memorial Day BBQ

Preparations for the annual Fort Bidwell Barbecue are well underway to present the public event on Sunday, May 30. Join the fun with great food, booths, and raffle prizes to benefit the Fort Bidwell Volunteer Fire Department and Civic Club

Steak or chicken will be grilled and served to adults, and hamburgers with all the fixings, served to the kids. The good times start at 11:30 a.m. and continue until 4:00 p.m. or until sold out; so arrive early

Space will be available for $10 per booth for those who have crafts, art or other items to sell. Call Laurie at 279-2106 to reserve a space

As always, the barbecue will be held at the Civic Park in beautiful downtown Fort Bidwell. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for kids. Kids under six accompanied by a paying adult eat free.

"Fort Bidwell Saloon" will be open for beer, wine, and cocktail purchases, to those 21 and over.

Modoc Fair seeks 2004 ambassadors

The Modoc Fair is seeking the 2004 Fair Queen and Princess. The Fair Queen and Princess will act as ambassadors representing Modoc County at various functions, fairs, parades and rodeos, locally and in other counties. The Ambassadors sought will be young women with the highest qualities in horsemanship, personality and appearance. Those interested in applying need to be between the ages of 16 and 21 and residents of Modoc County for at least the rest of the year. Refer to the Application and Rules for additional requirements

Applications are due May 28, 2004, and are available in Alturas at L&B Ranch Supply, Seab's True Value, Modoc Farm Supply, Plumas Bank, and in Cedarville at Page's Market and the Fair Office. For additional information or to have the application package sent via email, please contact the Fair Office (530)279-2315.

Obituaries:

Mamie O. Johnson

Mamie Ophelia Johnson passed away May 18, 2004 in Alturas, CA. Services will be held at graveside at Alturas Cemetery on Saturday, May 22 at 10 a.m. with fellowship to follow. Kerr Mortuary is handling arrangements. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the service. Mrs. Johnson was born in Millerton, OK. on June 18, 1920. She had been an Alturas resident for 41 years. An obituary will be forthcoming

Vonetia Heard Phipps

Vonetia Heard Phipps was born on April 12, 1903, to William and Annie Heard, three miles north of Lake City, California. Vonetia spent all of her life with the exception of the last nine years, in Lake City, just one mile from the cabin where she was born

She had three children, Joseph Lee Parman, Joy Lu Wimer Wilson and Freda Harriet Wimer Wilson. Vonetia passed away in Yreka, California, on May 16, 2004, after a short illness

Vonetia was preceded in death by her beloved son, Joe. She leaves behind daughter, Freda and Jim Wilson of Yreka; daughter, Joy and Harry Wilson of Winnemucca, Nevada; Bettie Parman of Lake City; grandchildren Carol Green, Nina Heard, Bonnie Bunyard, Walter Wilson, Julie Wilson, Angela Estes, Shauna Wilson, Matt Wilson, Kelli Nichol; 21 great-grandchildren and six great-great grandchildren.

Vonetia died peacefully on this date following a fall four days earlier where she broke her hip. Vonetia had been a Christian all of her life. She has gone to her heavenly mansion, prepared for her by the Savior whom she loved and trusted. She is to be laid to rest in Lake City, California Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Madrone Hospice, 255 Collier Circle, Yreka, California, 96097

Graveside services and interment will be held on Thursday, May 20, 2004, at 1:00 p.m. in the Lake City Cemetery in Lake City Cemetery in Lake City. Girdner Funeral Chapel in Yreka is in charge of arrangements

William 'Bill' Lehmkuhl

William "Bill" Lehmkuhl died May 5, 2004 in California Pines of an apparent heart attack. He was born November 25, 1942 in Missouri. His brother, Jim Lehmkuhl, is in rehab at the Northern California Rehab Center following cardiovascular problems. Jim is the owner of Jim's TV in Alturas, and William and he operated the store. The store is closed during Jim's rehabilitation

Services for William have not yet been determined.

Jonathan Dwain Davis

Memorial services for Jonathan (Jon) Dwain Davis will be held on Monday, May 24, 2004, at the Fort Bidwell Indian gymnasium at 11:00 a.m. A potluck will follow. This day is special because it would have been his 29th birthday. Jon was born in Lakeport, CA. on May 24, 1975 and passed away from this life August 26, 2003 in Broken Arrow, OK

Jon started his schooling in Clearlake, CA. and moved to good ole' Surprise Valley where he started third grade and graduated from Surprise Valley Elementary and Surprise Valley High School in 1994

He participated in the Sierra Nevada Job Corps and graduated from the Cement/Masonry trade. He later attended the Heavy Equipment Operators School in Springfield, OR. from which he successfully graduated. He loved to travel to different places and "see the world," as he would say

Jon will be missed by his mother Glenda Frease and stepfather Bob Frease of Fort Bidwell, CA.; brothers: Teo Knight, Fort Bidwell, CA.; Derrick Garcia, Red Bluff, CA.; sisters: Ella Mae Davis, Tacoma, WA.; Kathy Bean, Coweta, OK.; Dorothy Davis, Redding, CA.; Cardina Frease, Mt. Vernon, WA.; uncles: Eugene Arnett, Cedarville, CA.; Ronnie Barr, Bishop, CA.; "Uncle Rogelio," Alturas, CA. He leaves behind lots of aunts, cousins, numerous relatives and friends. Jon was always happy, easygoing and such a conversationalist, he loved people

He was preceded in death by his father Bruce Davis, maternal grandparents Rose Williams and McGill Arnett and paternal grandparents, Weldon and Florence Davis

"bJon has a very special place in my heart and I will miss him very much. Love Mom."

Sports

Modoc wins Div. III section baseball title

It took some last inning heroics, but the Modoc Braves won the North Section Division III baseball title here Saturday, with a 6-4 win over Durham.

Modoc went into the final inning trailing 4-3, but a home run by Adam Server brought in two runs for the Braves and the win.

Modoc started early with three runs in the first inning and Durham scored one. Durham added another run in the third and two in the fifth to take the 4-3 lead.

In the bottom of the seventh, Travis Potter singled and moved to second on a ground out. Potter scored on Joey Catania's single. With Catania on base, Server came to the plate and smashed the two-run shot.

Potter got the win for Modoc, allowing eight hits, and striking out five. Potter also had a home run in the first inning. Marty Stevens had a double, while Server had three hits in the game and Potter, two.

The section crown is added to the Braves' Shasta Cascade League championship this season.

Modoc won 16 of its last 18 games, with coach Brad Server crediting a total team effort and a belief by the team that it was never out of any ballgame. "This was the sixth time this season that we have won a game in our last at bat," Server said. "We weren't intimidated by pitching in the playoffs and our pitching was outstanding. Travis and Adam allowed just three earned runs in the three playoff games. I've never had a team as spirited as this one. They became a family about midway through the season."

Rich Culp was selected as the Shasta Cascade League Most Valuable Player, while seniors Marty Stevens and Adam Server and juniors Travis Potter and Joey Catania were named All-league.

Modoc boys win SCL track

The Modoc Braves varsity boys won the Shasta Cascade League track title last Thursday in Weed, easily outdistancing Trinity and the rest of the loop. The Braves finished with 175.5 points, Trinity 83, Fall River 60, Weed 51, Mt. Shasta 43.5, Burney 32 and Etna 24.

Modoc now travels to the Division III Championships May 21 at Yuba College. The top two finishers at league and the top two third place finishers from the SCL, Greater Mountain Valley and Sacramento Valley Leagues qualify.

The Braves were led by Scott McMaster and Max Wise, both of whom had outstanding days.

McMaster won the shot put at 46-3 1/4 and the discus at 135-8. Wise leapt 5-11 to win the high jump, went 39-3 for second in the triple jump and was fourth in the 400 meters in 54.8. Jared Cox won the pole vault at 9-3. Cory Bell took second in the shot at 41-6 and Jake Gray was fourth at 38-1 3/4. Micah Eppler took a second in the high jump at 5-7, third in the triple jump at 36-10 1/2, and fifth in the long jump at 16-2 1/4.

John Yeier was fourth in the long jump at 16-3, fourth in the 110 high hurdles in 20.7 and fourth in the 300 hurdles in 48.4. Scott Joyce took third in the 3200 meters in 10:21.9 with Ryan Carrithers fifth at 12:08, and Sheridan Crutcher sixth at 12:09.3. Joyce was fifth in the 1600 meters in 4:54.8 and sixth in the long jump at 14-9 1/4. Justin Mason took a third in the pole vault at 8 feet. Cox was fifth in the triple jump at 34-7 1/2. Grant Hall was third in the discus at 104 feet and Gray was fifth at 100-1 1/2. Brad Bell was second in the 110 high hurdles at 18.8. Matt Wilkie was fifth at 22.8 in the high hurdles. Carrithers took a third in the 800 meters in 2:18.8. Crutcher was sixth at 2:23.2. Clint Nardoni took third in the 300 hurdles in 47.0 and Wilke was fourth in the 200 meters in 25.0. Nardoni tied for fifth in the high jump at 5-4.

Modoc's varsity girls placed fourth in the league meet. Mt. Shasta won with 193.3, Trinity was second at 118, followed by Modoc, Burney, Etna and Fall River.

Sadie Harrison led the Braves with a second in the 400 meters in 1:06.3, fourth in the 200 meters in 30.0, and fifth in the 100 at 14.0. Ann Sanchez was second in the discus at 79-10 1/2 and fifth in the shot at 25-2 1/2. Jessica Gray was fifth in the 800 meters and sixth in the 100 hurdles in 21.0. Kim Crnkovic was fourth in the discus at 69-11 and sixth in the shot at 24-2 3/4. The junior varsity girls had a great day as well, with Danielle Moriarity, Jennifer Joyce and Chis Abbott winning events.

Moriarity won the 1600 meters in 6:23.4 and the 3200 meters on 14:07. Abbott won the discus in 79-9, the 300 hurdles in 1:00.7 and was second in the shot at 25-6 3/4 and the 100 hurdles in 19.9. Joyce won the 400 meters in 1:07.4 and the 800 meters in 2:50.8. Abbott was second in the 100 hurdles in 19.9. Joyce was second in the 3200 at 19:47.7 and Moriarity was second in the 800 meters in 3:00.2. Kelly Campagna was second in the 300 hurdles, third in the 400 meters and in the 3200 meters. Marielle Nardoni took third in the 300 hurdles in 1:11.1 and in the 1600 meters in 7:43.9.

Brandon Anderson won the 3200 meters for the Modoc JV boys in 12:21.6. Brett Joyce was fifth in the triple jump at 29-9 and sixth in the 300 hurdles in 55.5.

Brave girls named to All-league team

Three Modoc softball players were named to the Shasta Cascade All-league team this week: Kristen Taylor, Amy Ridgway and Allison Campagna. Taylor was also selected to the Lions All-Star team for northern California.

Fish Derby set for Saturday morning

The 47th Annual Alturas Rotary Club Fish Derby is scheduled for May 22, 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. at Pine Creek Reservoir.

The derby is open to kids ages 12 and under, who must bring their own fishing gear. There will be a drawing for a boy's and girl's bike. In addition, there are prizes for the first fish, boy and girl; most fish, boy and girl; and largest fish, boy and girl.

The Rotary Club is providing free hot dogs and sodas for kids and parents. To get to Pine Creek Reservoir, turn left at Veteran's Park by the Steam engine, go to the Modoc Refuge road and turn right, follow that road to Pine Creek Boulevard and turn left, turn right at the stop sign on that road and Pine Creek Reservoir is up on the table lands.

Locals head to state high school finals

Tulelake's Jessica Hemphill, named All-Around Cowgirl in District I of the California High School Rodeo Association, leads the district competitors to the CHSRA State Finals in Red Bluff June 13-20.

Alturas' Michael Sphar is the number-one ranked bull rider from the district and Chris Brown, of Alturas, is ranked fifth.

Hemphill is ranked first in breakaway roping, second in goat tying, third in team roping as a heeler, and fourth in pole bending.

Junior Horse Show seeking riders

The 49th annual Modoc County Sheriff's Posse Junior Horse Show for youths eight to 18, will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 29 at the Junior Showgrounds, Alturas.

There is no entry fee. Ribbons will be awarded. The junior division is for ages 8 to 13; Senior Division for ages 14 through 18. Events offered include Trail Horse, Western Equitation, Western Pleasure, Buckaroo Class, Barrel Cloverleaf, Pole Bending, Keyhold Race.

Applications are now available at L&B Ranch Supply, Modoc Farm Supply, Pedotti's Saddlery, Likely General Store, Adin Supply, Page's Market in Cedarville and Modoc Veterinary Center and Davis Creek Mercantile. This year's committee includes: Show chairman Jerry Wendland, Don Blair, Chuck Browning and Eric Nelson. The Posse officers include Captain Phil Vermillion; Lieutenant Bert Moody; Secretary/Treasurer, Mike Morgan; First Director Mick Baldwin; Second Director Jerry Wendland; Third Director Fred Ingraham.

For more information please call Show Chairman Jerry Wendland at 233-2607. Entries must be postmarked by May 24 and mailed to Modoc County Sheriff's Posse, P.O. Box 1408.

May 27th , 2004

News

Modoc facing higher wildland fire potential

The Warner Mountains are included in an area of potential higher wildland fire danger this season, thanks in part to a warmer spring and low precipitation.

The National Interagency Fire Center reports that an "exceptionally warm March has led to significant snow melt and early green-up of annual grasses. Spring and summer should be warmer than normal with rainfall at or below normal. This could lead to an early start in the fire season." Southeastern Oregon is also expected to face severe fire danger this coming season.

While there has been some precipitation this May, the warm March and April dropped the snowpack in the Warners. So far this month, .90 inches of precipitation has fallen. There is some rain expected today and tomorrow, so May could actually come close to its 1.2 inch average. According to the April survey, Cedar Pass had 33 inches of snow, containing 14.6 inches of water the first of April. According to the latest report, that has dropped by more than half.

In April, Blue Lake had only eight inches of snow. In January's snow survey, Blue Lake had 26 inches of snow containing 8.9 inches of water. Cedar Pass measured 43 inches of snow with 15.3 inches of water. Barber Creek had 37 inches of snow containing 12.4 inches of water. 49 Mountain (Nevada) had 22 inches of snow with 4.8 inches of water.

Fire season outlook and Forest Service recreation resources available

The Modoc National Forest will begin fire season on May 30 by increasing the availability of engine crews, lookouts and other resources.

Nan Madden, Fire Prevention Officer stated, "Although the forest has received rain recently, seasonal trends indicate warming and drying, with live fuel moistures already below average for this time of year."

Homeowners are encouraged to begin fuel reduction activities around their homes in anticipation of the upcoming fire season. Burn permits and campfire permits have been required since May 1 and are available at all Forest Service offices.

Engines at Buck Creek, Cedarville, Alturas, Canby, Crowder Flat, Adin and Long Bell stations and the Blue Mountain, Timber Mountain, Round Mountain and Happy Camp lookouts will be staffed beginning May 30. Manzanita lookout will be staffed by the middle of June.

The Modoc Hotshot Crew, stationed at Canby, is available for assignments nationwide, and four fire prevention patrol units are currently patrolling the Modoc National Forest. .

On May 30 the Modoc Interagency Command Center will begin a seven-day-a-week operation.

Currently, four full-time dispatchers in the Command Center in Alturas dispatch for the Modoc National Forest, Lava Beds National Monument and the Klamath Basin Fish and Wildlife Service.

With Memorial Day around the corner the Modocmpgrounds for those ready to enjoy the great outdoors in a variety of settings from Blue Lake in the South Warner Mountains to Reservoir C on the Devil's Garden to Ash Creek near Adin, California.

Cave Lake campground on the Warner Mountain Ranger District and Medicine Lake campground on the Doublehead Ranger District remain closed due to snow. All other campgrounds are open.

Water is not available in all campgrounds and some campgrounds require that water be boiled prior to use; campgrounds with this restriction have signs alerting campers

Fishing at Duncan Reservoir, Reservoir C, and in Ash Creek has been good.

Likely water system to Fire Department?

The small Likely Water System, now owned by Union Pacific, may be donated to the Likely Fire Department

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors discussed options presented by Modoc Planner Scott Kessler Tuesday. Union Pacific no longer has a rail line through Likely and wanted to get rid of the water system.

Kessler said there were four options on the table: to donate the system to the county for operation; donate the system to the Likely Fire Department; not accept the water system, meaning UP would probably remove it, requiring property owners to drill new wells; or the individuals on the system purchase the system and operate it as a small water system.

Following discussion, the Board felt the Likely Fire Department was the logical place to go. The LFD has indicated it would accept the donation and operate the system. Kessler said there are few actual users on the Likely water system.

Kessler will advise UP of the county's desires and it will be up to UP to decide what they want to do.

Medicine Lake geothermal project goes to Federal Court

A coalition of local, regional and national environmental organizations announced the filing of a lawsuit in Federal District Court in Sacramento to prevent construction of a massive complex of geothermal powerplants within the remote and spectacular Medicine Lake Highlands northeast of Mt. Shasta.

Led by the Save Medicine Lake Coalition, four diverse but united conservation groups--Medicine Lake Citizens for Quality Environment, Klamath Forest Alliance, California Wilderness Coalition and Fall River Wild Trout Foundation--filed suit in federal court on May 18, challenging the U.S. Government's approval of the first two geothermal powerplants proposed by Calpine Corporation within the Medicine Lake caldera 30 miles east of Mt. Shasta and 10 miles south of the Lava Beds National Monument. The Medicine Lake Highlands is a national treasure of word-class stature, boasting outstanding views of snow-capped mountain peaks, pristine alpine lakes, and deep, old-growth forests. For hundreds of years, Medicine Lake has drawn large numbers of Native Americans from throughout the West for communion, spiritual healing, cultural education and meditation. The area also provides outstanding opportunities for solitude, primitive recreation, and aesthetic enjoyment for thousands of Americans each year. The geothermal projects at Fourmile Hill and Telephone Flat would be located on National Forest lands within three miles of Medicine Lake. Their development would transform the beautiful Medicine Lake Highlands into an ugly, noisy, stinking, industrial wasteland. Each project involves construction of numerous 150-foot high drilling rigs and excavation of several 750,000-gallon toxic waste sumps, construction of nine-story, 49-megawatt powerplants on numerous 15-acre pads stripped of all vegetation, erection of miles of high-tension transmission lines and towers and above-ground pipelines, grading of miles of dusty gravel roads, year-long drilling of test and production wells up to 8,000 feet in depth, grading of at least of 12 new 5.5-acre drill pads (each 'of' the size of four football fields), the incessant roar of 5,900 horsepower drilling machines and the constant rumble of scores of heavy trucks transporting machinery, equipment, water, construction materials, and workers back and forth throughout the formerly peaceful forests, meadows and mountains surrounding Medicine Lake.

The outstanding vistas from the adjacent Mt. Hoffman Roadless Area and the Lava Beds National Monument would be marred forever by huge transmission towers and lines and towering steam plumes from the powerplants 50 and 70-foot high cooling towers that would, together with the plants' 65 and 90-foot high turbine buildings, dominate the horizon for miles. The eerie glow of the night lighting on and around the 150-foot tall drilling rigs, which would operate 24 hours a day, would be visible throughout the 45-year lifetime of the projects.

These power projects also pose a severe threat to the pristine water quality of Medicine Lake and the downstream headwaters of Fall River, California's premier fly fishing resource. Calpine intends to inject highly toxic acids into the geothermal wells in order to increase the generation of stream; a process that would, according to noted Professor of Hydrology, Robert Curry, permanently pollute groundwater within the region and potentially endanger both Medicine Lake and the Fall River's wild trout, Shasta crayfish and other endangered species.

Ironically, although Calpine's project would be heavily subsidized with millions of dollars of taxpayer funds from the California Energy Commission, none of the power from the project would be available for use in California. Instead, Calpine proposes to sell the power to the Boneville Power Administration in Oregon for use outside of California.

Janie Painter, Chairperson of the Save Medicine Lake Coalition, denounced the Forest Service's decision to approve these geothermal plants as "an environmental abomination." "Of the dozens of geothermal sites throughout the western United States available for power plant development, the Medicine Lake Highlands is absolutely the worst conceivable location to place these monstrous industrial operations," Ms. Painter pointed out. "To allow Calpine to transform the sacred Medicine Lake Highlands into an industrial zone is like chopping down our cathedrals for firewood," observed Ms. Painter. "This environmental and cultural disaster is being imposed over the vigorous objectives of hundreds of environmentalists, Native Americans, sports fishermen, recreationists and resource experts, solely so that the project proponent, Calpine Corporation, can scoop up over $50 million dollars in free taxpayer subsidies, all for less than 100 megawatts of power that won't even be available in California," noted Ms. Painter.

"These are public lands, and Calpine intends to use taxpayer funds to destroy them," objected Ryan Henson, Regional Conservation Director for the California Wilderness Coalition. A naturalist by training, Mr. Henson pointed out that "extensive stands of old-growth forest and habitat for rare and endangered species would be cut down or bulldozed into oblivion, and the projects would unleash the staccato thunder of huge, 10-story illuminated drilling rigs, operating around the clock for years within a remote semi-wilderness shattering its tranquillity for wildlife and recreationists alike.

"Unless we secure protection from the courts, Calpine's geothermal projects would create an environmental nightmare," concluded Mr. Henson. The lawsuit alleges the Forest Service's violation of a host of federal environmental laws, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) and the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (GSA). According to Stephan Volker, the environmental groups' attorney, "In approving the industrialization of the Medicine Lake Highlands, the Forest Service thumbed its nose not only at the public, but at the environmental laws of this country.

"Contrary to NEPA and other environmental laws, before leasing these lands for geothermal production, the Forest Service never evaluated in an environmental impact statement, the threshold question whether the Medicine Lake Highlands should be sacrificed for geothermal development rather than preserved for wildlife habitat, aesthetic enjoyment and public recreation," explained attorney Volker.

Fort Bidwell hosts Memorial Day BBQ

Preparations for the annual Fort Bidwell Barbecue are well underway to present the public event on Sunday, May 30. Join the fun with great food, booths, and raffle prizes to benefit the Fort Bidwell Volunteer Fire Department and Civic Club.

Steak or chicken will be grilled and served to adults, and hamburgers with all the fixings, served to the kids. The good times start at 11:30 a.m. and continue until 4:00 p.m. or until sold out; so arrive early.

Space will be available for $10 per booth for those who have crafts, art or other items to sell. Call Laurie at 279-2106 to reserve a space.

As always, the barbecue will be held at the Civic Park in beautiful downtown Fort Bidwell. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for kids, available at the entrance. Kids under six accompanied by a paying adult eat free.

"Fort Bidwell Saloon" will be open for beer, wine, and cocktail purchases, to those 21 and over.

Obituaries:

Mamie O. Johnson

Mamie Ophelia Johnson, 83, passed away peacefully May 18, 2004, in Alturas, CA.

Born Mamie Ophelia Flowers on June 18, 1920, in Millerton, Oklahoma, she had 12 brothers and sisters. She married Alford Alonzo Johnson on June 22, 1940, in Idebal, OK. and was a homemaker, loving mother, and an Alturas resident for 43 years. She loved her garden and flowers and enjoyed the time she spent working in it. She also enjoyed quilting and spending time with her grandchildren and children. .

She was preceded in death by two of her children, daughter Wilma Carol Johnson of Alturas, in 1997, and son Lyndale Johnson in 1974. Her husband of 63 years, passed away on January 12, 1980.

She is survived by her son, Alford Lee Johnson of Alturas, CA.; daughters Myrita Vee Dial of Naples, Texas and Linda F. Beachell of Beaverton, OR.; son Larry Dewayne Johnson of White City, OR. She is also survived by brothers Joel Ray Flowers of North Bend, OR. and Elton Flowers of Salem, OR.; sisters Clauzell Smith of Broken Bow, Oklahoma and Iona Jones, Houston, Texas; 20 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. Mrs. Johnson also leaves many caring friends in Alturas.

The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted a graveside service at the Alturas Cemetery on Saturday, May 22 at 10 a.m. A time of fellowship followed. Kerr Mortuary was in charge of arrangments.

Mary Ann Madden

Alturas resident Mary Ann Madden, 56, passed away unexpectedly on May 25, 2004, in Redding, CA. Services will be held in Alturas with date to be announced. Arrangements are being made with Desert Rose Funeral Chapel of Lakeview, OR. Mrs. Madden was employed at Desert Rose Casino in Alturas. She and her family have made Alturas their home for over 14 years. Mrs. Madden's obituary will be forthcoming.

Vicki Christensen

A memorial graveside service for Vicki Anne Christensen will be held at the Likely Cemetery on Saturday, June 12 at 2 p.m. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the service.

Born March 2, 1947, in San Francisco, Calif. to C. Brunel "Bru" and Barbara Don Christensen, Vicki was reared in Likely, graduated from South Fork Elementary School and Modoc High School. She died of natural causes in Carmichael, CA. on February 1, 2004.

She is survived by her loving son, Gerald Watts of Sacramento; her mother, Barbara D. Reavley of Sacramento and sister Jan Christensen of Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

Remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

Cindy Stefani

A memorial graveside service for Cindy Stefani will be held Saturday, June 5 at 4 p.m. at the Lake City Cemetery. Potluck fellowship to follow at the Lake City Fire Hall.

The fire hall will be open ahead of time to accommodate remembrances and food dishes.

Sports

McMaster goes on to North Section Finals

Scott McMaster is the only Modoc track athlete who will move on to the North Section CIF Finals next Friday at West Valley.

McMaster won the shot put with a heave of 48-8. Only the winner at the small schools meet qualifies to move on. McMaster also placed second in the discus with a 142-2.5 toss.

Modoc's Max Wise placed second in the high jump, clearing 5-8, two inches off the winning height. Overall, the varsity boys team tied for second with 62 points, with Durham winning the title with 77.

Wise placed fourth in the triple jump at 38-11 and Micah Eppler placed fifth at 38-7.5. Eppler placed fourth in the high jump at 5-6. Scott Joyce took a third in the 1600 meters in 10:31. Clint Nardoni was sixth in the 300 hurdles at 46.0. Cory Bell was sixth in the shot at 40-0 and Brad Bell was sixth in the 100 hurdles at 19.0.

The Modoc junior varsity girls won the small schools meet. They scored 82 points, with Willows sceond at 77.

They were lead by Danielle Moriarity, who won the 1600 meters and the 3200 meters and Jennifer Joyce, who won the 400 meters and the 800 meters. Moriarity was fourth in the 800 and in the 4x100 relay. Joyce took a third in the 3200 and fourth in the 4x100.

Kelly Campagna was second in the 3200 and fourth in the 4x100 relay. Marielle Nardoni was fourth in the 1600 and in the 4x100 relay. Christina Abbott was fourth in the shot put, the discus, the 100 hurdles and the 300 hurdles

Brandon Anderson took a third in the JV boys 3200 meters.

Menkee makes a national rugby team

Cheyenne Menkee, a 1999 graduate of Modoc High School, and a two-year University of Nevada, Reno Women's Rugby Player, has been selected to play for the Grizzlies, the Northwest National Women's Rugby Team. A standout athlete at UNR and Modoc High School, she first made the Pelican Select Side at a tryout hosted by University of California, Davis, where players from Stanford, UC Davis, Berkeley, Chico, UNR, Humboldt and Sacramento State vied for the position.

Last weekend, the Pelicans went to Portland to play teams similarly selected from Oregon, Washington and Utah. The Pelicans dominated those watches with Menkee leading the forward pack. The Grizzlies were picked from this group of players.

On June 16, the Grizzlies will go to Minnesota for three days of matches with other regional teams. The national team will be forged from the crucible of that competition.

Fish derby had winners

The Alturas Rotary Club's annual Fish Derby had about 75 kids drowning worms last weekend at Pine Creek Reservoir. And they caught some fish. Victoria Gardner won the first for girls, the most fish with two and the biggest fish, at 11 inches.

On the boy's side, Robert Butcher won the first fish and most fish with two. Ryan Jacques caught the biggest fish measuring 11.25 inches. Each of the winners received a new tackle box and fishing pole.

Karen Pedrola won the drawing for the girls bike and Kaden Knight won the boys bike.

Culp on Lions All-star team

Modoc's Rich Culp will play in the second annual Bob Busch Classic high school All-star baseball game in Chico, June 6. The game is set for 12:05 p.m. at Doryland Field.

Culp played third base for Modoc, and hit .487 for the season. He also tied for the league lead in runs batted in with 29.

Game tickets are $5 and may be reserved by calling Bob Pentzer at 530-893-0507.

Youth Golf Camp comes to Arrowhead June 28-30

The Youth Golf Camp will be held June 28-30, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas. The camp is open to anyone ages 8 to 18.

The cost is $5 per child. There will be a tournament on Wednesday, and a lunch of hot dogs, chips and so on will follow the tourney.

To sign up or for more information, call the Clubhouse at 233-3404.

June 3, 2004

News

2 kids rescued from deep Lava Beds cave

A scary 27 hours ended happily Friday evening when two 11-year-old Nevada City students were found safe after getting lost in Catacombs Cave in the Lava Beds.

Local officials report that the pair became separated from the school tour group last Thursday about 4 p.m. About a half hour later, the two kids, Kyra Leigh Young and Timothy "Ky" Ellinwood, hadn't shown up at the car, and parents and chaperones went to look for them.

After searches by the school party yielded no sign of the pair, the park rangers were contacted. Near midnight, the search teams scoured the cave, but didn't find the kids.

The search continued throughout the night without any success. Seachers continued to come up empty handed through Friday morning. Friday afternoon some experienced cave explorers from Shasta Area Grotto, who were familiar with Catacombs Cave, joined the search. One of them, a Dr. Bill Broeckel of Yreka, had a hunch where the kids might be. He and a colleague, Russ Yoder, started the search. It took about two hours to find the kids. They were well, just scared, tired and thirsty according to local officials.

At about 7:30 p.m. the kids were reunited with their families and friends above ground.

Modoc Sheriff's Deputies assisted with the search effort, along with Siskiyou County Sheriffs Deputies, the National Park Service, the California Highway Patrol and private volunteers. The two kids are fifth graders at Nevada City School of the Arts, a charter school.

Alturas starting mosquito spray

The City of Alturas will begin spraying for mosquitoes Friday, and none too soon. The City will also spray the football field the morning of Thursday's Modoc High School Graduation.

Residents are noticing a big hatch of the pesky insects this week as the area warms up and nights don't get below freezing. According to the City, the spraying program will run each Friday throughout the summer.

The equipment has been calibrated this week and things are set to move forward. The spray program is funded, in part, by a .50 cent charge per month on residents' water bills.

Modoc well ahead of water year

A wet May has helped boost Modoc County's overall precipitation figures to well above average in the current water year.

According to the U.S. Forest Service's Steve Riley, 1.59 inches of moisture fell in May, above the 1.16 average. The water year-to-date (since October 1) total is 10.87 inches, above the 9.83 inches average. The average yearly total is 12.01 inches.

Last year in May, the total was just 9.52 inches and the total precipitation for the water year in 2003 was 10.47 inches. In 2002, at this time the total was 9.01 and in the drought year of 2001 it was only 5.55 inches.

The monthly precipitation totals for this water year so far are as follows: October, 2003, 0 inches; November, 2003, 2.13 inches; December, 2003, 2.97 inches; January, 2004, .96 inches; February, 2004, 1.58 inches; March, 2004, .71 inches; April, 2004, .93 inches; and May, 2004, 1.59 inches.

Hornets showing up early in Modoc

There appears to be more hornets and yellow jackets out earlier this year, and people in Modoc are starting to take notice.

"We're ahead of normal on warm temperatures," said Agriculture Commissioner Joe Moreo this week. "We haven't actually done a survey on the hornets and yellow jackets, but they do seem to be out in good numbers earlier than usual. We haven't had a solid night freeze that usually knocks them down this time of year."

Moreo said the weeds in Modoc are about three weeks early and everything else is following that cycle

The main critters here that cause issues here are the baldface hornets, the yellow jacket and the paper wasps. All have different habits and different levels of agitation before they'll actually attack. Moreo said the bald faced hornets seem to be the most aggressive, but he said they all can be a problem.

The paper wasps build a hive attached by a single pedestal and are aggressive if disturbed. Yellow jackets can nest most anywhere, including in the ground.

Wasps feed their young on animal proteins, said Moreo, as opposed to bees who raise theirs on pollen. The hornets and wasps like sugar and like aphids and the aphid honey dew, especially on aphid invested trees. Late in the season, the yellow jackets actually like .

meat and fat, that's why they show up for picnics.

"Don't mess with the hives," said Moreo. "Most of us have had experiences, not usually pleasant, after messing with wasp and hornet hives."

He said if homeowners want to destroy hives it's better to wait until evening when most of the workers will have returned. The hornets can give off a warning scent if the hive is attacked during the day. When the workers return later, they'll smell that scent and become aggressive.

It is not a good idea to hit the hives with a baseball bat or stick or to knock it down with a water hose. Moreo suggests using pesticide spray from the hardware store and following its instruction to the letter.

"We want elderly people or people who aren't real mobile to call us if they have a problem with yellow jackets and wasps," said Moreo. Moreo said that people who discover large hives need to have people who know what they're doing take care of those nests. In the past, some hives found in Modoc have been larger than a couple of basketballs.

Moreo said the early arrival of the wasps and hornets indicates it may be a busy summer for them and advises people to use common sense around their hives.

Call the Ag Commissioner's office at 233-6401 for additional information or advice.

MHS Project Grad party promises something special

Modoc High and Independent Study grads of 2004 will have no time to be bored during the all-night Project Graduation party planned for their enjoyment tonight until 5 a.m. Friday morning in the Modoc High Griswold Gym.

Outdoor commencement will start at 8 p.m. tonight, June 3. Doors to the Modoc High Griswold Gym will open approximately 9:30 p.m., following the ceremony. Families will be able to visit with grads and enjoy cake and coffee, from 9:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Griswold Gym. Grads and their guests must check-in no later than midnight and must stay until 5 a.m. to enjoy a grand night of games, activities, prizes for all and a grand prize for each. Colored wristbands will designate the graduates, with a different color wristband for guests.

Some of the spectacular activities planned this year include bringing in the Army's rock climbing wall; the CHP's "Fatal Vision" gear to be used in conjunction with a golf cart driving course arranged outside; an obstacle course, a soft boxing arena and a jousting arena.

"We needed a lot of space and time to set things up for Project Grad this year. That's why we arranged to have graduation on the football field this year," said Victoria Larranaga, a co-president with Kim McCombs. The Project Grad parent committee also surveyed the seniors to find out what each senior really wanted. With the funds raised through donations, the Harley motorcyle drawing and more, the committee was able to purchase a big gift of each senior's choice. Numerous prizes will be given for each activity and throughout the evening and morning, including gas and phone cards. "No one will leave without something major and alot of other prizes," said Larranaga.

"Seventy-four seniors are signed up to attend. Any who don't show up, we'll put their prizes into a drawing to give among the students who do attend," said Larranaga.

4-H, FFA members look forward to 56th Junior Livestock Show

The 56th Annual Modoc County Junior Livestock Show and Sale will be held June 7-11, 2004 at the John Cummings Memorial Livestock Grounds. Junior Show Board members have been working hard since December to make sure everything is ready.

This year's Show Board members are: Ashley Anderson (Fort Bidwell 4-H), Zeke Bonham (Alturas FFA), Denise Brown (New Pioneer 4-H), Wayne Cockrell (Surprise Valley FFA), Nicole Frutuozo (Surprise Valley FFA), Aaron Heggins (Canby Hot Springs 4-H), Rachel Imbach (New Pioneer 4-H), Cole Joiner (Lookout 4-H), Kevin Konz (Cedarville 4-H), Travis Orr (Lookout 4-H), Eric Shultz (Providence 4-H and Big Valley FFA), Jack Veverka (Alturas FFA), Todd Weidner (High Grade 4-H), and Alan Welsh (Canby Hot Springs 4-H).

. The show kicks off on Monday with the Horse Show at 8:00 a.m. 4-H and FFA members will be participating in performance and Gymkhana classes, judged by Charlene Cluck of Janesville, CA. On Tuesday, rabbits and poultry will be exhibited and judged by Leann Stearns of Redding, CA. 4-H and FFA members will be weighing their animals and getting settled at the show grounds on Wednesday evening. Thursday at 8:00 a.m. begins the market classes for hogs, beef, sheep and goats. Dennis Lee of Millville, CA. will judge hogs and beef and David Downs of Fresno, CA. will judge sheep and goats. In the afternoon is Pee Wee Showmanship and Breeding classes. At 4:30 p.m. on Thursday is the Livestock Judging Contest. There are 4-H, FFA and Adult Divisions. The Adult Division is open the public.

The show wraps up on Friday with Showmanship, Round Robin Showmanship, a Tri-Tip Barbecue, Awards Presentation, and the Livestock Sale, starting at 6:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information contact the Modoc 4-H Office at 233-6400.

Desert Rose plans local 'Wall of Honor'

Desert Rose Casino plans to create a "Wall of Honor" with the communities' help, to show appreciation to Modoc residents, living or deceased, who have or are currently serving in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Those with a family member or friend currently serving or who has served in any branch of the Armed Forces, may obtain a form from the Casino and present the information required. A photo is optional.

The Wall of Honor will be displayed from June through July 12, 2004, located in the Desert Rose Casino's Bingo Hall. The Wall of Honor will be created in time for Flag Day, June 14.

The Desert Rose Casino is providing the Wall of Honor to show the appreciation for all who have served and who are now serving. The available form calls for who served, dates they served, where they served and what their job was. Other pertinent information may be provided, along with a photograph. For further information please call Elaine at (530) 233-3141.

After July 12, 2004, items, photos or any information that have been submitted, may be retrieved.

Obituaries:

Hiram W. 'Dick' Winnop, Jr

Hiram Walter Winnop, Jr. known as "Dick," to his many friends and family, was a dear and gentle community-minded man, who passed away June 1, 2004, at Surprise Valley Hospital, Cedarville, CA.

Mr. Winnop will be laid to rest on Saturday in his beloved valley among many friends and family whom he loved. The graveside memorial service will be held at the Cedarville Cemetery June 5 at 11 a.m. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Winnop's obituary will be forthcoming.

Mary Ann Madden

Alturas resident Mary Ann Madden, 56 years old, died of natural causes on Tuesday, May 26, 2004, in Redding, CA. Born to Harry and Irene Bertrum in Oakland, CA., she was raised and attended schools in Clearlake, CA. Mary was married to Larry Madden in 1971 in Union City, CA., where they raised four children: two boys and two girls. Mary was at her happiest in the outdoors, fishing, camping, boating, or perhaps just hanging out with her family. The Maddens moved from the Bay Area to Alturas, CA., in 1991

She was preceded in death by her mother Irene Bertrum and grandson Travis Madden.

She is survived by her sons Steven Sherbourne of Crescent City; Larry Madden, Jr. of Alturas; step-daughters Cindy Nunes of Tracy; Misty Sampalo, her husband Mario of Salinas; brothers George Bertrum, his wife Betty of Minnesota; Ron Bertrum and his wife Patty, of Clearlake; brother Bob Hinze of Clearlake; father Harry Bertrum of Minnesota; sisters Francis Kelly and her husband Norman of Clearlake, and Loretta Roden of Alturas; many-many nieces and nephews, 11 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, several in-laws, Tony Madden and his wife Janet, Jerry Madden and wife Charleen, mother-in-law Dorothy Madden. She will be missed by all those left behind.

Services will be held at Alturas Cemetery with a graveside service at 1:00 p.m. Friday, June 4. Everyone is welcome. Food and conversation will follow at her home.

Sandra (Rohde) McAllister

A celebration of the life of Sandra McAllister (Rohde) will be held Friday, June 4, 2004, at 11 a.m. in the Chapel of Brusie Funeral Home, Chico. Sandra passed away May 31, 2004, at a Chico hospital from a short battle with cancer. She was 57

Born May 16, 1947, in Elmhurst, Illinois to C.F. "Mac" McAllister and Patricia Puritz, she graduated from Chico High School in 1965. She worked as a teacher's aide at Parkview Elementary for eight years, was a housemaker and mother and worked in childcare and also for Moore's Awards.

She was very active in the Eagles #218, Chico Women's Bowling Association.

Sandra was a loving and devoted mother of four and a dedicated grandmother of five; an avid bowler since the age of 12; enjoyed visiting a variety of casinos, and knitting, ceramics, crochet and any crafts she could do with her hands. She also enjoyed Western music, line dancing, rodeos, sprint car racing, and loved spending time with friends and family.

She is survived by sons, Kenny Davis and wife Heather of Orland, Kris Rohde of Chico; daughters Kim Valena and husband Bill of Alturas and Kari Rohde-Tiffany and her husband Tim also of Alturas; grandchildren Jennifer and J.T. Davis of Alturas, Wyatt, Justin and Hailey Valena of Alturas; mother and stepfather Patricia and Sam Puritz of Chico; sister Janine Spradlin of St. Petersburg, Fla.; brother Michael "Mac" McAllister and wife, Joanie of Kelseyville, CA.; longtime boyfriend James Dean of Chico; and many other friends and family who loved her dearly. Burial will be at Glen Oaks Memorial Park. Anyone wishing to make a Memorial contribution may do so to the American Cancer Society in care of the Brusie Funeral Home.

Harry Copsey Hoshaw

Harry Copsey Hoshaw, 83, died Monday, May 31, 2004, at Enloe Hospital, Chico, CA. He lived with his wife Audrey, at Sycamore Glen Retirement Community in Chico.

Harry was born to Jesse and Gertrude Hoshaw, Westerville, Nebraska, on June 24, 1920. He served in the U.S. Army in the 1940s and worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a heavy equipment operator and mechanic, until he retired in 1980 in Alturas, CA.

He then moved to Orland with his wife Dorothy, who preceded him in death in 1986. Harry enjoyed playing golf, bowling, games of all kinds and especially telling stories about his life. He attended the Church on the Esplanade in Chico.

He is survived by his wife Audrey, three daughters, Marilyn Huffmaster, of Suisun, CA.; Audra Wilcox of Carson City, NV.; Barbara Stevenson, of Willows, CA.; three step-children and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Services will be held at F.D. Sweet and Son Mortuary, 825 A Street, Orland, CA. on Thursday, June 3 at 1:00 p.m. A graveside tribute at Masonic Cemetery in Orland will follow.

Services: Antha Lorraine Nelson

Alturas resident Antha Lorraine Nelson, 82, passed away in Redding, CA. on June 1, 2004. Services will be conducted by Pastor Rod Bodmer at the Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas on Sunday, June 6 at 2 p.m. Private interment will be held Monday at Alturas Cemetery. Kerr Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Services for Vicki Christensen

A memorial graveside service for Vicki Anne Christensen will be held at the Likely Cemetery on Saturday, June 12 at 2 p.m. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct the service. Fellowship to follow at the Likely Fire Hall.

Born March 2, 1947, in San Francisco, Calif. to C. Brunel "Bru" and Barbara Don Christensen, Vicki was reared in Likely, graduated from South Fork Elementary School and Modoc High School. She died of natural causes in Carmichael, CA. on February 1, 2004.

She is survived by her loving son, Gerald Watts of Sacramento; her mother, Barbara D. Reavley of Sacramento and sister Jan Christensen of Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

Remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

Sports

 

McMaster 5th in section shot

Modoc's Scott McMaster took a fifth place in North Section Track and Field Finals at West Valley last weekend.

McMaster put the shot 48-7.5. The winning effort came form Shasta's Matt Jarvis at 56-05. McMaster placed sixth in the discus with a toss of 130-03. The winner was Kyle Ravera, of Central Valley, at 158-09.

Sheriff Posse show has winners

Several riders participated in the 49th Annual Modoc County Sheriff's Posse Junior Horse Show May 29 at the Alturas Arena.

The overall winner in the senior division was Dylan Sponseller, who won individual titles in western pleasure, pole bending and barrel race events. Deidra Jeppson was second overall. Megan McCulley took third place, Anna Nelson was fourth and Claire Crenshaw took fifth.

Megan Moore won the junior division. She took first place in western pleasure, pole bending and barrel racing. In second place overall was Jamie Brazil, third went to Jordyn Alexander, fourth to Alex Moreo, and fifth to Candace Spedding.

The overall winners received a set of braided reins and ribbons were awarded for first through fifth places.

Jerry Wendland was the Horse Show Chairman, with Don Blaie, Chuck Browning and Eric Neslon on the comittee. Phil Vermillion is Posse Captain, with Bert Moody serving as Lieutenant, Mike Morgan Secretary/Treasurer, Mick Baldwin 1st Director, Jerry Wendland, 2nd Director and Fred Ingraham, 3rd director

The announcer was Pearce Flournoy and Teri Brown was the judge.

Junior Fish Derby June 12 in Ash Creek

The Pit River Rod and Gun Club is hosting its ninth annual Junior Fishing Derby June 12 at the Ash Creek Wildlife Area.

The derby is open and free to all kids 15 years of age and under. All California Fish and Game laws apply and anglers are reminded to bring their own bait. Grand prizes will be awarded to the girl and boy who catch the biggest trout.

Check in between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. at the Bassett Road Angling Access Parking lot, one mile west of Adin on SR 299. At 8 a.m. there will be a short talk by a DFG official and fishing starts right after. A free lunch will be served to kids from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., and at 12 noon the derby ends and prizes will be awarded.

Call the Pit River Rod and Gun Club at 299-3414 for more information.

June 17th 2004

News

Rainbows choose Bear Flat for 2004

The Rainbow Family of Light Gathering will be held at Bear Camp Flat, in the south Warners, July 1 through July 7 this year. The selection of the site was made last Friday by the Rainbow Spring Council.

The Rainbow Family held its 1984 gathering near the same spot at Camp One.

The Rainbow Family is advising members that the weather at that site will be a mixture of rain and snow and they should be prepared with the proper shelter, clothing and adequate foot gear.

According to the Rainbow information, the parking area for this year's event with be at Homestead Meadow.

Forest Service sends team for Rainbows

The U.S. Forest Service has sent a "National Incident Management Team" to manage the Rainbow Family Gathering, scheduled July 1-7 at Bear Camp Flats in the South Warners.

The team was formed in 1997 to manage large group events and consists of an Incident Commander and support staff, natural resource specialists and advisors, and approximately 40 law enforcement officers, including K-9 officers, mounted police officers, and patrol officers from the Forest Service, California Highway Patrol, Modoc County Sheriff's Department and Department of Fish and Game. Reports in other papers have put the number of people on the team at around 90.

The Forest Service insists the Rainbow gathering is required to have a non commercial group-use permit, required for gatherings of 75 or more on National Forest Lands. The Rainbow Family argues that they have a right to gather under the 1st Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. According to the U.S. Forest Service, as of June 14, no permit has been signed by the any member of the Rainbow Family.

Actually, last year was the only time the Rainbow Family obtained a group-use permit, and that caused some consternation in the group. It's not clear whether anyone will sign the permit for this gathering. The Rainbow Family considers itself a leaderless organization and stated emphatically that no one person speaks or represents the group. The Forest Service has some difficulty accepting that definition.

What is clear is whether they sign the permit or not, the Gathering will still take place this July. While the Forest Service states that organizers and participants of the Gathering are subject to being cited for not obtaining a permit, it also realizes that forcefully removing them from the area is "not practical."

The permit issue weighs heavily on the Forest Service, while the Rainbow Family pretty much feel it's an infringement on their rights and has, for the most part, ignored the permit process for past events. In addition, The Rainbow Family feels it doesn't need the "Bureaucratic blessing" to provide its participants with essential services or protection of the people and the land. They provide for their own security, medical, food, sanitation and cleanup activities

Reports from past events, including the last one here in 1984, are positive about the clean-up and rehabilitation of the ground when the Rainbow Gathering is over. The pledge the "live lightly" on the land is taken very seriously.

The Forest Service says the Incident Management Team now in place has started working with local communities and agencies to mitigate social, economic and resource impacts during the gathering. In general, the Forest Service paints a fairly dire picture of the gathering, while actual experience tends to reveal few, if any, major problems.

Modoc is fortunate and ahead of the game in that it has hosted the Rainbow Family before and knows about what to expect.

The Incident Team Commander is Tim Lynn. He is assigned to the Washington Office Enforcement and Liason Staff and has over five years experience with Forest Service Law Enforcement and Investigations. He also served over seven years with the U.S. Secret Service and over three years with the U.S. Navy Seabees.

On July 4, the Family has a traditional silent Circle of Peace, of about 20,000 people, and pray for world peace at the campsite. The circle starts at sunrise and ends around "Rainbow" noon.

MJUSD changes to make budget

In an effort to make up a budget shortfall of about $140,000, the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees Tuesday night approved major changes in administrative structure.

The biggest change comes from current Alturas Elementary School Principal Randy Wise accepting a new position as Assistant County Superintendent of Schools as of July 6. His final day as AES Principal will be June 25.

The Board opted to eliminate the AES Principal's position and instead have Modoc Middle School Principal Steve Iverson assume responsibility for the kindergarten through eighth grade administration.

In addition, the vacant Librarian position at Modoc High School will not be filled and the two Librarians remaining will mold that facility into their responsibility.

There are also other areas where the district is working on saving funding through staff reductions, including early retirement.

Alturas Main Street project public meeting June 21

The Modoc County Transportation Commission (MCTC) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) invite you to attend a Public Meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 in the Alturas City Hall Council Chambers, 200 North Street, Alturas

This informative session will be held in conjunction with the regular MCTC meeting, which starts at 6:00 p.m. The Caltrans Project Manager, Eric Akana, will provide an overview, update and recommendations. Caltrans is proposing refinements to the project scope for discussion and approval by the MCTC. Handouts will be available; project designs, plans and cross-section displays can be viewed

The MCTC will consider allocating a portion of the regional Transportation Enhancement Activities (TEA) apportionment to add to the State's roadway rehabilitation project--and realize savings during same construction period.

New elements to be added are street lighting along both sides of Main Street (US 395), some sidewalk and curb and landscaped area, where 12th Street "dog-leg" will be closed. Proposed streetlights will be same as lanterns and posts installed in front of the Post Office at 240 North Main Street, Alturas. A rough estimate for these enhancements, to be supported by regional transportation funding, is $410,000 to $500,000, which is in addition to the $10+ million State project. The apportionment through the six-year TEA cycle of the 2004 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is $723,000 total for the region.

The US 395 roadway rehabilitation project is sponsored by Caltrans, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration. It will include construction of a new storm water drainage system on Main Street, reconstruction of the 12th and Main Streets intersection. Project construction will begin 2005.

For information about project specifics, contact Eric Akana, Caltrans Project Manager at (530)225-3530 in Redding. For MCTC and funding source information, call Pam Couch at 233-6422.

Opening delay for 'Crucible'

There will be a one week delay for the opening of the Modoc Performing Arts Theater production of Arthur Miller's The Crucible.

The new dates are, Friday, June 25 at 7:30 p.m. and continuing Saturday, June 26 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 27 at 3:00 p.m. at Modoc High School's Shirley Oxley Hall. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4.50 for students and seniors.

The Crucible won the 1953 Tony Award for the best Broadway play. Written during the infamous McCarthy hearings, it only ran on Broadway for a few months, perhaps due its obvious references to the danger in accusations made through innuendo and evidence procured through threats. But, in the years since, it has become a standard in American Literature. Though set during the infamous Salem Witch Trials, Arthur Miller's play is about timeless themes of love, greed, fear, honor and faith. Although the setting during the Witch Trials may seem dark and gloomy, the play is rich with poetry and humor.

Director Nancy North-Gates says it has been a joy to work with such a talented and wonderful cast which includes a number of Modoc High School students. The cast is Gerry Gates as Reverend Parris; Anna Belle Duvall as Betty Parris, his ten-year-old daughter; D Gleeson as Tituba, his Barbados slave woman; Marya Gates as Abigail Williams, his orphaned niece; Jesse Carpenter as Susanna Walcott, servant girl; Tiffany Ford as Mrs. Ann Putnam, goodwife of Salem; Michael Lanham as Thomas Putnam; Jodi Owens as Mercy Lewis, servant girl to the Putnams; Jenifer Beck as Mary Warren, serving girl to the Proctors, Thad Lunsford as John Proctor, farmer; Karen Hays as Rebecca Nurse, respected goodwife; Lawrence Shippen as Giles Corey, elderly landowner; Niles Reynolds as Rev. John Hale; Tiffanie Carpenter as Elizabeth Proctor; Larry Manzer and Derrick Sandeland as Francis Nurse, wealthy citizen of Salem; Tony Hartman as Ezekiel Cheever, clerk of the court; Ross Montague and Derrick Sandeland as John Willard, Marshal of Salem; Nathaniel Futterman as Judge Hawthorne; Nancy North-Gates as Martha Corey; Miran Reynolds as Deputy Governor Danforth; Linda Hubble as Sarah Good, accused of witchcraft; Joseph Gates as Hopkins.

Properties and set decoration, Karen Hays; Director and Costumes, Nancy A. North-Gates; Assistant Director, Sarah Currer; Publicity, Linda Hubble.

Jobless rate drops to 7.2%

Modoc County unemployment rate dropped to 7.2 percent in April, in line with the seasonal employment history of the county.

The number of employed people fell from 420 in April (at 9.6 percent) to 320 in May. Last May, Modoc had an unemployment rate of 7.9 percent.

Modoc ranked 34th out of the state's 58 counties for highest unemployment. Lassen County ranked 24th at 5.7 percent and Siskiyou ranked 43rd at 9.5 percent. The lowest unemployment at 3.1 percent is in Santa Barbara County and the highest at 18.7 percent is in Imperial County.

The state unemployment rate for May was 5.8 percent and the national rate was 5.3 percent.

Canby FD barbecue June 19

The 28th Annual Canby Volunteer Fire Department Barbecue is set for June 19, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Canby Fire Hall.

The feast includes top sirloin, a baked Tulelake potato, country baked beans, a choice of five salads, French bread, dessert and coffee and mixed drinks. In addition to the meal and socializing, there are also playgrounds for the kids and games will be played.

The cost for the barbecue is $9 for adults and $4.50 for those under age 12. The CVFD's brand new fire engine will be on display at the barbecue and is ready for service.

Obituaries:

Gladys M. Tourtillott

Services for Gladys Marie Tourtillott will be held June 21, 10 a.m., at the Surprise Valley Community Church in Cedarville.

Mrs. Tourtillott died June 14, 2004 at Surprise Valley Hospital in Cedarville. She was born Gladys Marie Walter, Sept. 23, 1924 in Glenburn, North Dakota

She and Albert Tourtillott were married May 17, 1947 in Glendale, CA. Her husband preceded her in death May 3, 2003. She has been a 31-year resident of Modoc County.

Mrs. Tourtillott was a pet store owner and homemaker. She was an avid gardener of flowers. Among her favorites were tulips, gladiolus, roses and geraniums. She was very active in the Modoc Fair and Parade. Many people would get their flowers from her garden to submit as a floral entry. She would also have a floral entry. She is remembered for having a real green thumb and truly enjoyed flowers.

She was a skilled carpenter and was responsible for remodeling the family home. She was also credited with the majority of the remodeling and repair of the church. She will also be remembered for her hours of work on the rummage sale for the church. She was also a skilled seamstress and embroiderer.

Mrs. Tourtillott was also a member of the HOK Women's Fellowship, Cedarville; active in the Surprise Valley Community Church, the VFW Auxiliary Post 7888, and the Associated Women's Business Club of Apple Valley........ She is survived by a son, Eric Tourtillott and daughter-in-law Dee of Moreno, Valley, CA., a brother Roy Walter of Devil's Lake, North Dakota, granddaughter Jennifer Tourtillott, grandson Ryan and wife Juliette Tourtillott.

She is also survived by her beloved blue and gold Mccaw named Pokey Joe. She raised this macaw from the time it was a baby and it is now 38 years old.

The church service will be followed by inurnment in the Cedarville Cemetery and a pot luck.

Perry Melvin Hawkins

Long-time Tionesta resident Perry Melvin Hawkins was a true believer in the value of education. So much so, that Mr. Hawkins worked his entire life to provide a fund, upon his demise, to help students who wanted to attain higher eord their goal. Mr. Hawkins passed away of natural causes on June 9, 2004, in Merrill, Klamath County, Oregon, at the age of 87.

Never married, Mr. Hawkins bequeathed every penny he could save during his lifetime, to help provide student scholarships through a substantial Hawkins Trust to be arranged with Modoc Joint Unified School District. Born in Clearwater, Idaho on June 20, 1916, to Madison Hawkins and Lila Belle Sylvester, he loved to hunt and graduated from schools in Klamath Falls, OR.

He spent a year of study while working his way through the University of California, Berkeley. But following a disabling accident at the end of his first year at college, he was unable to continue his position at the college and unable to further continue to fund his college education. He left school and began working in lumber mills and box factories for several years that followed. He took night classes and was hired as a Biologist with the State of California. He worked throughout northern California at the inspection stations from Truckee and Reno's bordertown stations to Modoc's Highway 139 inspection station, before retiring, years later. He lived at Willow Ranch for a time and then purchased the Timber Mountain Store in 1945 in Tionesta. He later sold the business to Connie Parsons. He earned the respect of his long-time neighbor and friend of 50 years, William S. Muller of Tionesta, who said Mr. Hawkins "lived like a miser to save every penny he could to further the education of others." He is survived by a niece near Applegate and a nephew in New York.

A memorial service is pending and will be held at Mr. Hawkins' Tionesta residence. Davenport's Chapel of the Good Shepherd, Klamath Falls, OR. is in charge of cremation

Services for Earl 'Sully' Sullivan

Memorial services for former Modoc High School teacher Earl "Sully" Albert Sullivan, age 86, will be held at the Sacred Heart Parish Hall in Alturas, June 26, 10 a.m.

Mr. Sullivan was born September 22, 1917 in Sturgis, South Dakota to parents Albert Sullivan and Christina Kefler. He died at his home in Valley Springs, CA., June 2, 2004, from cancer.

He was a respected and well-liked teacher at Modoc High School. He was also a purebred sheep rancher in Modoc.

Sports

Super Bull Rodeo promises big night

On June 26, bronc and bull riders will thrill spectators at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville, beginning at 6:00 p.m. Gates open at 5 p.m. Cowboy clowns and a mutton busting event (for kids 4-8) will precede the night's climax of a "Short Go," where the top six bull riders will compete for a grand cash prize.

Food and beverage will be available. Cedarville Fire Department will be serving cold beer and wine as well as a concession stand featuring the Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce's famous barbecued sandwich and an assortment of filling dinner items and snacks. An old-fashioned barn dance will follow at the fairgrounds.

Ed and Darrel Hill of H&H Rodeo Company are once again staging the event. But, the sponsoring Super Bull Committee, which meets throughout the year to plan this one exciting night, is comprised of hard-working local volunteers. President Rick Milton is joined on the committee by his wife Diana, Kurt Sjoberg, Dave, Sharon and K. Cee Boneck, Dave Jones, Chuck Vermillion, Penny Van Ornum, Edie Asrow, Skip Arnew and James Bonderer.

Les Schwab Tires is sponsoring the prized silver belt buckle, awarded to the Bronc Champion while Surprise Valley Auto Parts and Napa Auto Parts of Alturas are donating the top bull rider's silver buckle.

Skip Arnew, owner of "Arnew's Custom Saddlery" in Cedarville, has made a beautiful, one-of-a-kind saddle valued at $3,000 for the night's raffle. The saddle is currently on display at Plumas Bank in Alturas. Funds raised from the sale of 500 tickets at $10 each help underwrite the high cost of the event.

Super Bull presale tickets are $12 if purchased at one of the many local outlets, including Page's Market, Napa Auto Parts and Arnew's Custom Saddlery all in Cedarville. In Alturas, tickets can be found at Napa Auto Parts, L&B Ranch Supply, Seab's True Value, and Jay's Clothing. Tickets at the gate are $15, with kids seven and under entering free.

Children who'd like to compete in the mutton busting event should register by calling (530)279-6383. There is no fee, but spaces are limited to the first 15. Contestants for other events may also call the same number.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing at Eagle Lake was mostly good the past week. Most fish have been weighing in at one-and-one half to three pounds. The best action has been from Wildcat Point working north towards Pelican Point. Trolling with needlefish and other similar lures at about 10-30 feet seems to be producing best results.

Still fishing continues best using night crawlers under bobbers. Shore fishing has been marginally successful using night crawlers, power bait or a combination of the two from the jetty at Eagle Lake Marina. Some reports have come in that indicate success in the tules near Spaulding.

On the calendar for July 3 the Sep Hendrickson and Eagle Lake Marina is fourth annual all free fishing seminar in the parking lot at Eagle Lake Marina. Sep Hendrickson and his Pro-staffer fishing guides will explain the best ways to fish Eagle Lake. This exciting and informative seminar will include many free samples of fishing products as well as a free drawing for a complete rod and reel combo and other prizes. All ages and experience levels can benefit by the information provided.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available first-come, first-serve. For camping information at Eagle Lake call the U.S. Forest Service at (530)257-4188. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Elks tourney winners shot 197 in event

The team of Bob Brooks and Gary McClellan shot a 197 to win the Elks Golf Tournament last weekend. In second place was the team of Larry Estes and Blake Thorn with a 199

Tied for third at 202 were the teams of Bunk Richardson and Jim Widby and Greg Valencia and Kyle Weber.

Cancer benefit golf tourney June 26

The Modoc County Cancer Society Benefit Golf Tournament is scheduled for June 26 at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

The tourney will be a three-person scramble and each player has to use five drives. The entry fee is $25 per person. There will be a shotgun start at 10 a.m.

Tee prizes and many others including $200 in pro-shop credits. Fore more information, contact the Club House at 233-3404.

Little League hosts awards night

Modoc Little League will hold its annual awards ceremony in conjunction with a dessert potluck June 22, 6:30 p.m. at the Little League Field. Players are asked to bring a dessert, their uniform and candy sales money at that time.

Each player will receive an award and this year's All-star team players will be announced at the ceremony.

Houghtby 2nd in Police, Fire wrestling

Modoc County Deputy Sheriff Robert Houghtby placed second in the free-style wrestling event at 220 pounds at the Police and Fire Games, held in Stockton June 5--13.

Houghtby, and 18-year deputy, lost in the finals to last year's champion. The Police and Fire Games are open to all law enforcement and fire personnel from six western states. Several hundred participants were involved in the games.

Sheriff Bruce Mix and Undersheriff Mark Gentry expressed the department's congratulations to Houghtby.

June 26, 2004

News

Shovel attack brings felony charges at Gathering

A shovel attack Saturday on two people at the Rainbow gathering has resulted in felony assault charges against Harry Eugene O'Neill, also known as Harry Huggs, 47, of Whitehorn, Ca.

According to Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix, the incident occurred Saturday evening when a vehicle was apparently driving too fast through the parking area.

O'Neill is alleged to have grabbed a shovel and smashed the windshield of the vehicle. When the driver, Kelly Cook, 44, of Brosnan, Texas, rolled down the window to find out what was going on, O'Neill allegedly hit him in the head with the shovel, causing severe lacerations. He initially opted to stay at camp and have the medical personnel there deal with his injury, but the next day was transported by ambulance to Modoc Medical Center.

Mix said O'Neill then struck Christopher Witcher, 47, of Round Mountain, Tenn., with the shovel. That victim was hurt seriously and was flown from the camp to Redding in critical condition. He sustained a punctured lung, ruptured spleen and head injuries. As of Wednesday afternoon, he was still listed as critical.

O'Neill was detained by the Rainbow Family security, said Mix, and was arrested and transported to the Modoc County Jail by the California Highway Patrol.

with serious bodily injury and two allegations of personal infliction of serious bodily injury against O'Neill, who was arraigned June 22.

Sheriff's Deputies also arrested Mark James Blossom, of Minnesota, alleging possession of stolen property this weekend. He was found to be in possession of items stolen from the Adin Transfer Station, which belonged to the pay station attendant.

City providing real relief for Rainbows, stores

The City of Alturas is providing some serious relief for the Rainbow family as well as local businesses, in the form of Porta-potties.

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes said he hopes the public restrooms will alleviate problems before they start. There are five chemical toilets placed at areas where they are most convenient in town. The units are at Carlos and Main, 5th and Main, 12th and Main, Holiday Market and City Hall. The county has also placed the facilities in Likely and in Adin.

"We've had some complaints about the Rainbow members going into local business restrooms and basically showering up," said Barnes. "We just want to give them a choice and give the business folks in town a little help. We're also going to place some dumpsters in town to take care of increased trash."

Barnes said his department is working well with the Sheriff's Office, the California Highway Patrol and the Rainbow Incident Team, of the Forest Service, to keep things under control.

"We're not trying to be heavy-handed at all," said Barnes. "Our goal is to keep the peace and maintain the best for public health and safety. We're not targeting the Rainbows, but if anyone breaks the law, they'll be dealt with. We're trying to keep things going smoothly throughout this event."

Barnes suggests that residents use some common sense as the Gathering nears and lock their home doors, their cars and not leave their keys in the vehicles.

"We'll have a lot of people coming through, and while most will be honest people going to vacation, there's always a percentage who aren't," said Barnes. "Practice a little preventive action and it will stave off some problems."

Barnes said his office has dealt with a few shoplifting cases, and some citations for driving without a license, but for the most part, the flow of people through Alturas to the Gathering has been relatively smooth. "We expect the major influx of people at the end of this week and through next week,‘ said Barnes. "We'll also have some extra law enforcement here for the Fandango Days celebration."

During Fandango Days, Barnes said they are going to close McDowell Street on the south side of the park to through traffic and Water Street will be open to one way traffic with diagonal parking. Detours through town will be clearly marked, he said.

With Main Street closed for the parade and so on, there will be more people going throughout the detours and neighborhoods," said Barnes. "We have more people to patrol those areas, but if residents do their part, it should go without any problems."

FS restricts land use in Gathering camp area

The U.S.. Forest Service has issued temporary land use restrictions for the area in and around the 2004 Rainbow Family National Gathering at Bear Camp Flat in the south Warners.

The Forest Service issued a non-commercial Group Use Permit to "Individuals Assembling for a Rainbow Gathering" on June 21. A communiqué from other sources says the permit was signed by an individual who had never been to a gathering, and is not at this gathering, yet.

The Rainbow Gathering has insisted no one individual represents the gathering and thus, cannot sign permits. But, the signing now brings the gathering into the "legal" status in the Forest Service's eyes.

The area covered by the land use restrictions imposed June 17 and running through August 1 includes no camping within 150 feet of any running stream or body of water, no public nudity, requiring dogs to be on leashes, placing kitchen facilities (including food preparation areas), gray water pits, or slit trenches within 300 feet of any running stream or body of water, and parking will be allowed only in designated areas.

Since nudity is considered a part of Rainbow culture, individuals are asking the Forest Service to rescind that order.

According to one communiqué from Rainbow camp, the USFS and Rainbows are striving to work cooperatively together. Other reports are indicating a lack of Forest Service law enforcement cooperation.

The area under the temporary restriction applies to all forest users, runs from the Forest boundary at West Valley, northeast to Mill Creek Falls, then follows the South Warner Wilderness boundary.

As of Tuesday, the Forest Service estimated that about 1,000 people were at the camp. Forest Service law enforcement officers have made four arrests and one stolen vehicle was recovered, with two people arrested.

The stolen vehicle case is now under local investigation and no charges have yet been filed because there is some disagreement over its actual ownership and the circumstances surrounding the car and its purchase.

On Wednesday, the official report from the Forest Service put the number of campers at about 1,150. Local individuals, who have toured the camp, estimate the number is higher.

County wants program to cut, replace trees

The Modoc County Public Works Department says there are 65 large cottonwood trees at the park in Alturas and around the courthouse, many in need of removal.

The County Public Works Director/Road Commissioner, Tom Tracy, presented a report to the Board of Supervisors June 15 detailing the condition of the trees and defending the cutting down of five large trees along Main Street in front of the Veteran's Hall on May 25. Cutting those trees down did not meet with overall public approval.

Tracy, to make his point, brought in sections of those downed trees, which he said proved they were unhealthy and presented a safety hazard.

Basically, those trees were cut down at the request of Pacific Power, because they had grown into the overhead power lines (for more than 40 years). The power company offered to cut the trees at no cost and the county approved.

Tracy told the Board the stumps need to be removed and Pacific Power is purchasing new trees.

As far as the remaining 65 trees go, there's some public safety concern by Public Works. Tracy told the Board, all of those trees have some rot, some have extensive rot and holes in their trunks, and "a very few pose a safety risk because of their weakened condition."

"There are often large numbers of people in the park, so risk of injury exists," said Tracy. "The main factor reducing the risk is that the trees and branches are most likely to fall during strong winds, when there will be few or no people at the park."

He told the board that during the past year three large limbs have fallen off trees in the park. There were no injuries, but a vehicle was damaged.

"About three years ago, a strong wind caused so many branches to fall from the trees at the park that it took 67 dump truck trips to bring the debris to the transfer station," Tracy said.

Tracy said the county needs a long range program to plant new trees and remove any trees that pose a risk.

"I recommend that we initiate a program to replace all of the large cottonwood trees that pose a safety risk at the park in Alturas, and a few trees at other county parks and at the courthouse," Tracy said. "We could begin by planting some trees each year, between existing trees. The trees should be large enough to withstand some vandalism, so they will cost more than seedlings."

Tracy recommends cutting down selected trees at appropriate times, always considering the risk of having standing unhealthy trees versus the shade benefit of trees in the park.

"About three trees should come down within a year," Tracy said. "We should try to plant at least five replacement trees a year, and continue tree planting regardless of cutting down unhealthy trees."

Tracy said one of the stumbling blocks of the program is cost, but feels the work could be eligible for Proposition 40 funds, for park improvement. The cost is high. Tracy estimates the purchase and installation of trees at $500 each, cutting down large trees at $2,000 per tree, grinding and removing stumps at $400 each.

For 65 standing trees, 65 new trees and 80 stumps, the cost would be about $200,000, said Tracy.

"Normally, the revenue source for caring of park trees is the General Fund," Tracy said. "Alternatives include charging fees for park use. We get about 200 reservations a year at the park, and a $5 charge might bring in $1,000 per year. Volunteer tree planters could reduce the cost of a new tree from $500 to $300."

The Board was in general agreement with Tracy's program, and asked Public Works to look into the feasibility of using the Prop. 40 funding and report back.

County adopts skate ban in some areas

Skateboard, roller skating, in-line skating or any other wheeled device propelled by human power will be banned in any public areas posted against such activities or use.

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday passed an ordinance that was in response partly to continuing vandalism at Veteran's Park in Alturas. The ban does not apply to devices which are being used by disabled persons.

The provisions of the new ordinance will apply to private property open to the public if the property is conspicuously posted against such use. The Sheriff's Office will require the notarized signature of the owner, manager or lessee of the private property consenting with the ban and enforcement.

The ordinance will go into effect 30 days after it is published as a legal notice.

Obituaries:

John David Monroe

John Monroe passed away on June 16, 2004, at Merle West Medical Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon, due to complications from a long battle with Leukemia. John was 72 years old.

John was born on June 2, 1932, in Sacramento, CA. to John David Monroe, Sr. and Muriel Monroe. After growing up in Sacramento, John enlisted in the United States Army in 1950 and served in the Korean War with the 25th Infantry Division.

While in Korea, John was awarded the Bronze Star for Heroism during combat. Upon his honorable discharge from the Army, he returned to Sacramento where he met and married Linda Dee Dorris in 1956. They moved to Alturas in 1961 to make a home and raise a family. In 1969, John moved his family from town to a ranch on Parker Creek, known to the family as "Malfunction Junction."

John enjoyed ranch life and stayed busy at little projects all the time. John also enjoyed the outdoors, especially hunting and after retirement being able to go hunting in Montana and Nevada.

John held numerous jobs throughout his life and was considered to be a "Jack of all Trades." Some of those jobs include machinist, locksmith, gunsmith, welder, mechanic and store owner. John owned and operated Monroe's Sporting Goods in Alturas from 1961 to 1973, and Modoc Muffler and Auto Service in Alturas from 1974 to 1977. In 1978, John went to work for the Modoc County Department of Agriculture. He retired in 1998, after 20 years with the county.

John will always be remembered by his family and friends as a hard working man, who was always quick to joke with you. He will be truly missed.

John is survived by his wife of 48 years Linda Monroe, Alturas, CA.; his son, David Monroe and wife Leora, Alturas, CA.; his daughter Lisa Monroe, Sparks, NV.; his grandchildren, Duane Singleton and wife Dawn, Jennie Singleton, J.D. Monroe, Joey Bechen, Sandy Monroe, Jordan Bechen, Karlee Monroe, and great granddaughter Kylee Singleton, all of Alturas; his sister Agnes Lowery, British Columbia, Canada; and numerous nieces and nephews.

John was preceded in death by his parents and two sisters, Betty Kenyon and Rosalie Smith.

A graveside service was held on June 19, 2004 at 2:00 p.m. at the Alturas Cemetery, and was conducted by the Alturas Elks, as John was a 40-year life member of the organization.

If desired, donations can be made in John's name to the local Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 Scholarship Fund at 619 North Main Street, Alturas, CA 96101 or to the Hugh Currin House of the Cancer Treatment Center at 2610 Uhrmann Road, Klamath Falls, OR. 97601 or the charity of donor's choice.

James Alford Simmons

Bieber resident James Alford Simmons, 60, passed away at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, CA. on June 15, 2004, after a brief illness.

Born in Hanover, New Mexico on July 4, 1943, Mr. Simmons had moved to Big Valley in 1949. A husband, father, son, brother and grandfather, he was also a mill worker at Big Valley Lumber Co.

Pastor Harold Luke of the Adin Community, conducted graveside services at the Lookout Cemetery at 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 19.

Mr. Simmons is survived by his wife Katherine Simmons of Bieber; sons James of Woodland; Donald of Cottonwood and Todd of Anderson; daughter Danielle Howard of Woodland; brothers Orville of Anderson and Robert of Nubieber; sister Lela Carmichael of Gilchrist, OR; mother Viola of Nubieber and eight grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Travis Nelson Memorial Scholarship Fund, care of Tri-Counties Bank, Main St., Bieber, CA 96009.

John Robert (Bob) Bone

John Robert (Bob) Bone died in Alturas, CA of congestive heart failure on June 16, 2004.

He was born August 21, 1924, in Buttonwillow, CA to John B. Bone and Eva M. (Hill) Bone. The family moved to Tulelake in 1938, when his father drew a homestead. Bob attended Tulelake High School. He later graduated from Bakersfield High School and attended Bakersfield College. In 1943, he enlisted in the Navy and served in the Aleutian Islands.

In 1947, he married Ann Kemp of Santa Maria, CA. They farmed cotton for several years in the Buttonwillow area, and in 1957 moved to Tulelake, where they farmed potatoes, onions, garlic and grain until 1989. Mr. Bone lived an active life until 1989, when he suffered a stroke and heart attack. Even though he spent several years confined to a wheelchair, he continued to live an active and full life.

He loved farming, flying, water and snow skiing, sailing and traveling.

Survivors include his wife Ann of Tulelake; daughters and sons-in-law Chris and Mike McElroy, Nampa, ID; Patti and Mike Hickman, Tulelake, CA.; Marcia and Chris Snowden, Colorado Springs, CO; grandchildren, Todd McElroy, Boise, ID.; Becky Gonce, Haines, AK.; Amanda Hickman, Chester, CA; Brandon Hickman, Redding, CA; Jeffrey and Michelle Snowden, Colorado Springs, CO. He also leaves numerous relatives and friends.

Memorial services will be held on Thursday, June 24, 2004 at 2:00 p.m. at the Tulelake-Butte Valley Fairgrounds. The family invites everyone to attend a potluck following the services

Those wishing to make donations may do so to the Tulelake Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 306, Tulelake, CA. 96134.

John H. Tollett

Services for John Henry Tollett, 66, of Millville, will be held June 28, 10 a.m. at the Allen and Dahl Funeral Chapel in Palo Cedro.

Mr. Tollett died June 22, 2004, at the Redding Medical Center of natural causes. He was born April 16, 1938 in Salinas. He was a one-time resident of Cedarville and was a commercial Bee Keeper for 40 years.

He is survived buy his wife Lorale Tollett of Millville, a daughter, Jane Elizabeth Palmer of Shingletown, brothers David Tollett of Walport, Or., and Tim Tollett of Dillon, Mt., sisters, Judy Cockrell and Wendy Benner of Cedarville, Melissa Malamed of Ventura, and parents Harold and Evelyn Tollett of Millville.

He was a director of the California Bee Keepers Association, the California Bee Breeders Association, a 4H leader in Shasta County, a member of the Shasta County National Rifle Association, Shasta Cascade Cutting Horse Association, a member of the Pacific Coast Cutting Horse Association, American Quarter Horse Association, the National Cutting Horse Association, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Safari Club.

He will be laid to rest at the Millville Cemetery. Visitation is June 27, 4-6 p.m. at Allen and Dahl.

Judith Ann Caroline

Becica Judith Ann Caroline Becica, of Alturas died June 22, 2004 at her home. She was born Dec. 7, 1935 in Milwaukee, Wis. Her husband is James F. Becica of Alturas and they have been residents of Alturas for five years.

A celebration of life is pending and a full obituary will be published when the service is decided

Sports

Super Bull ready for wild ride Saturday at Modoc Fairgrounds

Cedarville is set for a wild ride Saturday when gates open for the 8th Annual Super Bull at the Modoc Fairgrounds arena.

Gates open at 5 p.m. and rodeo action begins at 6:00 p.m.

Cowboy clowns and a mutton busting event (for kids 4-8) will precede the night's climax of a "Short Go," where the top six bull riders will compete for a grand cash prize.

Food and beverage will be available. Cedarville Fire Department will be serving cold beer and wine as well as a concession stand featuring the Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce's famous barbecued sandwich and an assortment of dinner items and snacks.

An old-fashioned barn dance will follow at the fairgrounds.

Ed and Darrel Hill of H&H Rodeo Company are once again staging the event. The sponsoring Super Bull Committee, which meets throughout the year to plan this event, is comprised of local volunteers. President Rick Milton is joined on the committee by his wife Diana, Kurt Sjoberg, Dave, Sharon and K. Cee Boneck, Dave Jones, Chuck Vermillion, Penny Van Ornum, Edie Asrow, Skip Arnew and James Bonderer.

Les Schwab Tires is sponsoring the prized silver belt buckle, awarded to the Bronc Champion while Surprise Valley Auto Parts and Napa Auto Parts of Alturas are donating the top bull rider's silver buckle.

Skip Arnew, owner of "Arnew's Custom Saddlery" in Cedarville, has made a beautiful, one-of-a-kind saddle valued at $3,000 for the night's raffle. The saddle is currently on display at Plumas Bank in Alturas. Funds raised from the sale of 500 tickets at $10 each help underwrite the high cost of the event.

Super Bull presale tickets are $12 if purchased at one of the many local outlets, including Page's Market, Napa Auto Parts and Arnew's Custom Saddlery all in Cedarville. In Alturas, tickets can be found at Napa Auto Parts, L&B Ranch Supply, Seab's True Value, and Jay's Clothing. Tickets at the gate are $15, with kids seven and under entering free.

Children who'd like to compete in the mutton busting event should register by calling (530) 279-6383. There is no fee, but spaces are limited to the first 15. Contestants for other events may also call the same number.

Good turnout for Father's Day golf

There were 40 golfers who participated in the Arrowhead Golf Course's Father's Day tournament Sunday.

The winning team of Phil and Ivy Smith, Don Sherer, Gerald Widby and Will Berger shot a 59.

In second place was the team of Steve Riley, Wai Lee, Brad and Jim Widby, who shot 65.

Third place was a tie at 67, between the team of Rex and D.J. Northrup, Kyle and Bill Madison and the team of Jay and Micah Eppler, Alan Hopkins and Lance Burns.

Arrowhead is hosting the Evie Capik Youth Golf Camp, June 28, 29, and 30, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. each day. The camp is open to youth, ages eight to 18. Call the Clubhouse at 233-3404 for more information.

June 26 effort to drive off Cancer

The Modoc County Cancer Society Benefit Golf Tournament is scheduled for June 26 at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

The tourney will be a three-person scramble and each player has to use five drives. The entry fee is $25 per person. There will be a shotgun start at 10 a.m.

Tee prizes and many others including $200 in pro-shop credits will be awarded. For more information, contact the Club House at 233-3404.

Think you can play? Chance to prove it

Think you can play basketball? Well you have a chance to prove it at the Fifth Annual Fandango 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament scheduled for July 3, starting at 2 p.m. in the Griswold Gym.

The cost to enter is $40 per team and all proceeds go into the Modoc High Basketball program. Divisions are junior high boys, junior high girls, high school boys, high school girls and adult open.

The event is sponsored by the Modoc County Record, Modoc County Tobacco Education Program and the MHS Boys Basketball program. For more information call Rick Holloway at 233-2632, Mike Martin at 233-2046, or Bill Hall at 233-5807.

Register at the Modoc Record or at 1 p.m. at the gym the day of the tourney. Pre-registration is preferred and requested.

Still room Summer Day Camp kids

There is still room for participants at the Summer Day Camp offered for kids age first grade through fifth grade in July.

The Camp has room for only 50 kids, so it will be on a first-come, first serve basis with a cost of $30. It will run Monday through Wednesday each week, starting July 5 and ending July 28, from 8 a.m. to 12 noon. The camp will be headquartered at the Teen Center, located between Modoc Middle School and the Alturas Swimming Pool. Activities in the works are water, board, sporting and activity games, arts and crafts, presentations, snacks and swimming at the Alturas Pool from 11 a.m. to 12 noon each day.

Eric Burrows is the Camp Coordinator and he will be assisted by De Funk and Debbie Mason.

Families may register their kids at the Modoc Family Resource Center, next to Alturas Elementary School (Closed from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for lunch). The Camp is sponsored by Families Matter and the 21st Century Learning Afterschool Program. For more information contact Funk at 233-7128, Mason at 233-7125 or Donna at 233-7115.

July 1st, 2004

News

Energetic Cantrall will lead Fandango Parade for 2004

She's "outspoken," "outgoing," "brash," "involved," "amazing," "caring," "friendly," "energetic," "compassionate" and "genuine," say friends and family of Patricia Cantrall, a Modoc County supervisor and the woman chosen to be Grand Marshal for the Fandango Days celebration this year. "I was completely astounded—especially by the way they did it," says Cantrall reflecting on how she learned of the award.

She relates that six people came into a recent Board of Supervisors meeting and patiently waited for the portion of the meeting set aside for public comment.

Then, Jim Cavasso, a local businessman and member of the Chamber of Commerce, somberly rose to his feet. Speaking in measured tones, he gravely noted that they had "a great problem with the Modoc County Board of Supervisors—and one in particular. And that one is Patricia Cantrall." She put her head in her hands as her mind raced. Explains Cantrall, "I now know what people mean when they say their life flashed before them because mine sure did! All I could think of was, 'Oh, my God. What have I done now?' It's a wonder I didn't faint!"

"I could just see the look on her face," says Donna Garcia, Cantrall's daughter, noting that her mother looked stunned.

"And our problem is," continued Cavasso, grimly, "we wonder … if she will be Grand Marshal?"

"I just kind of collapsed," gushes Cantrall, feigning exasperation. "And then when he told her, Mom just started crying," continues Donna. "It was the first time I've seen her surprised in years."

"This is truly the greatest honor of a lifetime," insists Cantrall, emotionally. "I don't know how I fell into this, but I am extremely grateful."

She also insists that she will get even with Cavasso for his practical joke "if it takes the rest of my life!"

All joking aside, the approbation and appreciation for Cantrall's service to the community is seemingly unanimous.

"Money and political favoritism means nothing to her. She's interested in her constituents, one hundred percent," says John Estill, a local rancher. While he asserts that they to not agree on every issue, he says that her motives are unassailable. "Even if she's not right all the time, it doesn't matter. Her heart is one-hundred percent in the right place."

"She gives a lot to the community," says Josie Johnson, Modoc County assessor and friend of 30 years. "I applaud her for what she's been able to accomplish—not only on behalf of her own constituents in her area, but for the county as a whole. She really has Modoc County foremost in her mind." "She's such a friendly person. I think that's one of her best traits. And she is really a hard worker. She's very energetic," says Mary Flournoy of Likely, who has known Cantrall since she was born. "One time I went and asked her, 'I'd like to talk to you about doing something for the hospital. She said, 'Whatever it is, I'll do it!' She never asked what it was or anything."

Cantrall's roots go deep into local history. Ora Hawkins, her mother, came to Modoc from Texas at age 16 with her family. A well-known figure in the county, her father, Charles Francis Demick came to Modoc in 1888. "He spelled his name, 'Charley,' but he was known as 'Demick.' I don't think he liked the name Charley," says Cantrall.

Demick was 60 when he married 34-year-old Ora in a May-December wedding. Patricia was their only child

"He was 65 when she was born," adds another of Cantrall's daughters, Billi Ayne Taylor. "I think it was hard to impress (him). I think she was always trying to say, 'Hey! Look what I'm doing now, Dad.' (She's) still trying to impress her dad."

Undoubtedly, Cantrall has taken much of her father's persona as her own. "Mom is a lot like Grandpa in a lot of ways," observes Donna, candidly. "She is her daddy's girl. I don't know if he ever realized it."

All who know her can attest that she personifies tenacity, a trait she probably learned from her father. "Daddy would not have given in to the devil himself, and neither will I," stresses Cantrall, vehemently. Demick was also named Grand Marshal in his day, an irony that is not lost on Cantrall. "Daddy was my idol. He was just my idol," she reiterates. "He would do anything for anybody. He would help anybody in a pinch." That may be why this honor is so bittersweet for Cantrall. "You can tell the people of Modoc County that I love them dearly," she says, her voice breaking and her lip quivering. "I don't know how I got this award, but I love them dearly."

Donna notes that her mother was also designated Woman of the Year in Sacramento last year, saying, "Mom's in history forever now. Grandpa was great in his own way, but Mom has outdone her dad at this point." Rod Weed, an employer and long-time friend of Cantrall, says, "She's got a wonderful gift of gab. Everybody's a friend; nobody's a stranger. They enjoy her very much. She's one that can pull a five dollar tip on a cup of coffee." "Mom has waitressed all her life," explains Donna. "When it comes to people and customer service, she's great."

Typical of Cantrall's confrontational style is a button she wore while waiting tables. It read, "Tipping is not a city in China."

But her humor can sometimes be self-deprecating, too. "I can't get over it. Usually you have to be eighty or ninety to get (named) Grand Marshal," she says, with a puckish grin and a twinkle in her eye. "Maybe I look eighty or ninety … I don't know."

Some characterize her as a little impulsive and rather outspoken. "You might say that," admits Cantrall, tossing her head back and laughing heartily.

"She's probably the last person in America that has the guts to say what's on her mind," elaborates Donna. "She is not politically correct. She doesn't care about all that."

"She is the consummate public servant," says Doug Taylor, Cantrall's son-in-law. "And she does a wonderful job. She goes above and beyond. She's incredible. I don't know where she gets the energy. It's just amazing." "I couldn't get anything done if it weren't for all the people in this county," submits Cantrall. "I ask somebody for help and I get it—no matter what it may be. If I've ever succeeded it's only because of the good people in Modoc."

County allows Eagle Peak to move ahead with quarry

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors upheld the Planning Commission's decision in favor of the Eagle Peak Rock and Paving Inc., Hogsback Quarry Project, rejecting an appeal of the commission's initial approval.

On Monday, the Board Certified the Environmental Impact Report and approved the use permit, reclamation plan and financial assurance of the project.

The approval gives Eagle Peak (Formerly Fitch Sand and Gravel) the ability to move forward on the project, which is located three miles east of the intersection of SR299 and US395 on Cedar Pass.

The quarry is permitted to exhume 100,000 tons a year over a 50-year life span. Approximately 49 acres will be mined and 64.54 acres will be reclaimed. In addition to the mining operation, the project will include a rock crushing/screening plant and an asphalt batch plant. Eagle Peak Rock and Paving is named in a lawsuit involving about $500,000 in a grant overpayment the county made to then Fitch Sand and Gravel in 2001 for work on the Cedarville airport.

The approval of the quarry is not connected or related to the overpayment and the lawsuit.

The county is suing Fitch Sand and Gravel and principals Gale Easley and Tony Cruse, their wives, Eagle Peak and insurance companies.

At the time of the overpayment Easley was the owner of Fitch Sand and Gravel and Cruse was a 15 percent partner. Cruse argues that he told Easley of the overpayment at the time. Cruse has stated he offered to pay his 15 percent share of the overpayment back to the county. While he said the county refused, County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said the offer was never formally put in writing.

Maxwell said attorneys for the county, Cruse and Easley are currently working on details of the suit. He said nothing could be reported to the public, but said neither Cruse nor Easley have written that they dispute they owe the money.

Cruse has said he will pay his share, and may have to mortgage his home or sell his property to help come up with funding or the ability to borrow the necessary funding. That's still in the works.

Cruse said Eagle Peak was formed as an employee-owned corporation in January, 2003, and no longer is associated with Fitch Sand and Gravel and Hardrock, out of Redding.

The overpayment mistake was made in June, 2001 when an engineer's statement was sent to the county with the net payment of $240,641.28 due. Near the bottom was the total of the contract, $695,769. The county erroneously paid the total contract of $695,769.

The overpayment was not discovered until December, 2003 when the grant was being closed out at Public Works.

Local schools, district election filing opens

Candidates in various county school districts and special districts will start taking out papers July 6, and the nomination period ends August 12. The election will be November 2.

There are three full term openings on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees, three on the Tulelake Basin Joint Unified School District Board, two on the Surprise Valley Joint Unified School Board, one in Lake City and one in Eagleville; two on the Modoc County Board of Education, one in Surprise Valley and one in Supervisorial District 4. There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said there are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Rainbows planning nude protest July 1

Bear Flat Camp may look like the Rock Opera "Hair," times a few thousand, July 1 at noon, if a planned protest materializes.

According to a communique, individuals upset over the U.S. Forest Service's temporary ban on nudity at the Gathering plan to disrobe at noon today.

"The U.S. Forest Service has no compelling government interest to ban nudity at an event attended primarily by people who believe that clothing optional in the woods is a cultural norm," the letter states. "Yet, the US Forest Service took the unprecedented action of temporarily banning nudity at the Rainbow Gathering."

According to the letter, the state of California has no ban on nudity, leaving it up to local communities to regulate standards. Nude beaches are allowed, for instance. The U.S. Forest Service has no rules prohibiting nudity across the board, states the letter.

"By participating in a mass nudity action, participants hope to pressure the U.S. Forest Service to revoke the anti-nudity closure order," the letter states. "The USFS states that people who are offended by nudity may stumble across the gathering. No way. It's 20 miles from nowhere and a long haul down a gravel road. Then you have to park your car at the 'rainbow gathering' and hike in."

The public is invited to participate in the "nude-in" July 1 at noon. The letter writer also complains of the Forest Service riding horses through creeks and kitchens and driving vehicles through the gathering when they promised to leave them out except in emergencies.

Local officials have said the gathering tends to be more relaxed and organized as time passes. While federal law enforcement efforts may have been overly aggressive initially, those efforts have also calmed down. According to the Forest Service, there were at least 6,500 people on the Gathering site as of Wednesday, but that estimate may be low. Other observers put the number at well over 10,000 with many more pouring through and into the camp.

The USFS states there are license plates from 32 states on cars at the site; and participants from Israel, Quebec, Costa Rica and Austria.

Modoc County Health officials are saying the event is going well and that participants are working hard to make their camps safe and sanitary, with an emphasis on food preparation and medical areas.

Health officials are recommending that all drinking water from the site be boiled a minimum of 20 minutes, regardless of the source or prior treatment.

A U.S. Magistrates court has been set up in Likely to deal with the citations issued by the Forest Service.

City plans for new direction

The City of Alturas six months ago set out a proposal to reorganize and staff its Public Works/Planning Departments, but the plan got mired down in confusion and politics.

As a part of that proposal, the City canceled its $40,000 annual contract with the county for planning services, and that termination is effective this month.

In a work session last week, the council was pretty much in agreement to rescind the termination and remain with the county. County officials were less than supportive of that idea.

In a complete turnaround this week, the council decided it would not rescind the termination and will meet July 6, 6:30 p.m. to hear the new proposal from Mayor George Andreasen and Councilman Jerry Smith. In essence, the proposal calls for one management position which would be over public works, planning, building, streets, and economic development. Alturas Treasurer Kathie Alves, who had concerns over the past proposal, said this new proposal is financially more feasible.

The council will debate the issue and hear the options July 6.

Rainbow shovel assault attack victim stable

The victim of a shovel attack at the Rainbow Gathering last week, Christopher Witcher, 47, of Round Mountain, Tenn., is now listed in stable condition.

He was seriously hurt when Harry E. O'Neill, 47, (also known as Harry Huggs) of Whitehorn, Ca., struck him with the shovel. He sustained a punctured lung, ruptured spleen and head injuries.

According to Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix, the incident occurred when a vehicle was apparently driving too fast through the parking area. O'Neill is alleged to have grabbed a shovel and smashed the windshield of the vehicle. When the driver, Kelly Cook, 44, of Brosnan, Texas, rolled down the window to find out what was going on, O'Neill allegedly hit him in the head with the shovel, causing severe lacerations.

Witcher was struck apparently while trying to aid Cook.

O'Neill was detained by the Rainbow Family security, said Mix, and was arrested and transported to the Modoc County Jail by the California Highway Patrol.

Modoc District Attorney Jordan Funk has filed two counts of felony assault, two counts of felony battery with serious bodily injury and two allegations of personal infliction of serious bodily injury against O'Neill, A preliminary hearing is set for Friday.

Fandango kicks off the 4th Friday

A Friday night Street Dance will kick off this year's Fandango Days celebration in Alturas, with the majority of events scheduled for Saturday. The Street Dance, with popular local band Big Sage providing the music, will be held from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Walt's Market parking lot. This year's Fandango theme is "Celebrating old memories and new beginnings." Saturday's parade starts a full day of events at 11 a.m. down Alturas Main Street to the park.

Events will start in Veteran's Park at 12 noon, including games, vendors and a variety of food booths. The popular Lions beef barbecue is also held at the Park Pavilion. There will be a rock climbing wall, a dunk tank and plenty of kids contests and games. The Chamber is again sponsoring Cow Pie Bingo and tickets are available at Main Street Coffee. Music in the park will be provided by Heartless.

The public needs to be aware of a closure of County Road 56, from the Museum to Sully's Trailer Park from just after the parade until 4 p.m. The road is being closed for safety reasons. In addition, Water Street will be one-way immediately following the parade until 4 p.m., with diagonal parking. All day Saturday will be the Classic Car Show, this year sponsored by the Alturas Elks Lodge. That show draws some of the top classic cars from this area, southern Oregon, western California and Nevada.

Saturday night, the California Pines Property Owners Association is presenting its annual Fireworks Show for Fandango. The show starts at dusk over the California Pines Lake.

This year's Grand Marshal is Patricia Cantrall and Little Mr. Fandango is Jace Talbott with Kendra Lee Ramos as Little Miss. Big Mr. Fandango is Brandon Blake and Dawn Waterman is Big Miss.

Search in Nevada stirs suspicions

Search efforts for a shadowy man in Western Nevada and in the Long Valley area east of Surprise Valley are peaking the interest of local residents.

According to one eye-witness observer, there are SWAT teams, a Blackhawk helicopter, a Chinook helicopter, fixed wing aircraft, the FBI, Washoe Sheriff's Office, Modoc Sheriff's Deputies, and other law enforcement agencies looking for the man.

The witness said that law enforcement people on the ground are not saying exactly why so much effort is involved searching for one person. He said officials in charge were evasive when he asked for specifics.

He is suspected in the burglary of several places in western Nevada and Nye County and recently is suspected of burglarizing two buildings on a ranch in Long Valley. He apparently took food stuffs, alcohol, and small caliber firearms.

According to local authorities, the suspect is considered armed and dangerous.

Lightning pounds Modoc Forest

For the past three days, lightning has battered the Modoc National Forest concentrating its forces forest wide. Fire fighters have responded to 26 fires for a total of 160 acres.

The largest fire, dubbed the Mammoth, was reported yesterday at 4 pm and contained this morning at 146 acres. Located 15 miles southeast of Tulelake, the wildfire has consumed grass, juniper and sagebrush. The crews were hampered by poor access, rugged terrain and erratic winds. No mechanized equipment was used. Mammoth fire was held short of the California Oregon Transmission Power line and east of the Burlington Rail Road. It bumped into the Ackley Fire of 2003 and slowed because of the change in vegetation.

"This was truly an interagency effort," said Forest Service Incident Commander Bob Bell, "thanks to the excellent work by the California Department of Forestry, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, and private resources."

Modoc Picnic set for August

The 63rd Annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 1, 2004, at Carmichael Park in Carmichael, CA.

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this event. This is a potluck, so those attending are asked to bring a dish of their choice, their own place setting and their own beverage.

Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advisable to arrive early, to have a chance to visit before lunch begins. Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The Modoc group will gather at the rear of the park near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider, (916) 645-2995.

Old-fashioned July 4 set for Eagleville

When Sunday, July 4th rolls around, one terrific way to celebrate America's birthday is to join friends and neighbors at an old-fashioned country fair in Eagleville.

The fun begins at 1:00 and will continue through 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce, the event promises a full day of games, crafts, good food, great live music and just plain relaxing and visiting under the tall trees at the picnic grounds just south of town.

The chamber will be hosting both a silent auction and 50/50 raffle. Their new cotton candy machine will be running full blast, delivering the warm, nostalgic pink treat. Roger Davis will have his horse decked out and ready to give rides to the kids. Bob Staton has promised a fire engine, and the Fort Bidwell Civic Club will be calling Bingo numbers all afternoon.

Many local crafters and authors, photographers, quilters and woodworkers will also have booths offering made-in-Modoc items.

Round out the day with a Mexican feast at the Community Hall, sponsored by local VFW Post 7888. Dinners are only $8 for everyone aged 10 and up and will be served beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Obituaries:

William P. Goulden

Lifetime Modoc resident, rancher and general contractor William P. Goulden, passed away June 29, 2004 at a Fullerton, CA. hospital, at the age of 90. He was the son of Wm. Evans and Dorothy Goulden, who immigrated from Ireland to Modoc County, where they also ranched.

William P. was born December 16, 1913, and graduated from Modoc Union High. He was a self-employed general contractor in the 1960s and 70s, in addition to ranching. He was preceded in death by his dear wife Ruby in October 1991. He relocated in 1996 to Whittier, CA. at the request of his son, Robert.

He is survived by his son Robert and wife Charlene Goulden of Anaheim Hills, CA.; grandson Jason Goulden and wife Shauna of Los Gatos, CA.; granddaughter Anna Nussio and husband Justin of Adelaide, So. Australia; former daughter-in-law Pat Goulden of Anapolis, MD; niece Pat Kerr of Alturas; nephew Warren Weber of Alturas and first cousin by marriage, Claire Goulden of Alturas.

At Mr. Goulden's advance request, no services will be held. Burial will be at the Alturas Cemetery.

William Lee Olson

Alturas resident William Lee Olson passed away at his home on June 24, 2004, at the age of 67. A volunteer firefighter for the California Pines Fire Department, he was also a member of the Eagles, Foresters and sheet metal workers union local 206.

Born April 8, 1937 in Rockford, Illinois, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1954 to 1955, and then with the U.S. Air Force from 1955 until his discharge May 10, 1962. He earned his Associate of Arts degree and worked in detailing and drafting in sheet metal fabrication for 44 years, when he retired. Married to his wife Regina on Feb. 5, 1965, they relocated from San Diego to Alturas five years ago. Mr. Olson especially enjoyed camping, golfing, baseball and football. He liked to travel and was always working on a project at his home or building something.

He is survived by his wife Regina Olson of Alturas; son Scott William Olson of San Diego; son Ryan Lee Olson of Carmel; son Robert "Bob" Lloyd Edwards of Santa Clarita; son Dr. Troy Alan Edwards of Lancaster, Ohio; sister Linda Rae Ward of Elgin, IL; four granddaughters, eight grandsons and three great-granddaughters. Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary of Alturas.

Sports

Super Bull, a super success

The 2004 Super Bull rodeo, held Friday night at the Modoc County fairgrounds, was a super success with 1,000 filling the stands.

Les Schwab Tires donated the silver belt buckle that was awarded to top bronc rider Jory Bradford.

Top bull rider was Marcus Mariluch of Elko. He also went home with a silver buckle donated by Modoc Motor Parts and Surprise Valley Parts. Both top riders also won substantial cash prizes for their efforts in the arena. The custom saddle, valued at $3,000, was awarded to Monty White of Alturas. It was crafted by Skip Arnew of Arnew Custom Saddlery in Cedarville.

Fifteen young mutton-busters competed in the ring and all were awarded new embroidered t-shirts donated by The Gift Gallery in Alturas. Jack Burgoyne of Surprise Valley won the entertaining competition.

Joann White of Alturas opened the evening's festivities with a moving rendition of the National Anthem. 2003 Miss Modoc Nicki Poindexter and 2004 Queen Contestant Meghan Benning helped with programs and drew the winning saddle raffle ticket.

The Super Bull Committee would like to thank all their local sponsors. The annual show couldn't go on without their help. Rick Milton is the President of the committee that puts on this much-anticipated annual event. Other committee members include Diana Milton, Kurt Sjoberg, Dave, Sharon and K.Cee Boneck, Dave Jones, Chuck Vermillion, Penny Van Ornum, Edie Asrow, Skip Arnew and James Bonderer.

Alturas men's softball results

The Alturas Men's Softball League standings as of June 25 are as follows: Hooters 4-0; Alturas Tire 3-0; Lakeview 2-1; Styx 1-3; SV Aviation/4 Corners 0-2; and Mavericks 0-4.

Friday;'s games are: Lakeview at Styx 6:30 p.m. Cedarville; Lakeview vs Hooters, 8:30 p.m. Cedarville; SV Aviation vs 4-Corners and Mavericks, 7 p.m. in Alturas.

July 5, Styx at Alturas Tire, 7 p.m. Alturas; July 6, Hooters vs SV Aviation/4Corners in Alturas, 7 p.m.; July 7, Mavericks at Lakeview, 6:30 p.m.

Alturas Pool closed July 3

The Alturas Swimming Pool will be closed for the July 3 Fandango Days celebration, but will be reopen July 4.

Regular pool hours are 12-1 p.m. for lap swimming, 1 to 8 p.m. for general public swimming, and 8-9 p.m. for lap swimming.

General admission to the pool is $2.50. An individual season pass is $60 and a family season pass is $80.

July 8th , 2004

News

Rainbow people moving out after peaceful gathering

Participants of the Rainbow Gathering of the Tribes are moving out of Modoc this week, following what local officials are calling a peaceful and pretty much trouble free event at Bear Camp Flat in the south Warners. According to the U.S. Forest Service, there were more than 19,000 people participating in the Gathering on the Fourth, when they all formed into their circle to pray for world peace and mother earth. The day passed without major incident.

Modoc Sheriff Bruce Mix figures there were more than 20,000 participants at the gathering, and felt things went well. He reported no major incidents after the shovel attack early on.

'"I believe it's gone real well so far, with fewer problems than we anticipated," Mix said. "We're going to be watchful as these people leave and we do expect more problems than when they came in. Their actions are no longer motivated by missing the party if they mess up. We're continuing our visible presence."

Mix said the Likely Emergency Services crews did have a lot of activity over the past two weeks and repsonded to a lot of calls. He said agreements with the Alturas Rural, City EMS and Fire Departments helped insure there was enough equipment and supplies on hand."

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes, was at the event on the Fourth and said it was very solemn, respectful and peaceful and most of the people he met were very friendly. He said the camp looked good and the Rainbows were well organized in their setup.

Barnes said there have been only two reports of shoplifting in Alturas over the past few weeks. This last weekend, local stores reported extremely brisk sales, which depleted a lot of stock. All three local grocery stores, Walt's Market, 4-Corners and Holiday, reported they were very busy.

Barnes said there were no Rainbow-related problems at the Fandango Days celebration, and the people going through town now, heading home, seem to be getting rides from other Rainbow people and are not loitering.

The Forest Service states that a soil scientist began measuring soil compaction at the site and he indicates that the compaction in the heavily-traveled kitchen and trail areas was fairly minimal with little disturbance to lower levels of soil.

The rehabilitation, done primarily by Rainbow volunteers, will focus on raking the top one inch of soil to break it up and then spreading woody forest debris to protect the soil. Some trail areas will need water bars to divert water off the trail at various intervals.

Participants at the gathering have indicated that the Rainbows will purchase any native seed to re-vegetate the site.

Alturas Police report the recovery of a Honda belonging to Donna Garcia of Alturas. That vehicle was stolen June 29 from the Chevron in Alturas. Barnes said the vehicle was recovered in Redding by the California Highway Patrol, June 30, and two people who had been to the Rainbow gathering were arrested.

Charged with vehicle theft and possession of stolen property were Edna Dorman, age 18, and Cody Baxter, age 20, both of Redding.

Garcia regained possession of her vehicle, which had minor damage. Both Mix and Barnes remind residents to lock their cars and home doors to keep temptation to a minimum.

Man dies in car-truck crash, 2nd fatality in motorcycle accident

A 38-year-old Silver City, New Mexico, man, Steven Standley, was killed June 30 in a car-truck accident on U.S. 395, north of Sagehen Summit. According to the California Highway Patrol, Standley was southbound in a 1998 Toyota Camry about 10:50 p.m. when he suddenly swerved into the path of a northbound truck and trailer driven by James Berta, 58, of Columbia Falls, Mt.

The front of the 1970 Peterbilt hit the Toyota squarely on the driver's side. The front axle of the truck was destroyed and it skidded to a stop on the west side of the road. The Camry rolled and came to rest on its roof on the west side of the highway. Standley, who was not wearing his seatbelt, was partially ejected from the car and sustained fatal injuries. Marie Beta, age 54, of Columbia Falls, was asleep in the sleeping berth of the truck and suffered only a few scratches. The driver of the truck was not hurt.

There were minor injuries in a solo rollover June 29, 7:05 p.m. on Lassen County Road 510.

A motorcycle accident July 5, 7:15 p.m. on U.S. 395 at Sugar Hill, resulted in the death of John Lewis, age 65, of Davis Creek.

According to the CHP, Lewis was riding his 2002 Harley Davidson Sportster southbound cresting Sugar .

Hill when he allowed the bike to drift off the road. It careened down a steep embankment approximately 75 feet, resulting in fatal injuries to Davis. The cause of the accident is under investigation.

The CHP reports that Kelly McMaster, 28, of Chicago, was driving a 2004 Suzuki too fast for the gravel road and lost control. The vehicle left the road and rolled onto its roof.

McMaster was not hurt, but a passenger, Rowena Hernandez, 24, also of Chicago sustaind minor injuries.

City can't make decision on PW reorganization

The Alturas City Council Tuesday night could not separate reorganization of Public Works from personalities, and ended up putting issue off for a new proposal.

The reorganization has been in the works for over a year, and has been an item on the council's table since January, when the council voted to terminate its planning contract for services with the county.

Currently, that county contract is over and the city has no planning services, which are required by law. The city is going to receive information on programs that County Planner Scott Kessler had been working on for the city.

Tuesday night's meeting was an obvious frustration for Mayor George Andreasen, who along with councilman Jerry Smith had worked on a new, and streamlined proposal for the reorganization. City Treasurer Kathie Alves also worked with the two and came up with a proposal that fits into the city's available funding.

Councilmen John Vass and Jach Ochs got mired into the personalities involved in the reorganization proposal and could not deal with the issue on an objective basis. New councilmember Cheryl Nelson also weighed in on personalities, but said a new proposal could be worked out. No one on the council suggested a concrete plan.

One of Vass' major objections was that current Public Works Director Stacy Chase could lose his job and he had not had an employee evaluation. Chase is an at-will employee answerable to the council. Andreasen pointed out that Chase was free, and was expected to, make application for the new position.

What was on the table was to change the Director of Public Works to the Director of Pubic Works/Planning with a salary starting at the top scale and capping at $64,000. The City has four applications for a similar position, which was advertised earlier this year following the decision to eliminate the planning contract with the county.

Under the proposal, the Assistant Director of Public Works would also include the function of building inspector. That is in the current job description, but that part of the responsibility has not been completed. While the proposal in front of the council was affordable, according to Alves, a new proposal which adds positions could stretch the budget. One idea bandied about Tuesday was for part time or contract planners and building inspectors and pretty much leaving the structure of management the same.

Ochs said he was not in favor of losing a job in the reorganization and would not come to grips that no job would be lost. Andreasen pointed out that under the proposal, Public Works would have the same number of employees it does now only the responsibilities and accountability would change.

"We thought we came in with a fair, streamlined proposal that met the requirements and put a better organization in place," said Andreasen. "The rest of the council didn't feel that way, but we certainly made the effort to make the city more efficient."

The City had paid the county $40,000 per year for planning services and has that funding available for the new proposal. Part of the proposal would have been to hire a part-time clerk for Public Works and Planning.

In the original proposal, from Councilman Smith and former councilman Joe Coffin, who passed away this spring, economic development in the city was a central issue. That was not discussed Tuesday night.

The original proposal called for a new position as Director of Public Works, Planning and Economic Development, with a Deputy Director of Public Works and a Deputy Planner and Building Inspector under that position. There would have been a Maintenance Worker 3, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 3, Maintenance Worker 2, Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 2, and two Maintenance 1 positions.

According to the proposal, the goals were to bring the planning and economic development functions of the city under the direct control of the City.

MJUSD will replace AES Principal

The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees decided this week to replace the Alturas Elementary School Principal.

Former Principal Randy Wise resigned to take the Assistant County Superintendent position this month. Originally, the Board opted not to replace the AES principal position as a cost-saving measure. Administration was going to be handled by the Modoc Middle School Principal.

The Board looked closely through the budget and made necessary adjustments to fund the position. Many community members and parents felt the AES Principal position was needed.

There are currently five applicants for the job.

Democratic State Senate Candidate meets in Modoc

The Democratic candidate for the State Senate in District 1, Kristine Lang McDonald, visited Modoc over Fandango Days.

McDonald, of Auburn, will be running against Dave Cox in the November 2, General Election. She got to visit with several Modoc Democrats during her visist and also joined the Friends of the Modoc Library.

"Government has a duty to ensure that all people have an equal opportunity to achieve prosperity, health an freedom," she states. "Citizens have a duty to demand governmental fiscal responsibility, support for workers, opportunities of business and the improvement and protection of civil rights and equal rights."

. She advocates a fair tax system that allows investment in "efficient and productive programs." She also believes she can better represent this north state and be more involved in north state issues

"The fundamentals of a prosperous society are education and job training; a living wage in a safe working environment; and affordable, quality health care and housing," she said. "Investment in programs for the health and prosperity of future generations, such as renewable energy and mass transit projects, are needed to improve the quality of our air and water supply now."

She believes legislators of both parties need to work together for the best interests of their districts and the state, not what's best for them or their parties.

"All civil rights must be protected and equality guaranteed," she said. "While we need to defend ourselves against terrorism, we also must preserve the values that we're defending. We must protect against policies that infringe on our civil rights."

She believes education is a lifelong process and an informed public is vital to a working democracy. Equality, she says, comes through education. In order to achieve equality, she states that "we need to educate people properly in the public schools to become productive citizens in society and the economy as well as to educate them on the possibilities of universal health care as a money saver for the state and businesses."

She believes tax dollars should be an investment and necessary services should not be eliminated. She also believes in more emphasis on teaching safe sex, contraception and sexually transmitted diseases to prevent unwanted pregnancies. She states that access to abortion must be kept safe and unrestricted.

Education emphasis is also needed on the dangers of air pollution and on the possibilities of renewable energy.

"We need to make renewable energy and solar a priority to protect our lives and livelihood," she states. "And we need to educate people about the civil rights that we all are guaranteed which must be preserved regardless of race, nationality, gender or sexual orientation."

McDonald is a native of Silver Spring, Maryland, and has lived in Auburn since 2000. She has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Maryland. She is an analyst, on planning and business services information technology with Gannett Co., Inc.

Filing begins for local elections

Candidates may now file for county school districts and special districts and the nomination period opens July 12 and ends August 6. The election will be November 2.

There are three full term openings on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees, three on the Tulelake Basin Joint Unified School District Board, two on the Surprise Valley Joint Unified School Board, one in Lake City and one in Eagleville; two on the Modoc County Board of Education, one in Surprise Valley and one in Supervisorial District 4. There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said there are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board.

There will also be an election in Supervisor District two, where incumbent Mike Dunn is in a run-off with Alturas resident Roy Moore. Moore was the highest vote getter in the primary with 314 at 42.43 percent. Dunn received 30.14 percent (223) of the vote. Ron Sharpless got 23.38 percent (173) of the vote cast. Moore had to receive 50 percent plus one vote to win outright in the primary.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Man arrested on assault charges

An apparent shooting at the Schultz Cottonwood Ranch south of Cedarville July 6, 1 a.m. resulted in assault with a deadly weapons charges.

According to Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix, Seth Sailors, age 20, formerly of Alturas, traveled to the Schultz Ranch and confronted Freddy Schultz. Mix said Sailors is alleged to have fired a shot in the direction of Schultz, apparently the result of marital issues.

Sailors then fled the scene in his pickup, running over a wheel line and gate. He sped off south of County Road One and Schultz jumped in his pickup and gave chase.

Mix said the wild chase went through Eagleville up and over the Warners to Likely, from Likely out the back road and to Bailey Reservoir, finally coming back to U.S. 395 heading south. Schultz ran out of gas on Sage Hen Summit and Sailors was finally stopped and arrested at the Lyneta Ranch turnoff north of Termo.

He was booked into the Modoc County Jail and the Sheriff is recommending charges of Assault with a Deadly Weapon and a violation of probation (possessing a firearm) against Sailors who remains in the Modoc County Jail.

Modoc home to two 'Distinguished Schools' in state, AES, South Fork

Two Modoc County schools, Alturas Elementary and South Fork Elementary, have been selected as '2004 California Distinguished Schools'. This award is considered the state's predominant recognition of a school's total educational program including high expectations for all its students, the implementation of state adopted standards, and visionary collaborative leadership.

Schools were evaluated by teams of local educators under the direction of the California Department of Education, and those schools judged exemplary were visited by an outside review team to validate the application information.

Of the more than 5,500 elementary schools in the state, fewer than 1,900 were eligible to apply for this honor based upon their Academic Performance Index (API) results. There were 912 schools filing applications this year.

The two Modoc schools, along with 300 other selected schools in California, were honored May 21 at an awards ceremony at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim. This is the second time that Alturas Elementary has been recognized with this award. For more information on this year's California Distinguished Schools, visit the California Department of Education website: http://www. cde.ca.gov/ta/sr/cs/ap/distinguished.asp.

Plan to attend Modoc Picnic

The 63rd Annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 1, 2004, at Carmichael Park in Carmichael, CA.

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this event. This is a potluck, so those attending are asked to bring a dish of their choice, their own place setting and their own beverage.

Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advisable to arrive early, to have a chance to visit before lunch begins. Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The Modoc group will gather at the rear of the park near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider, (916) 645-2995.

Campbells to be Grand Marshals of Big Valley

Dick and Dorothy Campbell of Adin will be the Grand Marshals for Big Valley Days July 17 and 18 in Adin. The Campbells recently sold their long-time business Adin Supply, and have long been involved with Big Valley Days, as organizers over the years.

Events will start the week before with a Queen Pageant at 7 p.m., followed by a Teen Dance on Saturday, July 10 at the Adin Community Hall.

Big Valley Days will officially start on Saturday, July 17 at the Adin Community Hall and Park, with the Lookout 4-H Club serving breakfast to the public from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. A parade starts at 11 a.m. with the Campbells as Grand Marshals. Children's games will be scheduled throughout the day, along with a three on three basketball tournament to begin play around 9 a.m. Softball tournament starts play around 9 a.m. also. The Blood Bank will take donations from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A Horseshoe Tournament and scenic airplane rides at the Adin Airport will be offered, along with music in the park throughout the day. Roundhouse Ronnie the clown will roam the ground with fun and games for all ages from 12 noon to 5 p.m. Hop a buggy ride to various historical sites anytime between 12 noon and 5 p.m. Craft and food booths will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Enjoy a tri-tip barbecue meal, presented by Big Valley Days Association at 6 p.m. Winners of the parade and cow chip bingo will be announced.

Sunday, July 18 will begin with breakfast being served by Adin's Providence 4-H Club members, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Church in the Park with worship and fellowship from 10 a.m. will be followed by the opening of craft and food booths, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Both Softball and Basketball Tournaments continue play at 9 a.m. Children's games, music in the park, buggy rides and Round House Ronnie the Clown will be happening from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. A community "free" potluck will start at 2 p.m. Bring a potluck dish, some chairs to sit in and enjoy a time to visit and eat in the beautiful Adin Park. Every family or individual who brings a dish is invited to join in. The Adin Ambulance will sponsor a Ducky Derby.

For more information regarding any of the event, call Tracy Piscitello at 299-4264, Shari Blatt, 294-5814 or Kathie Banwarth, 299-3531.

Obituaries:

John Clifford Lewis

Graveside services for Davis Creek resident John Clifford Lewis will be held Saturday, July 10 at 2 p.m. at the Davis Creek Cemetery. Mr. Lewis known as John "Coop," died as the result of a motorcycle accident on July 5, 2004, on Sugar Hill near Davis Creek, CA

Born August 1, 1938, in Spokane, WA., he graduated from Modoc High School in 1956 and served with the U.S. Air Force from 1956 until 1959. He and wife Carol Diane Grubb of Alturas, were married at her parents' home in Alturas, CA. on December 25, 1960. They moved to Modesto about 1970. An automobile painter and pinstriper for 35 years, John was the owner of John's Painting and striping of Modesto, CA.

Upon his return to Modoc County four years ago, John enjoyed rock hounding, sitting on his porch enjoying the view of Sugar Hill, fishing, riding quads with friends, and enjoyed the country life. His wife Carol preceded him in death unexpectedly on May 13, 2002 in Davis Creek. He is survived by three sons, Cory Lewis of Modesto; Terry Lewis of Riverbank, CA.; Shan Lewis, Davis Creek, CA.; two step-sisters of Klamath Falls, OR. (names unknown) and five grandchildren: Heather, Brooke, Shawnee, John-Paul, and Jack, all of Modesto.

Memorial donations may be directed to the American Heart Association 1710 Gilbreth Rd., Suite 100, Burlingame, CA

Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas, CA.

Richard 'Dick' F. Hughes

Long-time Alturas resident Richard "Dick" Francis Hughes passed away July 7, 2004, at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, CA. He was 87. Graveside services will be held Friday, July 9 at 11 a.m. at Alturas Cemetery. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will officiate

Mr. Hughes was born in San Francisco, CA on March 30. 1917 and graduated from Oroville High School Oroville, CA. He served with the U.S. Army from 1941 to 1945, and married his wife Melba on August 4, 1945, in Burlingame, CA. Employed with Cal-Trans for 25 years, he spent 48 years of his life in Modoc County. He loved to fish, hunt and camp and play cards, especially pinochle.

He enjoyed trips to cut wood with his daughter Vicki. He and his wife Melba enjoyed traveling with the Modoc Senior Citizens group over the years and he belonged to the "Old Timers" Baseball Hall of Fame Northern California Chapter. He loved everything about baseball. He played, he watched and he coached Little League, Babe Ruth All Stars and American Legion. Baseball was always a part of his life

He is survived by his son Richard and daughter-in-law Jeanette Hughes of Portola Valley, CA.; daughter Vicki Hughes, Alturas, CA.; brother Evan Hughes, Carson City, NV.; nephew Bob and wife Bev Hughes of Oroville, CA.; great-niece Wendy Walker of Modesto; three grandsons: Luke Hughes of Boise, Idaho; Benjamine Hughes and Justin Hughes of Portola Valley, CA

Memorials may be directed to the Alturas Little League. Visitation will be Friday, July 9 from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Kerr Mortuary, Alturas. Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary

Robert L. 'Bob' Goodell

Robert L. "Bob" Goodell, who owned Klamath Livestock Auction Yard in Klamath Falls, died Friday, June 25 2004, of natural causes at the age of 75, at his residence on Old Midland Road.

Services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday in Peace Memorial Presbyterian Church at 4431 S. Sixth St. with Pastor Donna Herzfeldt-Kamprath officiating.

Mr. Goodell was born April 3, 1929, in Atascadero, CA, to Walter J. and Edna Irene (Allen) Goodell.

He loved working with cattle; ocean and stream fishing; the annual Paso Robles, CA. Trail Ride; and old cars, especially his 1932 Ford. He started and ended his life doing what he loved best - owning and operating a livestock yard.

He and his father built the Templeton Livestock Auction Yard in the early 1940s and in 1964, he moved from Templeton, CA. to Fortuna, CA., where he purchased the Humboldt Livestock Auction Yard.

He met his future wife, Patricia "Patty" Harlan in Fortuna and they were married on Sept. 30, 1967, in Carson City, NV.

That same year, they moved to Klamath Falls and purchased the Klamath Livestock Auction Yard.

Mr. Goodell enjoyed his cattle and, for several years, partnered with Dr. Ken Tuttle in running a cow/calf operation. He also ran about 250 to 300 head of steers every summer.

In 1991, he started working with video sales livestock. His partner and friend, Jack Houston, was in charge of the sales.

He also ran a livestock hauling operation with Dennis Murphy doing the driving.

He and his wife owned a summer home in Gold Beach, which they purchased in 1987, the same time he bought Oceanside RV Park there. Mr. Goodell, with a boat he had purchased, learn to love ocean fishing. It was said that, if any fish were to be caught in the ocean, it would be on the "Luck Tiger," the name of his boat.

He was a member of the Hope Lutheran Church, California Cattlemen's Association, Brookings Elk Lodge, the Masons and the Hillah Shrine Temple.

Survivors include his wife Pat Goodell of Klamath Falls; children John and Randy Goodell of Pismo Beach, CA., Gary Goodell and his wife Walline of Las Vegas, Mary Shliff of Washington, and Kelly Moessner and her husband Jerry of Atascadero; grandchildren Desiree Goodell of Fallon, Nev., Lauren Goodell of Pismo Beach, and Carla Alderman and LeAnn Davis of Atascadero; brother George Goodell of Fortuna; sisters Ellen Kerby and her husband Gene of Walla Walla, Wash., and Ruth Robenson of Atascadero; sister-in-law and her husband Norma and Win Madden of Mount Shasta, CA.; brother-in-law Jay Harlan of Klamath Falls; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Memorial donations may be made to Kenneth Copeland Ministries, Fort Worth, TX 97612-0001, Hope Lutheran Church Building Fund, 2314 Homedale Road, Klamath Falls, OR 97603, or Merle West Cancer Treatment Center, 2610 Uhrmann Road, Klamath Falls, OR 97601.

Sports

Golf tourney raises finds for Cancer

The fourth Annual Modoc County Cancer Society Benefit Golf Tournament raised a substantial amount of funding for the Cancer Society.

The event was held at Arrowhead Golf Course June 26, and 30 golfers, making up 10 teams, participated in the scramble.

The first place team was Harold Montague, Ross Montague and Jack Britton. Second place went to Kathie Widby, Bob Webb and Dave Holub. Third place went to Blake Thorn, Ivy and Phil Smith.

Bob Brooks was closest to the pin on number four.

The Modoc Cancer Society would like to thank Kathie and Jim Widby and the following sponsors: Betty Eppler, Desert Rose Casino, Alturas Pepsi, Antonio's, Auction Yard Cafe, Bethel's Propane, Black Bear Diner, Dale and Anita Goodwin, Davis Creek Mercantile, Dolby Insurance, Dr. Tom Krauel, Ed Staub, Four Corners Market, Gus Dekker, Brown's Pharmacy, Les Schwab, Heard Plumbing and Well Drilling, HEAT, Holiday Market, J&S Roofing, K&K Produce, L&B Ranch Supply, Modoc Motor Parts, Pioneer Auto Body, Tom Ratliff, True Value Hardware, Wagon Wheel Restaurant, and Weaver Chiropractic.

Widby wins Fandango golf tournament, 72

Jim Widby won the Arrowhead Golf Course Fandango Days tourney when he shot a gross score of 72.

The net winner was Bob Webb with a 65, Danny Parker shot 66, Bunk Richardson had a 67, and Jack Britton and KC Riley tied at 68.

The Calloway winners were Mike Wolfe and Greg Malcom each with a 75. Ivy Smith and Janet Allison tied for first in the women's division with 74. There were 32 players in the Fandango event, played under beautiful skies and with little wind.

The Evie Capik Youth Camp had 35 kids and they enjoyed three days, finishing with a tournament last Wednesday. There were awards for everyone and they were treated to lunch.

July 15th, 2004

News

Manhunt makes valley residents uneasy, careful

by Patricia Hemsley

Special to the Record

When one walks into a post office in Surprise Valley, it's usually only to pick up mail, send a package, and perhaps chat with friends engaged in the same daily errand. But being confronted by new and prominently displayed "Wanted!" posters this past week further jarred the nerves of locals already concerned with an ongoing manhunt in the desert east of the valley.

Officers from the Washoe County Sheriff's Office, rangers from the local BLM field office, the FBI, and other peripheral law enforcement agencies in the tri-state area have been searching for a man believed to be hiding in northwestern Nevada. They have been working together, coordinating the intense search, since June 24.

The suspect is wanted for questioning about a string of burglaries and vehicle thefts in remote areas up and down eastern California and western Nevada.

A local rancher probably helped the man change a tire several weeks ago. From his and other recent reports, a composite sketch and clearer physical description has emerged. The suspect is described as 5'8-9" tall, 150-160 pounds, with dark hair, dark complexion, and light eyes. He has been spotted wearing tan camouflage clothing, brown boots and a ball cap. He is possibly going by the name "George"

The suspect is wanted locally for questioning about a series of burglaries at remote ranches in Long Valley and other locations in northern Washoe County. Missing items at various ranches have included guns, fuel, food, blankets, camping items, and tools. He usually strikes remote, uninhabited buildings and leaves few traces of his activities upon superficial examination.

Though fingerprints have been submitted to the FBI, the suspect thus far has not been officially identified. It is unknown if he is wanted for other crimes, and law enforcement officers are concerned about why he appears to be "running". He is considered dangerous, if only because he has acquired a large cache of firearms and ammunition during his verified recent burglaries.

Sergeant Russell Pedersen, of the Washoe County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Team, stresses the man hasn't hurt anyone -- as far as officers know. He apparently started his antisocial, "live off others' belongings" lifestyle in Inyo County, near Death Valley.

From there, he moved through Nye County, Nevada where he is believed to have stolen a white pickup truck and green Honda ATV. The pickup was later found abandoned, half-hidden and bullet-riddled, near Holy Lake, northeast of Surprise Valley.

When the truck was found, a strange smell in the area was noted. To investigate, a volunteer with a forensic dog was brought in. Due to the presence of a non-police volunteer, SWAT teams and helicopters were also brought in to secure the area while a careful examination was conducted. Apart from the destroyed truck and signs of recent camping, nothing suspicious was discovered.

Four days later, a theft in the Barrel Springs area was reported. Officers were flown over the area in fixed-wing aircraft so they could get a better feel for the terrain. Since then, rangers and deputies have traveled through the area on foot and horseback, following signs of the suspect's movements. The latest incident being investigated is the discovery of a partially butchered cow near Sand Creek, north of Fort Bidwell. ATV tracks and other evidence point to the fugitive.

Pedersen describes the man as "very intelligent about the outdoors. He is a survivalist in very good physical shape." In fact, he has been known to travel 20-30 miles during a single night on various occasions, traveling "up and over ridgelines, much as an animal travels – not following roads or trails."

Pedersen also warns residents that this suspect is "perfectly capable of walking into town" to obtain supplies. His modus operandi thus far has been to watch a place for some time, then approach it when it is unoccupied. He then clears the house or cabin of food, guns, ammo and a variety of survival supplies, caching them at a series of isolated and hidden campsites.

Sam Parriott, whose Long Valley ranch was burglarized, says all the ranchers he knows are now locking up their trucks on remote roads, and "taking the keys" when they head out on horseback to tend to their herds. He continues, "And we worry all the time we're gone."

The suspect is believed to have also stolen a purple 1996 Toyota Tacoma truck which has not been recovered. It was stolen in Humboldt County, Nevada and possibly bears the license plate 151-PPW

When the first posters went up weeks ago, the local communities' rumor mills went into serious overdrive due to the scarcity of hard facts. As more specifics are collected and incidents reported and analyzed, law enforcement agencies are trying to amend previous news releases so people have what accurate information is available.

Many long-time residents recall the excitement in the 1970's when Claude Dallas, a county resident wanted for murdering two game wardens, spent 18 months hiding in the same remote area. Through the mists of time, Dallas has attained near folk-hero status in some minds.

Lake City Rancher Norma Hapgood remembered those days well. "Some folks just thought Claude was the nicest guy," she said with a chuckle. But this newest manhunt has left folks much more anxious and angry than bemused.

Valley resident Virginia Hopkins admits she's definitely more nervous lately. She wishes the FBI and involved law officers would talk more to local residents. "How can we be alert and aware if we're kept in the dark? They need to be very honest with us." She added, right now, from what she knows, "If I saw the guy, I wouldn't know whether to give him a baloney sandwich or shoot him!"

Norma Hapgood says, "You do feel more uneasy but you also have to carry on and do what has to be done." Her place in Long Valley has escaped pilfering so far, though the idea of anyone burglarizing her place makes her angry. "I don't want anyone messing with my stuff!" she says emphatically.

Mary Harlis sent along a copy of the wanted poster with husband Jeff who has been working near the area where the butchered cow was discovered. She has been locking more doors lately too.

Sergeant Pedersen wants everyone who travels through the area east of Surprise Valley to be aware and alert. If anything suspicious is noted, he would like it reported IMMEDIATELY to either the Washoe County Sheriff's Department (775-328-3320) or to BLM ranger Jim Massey (530-279-6101). Part of the problem in tracking the man has been that sighting reports are often not called in soon enough.

The sergeant also urgently cautions anyone sighting the man to use extreme care and avoid contact if at all possible.

Pedersen stresses that the suspect's profile looks increasingly dangerous to experienced officers. The questions that trouble him are, "Why is he doing this? Why is he collecting guns and ammo? What would he do if cornered?" The thoughts that good weather brings more folks out into the area, and that hunting season is rapidly approaching, are also troubling to officers. They remind everyone that camping, hiking or riding in isolated areas are activities more safely done with partners.

When asked if the behavior of the suspect observed recently is fairly common, something the Washoe Sheriff's Department has dealt with in the past, Pedersen didn't hesitate. "It is extremely abnormal behavior. This is a pretty unique situation. The guy's contacts have been very brief so far, but we are very concerned. Please tell everyone to be careful."

Sewer plant revamp moves forward

The Alturas sewer plant upgrade is moving forward, but the cost is going up with the rate of inflation.......... Public Works Director Stacy Chase, told the City Council that hired consultant Ron Young has completed the initial scope of work and submitted it to the state.

"With inflation, the cost at present is estimated to be $7.4 million," Chase said. "The estimate will be fine-tuned as the project proceeds. If inflation over the next 12 months is similar to the past 12 months, the final cost could be as high as $7.9 million."

Chase explained the project will be funded by a combination of grants and loans. The split is 80.3 percent grant and 19.7 percent loan, equating to a $5.9 million grant and a $1.5 million loan, based on current estimates. The project is going to be funded in two stages this year, he said. The first stage is for planning and the second stage is for design and construction. "Funds will probably not be available until January, 2005," Chase said. "The plans and specifications would be completed by April, 2005 and construction would start in July, 2005, with completion in August, 2006."

For the past several years, the Regional Water Quality Control Board has issued a Cease and Desist Order to the City of Alturas to submit a work plan and time schedule for repair and rehabilitation of the collection system, which was deemed in violation of state standards.

The existing sewer plant was constructed in 1936 and has been modified through the years. Chase said it is antiquated and deficient in reducing the large solids transported through the system, as well as other problems identified by the state. The effluent is discharged directly into the Pit River. In other action Tuesday, the City appointed Linda Ochs to the Alturas Planning Commission to replace Dan McKernan. Councilmember Jack Ochs., her husband, left the room during the issue to avoid a conflict of interest.

Alturas Chief of Police Ken Barnes reported that, overall, the Rainbow Gathering caused few major problems in Alturas. He reported that the Police Department costs for extra help and other items amounted to about $5,000. He expects to get some of that funding reimbursed from the Forest Service.

He also said he has received notice the Police Department will receive a visual speed radar trailer for use in town. The trailer will show driver's speed and can also be used for special warnings or messages and may also do traffic counts.

Barnes also said he'll bring a request to allow diagonal parking on the south side of Water Street to the council at its next meeting. The diagonal parking worked very well for Fandango and the council was interested in making the change to allow for more parking during regular days and events at the park.

The council also approved a letter sent to the Modoc Planning Department to have all city-related grant documents and financial records turned over to the city. The City canceled its planning contract with the county, effective June 30.

The City awarded the contract for asphalt concrete, premix and class II base to the low bidder, Larranaga Construction.

Alturas takes aim at new Main Street lights

The City of Alturas has a chance to replace its less-than-attractive street lights on Main Street with more decorative lights, like those in front of the Alturas Post Office.

Modoc County Transportation Commission Executive Director Pam Couch said there is Transportation Enhancement funding of $723,0000 for the region and $673,000 of that could be eligible for the street light project if the city moves forward.

Tuesday night the council opted to make Mayor George Andreasen the point person for the project. Planner Scott Kessler has been working on new street lights for years, but this is the only time funds have actually been earmarked for the project.

Couch said the ideal situation would be to get the project moving and on the August 3 meeting of the MCTC for discussion and approval. By doing that, she said, the lighting project could be included in next year's Caltrans U.S. 395 Rehabilitation Project for Main Street, saving some costs of installation. That project is about $10 million. Caltrans Main Street Project Manager in District 2, Eric Akana, has sent estimates in different lighting configurations and will coordinate with the city on final plans.

Couch said his plans include spacing the lights at 60 foot intervals, which means 126 lights, or at 110 to 170 foot intervals, requiring 62 lights or 100 to 140 foot intervals requiring 70 lights. Since the new lights are not as high as current lights, there need to be quite a few more to meet the lighting standards and requirements, said Couch.

While the cost per unit is estimated at $7,000 by Caltrans, local officials believe that figure is too high and lights could be much less each.

The issue will be discussed by the MCTC. The Council believes the addition of the new style lights would be a large plus for Main Street.

Woman killed in head-on collision

A woman returning from the Rainbow Gathering was killed July 7, about 3 p.m. in a head-on collision on State Route 299 east of Canby.

According to the California Highway Patrol, Magali Ruiz, age 47, of San Rafael, was westbound in a 1991 Toyota Previa Van. As she approached a 1993 Ford F350 driven by Chris Bushey, 22, of Canby, she allowed the van to drift into the opposing lane. Bushey quickly steered his truck onto the right shoulder in an attempt to avoid Ruiz, but the Toyota continued to drift toward the south shoulder and the two vehicles collided head-on.

The Toyota spun around after impact and came to rest just off the south shoulder. The Ford pickup careened off the road and rolled onto its roof. Ruiz sustained fatal injuries and died at the scene. Bushey sustained minor injuries and was treated at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas. Moderate injuries were reported in a motorcycle accident July 14, 12:45 p.m. on U.S. 395 south of Davis Creek.

The CHP reports that Charles Featherston, 34, of Reno, was northbound on a 2000 BMW motorcycle at about 65 m.p.h. and was adjusting his radio. He drifted of the road and attempted to correct his path on the east shoulder. He lost control and rolled his motorcycle. He was found lying on the shoulder and was transported by ambulance to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas.

Interest high in local elections

Interest is high in local school board elections and several people came in the first day to register, said Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison. The nomination period opened this week and ends August 6. The election will be November 2.

There are three full term openings on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees, those of Seab McDonald, Ken Fogle and Jeff Bushey. As of Wednesday, McDonald and Fogle have filed for re-election and current challengers are John Fogerty, John W. Ford and Heather Salazar.

In Surprise Valley, the short term Cedarville seats (expiring in 2006) of Marcie Grove and James Laacke, are up for election, as well as full terms for Bob Staton in Eagleville and Tony Darst in Lake City.

In Tulelake, the full term positions of Shelly Buckingham, Tom Macy and Larry LeQuieu are on the line.

The Modoc County Board of Education has two seats up for election, those of Jim Hays and James "Bucky" Harris. Hays has filed for re-election. There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison said there are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board.

There will also be an election in Supervisor District two, where incumbent Mike Dunn is in a run-off with Alturas resident Roy Moore. Moore received the most votes in the primary with 314 at 42.43 percent. Dunn received 30.14 percent (223) of the vote. Ron Sharpless got 23.38 percent (173) of the vote cast. Moore had to receive 50 percent plus one vote to win outright in the primary.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Modoc Picnic set for August

The 63rd Annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 1, 2004, at Carmichael Park in Carmichael, CA.

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this event. This is a potluck, so those attending are asked to bring a dish of their choice, their own place setting and their own beverage.

Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advisable to arrive early, to have a chance to visit before lunch begins. Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The Modoc group will gather at the rear of the park near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider, (916) 645-2995.

Help celebrate Big Valley Days

Old fashioned good times will make for a fun weekend in the welcoming and quaint "community that cares" known as Adin, this Saturday and Sunday during the annual Big Valley Days celebration

Dick and Dorothy Campbell of Adin, have been chosen for the honor of Grand Marshals for Big Valley Days July 17 and 18. The Campbells recently sold their long-time business, Adin Supply, and have long been involved with Big Valley Days, as organizers over the years. Saturday events

Big Valley Days will officially start on Saturday, July 17 at the Adin Community Hall and Park, with the Lookout 4-H Club serving breakfast to the public from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.

A parade starts at 11 a.m. in Adin. Children's games will be scheduled throughout the day, along with a three on three basketball tournament to begin play around 9 a.m. at the Adin Park. A softball tournament starts play around 9 a.m. also.

The Blood Bank will take donations from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A Horseshoe Tournament and scenic airplane rides at the Adin Airport will be offered, along with music in the park throughout the day.

Roundhouse Ronnie the clown will roam the ground with fun and games for all ages from 12 noon to 5 p.m. Hop a buggy ride to various historical sites anytime between 12 noon and 5 p.m. .

Craft and food booths will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Enjoy a tri-tip barbecue meal, presented by Big Valley Days Association at 6 p.m. Winners of the parade and cow chip bingo will be announced.

Sunday events:

Sunday, July 18 will begin with breakfast being served by Adin's Providence 4-H Club members, from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Church in the Park with worship and fellowship from 10 a.m. will be followed by the opening of craft and food booths, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Both Softball and Basketball Tournaments continue play at 9 a.m. Children's games, music in the park, buggy rides and Round House Ronnie the Clown will be happening from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. A community "free" potluck will start at 2 p.m. Bring a potluck dish, some chairs to sit in and enjoy a time to visit and eat in the beautiful Adin Park. Every family or individual who brings a dish is invited to join in. The Adin Ambulance will sponsor a Ducky Derby.

For more information regarding any of the event, call Tracy Piscitello at 299-4264, Shari Blatt, 294-5814 or Kathie Banwarth, 299-3531.

'Festival of One-Act Plays' to open

The Modoc County Arts Council's production of Chasin' Tricksters' Tales: A Festival of One-Act Plays will be offered, July 23, 24 & 25 at the Modoc High Country Amphitheater, located at the end of West Fourth St, between the airport and former Modoc Railroad Museum, in Alturas.

Resources for Indian Student Education (RISE) Inc., starting at 7:30 p.m., will perform pre-show entertainment, featuring "Thoz Womenz Singerz", an all woman drum that formed in the summer of 2002 with Alturas-based singers: Lisa Craig (Pit River/Paiute), Kandi Max-well (Cherokee), Cindy Gonzales (Klamath) and April Lea Go Forth (a-ni-yv-wi'ya); Chasin' Tricksters' Tales will open at 8:00 p.m. The amphitheater will open its gate to the public at 7:00 p.m.

Promoted as a comedic, festival of one-act plays, it is a family oriented, collection of "Tricksters' Tales" from around the world.

Have you heard the one about - the fly, on a pole, who served as a witness in court? Or, do you know how the bear lost his tail?

Directors Nancy Ballard and Michael Halderman are responsible for turning traditional "Tricksters' Tales" into little staged scenes, filled with fun and laughter.

Other scenes were written by: Rudyard Kipling and William Shakespeare. Cast members, each performing a variety of characters, include: Jessica Correa, Kerry Davis, Midge Dier, Maggi Duncan, John Lawson, Shannon Philpott and Larry Shippen.

Anyone interested in assisting on the production crew is encouraged to contact any of the above. Rehearsals will move to the amphitheater starting Monday, July 12, at 6:00 p.m.

General admission tickets are: $7.00 for adults; $5.00 for children and seniors. There are no reserved seats. Group discounts are available for parties of twenty-five or more patrons, contact MCAC director Ken Frank-lin, (530) 233-2505, to make arrangements.

A benefit drawing will be held on July 25, 2004. Winners need not be present to win. Prizes include: A two-night stay at the Sands Regency Casino Hotel in Reno, Nevada; a round of golf for two, with a cart, at Harbor Links Golf Club, Klamath Falls, OR; $100 in cash; gift certificates and more. Tickets are $1.00 each; or 6 for $5.00 available at the gate; or, contact (530) 233-8193 for information.

Chasin' Tricksters' Tales is sponsored by: RISE, Inc. through a grant from the California Arts Council Multicultural Impact Grant and the PacifiCorp Foundation for Learning.

Cedarville 4-H talent show seeks youngsters

Have a talent? If you answered yes to this question and are of one to 18 years of age, the Cedarville 4-H Club/Talent Show Committee is looking for you. There are many young people in Modoc County who have undiscovered talent. So, this year a Talent Show will be held during fair time (Aug. 19 - Aug. 22) at the Modoc County Fairgrounds in Cedarville. First, second and third place prizes will be awarded. It doesn't matter what kind of talent or how unique it may be, all are encouraged to participate in the Talent Show. If interested, please contact Victoria Cochran or Tracey Cochran at (530) 279-6227. The following information will be needed from contestants: full name (if a group, the name of each person) and age, a telephone number to contact, the city of residence, type of talent to demonstrate, and estimated time needed to demonstrate the talent. Applications may also be obtained from Page's Market or Cedarville Grocery Store. If you decide to use the application instead of contacting the Cochrans by telephone, please mail entries to P.O. Box 34, Cedarville, California 96104.

Try outs will be held on Saturday, July 31, 2004, at a specific time and location in Cedarville to be determined in the near future.

The deadline for entry will be July 24. Although adults and guardians are encouraged to help participants prepare for the show, adults will not be allowed to participate in the Talent Show. 4-H Talent Show Committee Members or Talent Show Judge Members will not be allowed to compete due to a possible conflict of interest.

The show is being organized by Victoria Cochran and Tracey Cochran of the Cedarville 4-H Club/Talent Show Committee, Creative Arts & Crafts Project, 4-H Cedarville, CA.

Big night for Miss Modoc

The 2004 Miss Modoc competition will culminate on Saturday evening with the crowning of the 77th queen. The gala event starts at 6:00 p.m. with a dinner at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville.

"Mazolis," a local catering business owned by former Miss Modoc princess Bonnie Parman Bunyard, will be preparing one of its renowned meals for guests. The cost is $10 per person with children six and under dining free. The evening's festivities will proceed with musical entertainment featuring another former princess, Joann White.

Before the announcement of the newest queen, guests will be treated to a fashion show featuring current styles available in Modoc County. Outfits have been provided by the Classie Lassie and Calico Cow, L&B Ranch Supply, and Jay's Clothing. Modeling the outfits will be Miss Modoc 2003, Nicki Poindexter, Meghan Binning, and Tiffany Martinez, all of Alturas. Coordinator Wynarda Erquiaga announced a very special feature of the evening. Miss Modoc will be crowned in front of an audience that will include many past queens and members of their courts. Over 65 invitations have gone out to past participants in a contest that began in 1927. Erquiaga is still trying to track down current address for some of the women who have represented the county. If you have recent contact information, please call her at 279-6368.

Though scattered far and wide, Miss 1947 and many others have responded and will be present. Co-planner Jeannette McDonald Bucher of Cedarville (formerly of Canby) is also a past queen.

Miss Modoc represents the county at the Modoc District Fair in August, participating in the parade and many other events during fair week. She will also travel to surrounding county fairs, rodeos and events, spreading good will on behalf of the people of Modoc County.

Obituaries:

Sarah Virginia Harris

Sarah Virginia Harris, 59, a former chairwoman of the Pit River Indian Tribe, died of natural causes July 11, 2004, at Mayers Memorial Hospital, Fall River Mills, CA. Services will be held this Saturday, July 17 at 2 p.m. at the Full Gospel Indian Mission in Fall River. A reception at the Pit River Health Center will follow burial at the Burney Cemetery. Pastor Kenneth Landers will officiate. An all night wake will begin Friday night at the Full Gospel Indian Mission, Fall River Mills.

Mrs. Harris was born in Burney, CA. on April 24, 1945, and was a lifetime resident of Shasta County. She had worked as a certified nurses' aide at Mayers Memorial Hospital for 25 years. She was a member of the Pit River Indian Tribe.

She is survived by her husband Jerry Harris of Hat Creek, CA.; two sons Wayne Gibbs, Burney and Robbie Gibbs, Hat Creek; four daughters Pam Mason, Montgomery Creek, CA.; Jennifer Adkins, Sacramento; Sheila Montgomery, Burney and Deanna Trotter, Anderson, CA.; three sisters Mary Jane Montgomery, Hat Creek; Linda Montgomery and Anna Bell Christie of Hat Creek; and eight grandchildren.

Allen & Dahl Funeral Chapel of Palo Cedro is in charge of arrangements.

Joshua Isaac Allen

Joshua Isaac Allen, 22, of Cave Junction, Oregon, died Thursday, July 7, 2004.

Services will be 11:00 a.m. Sunday, July 18, 2004 at Rough and Ready Park in Cave Junction with Pastor Lydia Welcome officiating. A potluck lunch will follow. Services are under the direction of Hull and Hull Funeral Directors of Grants Pass, OR.

Contributions may be made to Home Valley Bank, Cave Junction, in the name of Joshua Allen.

He was born July 28, 1981 in Anaheim, California. He had lived in Alturas, California for sixteen years and had lived in Cave Junction the past seven years. He graduated from Illinois Valley High School in 2000.

He loved the outdoors and mountains of Oregon and Northern California, hunting, fishing and 4X4ing. He also loved building things of wood and metal. He was the best father to his baby girl Shelby Linden Allen. He was wonderful to everyone who knew him and would often give his last dime to anyone in need, which was often. He was loyal and honest and treated his fiance' Amanda like a queen. He worked hard to supply everything his family needed. He always had a smile on his face. His girls were his pride and joy.

He will be loved and missed by all who knew him.

Survivors include his parents, Darrell and Corinne Allen of Cave Junction; a sister, Mechelle Northrup of Cave Junction; grandparents, Richard and Dorothy Allen of O'Brien, Oregon; his fiance, Amanda Allen and a daughter Shelby Linden, both of Cave Junction and 13 cousins.

Edith Evalina Hunter

Davis Creek resident Edith Evalina Hunter passed away in Lakeview, OR. on July 11, 2004 at the age of 86 years. Memorial services are pending and will be held at the Davis Creek Church.

She was born Inez Evalina Masserini in Calipatria, CA. on November 23, 1917. Her husband, Earl B. Hunter, preceded her in death.

Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary of Alturas. Mrs. Hunter's obituary will be published in a future issue.

Sports

Modoc Girls All-stars in title game (Girls win)

The Modoc Major Girls All-Star team played in the District 48 Championship game Wednesday night against Quincy after presstime in Burney.

Modoc was undefeated in its first three games, beating Westwood 8-0, Feather River 24-12 and went extra innings to beat Quincy 12-11, July 11. Modoc has two shots at winning the title, as they are unbeaten in the double elimination tourney.

Late News: The girls beat Quincy 14-13 in the last inning Wednesday night and to win the District 48 Championship and now travel to the Regional Tourney in Redding to play Eureka Friday night at 8 p.m. The game was tight, tied a 11-11 and 13-13 before Modoc came up for the final at bat to score a run.

Men's softball league results

The standings of the Alturas Men's Softball League are as follows: Brass Rail 6-0; Lakeview 5-1; Hooters 5-3; Styx 3-5; SV Aviation/4-Corners 1-4; Mavericks 0-7.

Upcoming games: July 16, Lakeview at SV Aviation/4-Corners, 6:30 in Alturas; Lakeview vs Brass Rail, 8:30 in Alturas; July 19, Hooters at Lakeview, 6:30 in Lakeview; July 20, Styx at SV-4 Corners, 7:00 in Alturas; July 21, Mavericks at Hooters in Cedarville, 7 p.m.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing at Eagle Lake turned hot late last week as anglers are reporting excellent results in the South Shore areas of the lake. Best results have been in the Eagles Nest area and working from Wildcat Point north toward Shrimp Island. The fish have gone deep with best results coming from boats at depths from 20 to 35 feet. Strongest results have been with night crawlers followed closely by trolling with needlefish, rainbow runners and the like. Use of slip bobbers for still fishing and trolling with down riggers or lead-core line works best this time of year.

Fish have been weighing between two and four pounds typically. Best times continue to be early morning hours. Weather conditions have been mostly good following a period of heavy afternoon winds late last week.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available on a first-come first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake, call the U.S. Forest Service at (530)257-4188. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

July 29th, 2004

News

Forest Service buries 100,000 surplus seedlings

The Modoc National Forest has buried 100,000 surplus seedlings, valued at about $31,000, that were ordered for Blue Fire replanting.

Local residents saw the truckloads of bagged trees being buried at a gravel pit on Howard's Gulch and brought a bag and their concerns to the Record Tuesday.

Forest Information Officer Nancy Garden admitted the forest did surplus the trees and they were buried. She said the forest had ordered the trees from the Placerville Nursery three years ago, based upon an estimate of how many trees were needed for the reforestation of the Blue Fire. She said it is not uncommon to order more trees than may be planted. The extra trees are ordered as a hedge against various problems that could occur. The trees were generated from seeds taken from the Blue Fire area and propagated at Placerville to insure their survival, said Gardner.

She said the Forest Service planted 938,000 trees on the Blue Fire, in every area that could be planted. She said 70,000 excess trees were sold to the Fort Bidwell Reservation, and the remaining 100,000 trees were offered to various agencies, with no success. Garden said the Forest Service cannot sell to private parties because they would be in competition to local nurseries.

Local residents expressed sincere dismay that the Forest Service would willingly destroy $31,000 worth of healthy seedlings. They called it an incredible waste of money and resources.

Bad apple Rainbow escapes from jail, caught soon after

An apparent bad apple participant of the Rainbow Gathering is now serving time at High Desert State Prison in Susanville, following a crime spree and escape from the Modoc County Jail.

According to Modoc Undersheriff Mark Gentry, Mark Campbell, age 28 of Lakewood Co., escaped from the jail Sunday about 1:30 p.m. when some procedural requirements were not followed.

Gentry said Campbell was taken from his cell to make a phone call, got into the sally port area and lifted up the heavy metal gates and wormed his way under and out.

Corrections officers gave chase, but lost track of him. .

Alturas Police report that Campbell allegedy went into a garage in the Estes and First Street area, changed out of his orange jail suit in to different clothes and stole a bicycle.

Gentry said an alert was sent out a there agencies, the California Highway Patrol, Alturas Police and Sheriff's department covered the area. The CHP helicopter was in the area on another issue and was instrumental in the search for Campbell.

At about 4:40 p.m., Alturas resident Bill Roberts saw Campbell heading south down Estes Street and contacted authorities. Campbell continued past Sully's trailer park into an open pasture and over the railroad tracks. According to Gentry, Deputy Stacy Callaghan identified Campbell, told him to stop and kneel, but he took off, jumped a fence and Callaghan ran him down and tackled him. He was placed under arrest.

Gentry said because Campbell had been unruly and threatening during his time in jail, he requested and received authority to transfer him to the state prison. He will be transported back to Modoc for court dates.

Campbell was charged with felony escape, resisting arrest burglary and is also wanted on warrants out of Colorado including parole violation and he is a registered sex offender.

Campbell, who was staying at a local resident's home, was involved in a major incident last Friday. According to Barnes, Campbell and a companion had gone into Holiday Market and filled up grocery carts with food items. One of them dropped a pickle jar purposely on the floor to cause a disturbance while the other took the groceries out to a waiting Jeep Cherokee.

The Holiday management saw the baskets of groceries leave, estimated at about $250, and gave chase. The driver of the Jeep, Eric Schlicht, 33, out of New England, took off and ran into a car driven by Pauline Cravens of Alturas and was later stopped. Also found in the Jeep were several stolen books from the Modoc County Library.

Campbell took off and ran into the 1300 block of Fifth Street. At one point he grabbed a hammer from a residence, but dropped it and kept running. He entered a residence through a open window and refused to come out. There was no one at home at the time.

According to Barnes, he and Mike Crutcher entered the home and found Campbell drinking vodka on the floor of the kitchen.

Campbell was taken into custody and transported the Modoc Jail. Once at the jail, he bolted from officers and slammed into the metal sally port gates, going nowhere.

He was charged with burglary, resisting arrest, assault with a deadly weapon and possession of stolen property. Schlicht was also arrested and charged with possession of stolen property and other crimes.

Tragic end to desert fugitive saga, man dies

By Patricia Hemsley

Special to the Record

In a dramatic and tragic ending to an extensive multi-state manhunt, the suspect believed to have been committing a series of property crimes in the Long Valley area northeast of Surprise Valley used a .22 rifle to take his life on Sunday, July 25. He had been surrounded by federal BLM rangers and other law enforcement officers who tracked him to a remote camp within the boundaries of Death Valley National Park.

Despite officers promptly running his fingerprints through state and national databases, the deceased man remains unidentified to date. Not one piece of identification discovered among his belongings had been issued to him; everything found so far appears to have been stolen from past victims.

Sergeant Russell Pedersen of the Washoe County Sheriff's Search and Rescue team, assisted by federal Ranger Jim Massey of the BLM's Surprise Valley Field Office, has been coordinating the search in the local tri-states' region. Because of the frustrating uncertainty surrounding every aspect of this case, Pedersen, as well as every law enforcement officer interviewed for this account, refused to say with any conviction that the man sought for recent crimes is the same one who died on Sunday.

Pedersen said, "A lot of circumstantial things point to this being our suspect, many things appear unique to his past behavior but still…if we say we have him and then someone goes out and gets hurt…I'm just not prepared --yet -- to say 100% 'this is our guy'"

Suspect Leaves Local Area

The suspect, who has been at the center of an intense manhunt in the remote areas where northwest Washoe, Lake and Modoc counties meet, apparently left this area sometime after the last confirmed sighting of him on July 7. A few days prior to his death, he is believed to have been in the Imlay area, south of Winnemucca, Nevada.

Pershing County sheriff's deputies are investigating how the man traveled to where he allegedly pilfered food from a fifth wheel trailer and stole a nearby flatbed truck on July 21 or 22. Trackers are not hopeful, due to recent heavy rains in the area, of their ability to backtrack over his trail and connect him to the Little Basin area where he was believed to have been hiding.

An important piece of the larger puzzle would be the discovery of what vehicle the suspect used to travel to Imlay. Police are searching in Pershing County, Nevada for the purple 1996 Toyota Tacoma pickup stolen from Jesse Gladwill on June 21 near the Painted Rock area north of County Road 8A. Though the suspect had never been spotted driving that vehicle, it was speculated he may have hidden it for future use. Officers are hopeful it will be recovered.

Arrives in Death Valley

The Chevy flatbed truck stolen in Imlay was spotted by a BLM ranger on the side of a remote road within the boundaries of Death Valley National Park late on Thursday, July 22. Even though the truck hadn't been reported stolen at that time, the officer was mildly suspicious due to its "unusual location" within the park.

He left the heavily loaded vehicle to get to an area where his radio equipment would transmit clearly. When he returned later with another ranger to investigate further, it was immediately apparent someone had removed a good deal of the items seen when he first inspected the truck. The officers straight away began following fresh ATV tracks leading away from the truck south toward the town of Shoshone. Even though it was near midnight, they persisted in their search, driven by their growing gut feeling these new developments were tied to a suspect whose pattern they knew only too well. To several of the officers who eventually joined this final search, the unfolding scenario was all too familiar. It had begun in August 2003. It was an exasperating case of a man who routinely burglarized remote camps and cabins, a man who set up hidden hideaways and cached survival supplies, a man who had an uncanny ability to elude apprehension.

In the beginning, he struck from the most remote areas of the stark Panamint Mountain range along Death Valley's southwestern boundary. Then he moved on, to Tonopah, through Crescent Valley, finally settled just east of Surprise Valley long enough to trigger an organized search effort. Was it possible this same man who had disappeared from their local area for so many months had suddenly returned? Their familiarity with his methods and skills only increased the officers' determination to finally apprehend this maddeningly mysterious and amazingly competent lawbreaker.

Agencies Join Forces in Search

On Saturday, July 24, the California Highway Patrol joined the pursuit, flying over the search area in a fixed-wing aircraft. They scrutinized a wide region of the southern section of the park but were unable to spot the ATV rangers were tracking on foot. Late that day, they picked up tracks on a large dry lake bottom off Furnace Creek Wash Road. But neither the suspect nor signs of his camp were discovered.

On Sunday morning, reports came in describing a lone man seen holding an empty gas can, calmly leaning on a roadside call box. Most people in the predicament of needing gas at the height of summer with its devastating heat would be "jumping up and down and waving for help", according to one park ranger. So officers decided promptly to investigate further. But the man and his gas can were gone.

Within half an hour of the man's disappearance, BLM rangers, national park service rangers, and Inyo County sheriff's deputies began following a set of fresh, now familiar, ATV tracks cross country. The man appeared to be headed toward Death Valley's Dumont Dunes near Ibex Pass in the southern area of the vast park.

The Final Hours

The CHP again put a search aircraft above the area. Trackers, following a pattern established in past hunts for the man they suspected they were following, searched all drainages as they scoured the area. And a secluded drainage culvert is where the suspect finally was discovered about 2:00 on Sunday afternoon.

Four officers carefully approached what appeared to be a crude camp. Someone had covered a small tent and an ATV with a tan camouflage tarp. "At the first word, "POLICE", we heard a shot. And he was dead just that quickly," said one of the officers on the scene. The man they had been tracking put a .22 rifle in his mouth and –suddenly, decisively-- ended the final search.

Officials Remain Puzzled and Cautious

Silencing himself forever, the man may have ended any hope officials had of ever learning why he had been living in some of the West's most remote, inhospitable areas for almost two years. Why had he chosen to live with almost no known human contact? Was he running from past crimes, was he mentally ill, or was it a simple case of extreme antisocial and larcenous behavior? His motives may never be fully understood now.

To date, his known crimes appear to be relatively nonviolent. He had burglarized cabins and camps he watched until he knew they were empty, stolen several vehicles, and probably killed and butchered a cow. He persistently avoided contact with people, but the few times he did unavoidably meet up with someone, he was described as "politely distant". As far as the plunder he took from local cabins, what he didn't use, says Pedersen, "could be buried in tarps, or cached in places so hidden, bits and pieces may be turning up for years" in our area.

The only clear, uncontested link, thus far, connecting the suspect to the local area, was the ATV. Its ID numbers matched those of one reported stolen by a Lake County resident about one month ago.

Even with that established link, Pedersen remains stubbornly cautious. "We still can't say it is the same man. It's not inconceivable someone else stole that vehicle and coincidentally showed up down south", he said. For this law enforcement officer, the burden of proof is heavy and the concern for the public's safety paramount.

Identity Remains a Mystery

Because he fell just over the San Bernardino county line on BLM land, the dead man's body was claimed by that county's coroner's office where it remains so far. His fingerprints, to date, have come up as belonging to a "John Doe". Pedersen explained, "He may never have been arrested or he just may have never been charged with a felony that requires being printed."

So far, some of the physical features reported by the coroner's office match the familiar drawings posted locally. "He does have blue eyes, weighed about 150 pounds, and had bad teeth", said Pedersen, "but even that could be coincidental and doesn't prove anything so far. I'd like to see a face and more than a vague, general description", he added.

Some Stolen Items May Be Recovered

Detective Bill Talbot of the Washoe County Sheriff's Office, working in conjunction with several other law enforcement agencies, will be trying to come up with a thorough inventory of all items recovered from the suspect's camp and the stolen flatbed truck. He will be contacting local burglary victims sometime in the future when everything has been sorted out and there is a system in place to reunite owners with their belongings. His phone number is 775-328-3320.

However, Pedersen cautioned folks not to get their hopes up too high. All the items the man had with him on his last flight may have been stolen near Imlay or on the run.

The suspect actually had not been seen in the local area since Lake City rancher Dale Steward and a companion passed him on July 7 near Road 8A. At that time he was riding on a green ATV, surrounded by many overstuffed white trash bags. At a July 16 briefing of local BLM grazing permit holders, Pedersen speculated the man was possibly moving his camp.

No one expected it to be quite so far.

Now, it appears, he could have already been preparing to head "home", back to the Death Valley area where this whole strange saga apparently began. And ultimately ended.

Deadlines nearing for local candidates for Nov. 2 election

The deadline to file candidate papers for local elections is August 6, and there are still open spots. The election will be November 2.

There are three full term openings on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees, those of Seab McDonald, Ken Fogle and Jeff Bushey. McDonald and Fogle have filed for re-election and current challengers are John Fogerty, John W. Ford, Bill Hall and Heather Salazar. In Surprise Valley, the short term Cedarville seats (expiring in 2006) of Marcie Grove and James Laacke, are up for election, as well as full terms for Bob Staton in Eagleville and Tony Darst in Lake City. Staton and Laacke filed papers last week.

In Tulelake, the full term positions of Shelly Buckingham, Tom Macy and Larry LeQuieu are on the line. LeQuieu and Macy have filed and Jeffrey Boyd and Venancio Hernandez are challenging.

The Modoc County Board of Education has two seats up for election, those of Jim Hays and James "Bucky" .

Harris. Hays and Harris have filed for re-election.

There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. There are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board. Interest is low on those boards.

There will also be an election in Supervisor District two, where incumbent Mike Dunn is in a run-off with Alturas resident Roy Moore.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Legal action threatened on Eagle Peak contracts

A law firm representing Legal and Safety Employer Research, Inc. (LASER) has drafted a letter to Modoc County Counsel John Kenny and individual County Supervisors threatening legal action if the county approves any further contracts with Eagle Peak Rock and Paving.

"We urge the county to again address the issue of disqualification (of Eagle Peak) at its next meeting," wrote Theodore Franklin, representing LASER. "If despite the obviously irresponsible past conduct of Eagle Peak, the County enters into another contract with Eagle Peak, LASER will take whatever legal action it deems appropriate to vindicate the public interest." Last Tuesday, Kenny informed the Board of Supervisors that it should award a previously accepted low bid for a Barnes Grade Project to Eagle Peak, who was the lowest bidder.

Road Commissioner Tom Tracy delayed that award seeking advice from the entire Board. Kenny told the board that since Eagle Peak was not disqualified from the bidding process and was the lowest bidder, the contract should be awarded. The board agreed and Eagle Peak got the contract. What LASER is arguing in the latest letter is that the county needs to revisit the issue to disqualify Eagle Peak from bidding on county contracts. The issue revolves around a lawsuit the county has against Fitch Sand and Gravel (now Eagle Peak) to reclaim about a $455,000 overpayment to Fitch Sand and Gravel on a Cedarville Airport contract in 2001.

In part, the letters states, "The award of a contract to Eagle Rock (Peak) would be manifestly contrary to the public interest by routing more public funds to a contractor who is currently in litigation with the county for his failure to pay back unlawfully retained public funds . . . responsibility includes the attribute of trustworthiness, a quality demonstrably lacking in Eagle Peak's past performance. The Board of Supervisors should have been advised that a simple hearing on the allegations that Eagle Peak has kept public monies that should have been returned years ago is all that would be required. Eagle Peak must be given an opportunity to tell its side of the story, but the county may then exercise its official discretion in determining whether Eagle Peak is a trustworthy contractor. Eagle Peak's blatant failure to comply with the law in regard to its overpayment would satisfy any judge in California that Modoc County had acted properly if it refused to do further business with Eagle Peak."

Eagle Peak Rock and Paving's President Tony Cruse has paid Modoc County $43,263 as a first step in paying off the debt.

Cruse is trying to secure loans to pay the entire overpayment, even though he believes he legally only owes 15 percent of the total. He was a 15 percent owner in then Fitch Sand and Gravel, which received the funds in 2001. The other principal in Fitch Sand and Gravel, Gale Easley, is part of a civil action filed by Modoc County to collect the funds. Cruse maintains that Easley received the money. The county is going after both parties' assets to get the debt repaid.

Last week, Kenny told the board he felt the prudent action was to continue the civil action to have the county's money returned.

Cruse has stated the two companies are now separate. He said Fitch Sand and Gravel was incorporated in 1997. The Fitch Sand and Gravel Corporation status was amended, according to state documents, in Sept., 2003, to change the name to Eagle Peak Rock and Paving, Inc.

Cruse and his wife, Penny Cruse, are the principals in the Eagle Peak company.

Kenny explained that the Board had not disqualified Eagle Peak from the bidding process and since they were the low bidder, and could do the work, he felt they were the lowest and most responsible bidder on the Barnes Grade project.

Board Chairwoman Patricia Cantrall said the disqualification issue could be placed on a future agenda for discussion if the board desires.

City opts to hire planner

Economic development took a backseat to other priorities at the Alturas City Council meeting Monday night.

The council, on a 3-2 vote, which was contentious, opted to hire a full time planner, at a total cost of just above $50,000 per year including benefits. Also contentious was a vote of 3-2 to increase Public Works Director Stacy Chase's pay by $400 per month until the planner comes on board. That increase is so he can handle planner's duties in the interim.

The City has $40,000 available annually for planning, which had been paid to the county to provide planning services. That contract expired at the end of June.

Mayor George Andreasen and Councilman Jerry Smith, who supported economic development as a priority, voted against the issues.

Councilmembers John Vass, Jack Ochs and Cheryl Nelson voted in favor. Vass, Ochs and Nelson are subjects in a recent complaint of Brown Act violation in relation to a letter they sent to Mayor George Andreasen. The letter states the three of them discussed certain issues outside of a council meeting, which is prohibited under the Brown Act. A majority of any governing body is not allowed to come to a conclusion by calling individually or discussing the issues outside of an open meeting.

The council also voted to go to bid to hire a grant writer, with the cost of that position supposedly coming out of the administrative portion of successful grants, which is allowable.

The council also voted to add another position of Building Inspector/Maintenance Worker and took the building inspector duties away from the Assistant Public Works Director.

Vass, who recommended the changes, also wants to raise the building permit fees in Alturas by a minimum of 100 percent. That issue will have to go to public hearings.

Finally, the board opted to go out for still another feasibility study. This time, the city wants to write a grant for a feasibility study for the formation of a Community Development Corporation. That grant application must be done by Sept. 20, and amounts to $35,000.

Dr. Clyde will leave Modoc Clinic

Dr. Debra Clyde will leave Modoc Medical Center on Sept. 25, saying she would rather have re-negotiated her contract, but hospital administration had other ideas.

Clyde shared duties with Doctors Ed Richert and Owen Panner and said she will miss her patients and providing for their health care. She said she intends to continue working and seeing her patients, easing their transition to new providers.

Dr. Clyde sees ongoing management problems at the hospital facilities and hospital administration sees problems with Dr. Clyde keeping up with her paperwork.

She will not be scheduled to see patients after Sept. 3, so she can complete the documentation and patient records.

Obituaries:

James MacArthur Cox

James MacArthur Cox, 61, of Alturas, passed away July 25, 2004. Graveside services will be held Friday, July 30 at 10:00 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery. Pastor Rod Bodmer will officiate with the Veterans Groups of Alturas.

Jim was born in Wewoka, Oklahoma on October 18, 1942, to James Lester Cox, Sr. and Mary Edna Womache. Jim lived in the Chowchilla area of California and was raised by his grandmother until he was a teenager. Jim enlisted in the United States Navy where he served 16 years and three tours of duty in Vietnam. While there, he served as Boat Captain on a 36 foot MK XI LCPL (patrol boat) as well as a 45 foot Pickett boat. His duties included patrolling around anchored ships, boarding and searching of Vietnamese craft, and conducting anti-swimmer operations.

While in Vietnam, he commanded a small patrol boat and their mission was to protect friendly shipping in the patrol sectors assigned. Other duties included boarding and search of small craft and search and rescue. he was adept in his missions. As per his commanding officer evaluation, he was credited with inspecting more craft then any other crew.

Toward the end of his career he became an instructor to train in tactical operations of Picket Boat, LCPL MK XI and Boston Whaler.

Jim met and married Opal Pearl Cox, July 19, 1965 in Las Vegas, Nevada. They made their lives in Vallejo, CA. Upon retirement from the United States Navy Jim and Opal ran a janitorial service. What brought Jim to Alturas was a commercial about the high desert area that had wonderful pine trees and many acres for sale. Upon coming to Alturas and seeing the area they had decided this was the place to be. They purchased property and moved to Modoc, where they have lived for the past 18 years.

While living in Alturas, Jim became an important part of the Modoc County Special Olympics for over ten years. He served on the board, participated in coaching of athletes, and helped setup and run local events. Jim worked for the Modoc County Office of Education for 16 years and retired.

He was preceded in death by his wife of 37 years Opal Pearl Cox; son, David Wayne Cox; father, James Lester Cox Senior. He is survived by his sister-in-law Lucile Russell of Alturas; mother, Dora Cox of Surprise, Arizona; brothers: Daniel Cox (Karrie Cox) of Alturas; William Spencer Cox of Texas; James Lester Cox, Jr. of Orting, Washington. Sisters: Irene Louise Chambers (Randy Chambers) and Linda Mae Thomas of West Valley City, Utah; Mary Lou Guinn (Nathan Guinn) of Konawa, Oklahoma. In-laws: Myrel and Alan Lutz of Delano, California; Leon and Bonnie Russell of Hermiston, Oregon; Joe and Madge Russel of Huntley, Montana; as well as many nieces and nephews.

Jim will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Kerr Mortuary of Alturas has charge of arrangements.

Edith E. Hunter

Edith Evalina Hunter died July 11, 2004 in the Long Term Care at Lake District Hospital, Lakeview, Oregon. The Davis Creek, CA. resident was born November 17, 1917, in the small town of Calipatria, CA. in Imperial Valley.

A memorial service will be held at the Davis Creek Community Church on Sunday, August 1, 2004 at 3 p.m.

Edith's mother, father and one sister immigrated from Switzerland in the early 1900's. They settled in the Imperial Valley, where they owned and operated the Masserini Dairy.

Edith married Earl B. Hunter on March 19, 1940 and had three children. Earl and Edith farmed in the Imperial Valley until 1949, when they moved to San Diego. They owned, built and operated Mission Bay Golf Course. Edith was very active in the PTA, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Jobs Daughters and her church. She also enjoyed collecting shells and making all kinds of crafts, playing golf and spending time with her grandchildren.

In 1984, Edith moved to Davis Creek as partner in the Davis Creek Mercantile. She worked in the store until about 2002, when she retired due to illness. Edith loved Davis Creek and all the people in the community. She felt her move to the small community extended her life in a very happy and productive way.

She is survived by a very loving family. Her sister Lily Terribilini of El Centro, CA.; son Kirk Hunter of Vancouver, WA.; daughter-in-law Monica and grandson Blaine. Son Brad Hunter, daughter-in-law Laurie and granddaughter Salina of Holtville, CA.; daughter Beverley Palmer and son-in-law Jerry of Davis Creek; grandson Brett Palmer of Hemet, CA.; great-grandsons Kaleb, Ryan and Christopher; granddaughter Sandra Bath of Lander, WY. and her husband Jerry; great-grandsons Rick and Ben and great-great granddaughter Tatum. Numerous nieces and nephews. Edith was preceded in death by her husband, two sisters and one brother. Donations may be made to the Davis Creek Community Church, c/o Davis Creek Women's Fire Auxiliary, P.O. Box 108, Davis Creek, CA. 96108, or to the charity of your choice.

Ethel Florence Wood Shank

Former Modoc County resident, Ethel Florence Wood Shank, passed away in Clearlake, CA. on July 26, 2004, at the age of 82.

Born in Berkeley, CA. Ethel was a graduate of Berkeley High School, class of 1939. In 1944, she moved to a ranch in Sebastopol, later she purchased another ranch in Ukiah and relocated in 1957, finally settling in Modoc County in 1961, where she and her husband Melvin resided until Melvin's death.

She was preceded in death by her devoted husband of 61 years, Melvin E. Shank; loving mother of Les Shank and his wife Lynn, Everet Shank and his wife Menzie and the late Lee Shank; dear mother-in-law of Chris Hauge; adored grandmother of Little Les Shank and his wife Stacy, Kathy Burris and her husband Casey, Curtis Hauge, Renee Shank Schneider, Leanna Shank Aragon, Stacy Shank and his wife Julia and Jeff Shank and his wife Jennifer; loving great-grandmother of Jarrod, Alyssa, Leslie, Jordan, Chauncy, Andrew, Lucille, Kaden, Nicholas, Rachelle, Andrew, Scott, Olivia, Dominic, Jocelynn and Trenton.

Private services will be held. If desired, donations in Ethel's memory may be made to the Surprise Valley Health Care District, Main and Washington Streets, Cedarville, CA 96104. Daniels Chapel of the Roses Funeral and Crematory in Santa Rosa is in charge of arrangements.

Sports

Sign up, golf, win prizes, dine, have fun at 'Warner Mountain Scramble'

A fun tradition is being revived by Arrowhead Women's Golf Club for August 14.

The return of their annual invitational four-person "Warner Mountain Scramble" hopes to encourage women golfers with or without a golf handicap, to participate in the fun. Play golf, enjoy lunch and prizes on Saturday, August 14, with a shotgun start at 10 a.m. at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

It's all for a good cause, with tournament fees and basket drawing ticket sales to benefit the Club's scholarship for a Modoc High School senior in the coming year.

The 25-member Arrowhead Women's Golf Club has sent out invitations to Lakeview, Susanville, Redding, Fall River clubs and local golfers, who may have never participated in a tournament before, are encouraged to sign up - no invitation required.

Northrup and Son of Alturas is sponsoring a cash prize of $5,000 for the first woman golfer to make the hole in one on hole number 5 during the Warner Mountain Scramble. Entry fee is $30 per person, plus green fees of $10 which includes lunch after play. Awarded places will be determined by the size of the field.

"It's all about fun," offer Kathie Widby and her mother Lynn McClellan, who serve as PWGA rep and Secretary, respectively, and keep the course operating as a family enterprise.

"You don't have to be a good golfer to play. We'll be doing lots of fun things and giving away individual prizes as well as team prizes," says Widby. "We can put a team of four together or a team already formed, can sign up. It's called a scramble because the team scrambles to the best shot among the four shots, each time and keeps moving from the best shot through to the finish."

Special drawing

A large "Fall Basket" filled with selected items from distinctive Chala Towi Jewelry created by artist Ivy Smith of Alturas, golf and gardening items to candles, towels and much more, will be given a lucky ticket holder during the tournament's August 14 drawing. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5 available at the golf course, where the basket is displayed in the dining room. Arrowhead Women's Golf Club President Penny Keeney; Treasurer Rose Boulade, Handicap chairperson Jean Phillips, McClellan and Widby encourage newcomers to "come out and golf and enjoy the day." Gift certificates for use at the clubhouse, will also be part of the prizes. The Women's Club also meets conveniently for Ladies' Playdays on Thursdays at 9 a.m. or 5:30 p.m., depending upon the individual member's choice. Lunch meetings are held at noon on the first Thursday of each month. Women's Club dues are $26 per year.

The women's club also helps sponsor and organize the Evie Capik Youth Golf Camp in Alturas.

For more information please call Arrowhead Clubhouse at (530) 233-3404. Please register for the Warner Mountain Scramble by August 1.

 

Ranch Saddle Bronc new for Fair

An all-new Ranch Saddle Bronc event will thrill visitors to the Modoc District Fair on Friday, August 20, in the arena beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for children 6-12. Children under five will be admitted free. H&H Rodeo will be supplying stock for this exciting event. Twenty riders will compete in the Long Go, while six will fill out the Short Go roster. Riders are expected from Paisley, Lakeview, Adel and Modoc County. The total purse is $2,500. The entry fee is $100. Contact Darrel or Ed Hill at (530)640-0339, (530)640-2098 or (530)279-2561) to register.

Fair CEO Traci Green announced that the auto racing promoter originally programmed into the popular Friday evening slot had failed to secure proper insurance so this new event has been added. She's sure it will prove immensely popular to Modoc County residents and visitors longing for a taste of the true west.

Gates open at 6 p.m. but be sure to stop off along the way for fortification! The concession stand outside the arena will be open but fairgoers will have a wide array of favorite novelty items and carnival goodies available to them throughout the fairground before they head up to the grandstands.

After the show, be sure to stop by the carnival. American Traveling Show returns this year with 12 great rides, including the Gravitron, the Kamikaze, the Tornado and everyone's nostalgic favorite the Ferris Wheel. There will be ten game booths and numerous food booths as well.

This year, the fair staff announced a new way for families to have fun while saving lots of money! Presale ticket books and presale family sheets are now available! The family sheets offer two adult and two children fair admissions, 20 carnival ride coupons, $4 off carnival food items, and $4 off carnival games. This entire package, worth $80, is on sale until August 18 at the fair office for only $35.

On Saturday night, those missing loud motors and automotive thrills will be happy to head back to the arena for the 2004 Destruction Derby. Beginning at 7:30 p.m., battered cars and crazy drivers will compete for $1,700 in prize money.

Drivers hoping to compete need to pick up applications at the fair office and have them returned by August 1. Call Michael at 279-2110 between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. for more information. Entry fees are $45 per driver and $15 per pit crew member.

And everyone, be sure to mark your calendars now so you can take advantage of all the shows, displays, live musical performances and other entertainment, demonstrations, games, livestock exhibits, and plain old fun offered at this year's Modoc District Fair. It all begins Thursday, August 19 and runs through Sunday, August 22 at the fairgrounds in Cedarville.

Likely Links RV and Golf tourney results

The Fourth Annual Likely to Lie Golf Tournament held in Likely Saturday, July 24, was won by the team of Chet Carpenter, Gary Carpenter, Ron Hummel, and Harold Cessna of Fall River/McArthur, with a score of 67. Second place winners were Charles Thomason, Mike Krekel, Fred Gideon, and Steve Prigmore of Burney with a score of 68. Third place winners were Bruce Perry and Greg Malikidas of Redding, Don Brannon and Kurt Kendall of Burney, with a score of 69.

Ken Tashiro of Burney won the closest to the pin contest. Donovan Currey of Magalia earned the long drive honors.

After the tournament all contestants participated in the Shootout. Bill Williams of Burney, Roger Walker of Burney, and Bill Walsh of Pittville split the cash pot.

The evening meal for the 90 golfers and family members was barbecue ball tip roast and trimmings prepared by Chef Rich Hammel and his crew.

MHS soccer practice starts

Modoc High School soccer team practice will start August 16, 5 p.m. at Alturas Elementary School.

Players must have their physcials and sports informaton cards done before practice. For more information, call 233-5260.

 

Modoc sports boosters meet

There will be a Modoc High School Boosters Club meeting August 4, at the Modoc High School Weight Room, starting at 7 p.m.

Anyone interested in helping is invited to attend this organizational meeting.

August 5th , 2004

News

Friday is deadline for local elections

Friday is the deadline to file nomination papers for the November 2 election. In cases where an incumbent doesn't file, the nomination period is extended by five days.

There are three full term openings on the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees, those of Seab McDonald, Ken Fogle and Jeff Bushey. McDonald and Fogle have filed for re-election and a host of challengers include: John Fogerty, John W. Ford, Bill Hall, Alan Hopkins, Fernand Larranaga, Jr. and Heather Salazar. Bushey has not yet filed. In Surprise Valley, the short term Cedarville seats (expiring in 2006) of Marcie Grove and James Laacke, are up for election, as well as full terms for Bob Staton in Eagleville and Tony Darst in Lake City. Staton, Grove and Laacke have filed and Dean Cockrell has filed from Lake City. Darst has not filed.

In Tulelake, the full term positions of Shelly Buckingham, Tom Macy and Larry LeQuieu are on the line. LeQuieu and Macy have filed and Jeffrey Boyd and Venancio Hernandez are challenging. Buckingham is not expected to file.

There's also a lot of interest in the Big Valley Joint Unified School District race when incumbents Cathy Banwarth and Alan Nelson are facing challenges from Julie Gagnon, Russ Hawkins, Sharmin Stevenson and Gary Martin.

The Modoc County Board of Education has two seats up for election, those of Jim Hays and James "Bucky" Harris. Hays and Harris have filed for re-election.

There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. There are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board. Interest is low on those boards.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, there will be elections in the Davis Creek Fire District with Don Blair, Shan Lewis and Jennifer Jayo running and the Fort Bidwell Fire District with John Brauner, Sam Sweeney, Dean Anderberg and Gerald Gillogley on the ballot. The Lake City Fire District has incumbents Lee Gorzell and James Harris filing.

In the Adin Fire District, Steven Gagnon and Daran Myers have filed for election.

There will also be an election in Supervisor District two, where incumbent Mike Dunn is in a run-off with Alturas resident Roy Moore.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Missing 14-year-old SV girl now subject of search

Nancy Alejandra Rangel, the 14-year-old daughter of Lupe and Martin Rangel of Cedarville, disappeared from her home late on the evening of July 27. Authorities and her worried parents believe she left the area with Felipe James (or possibly Ortega), 28, who worked on a ranch near Lakeview.

Martin Rangel said James let it be known he had been married twice and has a young daughter who lives in Bend, Oregon.

James may be driving a 1987 teal Chevrolet Cavalier. But his sisters, who live in Lakeview with their mother, indicated in a terse conversation with the Rangels that the car was sold near Santa Rosa. That meager tidbit is all the information they will disclose about their brother's plans or whereabouts. Nancy's older brother Beto said, "We think he's been calling his family but they won't tell us much. They're protecting him."

If caught, the man would likely be charged with felony child abduction and enticing a minor away from her family because Nancy is under eighteen. If convicted, he would probably serve prison time. Nancy would not face any charges upon her return

Nancy Rangel met James at Aqua Viva!, the Hispanic church branch of Living Water Fellowship in Cedarville. One of her girlfriends said they appeared to enjoy a mild flirtation though "it was really nothing at all…she never called him her boyfriend."

Martin Rangel is the pastor of the church. He also observed the budding friendship but never suspected any type of serious relationship would develop between his young daughter and the much more experienced ranch hand.

Nancy, who would be a sophomore at Surprise Valley High School in the fall, appeared to enjoy school and her many girlfriends. She talked often of someday becoming a secretary. Her father insisted she was a happy girl and had "never done anything like this before."

Nancy has a cell phone with her. A US Cellular representative was able to tell the family it had been used at least twice though he could not disclose who had been called. The outgoing calls originated from the Santa Rosa and San Francisco areas.

Undersheriff Mark Gentry said there is a tangled web of regulations relating to obtaining phone records. "Phone privacy is a big issue", he said. The department is trying to get the proper court orders to trace the pair through their phone usage.

The cell phone apparently has been programmed to block all incoming calls. But after repeated tries, Rangel was fortunate to hit a tiny window of opportunity and left a recorded message. He said he told his daughter, "We all love and miss you. We want you to come home." That was all he had time to choke out before being cut off.

Nancy had about $500 in cash with her, saved from odd jobs. Her family said she had not packed a suitcase and her clothing and belongings appeared relatively undisturbed. One item that stands out among the stuffed animals and girlish belongings in her neat bedroom is a lovely, unworn, Quinceanera dress.

The Quinceanera ceremony is a significant rite of passage in a Hispanic girl's life. Traditionally, a religious ceremony is followed by a large party celebrating the young woman's fifteenth birthday; the event symbolizes her entrance into young womanhood. The honored girl, dazzling in her formal white gown, receives gifts from her family and friends.

Nancy's relatives had gathered to join in the long-anticipated festivities, planned for July 31, the Saturday before her 15th birthday. Now they sit, praying and waiting for word that their sister, friend, niece, and cousin is well and on her way home.

Her tearful parents want Nancy to know one thing: "Her dress and party are waiting for her. We are waiting for her. We only want her to come home where she is loved and will be welcomed with open arms."

The Polly Klaus Foundation has donated posters which are being distributed throughout the area. Nancy is described as 5'4", 130 pounds with long dark hair and brown eyes. Anyone with any information is asked to call the Modoc County Sheriff's office (530-233-4416) or Martin Rangel (530-640-1325 or 279-6360).

Sheriff gets $500,000 grant restored

The Modoc County Sheriff's Office is breathing much easier this week as the new state budget included a return of the Rural Law Enforcement grant of $500,000.

Those funds were taken away during the past year's state budget crisis, and had a serious impact on the local Sheriff's Office.

Undersheriff Mark Gentry said one of the keys in getting the funding returned was Sheriff Bruce Mix's argument that Modoc was unable to fund 24-hour patrols and was down on necessary staff.

Gentry said the money will make a huge difference, including the return of around-the-clock patrols. He said the funds will also allow the Sheriff's Office to bring staffing up to full levels in dispatching, corrections and replace some badly needed equipment.

County hears proposal on public tree cutting

Ben Vanmeter and Charlotte Ford presented the Modoc County Board of Supervisors with petitions containing more than 400 signatures Tuesday requesting county resolutions to require Pacific Power to put their lines bordering Veteran's Park underground and to require an arborist report before cutting down trees on public property.

Vanmeter said the Board heard their proposals, but didn't take any action, wanting to study the issue further. He and Ford will return to the August 24 meeting of the Board to ask for a moratorium on any further tree cutting at least until all the trees cut at the park have been replaced. Pacific Power has stated it will replace the trees.

Vanmeter said they will also bring more petitions to the Board at the next meeting and hope to get the county's attention when it comes to trees within the public realm.

He said he felt the Board listened to the issue and their proposals, but were not ready to take any specific steps.

The county has allowed all the trees on the north and west sides of the park to be cut down and to date none have been replanted. In addition, the county has stated more than 65 large trees at the park and County Courthouse need to go under the saw.

The county rejected the notion of hiring an arborist as too expensive, but may try to work with the Modoc National Forest silvaculturalist.

LTC approves Alturas street lights

Let there be light. On Tuesday night the Local Transportation Commission approved the Alturas Street Light project, which should go in line with the 2005-06 major renovation of Main Street by Caltrans.

The LTC voted unanimously to allocate about $723,000 for the project which includes at least 98 lights, in the style now in front of the Alturas Post Office. The project will go from McDowell Street north to the blinking light at the intersection of State Route 299 and U.S. 395.

The project will be noticed in the October meeting of the California Transportation Commission meeting in Sacramento and then voted on in the November meeting.

The Modoc County Transportation Commission and City representatives will coordinate with Caltrans on the project.

Migratory Bird Festival flies in this September

Circle the second weekend in September and mark it MBF for this year's Migratory Bird Festival, Modoc's annual tribute to its feathered tourists. It wouldn't be a bad idea to practice a bit for the duck calling contest either. Last year's winners "quacked" everybody up during the just-for-fun competition.

The Migratory Bird Festival Committee has been lining up some new activities and vendors for the 2004 event. Backyard landscaping, with an emphasis on creating wildlife habitat, will be a featured workshop, along with a garden tour and plenty of activities for the kids. A duck carver will also give demonstrations and show some of his creations in a booth during the event.

Metal arts, pottery, photography, and herbal products will also be artfully displayed for sale and more food booths have been added so no one goes away hungry. Also new this year will be The Ledge, a climbing wall for the adventurous, and the Laser Shot for those into high tech target practicing. Another big tub full of goodies will be given away as well, to the lucky ticket-holder.

Be on the cutting edge of fashion soon with the Festival's newly designed collector t-shirt, which will be on sale in about a week at the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, the River Center, and in the front office of the Forest Service building. The shirts will also be available, along with more information about the Festival, the River Center and the Refuge, in a booth at the Modoc District Fair August 19-22.

The Festival begins the Friday evening of September 10 with an "Octoberfest" style dinner, a visit with an eagle and its handlers, and then an evening in Modoc High's social hall with author Jeanne L. Clark, who has written a book titled America's Wildlife Refuges, Lands of Promise. She will reveal the stories behind some of the book's beautiful photography and take her listeners on an armchair coast-to-coast tour of our nation's remarkable refuges. Times for these events will be announced later. Saturday's events at Veteran's Memorial Park in Alturas will begin at 9 a.m. with the landscaping workshop, and include the popular Labrador Retriever demonstration, fly tying, the Turtle Bay raptors, and conclude with the duck calling contest. At 11 a.m. there will be a pause as the area's veterans remember 9/11. Sunday's events will start at 7:30 a.m. at the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge with a bird banding demonstration, bird identification, and an outdoor wildlife photography workshop. Garden tours will begin at 10 a.m. Sunday from the River Center and reservations will be required.

Although the Balloonfest will happen two weeks earlier this year, instead of the same weekend as the Migratory Bird Festival, there will still be plenty of high-flying activities to keep everyone floating on fun.

Modoc Fair readying for fun

For many, the words "county fair" immediately conjure memories of thrill rides, sticky cotton candy and enticing midway games promising garisl stuffed prizes for every gullible contestant. But the Modoc District Fair has always maintained a different more traditional and "homespun" image due largely to its heart--the exhibits, the judged competitions and the artistic displays designed by local residents.

The historic celebration of the rural northeastern California lifestyle, our agriculture heritage, country crafts and skills begins on Thursday, August 19 and runs through Sunday, August 22. This year the theme is, "Modoc: A Playground in the Wilderness"

The Modoc District Fair is an event deeply rooted in the community it represents. County residents eagerly anticipate the annual highlight which has been drawing them together for 84 years. Many put countless hours into planning and preparing their fair entries, while others just grab what is on hand and still end up taking home winning ribbons.

Fair CEO Traci Green says, "Though state fair entries have gone down on the whole, especially over the last 20 years, there hasn't been much fluctuation here." She reports many visitors comment positively on the quality and quantity of our exhibits. "I often hear our fair compared very favorably to others in our region. Many even prefer our special atmosphere to much larger fairs, such as the one in Reno," she said.

Candy Maidens, who has been known to take a week of vacation time just to prepare for and volunteer at the fair agrees, "I love fairs in general so I've visited quite a few and judged in many. But ours is particularly nice. It's clean and when you walk in, you immediately feel the excitement and welcoming community spirit."

The fair staff would like to encourage new Modoc residents and those who have never entered anything for judging to pick up a fair premium book and take the plunge. The books are available at all county post offices and many local businesses.

There are many opportunities to get involved, including categories for crafts and floral displays, photography, baked and canned goods, fresh garden produce, small and large livestock, diverse culinary and home decorating arts, wood and furniture projects, hobby displays and much more.

For many categories the deadline to have an entry form into the fair office is at 6 p.m., Friday, August 6. Floriculture, Agriculture and horticulture entries are all due by August 11 at 6 p.m. Forms are in the back of the premium books.

Longtime Cedarville resident Florence Bordwell has been the champion exhibitor over the last few years. In 2003, she entered 128 separate items for judging. "But," she said "I started with five or six things 'way back. I enter what I have on hand. I can already, so I'll haul out a few jars and get them labeled."

When cleaning out a cupboard recently, Bordwell came across a handful of ribbons from 1973. "Winning makes it fun but I like to think I help keep the fair going. It's fun to go to the fair and see what the judges have thought of your efforts. And I like to see what my friends and neighbors have entered." Bordwell would like to see more folks make an effort to participate. "Hopefully some young people will help fill some spaces on the shelves too, because I can't do this forever." she laughed.

Maidens, who lives in Lake City, also makes the top ten list of people with the most entries over the years. She exclaims, "It's so exciting being at the fair and seeing all the exhibits I think everyone should enter. The fair provides a great showcase for the very talented people in this area."

Her interest in being an exhibitor began when Maiden's children entered their animals and vegetables from the garden years ago. She still believes any child can and should participate at some level. "Anyone can afford a rabbit or chicken. It doesn't take much room to raise small animals." Maidens believes the ribbons she's collected over the years are an added bonus apart from all the enjoyment she gets from her fair work. The promise of a ribbon keeps people motivated. "It is fun to win. Everyone enjoys that pat on the back you feel when you see a ribbon awarded to something you made," she said.

Maidens added, "I get a lot of ideas wandering through the fair exhibits. I just wish people all over the county would get more involved. The Warner Mountains seem to be a barrier to getting exhibits in on time in many people's mind. We just have to break down that wall and all work together." Candy has one other important reason to be an enthusiastic supporter of the fair. Eighteen years ago, she met and fell in love with her husband Kim at the local fair.

The top five exhibitors (in numbers of individual items entered) last year were Florence Bordwell, Vivian Kemble, Charlene Ford, Judy Cockrell (of Eagleville), and Ray Langley. The top two junior exhibitors were Ashley Thompson and Alex Moreo.

Traci Green sees them and all the others who enter items as the very heart of our fair. "People show goods for pride but they all add to the community spirit felt so strongly here. The exhibitors capture the essential aura of a true country fair."

DFG released final report for the September 2002 Klamath River Fish-Kill

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) announced today the release of its final fish-kill evaluation entitled "September 2002 Klamath River Fish-Kill; Final Analysis of Contributing Factors and Impacts." This evaluation finalizes the preliminary report which was released to the public in January 2003.

A draft of the final report received peer review from several cooperating state and federal agencies, tribes and stakeholders, as well as Humboldt State University fisheries pathologist Dr. Gary Hendrickson and Oregon State University fisheries biologist Dr. Doug Markel.

"Our goal with this report was to document the conditions in the river that contributed to this fish- kill," said Don Koch, Regional Manager for the Northern California-North Coast Region of DFG. "It is our hope that the information will be useful to the decision makers as they balance and manage the limited resources of the entire Klamath basin. We also hope that the analysis and recommendations in this report will help minimize the risks of future fish-kills in the Klamath Basin."

Copies of the report are available on DFG's webpage at www.dfg.ca.gov, or can be accessed directly at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/html/krfishkill-2004.pdf. "Our findings are very similar to those of two other reports prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Yurok Tribal Fisheries Program," said Steve Turek, a DFG senior environmental scientist and one of the authors of the report. "We found that the primary cause of the fish-kill was a disease outbreak caused by two pathogens brought on by stressful environmental conditions and high densities of fish."

The two pathogens responsible for the death of more than 33,000 adult salmon and steelhead in September 2002 were the myxozoan parasite lcthyopthirius multifilus commonly referred to as Ich, and the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare referred to as Columnaris. These pathogens are common in aquatic systems and are present at all times in the Klamath River.

The report finds that unusually low flows, low river volumes and an above-average run of salmon resulted in abnormally high fish densities in the lower 36 miles of the Klamath River. Apparently, large numbers of fish congregated in the lower river one to two weeks before the onset of the fish-kill.

"While we do not fully understand why these fish held in the lower river in such large numbers, we can hypothesize that upstream migration was impaired due to physical, water quantity or water quality barriers, the disease itself, or a lack of environmental cues for the fish to head upstream," Turek said.

The report concludes that abnormally high densities of primarily natural fall-run Chinook salmon coupled with the normal presence of the pathogens and typical warm river temperatures created ideal conditions for the disease outbreak which ultimately resulted in the fish-kill.

"This was an unprecedented event in the Klamath River and one of, if not the largest fish kills of adult anadromous salmonids recorded on the west coast," said Turek. Other adult fish-kills have occurred on the Rogue River in Oregon, Butte Creek in California, and the Babine and Frasier rivers in British Columbia. Common threads in many of these fish-kill events include disease, high fish densities, low flows and warm water temperatures.

Obituaries:

Lucy C. Killingbeck

Lucy C. Killingbeck of Alturas, CA passed away July 28, 2004, at Washoe Progressive Care Center in Reno, NV.

Mrs. Killingbeck had been a resident of the Surprise Valley Health Care Center for the past two years and was a long-time Alturas resident. Lucy Clayton was born July 26, 1913, in Turlock, CA. and passed away at 91 years of age.

She married Lester Killingbeck on February 8, 1933 in Modesto, CA. Mrs. Killingbeck was preceded in death by her loving husband of 66 years, Lester Killingbeck on January 10, 2000; her mother and father, two sisters and two brothers and one son-in-law.

Mrs. Killingbeck was a sweet, loving wife, mother and friend who will be missed by all who knew her. She was a homemaker throughout her adult life.

She is survived by daughters Carol Minto of Gerlach, NV, Nora Intardonato and husband John of Calistoga, CA and son Merle Killingbeck and wife Joyce of Alturas, CA.; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.

At her request, there will be no services held. Arrangements were made by Kerr Mortuary of Alturas.

Doris Toney Weagant

Doris Toney Weagant passed away on July 28, 2004 in Winnemucca, NV. She was 63 years of age. Doris was born in Surprise Valley, March 19, 1941, along with her twin sister, Dona Vermillion. Her funeral service was held in Lovelock, NV. on August 3, 2004.

Doris married Floyd Weagant, June 17, 1961, in the Ft. Bidwell Community Church. Ft. Bidwell was Doris' childhood home.

Soon after marrying, they moved to Lovelock, NV. where Floyd worked with his father Buzz Weagant. Floyd preceded Doris in death June 1980. They are survived by a son, Kesner Marvin Weagant of Winnemucca and a daughter Kim Ione Strid of Green River, WY, five grandchildren: Steven Thacker, Michelle and Carlee Strid, Todd Weagant, and Danni Weagant. A grandson, Gary Weagant died in infancy. Doris' survivors also include her parents, Kesner and Maxine Toney, twin sister Dona and husband Chuck Vermillion and sister Peggy and husband Raymond Page, all of Cedarville, CA. She is survived by numerous nieces and nephews and a host of friends. Doris graduated from Surprise Valley High School and attended Shasta College. She enjoyed sports, was a quiet person and she was totally dedicated to any project or job in which she was involved. In Lovelock, she worked as a waitress and in later years worked as a flagger for a construction company. She loved working outside.

One of her most favorite activities was rodeoing and her son and daughter were both active in this sport as were her grandchildren. She provided every opportunity to train them to be competitive in rodeo events.

Donations, if desired, may be made in memory of Doris to the Surprise Valley Medical Center, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA. 96104, where she lived for three years, following a stroke.

Sports

Braves start football practice August 16

Modoc's Braves will start football practice August 16, with players to be on the field by 6 p.m.

Players must have their physicals done and sports information cards in before they can practice.

Modoc will open the season with a scrimmage against Tulelake August 27 and will have a fundraiser on August 28 against local police. The game against police will be a touch football seven-on-seven passing only game to help raise funds for the program.

The Braves will open with an official game at home against Lakeview Sept. 10 followed by a Sept. 17 game at home against Lost River. On Sept. 24, they will travel to Quincy. A scheduled game against Henley has been canceled. The Shasta Cascade League season for the Braves is pretty weird. Modoc will play Mt. Shasta, Etna and Trinity only and they each will meet twice. The remainder of the league, Burney, Fall River, Weed and Bishop Quinn will play each other.

Coach Shaun Wood is not overly impressed with the new lineup.

X-Country starts August 23

Modoc Middle School and Modoc High School cross-country practice will start August 23, 4 p.m. on the high school track.

Runners must have their physicals and sports information cards done before practice. For more information, contact coach Don Mason at 233-5017. If no answer, leave a message.

MHS Volleyball tryouts set

Junior Varsity and Varsity Volleyball tryouts for returning and incoming Modoc High School students, will be held August 18, 19 and 20 in Griswold Gym, Modoc High.

Students are required to have their physical forms completed and submitted prior to tryouts or at the start of tryouts. Varsity tryouts will be held from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. under the direction of Varsity Volleyball Coach Kim Schmidt. Junior Varsity tryouts will run from 10 a.m. to 12 noon in the gym, under the direction of J.V. Volleyball Coach Wendi Lowrey.

Physical forms are available from physicians and the high school office. For questions, please contact Wendi Lowry at 233-2335.

Arrowhead hosts night golf

Some people can just play better in the dark. Arrowhead Golf Course is hosting Night Golf, Wednesday, August 11.

The event will start with a barbecue at 6:30 p.m. with golf following. The format will be two-person alternate shot. Entry is $10 per person. For more information call the clubhouse at 233-3404.

Special pheasant hunt for juniors at Ash Creek

The Pit River Rod and Gun Club, Lassen County Sportsmen and the California Department of Fish and Game are sponsoring a junior pheasant hunt.

Open to California junior license holders, ages 15 and younger, two hunts will be held on September 11, 2004. A random drawing, if necessary, will be held on August 27, 2004. The hunts will be held at the Ash Creek Wildlife Area. Complimentary lunch served.

Applications Deadline: August 27, 2004.

Drawing Date: (if necessary) August 27, 2004.

Hunt Date: September 11, 2004.

Hunt No. 1, Saturday, September 11, 8:00 a.m. to noon-50 hunters. Hunt No. 2, Saturday, September 11, 1:00 p.m. to sunset--25 hunters.

All hunters must possess a valid 2004-2005 California Junior Hunting License at the time of application. Juniors wanting a permit must apply in writing--listing the name, complete mailing address, telephone number, date of birth, 2004-2005 Junior Hunting License number and in order of preference, the hunt numbers preferred. Up to four junior hunters may apply as a group if complete information for each hunter is included. No more than one application may be submitted per party. Written applications must be submitted on a standard Postal Service post card to: Department of Fish and Game, P.O. Box 37, Bieber, CA. 96009.

A random drawing, if necessary, will be held on August 27, 2004. If a hunter or group did not receive their first choice they will be considered for their second choice and so on. If a hunt is not filled, it will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis, until all hunts are filled. Only successful applicants will be notified. Permits or hunt dates are not transferable. Questions concerning the junior pheasant hunts should be directed to: Department of Fish and Game (530)294-5824.

The morning hunt will be limited to 50 participants and the afternoon hunt will be limited to 25 participants. Each participant must be accompanied by a responsible adult while hunting. Only supervising adults and approved dog handlers will be allowed in the field during the hunt. The junior hunter will be limited to taking two rooster pheasants. This is the 14th year of the no-fee event.

These hunts are provided by joint efforts of the Pit River Rod and Gun Club, Lassen County Sportsmen and the California Department of Fish and Game to provide young hunters the opportunity for an educational and successful hunt.

Sign up, golf, win prizes, dine, have fun at 'Warner Mountain Scramble'

A fun tradition is being revived by Arrowhead Women's Golf Club for August 14.

The return of their annual invitational four-person "Warner Mountain Scramble" hopes to encourage women golfers with or without a golf handicap, to participate in the fun. Play golf, enjoy lunch and prizes on Saturday, August 14, with a shotgun start at 10 a.m. at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

It's all for a good cause, with tournament fees and basket drawing ticket sales to benefit the Club's scholarship for a Modoc High School senior in the coming year.

The 25-member Arrowhead Women's Golf Club has sent out invitations to Lakeview, Susanville, Redding, Fall River clubs and local golfers, who may have never participated in a tournament before, are encouraged to sign up - no invitation required.

Northrup and Son of Alturas is sponsoring a cash prize of $5,000 for the first woman golfer to make the hole in one on hole number 5 during the Warner Mountain Scramble. Entry fee is $30 per person, plus green fees of $10 which includes lunch after play. Awarded places will be determined by the size of the field.

"It's all about fun," offer Kathie Widby and her mother Lynn McClellan, who serve as PWGA rep and Secretary, respectively, and keep the course operating as a family enterprise.

"You don't have to be a good golfer to play. We'll be doing lots of fun things and giving away individual prizes as well as team prizes," says Widby. "We can put a team of four together or a team already formed, can sign up. It's called a scramble because the team scrambles to the best shot among the four shots, each time and keeps moving from the best shot through to the finish."

Special drawing

A large "Fall Basket" filled with selected items from distinctive Chala Towi Jewelry created by artist Ivy Smith of Alturas, golf and gardening items to candles, towels and much more, will be given a lucky ticket holder during the tournament's August 14 drawing. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5 available at the golf course, where the basket is displayed in the dining room. Arrowhead Women's Golf Club President Penny Keeney; Treasurer Rose Boulade, Handicap chairperson Jean Phillips, McClellan and Widby encourage newcomers to "come out and golf and enjoy the day." Gift certificates for use at the clubhouse, will also be part of the prizes.

The Women's Club also meets conveniently for Ladies' Playdays on Thursdays at 9 a.m. or 5:30 p.m., depending upon the individual member's choice. Lunch meetings are held at noon on the first Thursday of each month. Women's Club dues are $26 per year.

The women's club also helps sponsor and organize the Evie Capik Youth Golf Camp in Alturas

For more information please call Arrowhead Clubhouse at (530) 233-3404. Please register for the Warner Mountain Scramble by August 1.

August 12th , 2004

News

Girl glad to be home after forced trip to Mexico City

by Patrica Hemsley

Special to the Record

Nancy Rangel, the teenager who disappeared from her Surprise Valley home on July 27, was returned safely to her family early on Friday morning, August 6. It was the day after her 15th birthday.

What began as a lark, a spontaneous journey with a 28-year-old Lakeview man, Felipe Jaimes, ended with her recovery by the FBI, with the assistance of multiple law enforcement agencies, in Mexico City.

After being taken to the American embassy in Mexico City where it was determined she was unharmed, Nancy was flown to Oakland, California, accompanied by two FBI agents. She was then transferred to the custody of agents from the Redding office who drove with her through the night to Alturas.

Early Friday morning, Sergeant Mark Pearce of the Modoc County Sheriff's Office escorted Nancy to Cedarville where she was reunited with her relieved parents, Lupe and Martin Rangel.

Nancy seemed a bit surprised at her warm reception. "The whole family was there, waiting in the yard. We all hugged and cried." Her father echoed the sentiment of that joyful moment, "We were all just so happy to have her home." Last week's deep lines of worry and fear on her parent's faces were gone. Their prayers had been answered

Martin Rangel serves as pastor of Aqua Viva!, the church in Cedarville where Nancy met Jaimes. The twice-married father of one young daughter easily charmed Rangel. "I thought he was a nice guy. I trusted him," she recalled.

The whole ordeal began innocently on Nancy's part. "I wanted to go for a ride somewhere, and he said okay." Not expecting to be gone for long, she quickly gathered only her make-up, some cash, and a change of clothes. The pair left Surprise Valley in his 1987 Chevrolet Cavalier.

Almost immediately, Nancy regretted her impulsive departure. "I wanted to call my parents and let them know I was okay. I wanted to tell them I loved them," she said. Though she had a cell phone, Jaimes convinced her not to use it. With a weakening battery, she said it quickly became useless and disappeared soon upon their arrival at his aunt's home in Santa Rosa. Meanwhile, Jaimes had his belongings all packed. "He had lots of suitcases and bags in the car," said Nancy. His family in Santa Rosa, alerted by Jaimes while he and Nancy were en route, had two bus tickets to Tijuana waiting for them upon their arrival.

No one seemed to notice the two as they traveled. "I don't understand, with all the threats we hear about, and all the talk about Homeland Security, why people can buy bus tickets with no identification. There is no record of who they are or where they go," said a frustrated Martin Rangel.

At this critical juncture it must have become apparent Jaimes had more elaborate plans than Nancy at first assumed. Asked why she proceeded to leave for Mexico with him, she replied, "I just had no time to think.

Everything was already arranged and happened so fast. I was really confused."

Again and again, Jaimes convinced Nancy to hold off calling her parents, afraid he would somehow be caught. However, Nancy said he made frequent phone calls to family in the local area. They kept him updated him on the police investigation, media reports, and the missing child agencies' campaigns to locate her.

"We talked to them (the sisters and mother) so many times, begging for their help in finding our daughter. We KNEW they were in contact with him. But they told us every time, ‘we don't know anything'. They protected him completely," said her father Martin.

In Tijuana, the pair picked up waiting airline tickets and flew on to Mexico City where they were met by more of Jaimes' family and friends. By now, Nancy was frantic to call her parents and let them know she was safe. Jaimes allowed her to use the house phone, cautioning her to "stay on less than a minute so the call can't be traced."

However, the first call went longer than planned, as did subsequent calls she made to her parents from the same phone. The FBI, alerted by the Modoc County Sheriff's Office about the unfolding details of the situation, was able to trace the number. They had an agent, posing as a friend, make a call to the house and ask for Nancy. When she was handed the phone, "they asked me if I could meet them at a store in the neighborhood. One of the cousins even gave me a ride."

Martin said with some amazement and pride, "When the FBI got involved in this search, it took only 24 hours to find her. They did a great job!" FBI agents and the local sheriff's office quickly made arrangements to return Nancy to her family. While she was on the flight to Oakland, Sergeant Pearce personally drove to the Rangel home and told the worried parents what had transpired in Mexico.

Thursday night, the regular service at Aqua Viva! was jam-packed as news quickly spread Nancy had been found and was on her way home. The planned prayer vigil had suddenly been transformed into a joyful, thankful celebration.

During her journey home, Nancy appreciated the kindness of her many escorts from various law enforcement agencies. "Everyone was nice to me." But what made a deep impression was the advice was given to her as she waited in Alturas. One of the sheriff's deputies "told me I might always have lots of ‘friends', but my best friends, who really love me the most, are my parents," she said with a smile.

After an emotional and jubilant reunion on Friday, the family sat down and began revising plans for Nancy's postponed Quinceanera party, originally scheduled for July 31. "We're thinking about Labor Day weekend now," reported a happy young lady and her parents. Her father had promised that upon her return, the coming-of-age ceremony and party would go on. Even though she had just experienced a harrowing ordeal, the just-turned 15-year-old quickly resumed her routines and was looking forward to spending time with her friends and family.

Felipe Jaimes was not arrested and allegedly remains in Mexico. Although Nancy went with him willingly and was not harmed, because she was a minor under the age of 18, eventual charges against him, should he return to the United States, could be very serious.

Filing ends for all local election candidate slots

The candidate filing period ended last night at 5 p.m. for all local elections. Incumbents in the Modoc Joint and Tulelake Joint Unified School District did not file so the nomination period was extended by five days.

In the MJUSD, incumbent Jeff Bushey did not file for re-election and in Tulelake, Shelly Buckingham did not file.

MJUSD Incumbents Seab McDonald and Ken Fogle did file for re-election and a host of challengers include: John Fogerty, John W. Ford, Bill Hall, Alan Hopkins, Fernand Larranaga, Jr. and Heather Salazar.

In Surprise Valley, the short term Cedarville seats (expiring in 2006) of Marcie Grove and James Laacke, are up for election, as well as full terms for Bob Staton in Eagleville and Tony Darst in Lake City. Staton, Grove and Laacke have filed. Gene Erquiaga has also filed a challenge. Darst has filed and will be challenged by Dean Cockrell.

In the Surprise Valley Hospital District, incumbents Gary Odgers and John Erquiaga have filed and since there are no challenges, will not have a election.

In Tulelake, the full term positions of Shelly Buckingham, Tom Macy and Larry LeQuieu are on the line. LeQuieu and Macy have filed and Jeffrey Boyd and Venancio Hernandez are challenging.

There's also a lot of interest in the Big Valley Joint Unified School District race when incumbents Cathy Banwarth and Alan Nelson are facing challenges from Julie Gagnon, Russ Hawkins, Sharmin Stevenson and Gary Martin.

The Modoc County Board of Education has two seats up for election, those of Jim Hays and James "Bucky" Harris. Hays and Harris have filed for re-election.

There are also several openings on special districts, including water, irrigation, fire, community service, and Resource Conservation Districts. There are also two openings on the Surprise Valley Community Hospital District Board. Interest is low on those boards.

According to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison, there will be elections in the Davis Creek Fire District with Don Blair, Shan Lewis and Jennifer Jayo running and the Fort Bidwell Fire District with John Brauner, Sam Sweeney, Dean Anderberg and Gerald Gillogley on the ballot. The Lake City Fire District has incumbents Lee Gorzell and James Harris filing.

In the Adin Fire District, Steven Gagnon and Daran Myers have filed for election.

In the California Pines Community Services District, incumbents Curtis Barber and Lucille Field did not file. Charles Coiner and Robert Swart have filed for the positions.

There will also be an election in Supervisor District two, where incumbent Mike Dunn is in a run-off with Alturas resident Roy Moore.

None of the above positions require candidates to collect signatures. Candidates must be 18 years of age and residents of the district in which they run. Nomination papers are available from the Modoc County Clerk's Office in the Courthouse.

Local girl bucks rules to ride bulls

It was a natural progression to go from riding steers as a 14-year-old at last year's Junior Rodeo during the Modoc Fair, to move up to riding bulls. So, considered Anna Nelson, now a 15-year-old bull rider from Alturas. Nelson had never considered that her bull riding entry in her "own backyard" fair would be turned down or stir such issue, in this day and age, for this year's Junior Rodeo at the Modoc Fair next Sunday.

It caught Anna and her parents, Marc and Tracy Nelson, off guard and her mother was "quite shocked," as was Anna, upon Anna's first entry submission last Tuesday at the Modoc Fair office. Anna called her mother from Cedarville to say the fair staff wouldn't accept her entry. The reason stemmed from Traci Green, fair CEO, who interpreted California High School Rodeo rules, applying to this year's junior rodeo rough stock events, to only sanction rough stock events for male participants. Green had stated this was a state rule among junior rodeos.

"There is no rule in a rule book that says girls can't ride rough stock. The private, non-profit National High School Rodeo Association and California High School Rodeo Association sanction events for boys and girls, but there is no written rule which states girls cannot ride rough stock, which includes bulls," states Anna's mother.

When she contacted Tawny Jo Dale, Director of California Fairs and Expositions, Dale informed Mrs.Nelson that the "rule" decision is not a state issue, but is left up to the Board of Directors at each fair.

The Dept. of Food and Agriculture reiterated on Wednesday afternoon to the Record, that it is a county fair board issue, not a state posture .

Nelson was a bull riding competitor in the Super Bull exhibition at Cedarville in June. For the past year, she has ridden bulls at Lakeview and Redmond Junior Rodeos, OR, Chiloquin clinic and jackpot bull riding competition and Susanville Jr. Rodeo, where she will return to compete on September 11 and 12, in the Lassen College arena, for the cash and buckle. Her points cannot be used in the all-around category until she is age 16, but she is thrilled to be able to compete.

The Susanville Junior Rodeo also adheres to California High School Rodeo rules, but categorizes by event and age, not gender. Anna can join the Women's Pro Rodeo Assn. when she turns 18.

During the school year, Anna traveled to Susanville on a weekly basis, to work out with the Lassen College Rodeo team in a class and hands-on clinic, riding PBR bulls on occasion. She completed a three-day course at the Lyle Sankey Rodeo School in Rio Linda, with PBR stock, where her instructors called her a "natural" for the sport. She learned about safety issues and safety in the chutes, was critiqued, videotaped and rode bulls. "I told Anna I was against it, and tried to discourage her when she first brought bull riding up. I told her there was no way she could even try it without the proper safety equipment," describes her mother.

Anna surprised her parents by borrowing and collecting the safety gear she needed -- face mask/helmet, vest, mouthpiece and tapes her wrists and wants to invest in even better equipment. Such equipment isn't required for junior rodeos or California High School Rodeo events, noted her mother. "Of course, I worry about her physical safety and she has had hard knocks. But, she absolutely loves it (bull riding) and she is more determined with each ride or fall. Her father and I have never been ones to say ‘you can't do that because you're a girl,'" says Tracy Nelson. Anna has been around horses her whole life and wanted to do something more exciting than the regular sanctioned events for girls, such as pole bending, barrel racing. Actively involved in 4-H for many years, she is also a Modoc High cheerleader and involved in California High School Rodeo Association. Feather River's Junior College Rodeo program has shown interest in her abilities.

She does not want to "genderize" the issue, but Anna believes it's time to take the rider's gender out of the rough stock events, which includes senior bull riding, bareback riding, and senior saddle bronc riding. "I've met quite a few young girls who are junior steer riding, just like I did. Several young girls attended the same Rio Linda school learning to ride bulls. They are excited about the possibility of riding bulls, as they get older and I'd like to see them be able to, if they want to," says Anna.

Last Friday, the final day to submit Modoc Fair entries, friend and Modoc Ag Commissioner Joe Moreo delivered Anna's entry, along with several others from the area.

Anna, who stands five feet, two inches, and weighs 100 pounds, took up a post at Holiday Market with a petition asking the public to sign her petition "to stop the discrimination with the Modoc Fair and to petition the Fair's Board of Directors to allow rough stock events to allow boys and girls to ride in them. She collected 150 signatures and plenty of support the first day and in the days that have followed. Many adults admonish her about the safety issues with the sport, but sign her petition, agreeing neither gender should be discriminated against.

"If this fair's junior rodeo acted like other junior rodeos which get so much participation because everyone can compete, they could boost this fair's junior rodeo in a big way," offers Anna's mother. "Bulls don't know the difference if it's a boy or a girl."

Anna's petitions are available for signing at many area businesses, many of which are sponsors for the fair. Anna plans to compete in the Thursday Horse Show and Gymkhana, and waits to hear if her entry will be accepted for riding bulls this year.

On Wednesday, in an interview with the Modoc Record, Modoc Fair Manager/CEO Traci Green said she is not against changing the rules so that Anna can ride bulls, but not this year. Green said the rules regarding the events were published in the Fair Premium Book, and the Fair doesn't think changing the rules now would be right. She said the Nelsons are on the next Fair Board meeting agenda, after the August 19-22 Fair, to present their case for Anna to be able to ride next year.

"I'm not really opposed to her riding bulls, but we feel we need to stick to the rules we published this year," said Green. "If she would have started the effort before the rules were published it could have been different."

Unfortunately, for Anna, there was nothing in the "rules" that said girls can't ride bulls, so she didn't expect to be turned down or be the one to bring up the issue in the first place.

According to Green, the rules being followed, and those that were published, are from the California High School Rodeo Association concerning the three rough stock events, bull riding, bareback riding and saddle bronc riding, and those rules, she insists, do not allow girls to compete in those events.

Green said she feels the rules have been set in place as a safety issue, not to discriminate against girls. She said she is not opposed to making a change for next year, if that's what the Fair Board decides to do. The issue remains on the table.

Modoc RAC seeks projects and new members

Have an idea that will benefit economic and environmental conditions on or adjacent to Modoc National Forest lands? The Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) is seeking ideas for 2005 projects. Proposals are due to the Modoc National Forest by August 20, 2004.

The Modoc County RAC will hold a meeting on Monday, August 30, 2004 in the Modoc National Forest Supervisor's Office at 800 West 12th Street, from 6 to 8 p.m. to review and recommend projects for funding in 2005.

RAC Member Sean Curtis stresses that Title II project ideas must be presented to the RAC no later than August 23 so the committee will have time to review before the August 30 meeting. The projects should include as much description and detail as possible.

In addition, the County Board of Supervisors can approve projects under Title III, and those projects need to be in to the Board no later than Sept. 3. Supervisors will hold a workshop on those projects Sept. 16. At that time they will review both Title II and Title III projects and make their decisions.

Projects can be delivered to the Board or to Curtis. The Land Use Committee will review the projects at a Sept. 8 meeting.

Established in 2001, the Modoc County RAC has funded 23 projects worth more than one million dollars.

The 15 members RAC is a federally sanctioned group by the Secretary of Agriculture and was formed as a result of the new legislation "Secure Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act of 2000." The group represents a cross section of county communities, industries, schools, environmentalists, and local government. It is one of 15 RACs established in California.

Notable projects that were approved by the Modoc RAC include the Cedar Creek Interpretive Trail, funding of a local initiative for the use of Western juniper, the installation of new restrooms at Logan Slough and the expansion of equestrian facilities at Pepperdine Campground.

Through cooperation with the Modoc National Forest and the Cedar Pass Snow Park, potable water and new bathrooms will be developed. Cedar Creek Interpretive Trail is now open and offers a scenic walk beside Cedar Creek from the Snow Park down canyon for about two miles. The trail is open to hiking, horse back riding and bicycles. The beauty of the Warner Mountains is captured in every turn of the trail. Remember this walk to truly enjoy the fall colors in Modoc County.

Another RAC funded local initiative is to develop the use of Western Juniper into wood products. This project funded the purchase of raw materials for the creation of pickets for fencing and hardwood flooring using Juniper Trees. The trees are cut and milled here in Modoc County for shipment, creating local jobs.

If you visit Logan Slough at Big Sage Reservoir you will be greeted by new restrooms facilities provided by the Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee.

The Modoc RAC funded the expansion of the trailhead facilities at Pepperdine Campground, allowing access to the South Warner Wilderness area, providing a destination for equestrian groups of the Warner Mountains. This project is being completed in coordination with the Backcountry Horsemen and the Modoc National Forest. The Backcountry Horsemen are providing volunteer hours for the development of this destination.

Alan Cain of the Backcountry Horsemen stated, "This project will free up parking in the upper campground and meet the corralling needs of large groups. There will be a total of nine campsites in the facility capable of handling a full-sized truck with multiple horse trailer. There will be a handicapped-mounting station for the physically challenged, a group barbecue area and two new restrooms. Each campsite will have its own corral or permanent highline for stock containment." A new half-mile trail now connects the facilities to the existing trailhead.

Interested in serving on the Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee? The RAC is also seeking applicants to serve on the committee. There are several openings available to assist in developing a lasting partnership that benefits your public lands in Modoc County.

The Modoc County RAC considers projects on or adjacent to National Forest Service lands with the stipulation that at least 50 percent of all project funds must be dedicated to 1) road maintenance, decommissioning, or obliteration; or 2) restoration of streams and watersheds.

The remaining monies, (50 percent) could be used to finance projects that include but are not limited, soil productivity improvement, improvements in forest ecosystem health, watershed restoration and maintenance, improvement of wildlife and fish habitat, control of noxious and exotic weeds, and re-establishment of native species.

For information about the Resource Advisory Committee positions available or how to submit a project contact Louis Haynes at 530-233-8846 or Nancy Gardner at 530-233-8713. Or contact any member of the Modoc County Resource Advisory Committee, John Fogerty, David Hoxsey, Michael Bacca, Billy Flournoy, Rich Hamel, Delbert Craig, June Roberts, Dixie Server, Alan Cain, Tom Carpenter, Willy Hagge, Frances Benally, John Clark, Mike Dunn or Sean Curtis.

Coroner seeking help to identify desert bandit

The man believed to have been raiding local cabins and camps in the Long Valley area northeast of Cedarville continues to frustrate law enforcement agencies throughout California, Nevada and Oregon even in death.

The unidentified man died on July 25 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound as law enforcement agents from the Inyo and San Bernardino County Sheriff's Offices, the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service converged on his makeshift hideout in a desolate area near the southern boundary of Death Valley National Park.

Despite the FBI processing his fingerprints, his identity remains a mystery. No identification was found on his body or in his belongings. Now the San Bernardino County Coroner's Office is asking the public for help in putting a name to the "John Doe" in their custody.

Brian McCormick, the San Bernardino County Coroner, has issued the following description and contact information: "The man is a White male, appearing approximately mid-forties (late 30s to early 50s). Height: 5' 7.5", Weight: 120 pounds, Eyes: Brown. His hair is dark-brown (almost black), short (average 2 inches), with very slight gray at the temples. The man has a tattoo on the upper left arm: "Harley-Davidson Motor Cycles" ........emblem/logo. Anyone with information that could lead to the identity of this person should contact the San Bernardino County Coroner Department (909-387-2978).

The suspect began his crime spree, pilfering unoccupied cabins and stealing a series of vehicles, in the Death Valley area in February 2003. As his activities attracted unwelcome attention and increasingly aggressive searches by law enforcement agents, he moved north, always operating out of the most barren, uninhabited areas east of the Sierras.

After a rash of incidents along the way, his familiar patterns were again noted in the tri-states area around June 25, 2004 though there had been two apparent earlier sightings.

On April 5, a lone man in a white pick-up was having difficulties with his vehicle near Steven's Camp. Several local men assisted him in getting his truck back on the road

On June 21, an Adel, Oregon rancher "pushing cows" in a very isolated area near Barrel Springs ran into a solitary man acting suspiciously and reported his concerns to the BLM. That same day, Jesse Gladwill reported his 1996 Toyota Tacoma pick-up had been stolen. His camp, in the Painted Rock area, had also been raided.

Ranger Jim Massey of the BLM's Surprise Valley Field Office in Cedarville was soon fielding reports of a stolen ATV, a butchered cow, and numerous property thefts at unoccupied cabins on BLM grazing permits up and down Long Valley, just over the Nevada state line from Modoc County. Ranchers reported food, camping supplies, guns and knives, gasoline, and a variety of other items had been stolen.

Sergeant Russell Pedersen of the Washoe County Sheriff's Search and Rescue team was quickly called in to coordinate the local search. At one point, an FBI forensic team also became briefly involved when a remote camp and an expertly camouflaged, bullet-riddled truck was discovered near Holy Lake, northeast of Surprise Valley.

Subsequent attempts at following suspicious tracks through the area led to the discovery of several more hidden camps where supplies had been cached for possible later use. The man, however, was rarely spotted. In his elusive raids, the man appeared to favor items that enabled him to live in remote desert areas. It was believed he hid supplies at numerous concealed camps, and constantly moved from one location to another. He amazed all those intent on his apprehension; he could run for miles over rough terrain, reportedly covering 25-30 miles on foot in a single night – though he preferred using stolen ATV's for his transportation.

The last confirmed contact with him in this area occurred on July 7 near Nevada Road 8A. Lake City rancher Dale Steward encountered a man riding an ATV loaded with bulging trash bags who called out a terse greeting as he passed by. Later attempts to trace his trail were unsuccessful.

There were no further reported incidents until July 21 or 22 when a flatbed truck and supplies were stolen near Imlay, south of Winnemucca. That truck, heavily loaded with an ATV and miscellaneous supplies, was sighted in Death Valley late on July 22. Call it instinct, as the truck had not even been reported missing at the time, but BLM rangers who had previously tracked the man in 2003 were immediately suspicious.

They tracked him for three days before the whole prolonged saga played itself out near a lonely stretch of Highway 127, approximately two miles south of the San Bernardino County border with Inyo County. Found hiding in a drainage culvert under a camo tarp, the man chose to end his life rather than face apprehension by officers.

Sergeant Pedersen has passed along a computer disc of photos taken at the scene of the man's final makeshift camp to Jim Massey. The photos clearly show many items recovered from the stolen truck he was driving at the time of his death. It is hoped people whose belongings are missing may be able to identify some of the pictured items.

Pedersen said Tuesday from Reno, "Though they didn't lay out and photograph each individual item, the photos do show some interesting things I think have a good possibility of belonging to folks up there." The great majority of things recovered, however, he said, were of the "generic type – he had a ton of red gas tanks, a white bucket…stuff it will be difficult, if not impossible, to identify."

Pedersen continued, "It appeared to officers on the scene that many of the items, such as the guns, were recently stolen. There was no "impression" or sense he hoarded or kept items for very long at all. It almost looked like he used and discarded things as he went. Or he may have cached things that will be turning up for years as people travel out in the areas where he operated."

Those who have filed stolen item reports with either Washoe County or Ranger Jim Massey will be contacted soon.

The ATV, stolen from a Lake County rancher in late June, was recovered at the site and has been returned to its owner. Jesse Gladwill's truck has not been recovered, though police suspect the man used it to travel to Imlay and hope it will eventually turn up.

Meanwhile, officers up and down the states of California and Nevada, having experienced the phantom presence of this man firsthand, are hoping someone can help identify the body. It has become almost a personal quest with some to finally name, then lay to rest, this most mysterious bandit.

Public Radio subject of tower negotiations

Returning the National Public Radio signal from KCHO Chico to Modoc is the subject of current negotiations. While the end result is not yet in the bag, there appears to be some progress.

KCHO Engineer Mike Birdsall said they took the translators and related equipment down last month after extensive negotiations with Citizens/Frontier proved unfruitful. Frontier, said Birdsall, wanted too much rent for their translators location. KCHO had been broadcasting in this area for the past 10 years.

Apparently, Frontier has asked for more translator rent from a couple of other local entities and they are part of the negotiation to secure a new site on Likely Mountain.

Several members of the public have called the Record to offer their help in getting the Public Radio signal back in Modoc. If current negotiations fail, then a committee will be formed to deal with the issue and possibly form a non-profit organization.

71st Modoc Fair aiming to share new fun, keep old favorites

The 71st Modoc District Fair in Cedarville promises carnival thrills, the return of old favorites along with new shows, a captivating interactive science attraction, western-themed diversions and just plain good times for everyone during its 4-day run beginning Thursday, August 19.

This year's fair theme is "Modoc: A Playground in the Wilderness". So come prepared to play, enjoy, compete, learn and experience all the best of Modoc County!

It would be wise to latch onto and scrutinize a fair schedule ahead of time to ensure not missing any of the shows, concerts and special events filling the fairgrounds to overflowing and every minute with delight .

The gates open Thursday night at 5:00 p.m. The American Touring Shows Carnival, wildly popular with fairgoers at its premiere last year, will be back with even more large rides, including the Gravitron, the Kamikaze, the Tornado and a Ferris wheel for the nostalgic, romantic crowd. There will also be ten game booths and new food booths in the carnival area. Fair CEO Traci Green wants everyone to know about the new Family Carnival Sheets, only available through Thursday, August 19. This fantastic value includes two adult and two child fair admissions along with ride, food and game coupons totaling $80 in value. These will be on sale for only $35 at the fair office and at Seab's True Value in Alturas.

Ride bands are available once again for $12 each on Thursday from 5-9 p.m. and on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m..

While the Kamikaze ride may sound intimidating to some, one new fair ride will appeal to young and old alike: the Rawhide Express will provide trackless train rides for everyone at no charge. Whether your feet need a break or you'd just like a leisurely tour of the fairgrounds, this new attraction is for you. The free narrated tour will stop at convenient locations as it whisks visitors from one end of the fairgrounds to the other.

One of the most successful, entertaining and educational shows in years returns to Cedarville after a long hiatus. "Wild Science!" was created so families and children could experience many of the mysterious and fun aspects of science and technology. The hands-on exhibits of the Imagination Gallery will be open to everyone in the arts and sciences building each day of the fair, at no charge.

People of all ages will enjoy participating in such activities as manipulating a robotic arm, creating man-sized bubbles, or dancing in the "wall of light". Playing, touching, learning and experimenting at "Wild Science!" promises to be one of the memorable highlights of the entire 2004 fair.

Get ready to meet the wildest, most mixed-up outlaws to ever ride a trail straight out of the Old West! Wild West Express is a zany, unbridled show of interactive comedy that has made it the most-booked entertainment act in the Western US for the last two years.

Kids of all ages won't want to miss running into Roundhouse Ronny the Clown as he wanders the fairgrounds, making incredible balloon animals, doing a few magic tricks, and telling corny jokes.

The Storyfeller, Tom McCormack, will be on hand Friday through Sunday, weaving Native-American legends, pioneer history and international fairy tales into a delightful mix accompanied by a variety of unusual instruments. He is renowned for his colorful and dynamic reenactments, distinct dialoguing of each character and incredible use of unusual instruments and sound effects.

If anyone tells you this fair has "gone to the dogs", don't fret! Just head up to the Grandstand on Thursday night for the sheep dog trials. The competition commences at 6:30 p.m.

If you still haven't had your fill of hardworking, clever canines, be sure to catch Rocket's K-9 Comets Frisbee Dog Stars with shows on Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Park Stage. Five phenomenal Frisbee-catching dogs compete in three intense events with unpredictable outcomes. The audience gets to vote which dog will be crowned Top Dog Star at the end of each performance.

Friday night is also the time to catch the all-new Ranch Saddle Bronc Event in the arena beginning at 7 p.m. Twenty riders will compete in the Long Go, while six will fill out the Short Go roster. Riders are expected from Paisley, Lakeview, Adel and Modoc County. The total purse is $2500. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for children 6-12. Children under 5 will be admitted free.

If bronc bustin' and the rodeos have the little ones all fired up to get on a horse, take them to Ponies-A-Go-Go for their very own pony ride.

Older rodeo fans won't want to miss all the Rancher's Day events beginning Friday at 7 a.m. with the Calcutta and ending with Finals on Saturday at noon. Admission is free. The Junior Rodeo begins on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. Admission is also free to watch high school students from the tri-states area compete in the Grandstand arena.

The Surprise Valley Rotary is once again organizing Saturday night's Destruction Derby. This popular event is the closest Modoc'ers ever get to live bumper cars at their fair! The night's mayhem begins at 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children 6-12, with kids 5 and under free. Don't forget to check out the exhibits and livestock shows throughout each day of the fair. Modoc County residents have entered their best in categories ranging from agricultural, livestock and horticultural judged entries to culinary, fine art, floral, and photographic entries as well as woodworking, furniture making, and so much more! Exhibit coordinator Eunice Eelkema says "already entries are very strong. It should be a great year for people who enjoy wandering through the exhibit halls."

The fair just wouldn't be complete without the great fare available each day! The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce hosts a Basque Barbecue Thursday night at 5:00 p.m., so stop by before heading off to the sheep dog trials. The Surprise Valley FFA kids hope you'll come by for another hearty meal on Saturday afternoon from 4-p.m. Their steak barbecue shouldn't be missed and proceeds help fund their events through the year. Cotton candy, sno cones, fudge, and corn dogs…this fair has every gooey, greasy, wonderful treat you remember from every fair you ever attended. Come prepared to nibble, snack or gorge your way from one end to the other.

If you get tired of dashing about to take in every wonderful bit of this year's event, come to the Park Stage area, find a comfortable seat or patch of cool grass, and enjoy a show by one of the talented musical groups entertaining throughout the run of the fair.

Kid and Nic return with their blend of classic country, show tunes, and gentle comedy. The Jeff Palmer Band also returns by popular demand, premiering Thursday evening at 5:00 p.m. Jeff and his guys will be also be on hand to keep things hopping Saturday night at the outdoor street dance in the Park Stage area, from 9 p.m.

New to the fair this year are the "Fiddlin' Foresters". Made up of U.S. Forest Service employees and volunteers, this group of accomplished musicians out of Golden, Colorado performed at the winter 2002 Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. Their foot stompin', hand clapping tunes will be appreciated by everyone who yearns for a taste of "old country and genuine cowboy" music. Be sure to catch their only show on Saturday, August 21, at 3:00 PM.

Hundreds of visitors and locals line the streets of downtown Cedarville on the Sunday morning of fair week to see how the fair's theme translates to colorful and imaginative parade entries. The parade starts at 11:00 am on August 22.

The fair opens Thursday, August 19 at 5:00 p.m. It opens Friday and Saturday at 11 am, and Sunday at noon, following the parade. Admission is $5 for adults, Seniors 60 and over, $2, and children 1-12, $3. Thursday, everyone gets in for only $2.

The fair is an annual collaboration by the fair staff and fair board members as well as everyone who exhibits, volunteers in one of the show buildings, or who attends and adds their enjoyment to everyone else's. It is truly one of the year's major highlights for Modoc residents and visitors alike. They return year after year, knowing that for four glorious days in August, they will experience memorable Western-tinged entertainment and welcoming hospitality.

Obituaries:

Maxine Louise Gloster

Former Modoc County Treasurer and Tax Collector Maxine Louise Gloster passed away August 6, 2004, in Alturas, CA. Mrs. Gloster was 79. She had served as County Treasurer and Tax Collector for eight years.

Born Maxine Louise Musselman on December 15, 1924, in Ottumwa, Iowa, she was known as "Mac" to her friends and family. She served with the U.S. Army during World War II, from 1945 until her discharge August 4, 1946. She married John Gloster in Reno, NV. on October 1946. John preceded her in death on January 14, 1973. Maxine made Modoc County her home for 65 years.

She was an excellent bowler and loved to play golf, often with her golfing buddy, Mildred Turner. She enjoyed the outdoors, loved all children and cared for many of the children of Alturas. She always had big family and friend gatherings at the Gloster cabin at the north fork in Davis Creek. Many memories were made there.

Mrs. Gloster was a member of St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Arrowhead Golf Club, Beta Sigma Phi Sorority and Emblem Club with Elks Lodge 1756, Alturas.

Services were conducted by the Rev. Linda Moore on Tuesday, August 10 at 2 p.m. at St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Alturas. Interment followed at Alturas Cemetery.

Mrs. Gloster is survived by her son Jerry Gloster of Tualatin, OR; son John Gloster of Tualatin, OR; daughter Mary Lou Server, Alturas, CA; brother John R. Musselman of Hixon, PA; sister Marie Baldwin, Cave Junction, OR; sister Shirley Telford, Chico, CA; sister Dorothy Stanton, Yerington, NV; four grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorial donations may be directed to St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Alturas. Services were under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas, CA.

Mark Ronald Smith

Lifetime Modoc resident, Mark Ronald Smith, known as "Ron Smith," passed away at his Alturas home on August 11, 2004. Mr. Smith was Postmaster in Alturas for 25 years and was preceded in death by his wife Fay, on July 14, 1982.

Mr. Smith was born on November 11, 1911, in Modoc County. Services will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra at Federated Church in Alturas on Friday, August 13 at 10 a.m. Arrangements are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas

Doris Smalley

Doris Smalley, 83, of Loomis, California, former resident of Alturas, passed away Saturday, August 7, 2004, surrounded by her loving family. Mrs. Smalley was born in Buntingville, CA, just south of Susanville, CA and moved to Alturas in 1959 with her husband Willard "Buzz" Smalley and three children. Willard "Buzz" Smalley preceded her in death in 1966. She is survived by her three children, Will Smalley and wife Cindy of Fullerton, California; DeAnn Johnson and husband Ron of Morada, California and Jason Smalley of Loomis, California; five grandchildren, Robert, Laura, Daniel, Michael Smalley and Summer Johnson; sister Ann Davis and husband Wendell of Auburn; brother Bernard Wurtzinger and wife Rena of Burney Falls, California and numerous nieces and nephews. Private memorial and interment will be at Alturas Cemetery, August 20 at 10:30 a.m. First Lutheran Church will conduct the service. Services under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas, CA

Ellen McCaw

Surprise Valley native Ellen McCaw passed away August 9, 2004 at the age of 90 years, at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV. Born Ellen McManus in Ft. Bidwell, CA on March 23, 1914, she had resided in Reno for the past six years. Services are pending and under the direction of Kerr Mortuary in Alturas.

Maria Rojas Turnage

Services for Alturas resident Maria Rojas Turnage will take place at El Camino Memorial Park in San Diego, CA on Friday, August 13 at 10 a.m. graveside. Mrs. Turnage passed away on August 9, 2004, in the Alturas home she shared with her son. She was 96 years of age and had been an Alturas resident for the past two years. She was born April 24, 1908 in Mexico. Kerr Mortuary handled local arrangements.

Sports

Braves add game against Bishop Quinn

Modoc's Braves will start football practice August 16, with players to be on the field by 6 p.m.

Coach Shaun Wood is also hosting a parents meeting for all football players and cheerleaders, August 18, 6 p.m. in the weight room. Parents are urged to attend.

Modoc has added a game Sept. 4 at Bishop Quinn in Redding. Gametime will be 12 noon for junior varsity and 2 p.m. for varsity.

Players must have their physicals done and sports information cards in before they can practice.

Modoc will open the season with a scrimmage against Tulelake August 27 and will have a fundraiser on August 28 against local police. The game against police will be a touch football seven-on-seven passing only game to help raise funds for the program.

The Braves will open with an official game at home against Lakeview Sept. 10 followed by a Sept. 17 game at home against Lost River. On Sept. 24, they will travel to Quincy. A scheduled game against Henley has been canceled. The Shasta Cascade League season for the Braves is pretty weird. Modoc will play Mt. Shasta, Etna and Trinity only and they each will meet twice. The remainder of the league, Burney, Fall River, Weed and Bishop Quinn will play each other.

Coach Shaun Wood is not overly impressed with the new lineup.

MHS Volleyball tryouts set

Junior Varsity and Varsity Volleyball tryouts for returning and incoming Modoc High School students, will continue August 19 and 20 in Griswold Gym, Modoc High. Tryouts opened Wednesday, August 18.

Students are required to have their physical forms completed and submitted prior to tryouts or at the start of tryouts. Varsity tryouts will be held from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. under the direction of Varsity Volleyball Coach Kim Schmidt. Junior Varsity tryouts will run from 10 a.m. to 12 noon in the gym, under the direction of J.V. Volleyball Coach Wendi Lowrey.

Physical forms are available from physicians and the high school office. For questions, please contact Wendi Lowry at 233-2335.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing at Eagle Lake continues to be very good. Best results have been in the Eagles Nest and Wildcat Point areas. The fish are deep with best results coming from boats at depths from 25 to 35 feet. Strongest results have been with night crawlers under slip bobbers followed closely by trolling with broken back Rapalas. Trollers using lead-core line are letting out about six colors

Fish continue to come in between two and four pounds. Best times continues to be early morning hours. Weather conditions have been good with warm days and cool nights. Shore fishing is producing moderate results from the shore near Eagles Nest and from the jetty at Eagle Lake Marina. Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake, call the U.S. Forest Service at (530)257-4188. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

Volleyball Practice to start

Attention all JV and Varsity girls returning to Volleyball or if it's your first year! We will be starting practice August 16. We have our first tournament the first weekend in September so we need to be prepared. Let's get ready for a wonderful season! Last year we finished at the top so let's continue those standings.

Remember if you haven't had a sports physical or you don't have your information packets to turn in on the first day you will not be able to practice and these practices are the start of our mandatory practices. Please make arrangements with me if you will not be available for any of these first practices and I will take that into consideration.

"Look forward to seeing you there. If you have any questions please give me a call at (530)279-2269 (home)." said Coach Angie Iveson.

August 19th , 2004

News

Severe flash floods smash through SV homes, shops

by Patricia Hemsley

Special to the Record

When a sudden hailstorm began pounding outside his home on County Road 20 north of Cedarville last Sunday afternoon, 14-year-old Trey Wright ran out to move his grandmother's car into the garage. Figuring he'd done his good deed for the day, he settled down to watch a movie.

He never suspected he, his baby sister Kate and his grandmother, Freda Wright of Alturas, were moments from being caught up in what proved to be a flash flood of sudden and incredible intensity.

Tim Sachak and Bunne Hartmann live in the house just across the county road to the southwest. Tim had come into the house an hour earlier after putting finishing touches on a new photography studio in a corner of his shop. He had been working with earphones on and his wife shudders as she imagines what would have happened if he'd still been there at the height of the deluge when the building was demolished by a roaring wall of rock and mud

Skip Johnson, who lives down the road from the Gooch home, was out in her yard watering when the hail started. She decided it was time to wind up the hose and, as she worked at that task, had her back to the canyon above. Trey remembers making a "lame joke about a flash flood" as the rain started pounding outside. Minutes later his grandmother, glancing out the kitchen window, gasped, "Oh no! There goes Scott's truck!" Trey looked out and saw his stepfather's truck hanging precipitously over a raging torrent of muddy water in what had been a dry creek bed moments earlier.

When many adults would have panicked, Trey demonstrated a calm determination unusual in an adolescent; his actions in the next minutes earned him the admiration and respect of all who witnessed the heroic measures he undertook to assure everyone else's safety that afternoon. Calling to his grandmother to dial 911, Trey ran outside and quickly moved other trucks away from the flooding channel. Gooch, an automotive mechanic with a garage in Cedarville, credits Trey with not only saving the vehicles but also a valuable collection of tools.

Much later, fire and rescue crews determined the flash flood's initial debris clogged the large culvert running under Gooch's road. With nowhere to go, the water, boulders and tree limbs quickly jumped the channel's banks and sent mud and debris racing downhill toward Johnson's home.

Johnson had the garden hose ripped from her hands by the first gush of water. "I was standing in the middle of it. I don't know how high it was but it came on so fast.

I just grabbed my dogs, ran inside and prayed," she said.

Returning to his house, Trey heard that rescue vehicles would likely be delayed. He asked his grandmother to call his parents and grandparents Gary and Linda Gooch as he ran out again. Unaware the dispatcher was alerting the Cedarville Fire Department, BLM, the Modoc County Office of Emergency Services, Modoc County Road Department supervisor Tom Minto and others who all responded quickly, Trey shouldered the responsibility of alerting neighboring families to the sudden danger

Meanwhile, Bunne and Tim had settled down to enjoy the welcome rain. However, within minutes of the start of the hailstorm, Bunne says, "there was a three-foot high river of mud and debris coming out of the canyon. I looked out and our garden was the first casualty. It just disappeared."

Even though previous owners constructed a solid 10-foot berm that channeled runoff superbly for over 30 years, Hartmann and Sachak watched in horror as boulders, mud, rushing water and tree limbs breeched the now-useless barrier and swept through their shop building "like it was a toy. It burst through doors and windows and just kept going, directly through the building," said Bunne. The photography studio that had been completed only an hour before was obliterated.

Trey was frantically making his way to check on neighbors. He was staggered at the destruction he saw in all directions. Boulders and a broad wall of water were crashing down the canyon. Yet he waded across the surging flow, determined to warn those who might not yet realize the extent of the flooding.

Following the torrent of muddy water, Trey first knocked on Skip Johnson's door. Hearing no answer, he quickly moved on, crossing the raging river to reach Bunne and Tim's home just across the county road. Fighting his way up to their house near the beginning of the flooding from their canyon, he verified they were also okay.

Before heading back to make sure his baby sister Kate, who will turn one on August 26, and grandma were safe, he told Bunne to "take some pictures!" One of those shots accompanies this article, taken during the ordeal. Bunne said later, "That young man had remarkable presence of mind. He was obviously distressed but still was determined to check on us." Trey will be a freshman at Surprise Valley High School beginning later this month. His mother, Kaila Gooch, wasn't surprised at his actions. She says he is "extremely protective of his baby sister and family"

Struggling to get back home, Trey noticed the flood waters flowing through Sachak's shop building behind him. He passed a filing cabinet mired in the mud and was startled by a sea of muddy books suddenly swirling around him as he made his way home

Barbara March, of Cedarville, had published those books during a successful writing and publishing career in Monterey County. She was storing them in her friends' shop. Over 6,000 books were lost in a matter of minutes. Bunne said later, "One pallet was spared. It still was shrink-wrapped and had the tight metal bands holding everything together. It was apparently too heavy to be swept away."

By the time Trey fought his way home to get into dry clothes, the Cedarville Volunteer Fire Department had arrived with a rescue vehicle and fire truck. Though met by a flash flood, "with tumbling boulders and rushing water", they were able to make their way close to the Gooch residence. The crew, led by Chief Dan Ross, disconnected a damaged propane tank before rigging a ladder bridge across the still raging main channel above the dammed culvert. Even with adding a length of rope to serve as a "handrail", the climb out was precarious and frightening. They were able to get Wright and a screaming baby Kate safely to solid ground where they were met by grandparents Gary and Linda Gooch who also struggled over flooded roadways to arrive on the scene.

Wet and muddy, Trey, who said he "made a pretty good mess of my mom's floors", still wasn't ready to rest. He quickly packed bottles and baby paraphernalia into a bag and again traversed the sea of mud and debris. He remembers, "The current was pretty strong and deep in parts…but it was shallow in others and I got across okay."

Scott and Kaila Gooch were reunited with their daughter Kate, son Trey and Kaila's mother Freda at Scott's parents' home where everyone shared their amazing stories. Scott and Trey both marveled at the destructive force that flowed from McCulley Canyon. "I've been up that canyon, all the way to the top, and it's ‘clean'", insisted Trey. "It didn't have that many rocks or trees. Where did all this stuff come from?"

Hartmann also reported she was told the canyon above her home was "small for that much debris" to rain down on their shop. She reported days afterward that "3-4 feet of muck and two boulders the size of Volkswagons" remain in the shell of the demolished shop building.

Ray Page, a valley rancher and naturalist, says his dad Francis used to always call such events "freshets". "He'd say, ‘Oh, a big freshet hit up there today", recalls Page, who says such sudden, terrifying, and powerful events are not uncommon along the foothills of the Warner Mountains. In the summer, Surprise Valley seems particularly susceptible to these quick, potentially destructive deluges. When the heavy rain hits a concentrated area such as a narrow canyon with no place for the water to disperse, raging flash floods result. Yet the rain squalls may be so concentrated that the next canyon over may stay bone dry.

Everyone was astonished at how quickly the flood gathered power and volume, caused its destruction and suddenly dissipated. "If it weren't for the mess in the yard, it's hard sometimes to believe it happened. It was just so quick!" said Johnson afterward.

Hartmann and Sachak have already enlisted the help of engineers to rebuild and reinforce their berm. "We love it here in Surprise Valley and we love our home. We're not leaving", Bunne declared.

Skip Johnson was also working on clean up. "There's not much I can do with the big stuff. It's pretty overwhelming. There's still mud and water in the mudroom…guess that's a good name for it!"

Johnson's driveway and yard look like a disaster zone. "I've got telephone pole-size logs outside and a new ‘rock garden'," she said ruefully. While she can crack jokes days later, she says there are moments she just cries, overwhelmed by the enormity of the task of clearing tons of debris. . "But we're not leaving", she avows. "We moved up two years ago and just love it here. No one was hurt, the horses came through it fine, and we'll manage." All three families also wanted to recognize fireman Lance Linker who returned after the storm with his own heavy equipment and proceeded to clean out driveways enough to get vehicles in and out. Linker dug trenches around Johnson's house to divert water and also cleared the clogged streambed near her home. Gary Gooch was busy the next morning also working at grading and clearing his son's drive. The Mendocino Hot Shot crew returned and worked on Sachak and Hartmann's road soon after the rain ended.

Bunne marveled, "Everyone was so helpful and wonderful. It just reinforces our determination to rebuild and stay put."

Dan Ross reported the flooding was minimal down near the highway. "There was some water flowing across the road", he said. Mike Comola and Sally Armstrong also had some floodwater and mud flow through their yard out of what Page called "Skunk Holler Canyon", just north of the area hardest hit. Page said the water filled two large ponds on his land just east of the highway near County Road 19.

Major show of support for Dr. Clyde

Modoc Supervisors spent an hour and a half Tuesday morning hearing that they should do what they can to keep Dr. Debra Clyde employed at Modoc Medical Center.

The meeting was moved into the Superior Court Room because of the number of people in attendance.

Chairperson Patricia Cantrall opened the meeting by explaining that the Board of Supervisors cannot change a personnel decision made by the Hospital Board of Trustees. But, she said, that didn't mean the Supervisors would not have a say in the running of the County hospital.

Supervisor Mike Dunn said the Board should have an impact and also said that he has never received as many phone calls on any issue that he has in support of Dr. Clyde and questioning the hospital administration.

Supervisors cannot change a personnel decision or overrule a personnel decision made by the Hospital Board of Trustees under the terms of the county agreement setting up the Trustees.

Following the discussion, Dunn made a motion to appoint a subcommittee including two Supervisors, two Hospital Trustees, Dr. Clyde and Administrator Teresa Jacques to try and resolve the issue of Dr. Clyde's employment situation. That motion received unanimous support and the committee is to meet soon to discuss the situation.

Several letters had been presented to the Board, including one from the entire ambulance crew and one from 12 nurses who are working at the medical center. In addition, several staff members and former nurses got up to speak on behalf of Dr. Clyde.

In all cases, Dr. Clyde was described as a physician who spent time with patients, who enhanced the care of patients and who was instrumental in improving the emergency services operations.

Several people told the Board that if Dr. Clyde is not retained, they will not use Modoc Medial Center and will take their business elsewhere. Bobby Ray, a member of the Hospital Trustees said that the Board should keep in perspective that Dr. Clyde resigned and the Trustees accepted her resignation following a meeting where Dr. Clyde was in attendance. She was not terminated. Ray said he believed administration and trustees made the correct decision for the future of the hospital. He said the hospital cannot be managed to accommodate the needs of one person above all others.

The issue surrounding Dr. Clyde is her self-admitted slowness in seeing patients and in completing the paperwork required. She told the Board she asked for help more than a year ago, but the hospital management did not respond adequately and is now dealing in crisis management.

Most people in the audience appreciated her taking more time to see individual patients, than just "herding them through" like cattle. In the nurses' letter they reference her being criticized for spending too much time with her patients while they're in labor. They say that criticism is "hilarious" and say she is a tremendous asset in the obstetrics department. Most of the nurses who spoke, and in the letter, said Dr. Clyde treats them with respect and respects their opinions and concerns about patients.

Mayor, councilman cite increased cost of plan in tight budget

Mayor George Andreasen and Councilman Jerry Smith, who voted against a reorganization of the City Public Works Department proposed by Councilmembers John Vass and Cheryl Nelson aren't giving up the battle. First of all, Smith said the Vass-Nelson plan adds $5,195 to the city's strapped budget, while the Andreasen-Smith plan saves the city $9,277. One of the big issues under Smith' and Andreasen's plan is the need for a real economic development position. That position does not exist in the Vass-Nelson plan.

According to Smith, their plan would combine economic development, planning and public works under one director, at a salary range of between $50,000 and $64,00. They would also be a deputy public works director at $37,590 and clerical help would be $22,505 for a $124,0895 total.

The money to pay for the plan comes from $40,000 saved from the county planning contract that was canceled by the city, the present public works Director's $55,782 salary and the Assistant Public Works salary of $37,590 for an a total of $133,372.

Under the Vass-Nelson plan, there would be a public works director, $55,782, an assistant public works director at $37,590, add a planner at $54,000 and add a building inspector for $22,726 for a $170,098 total. Smith said that's an additional $45,195 over the Smith-Andreasen plan and the funds to pay for it comes only for the canceled $40,000 from the county planning contract.

Vass plans to pay for part of the building inspector by doubling current building fees. City Officials, do not believe the building inspector position to a full time, or in some cases, even a halftime position.

City Treasurer Kathie Alves said the comparison was a accurate reflection of costs.

Alves also pointed out this week that the city's budget is short in several areas from the requested department budgets. She is able to solve some issues by recommending cutting out capital outlay costs, but there will be a $34,817 shortage in the special road department fund, which will require some cuts.

The general fund reflects a $51,233 shortage, but that can be taken care of, said Alves, but cutting out the Alturas Fire Department capital outlays and building maintenance requests.

Rainbows leave forest clean, tidy

The impact on the forest of the 20,000 members of the Rainbow Family camping in the area around Bear Camp Flat in the Modoc National Forest during June and July was negligible, according to District Ranger Edith S. Asrow of the Warner Mountain Ranger District

"It was pretty amazing to have that many people … (who) just left nothing behind," says Asrow, admitting her initial skepticism. "I … had my doubts. I heard good things about their rehab from other places. But until I saw it myself, I wasn't going to be convinced."

A tour of the occupied area revealed that a thorough and thoughtful job had been done to restore the forest to a near-natural condition. Campsites that once occupied almost every square inch of ground beneath the forest canopy were nearly indistinguishable from the natural, undisturbed forest floor. Using only hand tools—primarily rakes and shovels—to restore the nearly 2500-acre site, a few dedicated Rainbows remained after the celebration with the objective of cleaning up

"The last two weeks of cleanup, it was down to about twenty people that were doing the last of what they call ‘micro trash,' where they look for any bottle tops, pieces of paper or any of their pits that weren't buried right," notes Asrow

To the casual observer, it is hard to tell that hundreds of vehicles and thousands of people were ever in that location. Charcoal that marked the remains of campfires that pockmarked the area was removed. Latrine pits were covered and repaired. Numerous oil spots from leaky vehicles were excavated and removed for proper disposal

Nothing was left in the way of trash that is typically left behind by careless campers—no gum wrappers, no bottle tops and no beer cans

"We easily had probably five or six thousand vehicles. And to be left with no ruts, no damage, no oil spills, all the garbage picked up," Asrow reflects, "… I mean … it's hard for us to find anything left behind."

Tent and camping sites, parking lots and gathering places had been carefully manicured with limbs, brush, leaves and miscellaneous natural material, leaving the distinct impression that they were pristine wilderness

The exception to that rule is the loss of some small growth plants called forbs, some grasses and damage to sagebrush where vehicular and foot traffic had been the greatest, in parking lots and near campsites.

Damage to the sagebrush was clearly visible, but not irreparable since sagebrush is resilient enough to rebound quickly. "Even if you had a couple of acres of sagebrush impacted, with so many thousands of acres of sagebrush in this area, it doesn't have a huge impact on any wildlife population, etcetera," argues Asrow. "So … it will all come back. The sagebrush is pretty hearty."

Asrow does seem intent to minimize the impact that hundreds of vehicles and thousands of people had on a pristine forest. "It will take a few years to repair itself, but it doesn't seem that there'll be any long term damage at all. So, that really was really light on the land."

Conditions at the site were closely monitored before, during and after the gathering, according to Asrow. "We did water quality sampling in certain locations along creeks and springs and (in the) quarry …just as the Rainbows were arriving. We continued to do a second set of monitoring and so far have not turned up E. coli. We'll do one last set of monitoring in the quarry, where the swimming was, but the results of the water testing (so far) are good.

"We did soil compaction testing, and didn't find significant soil compaction," continues Asrow. "We did the monitoring of the creeks that were off limits. There was absolutely no use of them."

Although the Rainbow Family offered to provide seed to replant damaged areas, Asrow determined that re-seeding would be a waste of time after a thorough evaluation of the area. "We looked at the plants—whether there was a need to seed some of the trails. We decided that there wasn't enough need for seed, that the natural vegetation was still vigorous and existent enough to reoccupy the trails."

Several vehicles were left behind as the celebrants exited the forest, adding to the chores of the cleanup crew. "They removed all the abandoned vehicles off the site," notes Asrow. Three of them now sit at the Likely transfer station, awaiting disposition.

All in all, the cleanup crew spent almost a month rehabilitating the site. "They were gone by August first, which was the end of their permit," observes Asrow.

A skeptic at first, Asrow admits to having a change of heart about the core Rainbow group that did the cleanup. "The people that stayed behind to do the rehab, I really felt were heroes for the gathering. It was a 20,000-person party, and they took care of all the cleanup. So, that was really a contribution, and I told them that."

Trucker burned badly in wreck

A 30-year-old truck driver from Glendale, Az. was badly burned when his truck ran off U.S. 395 just north of Likely August 13, 11:47 a.m.

According to the California Highway Patrol, Marian Kosorinec was northbound in a 1996 Freightliner pulling a 1999 trailer when for unknown reasons he allowed the truck to drift into the southbound lane then off the road onto the dirt shoulder.

The rig continued out into the dirt and sage covered field west of the highway. It ran through a barbed wire fence and traveled towards a dry drainage ravine that runs perpendicular to the road. Once the tractor-trailer reached the top of the southern embankment, it became airborne because of its speed and the extreme downward angle.

The front end of the rig impacted about mid-way up the northern embankment. The top of the front end of the trailer collided with the rear of the sleeping compartment of the tractor. The momentum of the tractor trailer while airborne caused the load of mayonase to push through the front of the trailer, spilling out along both sides of the tractor.

The tractor came to rest on its wheels, facing in a northern direction, partially up the ravine. The trailer came to rest, also in a northern direction down the southern embankment of the ravine, still attached to the tractor. The collision started a fire in the engine well which consumed the entire passenger compartment.

Korosinec sustained major burns to 70 percent of his body and was airlifted to Washoe Medical Center in Reno and then transferred to Las Vegas facilities. A CHP officer and local emergency crews pulled him out of the flaming cab.

There were only minor injuries in a single vehicle accident August 15, 8:50 a.m. on State Route 299, west of County Road 86.

The CHP reports that Adrian Almanza, 17, Alturas, was eastbound in a 1993 Suzuki when he feel asleep. The vehicle left the north road edge and struck a culvert, coming to an abrupt stop. The vehicle sustained major damage, but because Almanza was wearing a seatbelt, his injuries were minor.

There were minor injuries in a two-vehicle;e accident August 13, 9:15 a.m. on County Road 91 and County Road 87.

The CHP state that Amanda Akridge, 75, Lookout, was driving a 1990 Dodge southbound on CR91 at an unknown sped approaching CR87. William Curry, age 54, Adin, was driving a 1989 Ford northbound on CR91 at approximately 55 m.p.h. approaching CR87. Ackridge did not see the Curry vehicle approaching and made a left and turn in front of him The vehicles collided head on. Because seatbelts were worn, Akridge sustained only minor injuries and Curry wasn't hurt.

A truck driver from Rosebrug, Or., was arrested alleging driving under the influence following an accident August 14, 3:45 p.m. on U.S. 395 north of Davis Creek.

The CHP reports that Vanderhoef (no first name give), age 57, was driving a 1993 Kenworth northbound at about 55 m.p.h. when he encountered a sudden rainstorm. The driver allowed the truck to drift off the west edge of the highway where it struck a paddle marker. Vanderhoef quickly corrected to the right, causing the truck to turn up onto the road. The sudden shifting of weight caused the trailer to overturn as soon as it was back on the road. The railroad ties spilled off the trailer onto the highway. The weight of the overturned trailer caused the truck to overturn to its left side.

Watermaster fees to skyrocket

Watermaster service fees in the Ash Creek, Big Valley, North Fork, Pit River, and Surprise Valley service areas are going up for the 2004-05 fiscal year by 276.52 percent

Modoc Treasurer/Tax Collector Cheryl Knoch informed the Record this week that the fees are substantially higher than last year. In one instance, a water right holder's fees would go up from $426 to $1604, she said

Another example is a pserson whose fees last year were $2,764 will jump to $10,510 this year

"I want to get this information out to taxpayers with water rights before they are shocked when they get their bills," said Knoch

Knoch said the total Watermaster service fees collected in Modoc in 2003-04 amounted to $94,550 and for 2004-05, the amount skyrockets to $356,002, a difference of $261,452

The notice came from the State Department of Water Resources in a letter dated August 5. "The increases are due in large part to the elimination of State General Fund support for the Watermaster Service Program, as delineated in the budget recently passed and signed by the Governor," the DWR states

According to DWR, it has historically used state General Funds to cover one-half the cost of Watermaster service, while matching fees have covered the remainder of the costs. However, those General Fund dollars have not been increased. The DWR has tapped related General Fund programs to cover increased costs, limiting the fees to approximately one-fourth to one-third of the total cost of the Watermaster service

"Without the State's recent budget crisis, the Department's General Fund budgets have been significantly reduced and we can no longer continue to use relate programs to help cover the cost of the Watermaster program," DWR states. "The State's fiscal year 2004-05 budget provides the department the authority to continue this important program in a self-sustaining manner, through fees that reflect the total cost of the Watermaster service. "Although the increase in fees is significant, the overall costs of the service are modest relative to statewide water costs, ranging from about $1 to less than $4 per acre-foot and averaging about $2 per acre foot."

Beware of scam posing as U.S. Bank

Several local residents have received emails from someone posing as U.S. Bank saying their bank account had been blocked and they needed to notify the bank by providing some account information.

U.S. bank warns its customers that the message is fraudulent and not to provide any of the information it requests. Actually, US Bank stresses that people should not click on the web site to open the link.

What the email says is: "We regret to inform you that we had to block your U.S. Bank account because we have been notified that your account may have been compromised by outside parties.

"Our terms and conditions you agreed to state that your account must always be under your control or those you designate at all times. We have noticed some activity related to your account that indicates other parties may have access and or control of your information in your account. "These parties in the past have been involved with money laundering, illegal drugs, terrorism and various federal Title 18 violations. In order that you may access your account we must verify your identify by clicking on the field below: (not printed here).

"Please be aware that until we can verify your identity, no further access to your account will be allowed and we will have no other liability for your account or any transactions that may have occurred as a result of your failure to reactivate your account."

One local customer said the information the scam requests could result in a great loss of funds.

U.S. Bank stresses that customers should not provide any of that information requested on the scam. If a customers gets an email, do not open the link and contact US Bank at 1-800-872-2657, 1-800-USBANKS.

Modoc Fair opens tonight with plenty of excitement for all ages

At 5:00 this afternoon, the gates at the 71st Modoc District Fair will officially swing open to admit folks to four jam-packed days of entertainment that include a "wild" hands-on science exhibit, an expanded first-rate carnival, live music and comedy shows, rodeos, rancher's day and livestock competitions, and exhibit halls filled to overflowing with the very best Modoc has to offer

This year's theme, "Modoc: A Playground in the Wilderness", will be noticeably woven throughout the fair in displays, parade entries, and in the impression delighted folks carry away after a memorable visit

Miss Modoc 2004, Meghan Binning, will be on hand to greet the first people through the gates of this year's event. The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce promises to have their popular Basque Barbecue, featuring lamb and beef steaks, lamb stew and all the trimmings hot and ready to serve. The Jeff Palmer Band, back for their third year, will be on the Park Stage, followed by the Kid and Nic Show, presenting an entertaining mix of music and humorous skits.

After a great meal, head up to the Grandstand to watch the Mark Walgenback Memorial Sheep Dog Trials at 6:30 p.m. For more canine antics, check your fair schedules for Rocket's K-9 Performing Dog act, beginning Saturday.

Thursday evening is a great time to visit the carnival! Ride bands are available for $12 each from 5-9, offering unlimited rides. The American Traveling Shows Carnival has returned with four large rides, eight junior rides, food and game booths. Ride bands will also be available on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

Tonight is the first chance everyone with items entered for judging will have to see if their efforts have earned a coveted ribbon. The exhibit halls open at 5; folks will have until 9 p.m. to look over the incredible variety of crafts, artistic, culinary, horticultural and agricultural and themed displays. Luckily, the fair runs for four days, so you'll have plenty of time to eventually see and appreciate everything. As one long time exhibitor said, "I wander around and get so many great ideas for future projects!

The Quilt Show, in the Art and Science Building, has more than twice as many colorful, intricate and skillful entries this year than last. In the same building, kids of all ages will love "Wild Science!" which encourages visitors to "please touch." Challenging all the senses, this attraction will pique your interest in how things work as you move and play your way through the huge exhibition.

Tired yet? Find a bench and wait for the Rawhide Express Trackless Train to glide by. This new feature will operate at no cost during all four days of the fair, providing a leisurely, narrated tour of the extensive fairgrounds or a welcome break from walking to each destination.

Fair highlights also include Friday night's Ranch Saddle Bronc Riding Competition at 7 p.m., the Destruction Derby on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. followed by a street dance with the Jeff Palmer Band. You won't want to miss the only fair appearance of the Fiddlin'' Foresters at 3 p.m. Saturday, followed by the FFA Barbecue from 4-7. Sunday, the day begins with the Fair Parade on Main Street in Cedarville at 11:00. The Junior Rodeo follows at 12:30 in the Grandstand. The Men's Softball Championship begins at 2 p.m. at the ball diamond.

When approaching the fair gates, you can't help but notice the restored carriages, buggies, wagons and one horse drawn hearse arrayed along the entrance road. These gems from bygone days are the work of lifelong Modoc resident Lewis Vermillion. The Surprise Valley Rotarians bring the valuable antiques to the site from Louie's Buggy Shop on Main Street. Some will make an appearance in Sunday's parade.

Vermillion is also the driving force behind "Louieville," a charming collection of restored historic buildings gathered over the years throughout Surprise Valley. With the help of occasional volunteers from the local Rotary Club, he patiently transferred a church, two jails, a slaughterhouse, bar, general store, and blacksmith shop to their present site along the fair's southern boundary.

Strollers happening upon Louievile will find not only a gathering of refurbished buildings but shaded benches for relaxing, western themed (modern) restrooms, and a traveling blacksmith demonstrating his craft. The buildings will be open Friday through Sunday.

Louieville, as a locally maintained permanent display, makes our site colorfully unique among California's 86 various district and county fairgrounds. Occasionally state bureaucrats grumble that it somehow doesn't fit in their cookie cutter plans, but visitors fortunate enough to pause and listen to its whispers of days long past, value it for the unique treasure it is. Be sure to take some time to wander through this area that brings our regional history alive for new generations to appreciate.

Our district fairgrounds often surprise many; the site is a veritable oasis of immaculate green lawns, clean facilities, and spacious buildings tucked away in the shadow of the Warner Mountains. It is a place many enjoy not only for the full schedule of quality attractions but as a place to relax, people- watch, and visit with neighbors and friends.

The Sage Stage will be offering free shuttle bus rides to the fair on Friday and Saturday. The bus will depart from the Elks Lodge in Alturas with the first run (of several) each day at 10:30 a.m. The last ride back leaves the fair at 9:00 p.m. The Sage Stage is wheelchair accessible and air conditioned. For more information please call 233-3883.

Modoc residents, friends and visitors are fortunate the Fair Board, CEO Traci Green and the hard working office and grounds staff all put in countless hours to pull together a fantastic, entertaining blend of shows, performers, displays, competitions, attractions, vendors and local organizations to delight and amuse everyone who ventures through the gates from August 19-22. It's a memorable experience that truly showcases the people and products of our "playground in the wilderness", Modoc County.

Obituaries:

Don Edgar Polson

Former Modoc County Road Commissioner and Supervisor Don Edgar Polson passed away in Klamath Falls, OR of natural causes on August 16, 2004. Cremation will be at Eternal Hills Crematory in Klamath Falls. Services are pending. Mr. Polson's obituary will be published as available.

Harry R. Miller, Jr

Harry R. Miller, Jr. died August 8, 2004, at the age of 76 at a Chico hospital. He is survived by Geene, his wife of 55 years, a son, John, long-time resident of Chico, and numerous nieces and nephews in Kentucky and California.

Harry was born January 15, 1928 in Berkeley, California. Much of his childhood was spent on Pt. Sur and Pt. Cabrillo lighthouses where his father was Assistant Lighthouse Keeper. He served three years in the U.S. Army with the 51st Signal Battalion. He was discharged in Kentucky where he met his wife, Geene, and six months later they married and moved to California.

Harry attended the University of California where he collaborated with the university and the U.S. Forest to develop early fire fighting techniques. He was instrumental in Operation Fire Stop which was to experiment with chemicals for air drops from airtankers. He made a training video for new Forest Service air attack personnel that was used for many years. Harry received a commendation from Queen Elizabeth II for his firefighting technique work.

In 1960, Harry was assigned to the Modoc National Forest, where he was Assistant District Ranger in Alturas and then promoted to District Ranger at Buck Creek Ranger District, where he spent six years. He transferred as District Ranger to the Six Rivers National Forest in Gasquet, CA where he retired in 1980.

After retirement, Harry and Geene enjoyed spending winters in Mexico and traveling extensively in the United States. In 1987, they made Chico their permanent home to be near their son, John.

Harry will be in our hearts forever and will always be remembered by his loving family, remarkable friends, and all of the people whose lives he has touched. He will mostly be remembered for his fun loving humor, his intelligence and talent, his always smiling face, enormous heart and for always living life to the fullest. Harry was loved by many and will never be forgotten.

A private Celebration of Life will be held at the home of close family friends. Donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, in memory of Harry R. Miller, Jr

Barbara Elizabeth Bouse

Graveside services for life-time Modoc resident Barbara Elizabeth Bouse will be held today, August 19 at 10 a.m. at the Adin Cemetery. Lay Minister Jerry Levington of the Community Church of Adin, will perform the service. Mrs. Bouse of Adin, passed away in Fall River Mills at the age of 75, on August 13, 2004.

Born Barbara Keefer on October 12, 1928 in Adin, she graduated from high school in Adin and attended Beauty College in Sacramento. She obtained her Cosmetology License and was the owner/operator of Barbara's Beauty Salon.

Mrs. Bouse was an avid walker, loved to garden, cook and most of all enjoyed taking care of children. She was known as "Grandma" to all who knew her. A member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary, she was a volunteer during the blood bank drives in her community. She married James Henry Bouse in Reno, NV. on April 29, 1962 and the two have shared 42 years of marriage.

She is survived by her husband James of Adin, CA; son David Kenobbie of Adin; son Jim Bouse of Adin; son Tim Bouse of Adin; daughter Judy Brown of Fairfield, CA; brother Marvin Hess of Redding; six grandchildren: Kimberly, Jennifer, Alicia, Jimmy, Bryan, Jason and one granddaughter Madison.

Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas.

Ellen McManus McCaw

Surprise Valley native Ellen McCaw passed away August 9, 2004, at the age of 90 years, at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV.

Born Ellen McManus on March 23, 1914, at Ft. Bidwell, CA to Hugh James and Edna Herron McManus. The second of four daughters, Ellen was raised on the McManus Ranch five miles east of Ft. Bidwell. She attended elementary and high school in Ft. Bidwell. After high school, Ellen went to work for the Modoc County Superintendent of Schools Office.

On December 10, 1938, she married William J. McCaw who worked for Tierney Ford in Alturas, for many years, prior to his death in 1969. Ellen spent several years working as Deputy Superintendent of Schools under Hallie Tierney and also worked at the Alturas Elementary School. Ellen was active in the Alturas Federated Community Church for many years and was known for the lovely flowers in her yard. For the past six years, Ellen resided at the Inn at Summit Ridge in Reno, NV.

Ellen's three sisters, Grace McManus of Yuba City, CA; Althea Bettandorff of Reno, NV; and Dorothy Suggs of Phoenix, AZ preceded her in death. Ellen is survived by her brother-in-law Norman Bettandorff of Reno; three nephews, Jim Bettandorff of Atlanta, Georgia, Bill Bettandorff of Houston, Texas, and Steve Suggs of Colorado Springs, CO; and numerous great nieces and nephew.

Services will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra at Federated Community Church in Alturas on Monday, August 23 at 1 p.m. Arrangements are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Alturas Federated Community Church.

Judith Ann Caroline Becica

"A Celebration of Life" gathering for Judith Ann Caroline Becica will be held at Faith Baptist Church, 800 West Carlos St., Alturas on Saturday, August 21 at 1 p.m.

Pastor Rod Bodmer will conduct the service for Mrs. Becica who passed away on June 22, 2004, in Alturas, CA at the age of 68. Born Judith Ernser on December 7, 1935, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, she graduated from North Side High School there and married James Becica on August 20, 1953 in Waukeegan, Illinois.

She moved to Alturas five years ago, where she enjoyed being a homemaker. But, her life's work prior, was varied, in addition to being a wife, mother and grandmother.

One of her accomplishments was when she owned her own cake decorating business and created a cake for President Richard Nixon. Mrs. Becica had worked for the U.S. Marine Corps Special Services at El Toro Marine Base, as Assistant Manager of Food Services. She had also worked as Assistant Manager and then manager of the golf course in El Toro.

She was employed with ARCO Engineering as an engineering prototype circuit board assembler and later for Erickson Electronics as lead assembler. She has also worked for Costco as a Demonstration Service Manager in Garden Grove, CA and as the fresh flower merchandiser. Mrs. Becica is survived by her husband James of Alturas; son James Frank, Jr. and wife Gerri of Sumner, WA; daughter Vickilyn of Novato, CA; daughter Pamelasue Figeriutto of Big Bear, CA; son Jeffrey Allen Becica of Huntington Beach, CA; daughter Holly Fulton of Alturas; daughter Linda Stanfield of Boise, ID; and 10 grandchildren: Chris, Kindra, Spencer, Chelsey, Christian, Shane, Casey, Lauren, Karrissa and Derrick. Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas.

Joseph Edward Haas

Modoc County native Joseph Edward Haas passed away on July 25, 2004, in Southport Florida, losing his battle to liver disease.

Joe was born December 25, 1959 in Alturas, CA. He grew up in Canby, CA. and graduated from high school in 1978. He joined the Army and served for seven years, serving both state side and in Germany. Upon his honorable discharge from the Army, Joe relocated to Florida where he met and married the love of his life, Tammy. Joe spent many happy years with Tammy and step-children Justin and Jessica.

Joe loved to hunt, fish and spend time with friends and family. He honed his carpentry skills and was a perfectionist when it came to making cabinets or anything else he decided to construct.

Joe was preceded in death by his father, Ed Haas; grandfather John Poytress and grandmother Mabel Kelley. He is survived by his mother Lydia Haas of Alturas, CA; wife Tammy and step-children Justin and Jessice of Southport, FL; sister Kate Haas and her children Emily and Ethan of Alturas, CA; brother Dan Haas his wife Kathy and their children Danielle and Megan of Jermyn, PA; grandmother Marjorie Poytress of Adin; cousins Tom Poytress of Adin; Jack and Carol Poytress of Burney and their children Steven and Phillip their families; a special uncle and cousin in the Porterville area and many friends. Services were held in Florida. A memorial service in Modoc County, will be held at a later date.

Memorial donations may be made to: Make a Wish Foundation of America, 3550 North Central Avenue, Suite 300, Phoenix, Arizona, 85012-2127.

Sports

Cops vs. kids football game set

ON AUGUST 28, 2004 6:00 p.m. at the Ed Carver Field, local law enforcement officers will compete against the Modoc Braves Varsity Football team in a seven against seven touch football game to raise money for the Modoc High School Football Program.

Tickets will be available at the gate, $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children twelve and under. All money raised will go to help the football team purchase much needed equipment.

For more information you can contact Coach Wood at the Modoc High School or Tex Dowdy at the Alturas Police Department.

Warner Mountain Scramble stirs up fun and funding

The weather and lightning created it’s own excitement and then Kathie Widby nearly hit the hole-in-one for the $5000, during the Warner Mountain Scramble Benefit Golf Tournament hosted by the Arrowhead Women’s Golf Club last Saturday in Alturas.

Organizers were pleased with the turnout of 33 women golfers and a fun day, which included "exceptional food and lots of fun." Golfers from Lakeview and Fall River joined the locals. It was a successful benefit for the club’s scholarship fund for a Modoc High senior

The team of Lynn McClellan, Kathie Widby, Louise Dunn and Mary Johnson took first place with a score of 67. Second place, with a tie score of 75, went to the team of Rose Boulade, Joanne Cain, Lillian McKenzie, Evie Younger and Sue McNeeley and the team of April Ackley, Deborah Halpenny, Pat Kerr and Diane Rustan.

The long-drive was won by Kathie Widby; Closest to the Pin prize went to Evie Younger; Accuracy Drive was won by Michelle Ray and the Basket Drawing winner was June Brunnemer.

Eagle Lake Fishing Report

Fishing at Eagle Lake continued very good last week with the largest Eagle Lake Trout weighing in at about four pounds at Eagle Lake Marina. Best results have been in the Pikes Point area near the jetty followed closely by Eagles Nest. Some have also reported good results in the vicinity of the Eagle Group Campgrounds.

The fish continue deep with best results coming from boats at depths from 25 to 35 feet. Strongest results continue to be coming from using night crawlers under slip bobbers followed closely by trolling with broken back Rapalas, Needlefish, Rainbow Runners and Orange Trolling Flies. Best times continue to be early morning hours. Shore fishing is sketchy with the best chance being from the jetty at Eagle Lake Marina.

Ample camping is available in the pines at the south shore of Eagle Lake with more than 200 campsites available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For camping information at Eagle Lake, call the U.S. Forest Service at (530)257-4188. For reservations, call; toll free, (877)444-6777. For current information on fishing conditions, call Eagle Lake Marina at (530)825-3454.

15th Annual Styx-Modoc Fair invitation Softball Tournament

The Hooters and Styx will play Friday night at 7:00 and 9:00 to open the fifteenth annual fair softball tournament. The Mavericks and Lakeview are the other league teams participating. Rounding out the tournament bracket are Bieber, Westwood, Reno, and the Stronghold Aces.

Games resume Saturday morning at 8:00 and run all day long with the Homerun Derby scheduled for 3:00 Saturday. Games will begin Sunday at 8:00 with the Championship game scheduled for 3:00 Sunday afternoon. The Styx and Modoc Fair would like to thank their trophy sponsors who have been with them the whole way, Les Schwab Tire Store, K&K Distributing, and Huckleberry Haying.

With three losses last week, the Brass Rail (10-4) team has left the door wide open for the Hooters and Lakeview (both at 11-4) to walk right in.

The Brass Rail has a makeup game tentatively scheduled for Thursday at 7:00 in Alturas. If they win that game then there will be a three way tie for first place. If this should happen defending league champs Brass Rail will play the winner of a playoff game between the Hooters and Lakeview tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, August 24 in Cedarville. The remainder of the league standings are Styx 7-8; S.V. Aviation/ 4 Corners 5-9; Mavericks 0-15.

Mark Walgenback Memorial Sheepdog Trial opens tonight

One of the most anticipated events at the Modoc County Fair will be Thursday night, August 19 starting at 6:30 p.m. The Mark Walgenback Memorial Sheepdog Trial will have handlers and dogs from three different states this year: Nevada, Oregon and California.

Four classes offered include Open Advanced, Ranch Dog, Novice and a new class this year, Modoc County Non-Pro Ranch.

The Open Advanced Class will be the first class shown at 6:30 p.m. There will be a two-person judging system with 35 points possible; the points are accumulated by the dog taking three head of sheep through the various obstacles. At the end of the class competition, the Annual Trailer Loading Event will take place. Five lucky competitors will have their names drawn out of a hat to see who can load five sheep into a free-standing trailer (in the middle of the arena) in the least amount of time. These five competitors will be vying for two cash prizes: $100 for first place and $50 for second place. The participants all hope for a chance at the Trailer loading event.

The trial is organized by Pam Iveson and Pam Hughes of Surprise Valley. Iveson supplies her beautiful Rambouillet sheep for the event.

"We'd like to take this opportunity to thank the community for the tremendous support they have shown for this trial in the past. As a competitor, it is always nice to look up into the grandstands that are filled with spectators cheering everyone on. We look forward to seeing you again this year," says Iveson. For more information, call Pam Iveson at 279-6281 or Pam Hughes at 279-2348.

August 26th , 2004

News

Squellati placed on leave pending investigation

Modoc Joint Unified School District Superintendent Doug Squellati was placed on paid administrative leave by the Board of Trustees Tuesday night pending the results of an investigation involving employee complaints. The Board took the action following about a 90-minute conference call with its legal counsel on the complaints. The vote to place Squellati on leave was split with Ken Fogle, Seab McDonald and Patt Swanson voting in favor and Jeff Bushey and Karen Hays voting against.

The action did not please a standing-room only crowd, largely in support of Squellati. The board, by law, cannot discuss the contents of the complaint nor the advice it received from counsel, so the level of frustration in the room was high.

Ken Fogle, president of the Board, allotted the audience 20 minutes for comment and did not move the meeting from the relatively small board room to the Middle School Gym, as some had requested. The meeting was primarily closed session, with just the board present.

On Wednesday, Fogle said he hoped the investigation into the complaints would be finished in a few weeks and the issue could be brought to fruition. While several people in the audience Tuesday night questioned the Board's adherence to policy, Fogle said he felt the board was following the advice of counsel.

A number of people spoke to the issue of the revolving door for administrators in the MJUSD and felt the lack of consistency in administration was presently, or potentially, harmful to the school district. Modoc has had several different administrators in the Superintendent's chair and at Modoc High School over the past eight years.

Many people in the audience felt that placing the administrator on leave starting the opening day of school was completely unwise

Teacher Sally Clark, representing the Modoc Teacher's Association, presented a letter to the Board stressing that their decisions on the issue not cause any adverse financial impacts, that the Board follow legal procedures, and make a non-biased, fair and justified decision.

"The Board of Trustees needs to commit to a fair and just process," she read. "We do not want the Board to incur any further financial costs to the District, as a result of dismissal of the Superintendent, unless legally bound to do so. We trust that you will look at the situation fairly and impartially for the good of the Districts, its students and employees. You have our support in pursuing necessary actions as long as an unbiased process is followed." Curtis Talbott told the Board that the high turnover rate for administrators in the District was "inefficient and costs like hell" and felt the board should make efforts to retain quality people.

A.J. McQuarrie wondered what a decision affecting Squellati would cost and whether it was a wise use of funds.

Don Demsher, who has worked as the Superintendent in the MJUSD and helped with superintendent searches throughout the north state, said that the turmoil created by these actions would not help attract quality people to future administrative posts.

He also said that the Board had denied Squellati due process and had failed to follow the district's policies and procedures. He said Squellati had not been presented a copy of the complaint as required by policy and that no effort was made to resolve the issue informally.

He also said it appeared that three board members violated the Brown Act, by coming together outside of public meetings to come to agreement on the Squellati issue. McDonald, Fogle and Swanson denied that had occurred. Demsher said the Board should start over and follow the law, honoring the conditions of Squellati's contract and conduct District business in public. Former teacher Marie Neer asked the board to "rise to the occasion" and bring a sense of justice and fairness to the issue, follow due process and not follow petty issues.

Barbara Baker, a school employee, told the Board the Teamsters Union was in support of Squellati.

The Board could not discuss the contents of the complaint or personnel issues outside of closed session, and could not answer most of the charges aired by the public Tuesday night.

While most questions were not answered, Bushey told the audience the investigation would cost $10,000 and Hays said she thought Squellati was doing a good job. The investigation, according to Fogle, may cost up to $10,000, but it could be less.

The Board had questioned Squellati's purchase of some computer equipment at a recent meeting, and people in the audience wondered if that was such a big financial deal, why wasn't the $10,000 investigation? The investigator is due back in early September for more interviews of witnesses and those people involved in the complaints. Squellati's leave started Wednesday morning.

Local woman trapped in vehicle overnight

An Alturas resident, Rosalie McBride, age 59, was trapped in her wrecked car overnight and sustained moderate injuries August 22, on SR299 east of Cedar Pass.

According to the CHP, McBride was driving a 2001 Hyundai Elantra eastbound over Cedar Pass about 7 p.m. Sunday when she drove into a fogbank. She slowed, but was unable to see the road and drove her vehicle onto the dirt shoulder and saw several piles of dirt to her right. She tried to slow but the rear of the vehicle started to rotate in a clockwise direction and she lost control.

The car left the shoulder and went down an embankment south of the highway. The car overturned several times as it went down the embankment where it collided with a tree at the bottom.

The vehicle came to rest on its right side, facing south, with the bottom of the car against the tree, trapping McBride inside.

She remained trapped throughout the night and until early Monday morning when a passing motorist saw the tire marks and investigated. He found the car down the embankment, placed flares at the scene on the road and called for assistance. Her family had reported her missing about 10:30 p.m. the night before. The Modoc Sheriff's Office said it did not receive a missing peron's report, and figured it must have gone to the CHP in Susanville the 9-1-1.

She was extricated from the car by emergency crews and transported from the scene by Mountain Life Flight to Washoe Medical Center in Reno. She was wearing her seatbelt and her driver side airbag deployed. She sustained a fracture to her arm possible fracture to her ribs and a concussion.

Major injuries were reported in a single vehicle ac cident August 22, 9:50 a.m. on U.S. 395 at Sage Hen Summit. The California Highway Patrol states that Michael Stuart Miller, age 57, Eagle Point, Or., was southbound in a 2004 Kia when he fell asleep at the wheel. The vehicle ran off the road and Miller woke up. He turned sharply to the left, but lost control of the vehicle which rolled. A passenger, Patrician Lynn Miller, age 48, of Eagle Point, was sleeping in the back and was ejected from the vehicle, landing in the road.

The car landed on its wheels facing in a southwest direction. The driver, who was not wearing a seatbelt, sustained major injuries. The passenger sustained minor injuries. Both were flown from the scene to Mercy Medical Center in Redding.

An Alturas resident was not hurt in a single vehicle accident August 19, 9:30 p.m. on East Street south of the Railroad tracks.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Carol Semenko, age 53, Alturas, was northbound on East Street and allowed her 1993 Chevy to drift off the road and strike a Caltrans fence, causing minor damage.

There were minor injuries in a single vehicle accident August 23, 4 a.m. on State Route 139 at Howard's Gulch. The CHP states that Tina Lynn Lock, 35, Corvallis, Or., was driving a 1992 Chevy southbound at 60 to 65 m.p.h. and as she entered a curve in the road she heard a "pop" and found she had no control of the vehicle. The Chevy went straight into an embankment on the east side of the road and overturned. Lock, and two passengers were wearing seatbelts and were not seriously hurt.

A deer was the culprit in a US 395 accident August 21, 6:30 a.m. just south of Spanish Springs.

The CHP reports that Robert Mueller, age 25, Reno, was northbound in a 1994 Chevy 3500 pickup at about 65 m.p.h. when the deer darted into the road. He was unable to miss the deer, causing minor damage to the pickup. He was not hurt.

Modoc assessed values up for '04

The assessment rolls in Modoc County have increased for the 2004-05 year, according to Modoc County Assessor Josephine Johnson.

Johnson reports that the secured roll shows an increase of 4.81 percent, amounting to an increase in the county's general fund of $48,899. In 2003-04 the secured roll showed a value of $622,395,768 and in 2004-05 it increased to $652,293,940.

The unsecured roll went up, but by only 1.91 percent, from $21,723,468 to $22,139,114.

The total assessment roll went up 4.72 percent, from $644,059,236 last year to $674,433,054 this year.

According to Johnson, high-end residential and rural residential property continued to show increases in value and agricultural sales were stable with some slight increase.

Johnson also pointed out the continued large volume of sales in California Pines reflect some price increases. There is also a restored value on about 1,000 vacant land parcels, indicating about a $10,800,300 increase.

Johnson said her office experienced a 14.9 percent increase in documents recorded in calendar year 2003, with a total of 8643. She noted that 4,896 document processed covered 6,816 parcels showing a 51.2 percent increase in parcels. In addition, 2,687 documents requiring reappraisal were handled, an 18 percent increase, and 360 parcels were reapprasied/reviewed for new construction.

Johnson reported that approximately 4,500 parcels reflected a decline in value and 22.6 percent of the total parcels still reflect a 1975 base value. Johnson also reported to the board on the percentage of the total roll geographically for the year and in past years. For 2004-05, 30.06 percent is from the area outside of Alturas; 19.05 percent of the total roll is from California Pines property; 14.54 in from the Tulelake area; 13.46 in from Surprise Valley; 13.29 is from Alturas; 8.35 percent from Big Valley and 1.24 percent is from Day.

As a comparison, in the year 2000-01, Cal Pines had a 14.97 percent share of the total; the area outside Alturas, 30.74 percent; Alturas 13.8 percent; Surprise Valley 14.31 percent; Tulelake 15.8 percent; Big Valley 9.14 percent; and Day 1.24 percent.

CHP officer rescues trucker from flames, certain death

Life and death situations are a fact of life for California Highway Patrol officers.

"Eventually every officer will respond to something like this," says Jay McPeek, a CHP canine officer and Ohio native, who got a call from his dispatcher in Alturas Thursday, August 12, sending him to the scene of a truck accident just north of Likely on Highway 395.

"Within four minutes I was on scene," reports McPeek, who could clearly see the tractor-trailer rig jackknifed in a ravine about 195 feet from the road, its nose and trailer protruding upward, the rest partially spanning the bottom of the gully.

The eyewitness who also reported the accident, Ben Fisher of Alturas, was still on scene. He later reported to the officer that the northbound three-axle tractor pulling a semi-trailer drifted across the centerline into the southbound lane approximately 2.5 miles north of Likely. Bound for Oregon with a load of mayonnaise in glass jars, the big rig left the west side of the road, crossed the right-of-way, went through a fence, briefly became airborne and hit a gully or ravine without braking or slowing in any way. After hitting the rock wall on the far side of the ravine head on, the nose of the truck, driven by Marian Kosorinec, a 30-year-old Russian immigrant from Glendale, Arizona, was forced upward by the violence of the impact. The trailer flattened the sleeper birth behind the truck's cab. As the load lurched forward, it ruptured the front of the trailer and spilled out into the ravine, covering the ground with a soupy mixture of lethal glass shards and mayonnaise.

"It wasn't the worst collision that I've ever seen," says McPeek, reflecting on his first impression when he slammed his cruiser to a stop at the scene that day. "But … when the fire took over, it became one of the worst." Seeing a little smoke rising from the engine compartment, McPeek immediately called for firefighting support before he jumped from his cruiser and ran to the wreck.

Diesel fuel from two ruptured fuel tanks began to burn, producing a steady stream of smoke rising from the tractor when the highway patrolman reached it.

"I saw his unshod feet in the driver's side window," narrates McPeek. Every police officer knows that shoes come off during the violence bodies experience in high-speed impacts. "If you see a shoe, then it's very possible it was a fatal (accident)," observes McPeek.

Dismissing any concerns for his own welfare, the young officer quickly negotiated the broken glass and the goop on the ground and climbed up to peer in the driver's side window. The cab was already full of black smoke, obscuring his view. He tried the door, but it would not budge.

McPeek surmised that if the driver's feet were in the window, he must have been lying down in the cab, head toward the passenger side. "Had he been wearing his seat belt, he still would have been in the driver's seat."

So, he dropped to the ground and ran around to the passenger side door. It, too, would not open, so he burst the glass with his bare hand. "As soon as I busted the window, the black smoke started rolling out," McPeek recalls. "I couldn't even see into the cab. I could hear him moaning, so I knew he was alive."

Knowing there was no time to spare, McPeek sent Fisher to his police cruiser for a fire extinguisher and then ran back to the driver's side, where he was shocked to see a face.

"By then the flames had started out of the engine compartment," explains McPeek. "He was only about eight to ten inches away from the glass." Flames were now coming up inside the cab, ironically allowing the patrolman to see inside more clearly. "He had his arm on the steering wheel. He had a blank stare to him. There was no emotion, nor any kind of a reaction out of the gentlemen other than just … the moaning that he was doing." Breaking out the window, McPeek reached in and tried to pull the driver out. "I grabbed ahold of his wrist, and he fought me. He didn't want to come to the window for some reason. I tried pulling on him. He slipped my grip, and he stood back into the flames that were … there were pretty substantial flames on the passenger side of the vehicle."

Kosorinec seemed oblivious to the fire that enveloped him. "He was conscious, but he wasn't coherent," explains McPeek. "He stood up into the flames, and it was just like it didn't even effect him. He had no notion that he was standing in the middle of all the flames."

Then came one of those strange moments in a crisis when time seems to slow or stand still. "He stared at me for … what seemed forever, but which was only a split second. Then he looked back into the sleeper birth, and, basically, crawled into the sleeper birth."

At that moment, flames leapt toward the driver's side window, forcing the would-be rescuer to abandon his attempt.

But as McPeek jumped back, he caught a glimpse of movement out of the corner of his eye. "As I stepped back, I could see his arm come out of the bottom of the sleeper birth."

McPeek made his way to the spot where the sleeper and the trailer were smashed together. He then saw the victim crawling out of a hole in the bottom of the sleeper and into the front of the trailer, where he stood up and began walking up the incline toward the back of the trailer.

"The flames, by that time, (had) already engulfed the entire passenger compartment of the vehicle," recalls the heroic officer. "It moved really fast."

For a second time, McPeek went back into the wreck—this time into the trailer. "I tried to turn him around, and he struggled with me a little bit." Dazed and insensible, the 6-foot, 4-inch tall Russian trucker, weighing about 180 pounds, was not easily manhandled.

"I finally got him turned around and pushed him back towards the opening, which was the front of the trailer," continues McPeek. "Once I got him to the opening, I pushed him out. He fell down through the broken glass and the mayonnaise, down towards the ravine. And I followed out after him. I ended up tumbling myself."

Even after he was free of the wreck and the flames, Kosorinec had to be restrained from returning. "He turned around and was heading towards the truck. So, again, I had to fight with him (to) turn him around."

At that point, the first responders from the Likely Fire Department began to arrive on the scene. Together with a few bystanders, they all struggled to help McPeek restrain Kosorinec.

"Everybody was doing their best," says McPeek. "We tried to get him down; we tried to get water on him. But, he was combative the whole time. "Ultimately, it took about six of us to hold him down to get him onto the backboard and strap him down so we could carry him to the ambulance," recalls McPeek.

A medivac helicopter from Susanville retrieved the badly burned and battered accident victim. "Mountain Life Flight landed right there on (Highway) 395, and they transported him as soon as they could to Washoe Medical Center. From there he was transferred to the Las Vegas burn center," McPeek relates.

Kosorinec reportedly has third degree burns over 45 percent of his body, and second degree burns over 35 percent of his body, as well as severe smoke inhalation. Listed in very serious, but stable condition, it appears that he will survive.

McPeek's commander has requested a commendation for the patrolman, given his heroic action in the face of considerable personal danger.

"It was part of my job," says McPeek, modestly. "I couldn't just stand back and let bad things happen. It was … get to him or …" He does not seem to want to consider the alternative.

Rain fails to dampen Fair spirit

by Patrcia Hemsley

Special to the Record

The Modoc District Fair ended Sunday afternoon on a wet note as the skies, which had been dark and threatening all day, finally opened with torrential rains about an hour before the official closing time.

Fairgoers ran for cover but eventually gave up waiting for the chance at one more turn on the Kamikaze or one last corn dog. The downpour continued for several hours as exhibitors struggled to stay dry, pack up displays and head home.

Overall, it was another very successful year for the annual event which just completed its 71st year in Surprise Valley. Exhibit entries were way up, with 3800 individual items as opposed to about 2000 last year. Beginning with the sheep dog trials Friday night, fundraiser barbecues by the Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce and the SV FFA kids followed by the much anticipated Destruction Derby and street dance on Saturday, organizers were pleased by the number who turned out to enjoy, participate in or observe each event. An expanded carnival also drew enthusiastic crowds during the fair's 4-day run.

The first-ever Ranch Saddle Bronc event held Friday night was so popular, organizers Ed and Darrell Hill hope it will become an annual affair. Winners in the Long Go, which had 21 riders, were Eddie Ginochio of Canby, Tommy Martinez and Victor Madrigal of Alturas, and Jory Bradford of Eagleville. The top four winners split a $2100 purse. The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce supplied a $500 purse for the Short Go. It was won by Bradford.

Jason Mitchell of Wadsworth, Nevada took the top trophy at Saturday night's Destruction Derby. The event, sponsored by the Surprise Valley Rotary, is always a big hit at the fair. Cody Easley of Cedarville took second prize, followed by Arlen Garison of Dorris and Paul Havel of Midland, Oregon. $1700 in prize money was awarded.

Despite cooler temperatures and stormy skies, the annual fair parade on Sunday morning delighted hundreds who lined Main Street in Cedarville. Grand Marshals Clevon and Anola Dixon of Lake City and Fair Queen Meghan Binning led off the event which included a number of floats showcasing the fair's theme, "Modoc: A Playground in the Wilderness". Equestrian entries were joined by Ronny the balloon-twisting clown and the comic Wild West Show duo on their miniature "horses". The parade climaxed with an awesome procession of official vehicles, all sirens blaring. Included were several "antique" valley fire department trucks as well as BLM and Forest Service engines, all accompanied by happy, candy-throwing firefighters, employees and volunteers.

Fair CEO Traci Green and her staff were tired but very happy at the outcome of the entire event. "I'd like to thank everyone who helped, participated or just came and enjoyed a great fair. It looks like the vendors were happy at the turnout, attendance stayed steady, and the shows and displays were popular. But I heard over and over from people how much they just liked the atmosphere and the community spirit our fair is known for. All in all, it was a big success", said Green.

Balloonfest offers big weekend in Alturas for fun on ground, in air

Alturas skies and Veterans' Park will be bursting with activity this weekend for the return of the Alturas Chamber of Commerce's 2004 Balloonfest set for Saturday and Sunday, August 28 and 29.

Hot air balloon rides both days will lift off at 7 a.m. from Sharp's Field and free airplane rides Saturday only will be offered from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Alturas Airport.

To promote aviation among young people, the Young Eagles will return to Alturas, with 11 pilots and their private aircraft to offer free rides for youths, ages eight to 17, at the Alturas Airport on Saturday starting at 8 a.m. and Registration forms will be available at the airport and parental signatures will be required to take advantage of the free airplane rides. The offer will run from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the airport.

Some 14 hot air balloons from California, Nevada and Oregon will converge for a Balloon Lift-off at 7 a.m. both Saturday and Sunday from Sharp's Field, east end of Fourth Street, Alturas. Pancake breakfasts offered both mornings at 6:30 a.m. at Sharp's Field for $5 per person. Paid rides will be available. Show up early at Sharp's Field to arrange for rides with balloonists.

At Veterans' Park, So. Main Street, starting at 12 noon Saturday, the Lions Club will be serving a barbecued beef meal for $8 per person.

An Ice Cream Social will be ongoing from noon until 3 p.m. at the park. The High Plateau Humane Society members will be dishing out the ice cream for a dollar a scoop to raise funds for the High Plateau Humane Society's low-cost spay and neuter program, which is still occurring in Modoc County, with the help of the Modoc Veterinary Clinic.

HPHS will also be offering tickets for a hand-tied rag rug, a hand-knit afghan and a wall hanging on display at U.S. Bank. Tickets are a dollar a piece or six for $5. Proceeds will be shared with Canine Country. Some of the dogs and cats currently available for adoption may be seen at the park during the Ice Cream Social. Public welcome for all events.

Enjoy the open air seating and live music by the local band X3B. At the same time, horse drawn wagon and carriage rides with Clydesdales, will be offered by Heavenly Valley Clydesdales for $3, for ages 12 and older or $2 for under age 12.

At dark Saturday night, watch the Balloon Night Glow in the park, weather permitting.

On Sunday morning before dawn, watch the skies for a spectacular "Sunrise Dawn Patrol," with lighted balloons ascending from Sharp's Field, while it's still dark.

Sunday events

The 2004 Balloonfest will conclude on Sunday, August 29 featuring hot air balloon rides at the east end of Fourth Street, Alturas, with lift-off at 7 a.m. Pancake breakfasts will be served to the public at 6:30 a.m. for $5 per person. Balloon rides will be available, just contact a balloon pilot at the site by 6 a.m. All events open to the public.

The public is invited to meet the sponsors and welcome the guest balloonists and pilots during a reception at 6 p.m. Friday evening, August 27 at Main Street Coffee in Alturas. Main Street Coffee owner Terri Haralson, a Chamber Board member and the Alturas Chamber of Commerce, will co-host the event.

For more information call Jim Cavasso 640-0000 or Val Flournoy, 640-0588.

Obituaries:

Don E. Polson

Don Polson, former Modoc County Road Commissioner, passed away on August 16, 2004, in Klamath Falls, OR., after a long and difficult illness. Don was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma, May 14, 1925, but spent most of his life in California. He was proud World War II Navy Veteran and married his high school sweetheart, Beverly, in 1945. He became a registered engineer, earned a pilot's license, and was elected to the Modoc County Board of Supervisors.

He believed in working hard and having fun.

Dearest to his heart were his family, his friends, his dogs and the cattle ranch outside Alturas, where he and Beverly lived for 33 years.

Don is survived by his beloved wife, Beverly of Klamath Falls, OR.; two daughters, Rosanne Murphy of Keizer, OR., and Melinda Taber of Klamath Falls, OR.; and their husbands, Ed Murphy and Dennis Taber; and four grandchildren, Colleen Murphy Furrow and her husband Scott Furrow of Seattle, WA.; Parker Hetherwick and his wife Vickie Hetherwick of Klamath Falls, OR.; Shane Murphy of Keizer, OR.; and Chad Golden of Klamath Falls, OR.

Don had a optimistic, adventurous spirit, and lived his life with integrity, courage and a great sense of humor. He would like it if his old friends went to Benny's and drank a toast to his memory.

Wesley Edward Gray

Cedarville resident Wesley Edward Gray, known as "Pete" to his family, passed away August 23, 2004 at the age of 69, at his residence. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct a Memorial Service at the Surprise Valley Community Church on Tuesday, August 31 at 11 a.m. Mr. Gray was a church member there.

Born June 27, 1935, in Alhambra, CA, Mr. Gray was known for being a very hard working man who loved the outdoors and his dogs.

He enjoyed hiking and snow skiing, but most of all, he loved to farm. Retired from Pacific Gas & Electric as a control operator after 15 years, he also farmed, grew walnuts, almonds, oranges and alfalfa. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, discharged January 17, 1957. He had been a resident of Modoc County for the past 14 years. He and wife Arlys were married in Alturas, CA on March 15, 2004. Mr. Gray was a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and friend. He was a shy man, but was loved by all who knew him. He will be missed.

He is survived his wife Arlys of Cedarville; daughter Kina Sweaney of Antioch and brother Arthur Gray of Anaheim. He also has three grandchildren.

Services are under the direction of Kerr Mortuary, Alturas.

Sports

Modoc has football scrimmage Friday

The Modoc Braves football teams will scrimmage against Tulelake Friday night starting about 5 p.m.

On Saturday, the Braves have a fundraising game, a seven-on-seven passing only event against local law enforcement. That game will start at 6 p.m.

The Braves open season at Bishop Quinn Sept. 4 and have Lakeview at home Sept. 10.

Modoc coach Shaun Wood is pleased with the turnout and talent on this year's squad and should have 24 players at the varsity level. The junior varsity had about 30 players out the first week.

Leading the squad will be quarterback Travis Wood, along with fullback Joey Catania and end Brad Bell and receiver Kyle Madison.

Wood said the line is young, but shows plenty of promise with kids competing for starting spots. Those players include Mark Main, Tim Cruse, Ian Jacques, Kody Dunn, Grant Hall, Taylor Dunn, Rigo Ibarra, Bud Groff, Matt Williams, and Lenny Gladu.

The backfield and receivers also include: Jacob Hughes, Jared Cox, Justin Mason, David Kolvoord, Cam Wheeler, Willy Mohr, Brain Weed, Kyle Wheeler and Cody Widby.

Nelson's chance to ride surfaces before too late

Working for the opportunity to ride a bull at the Modoc District Fair Junior Rodeo over the past two weeks, was more difficult than the ride itself last Sunday afternoon, for Anna Nelson of Alturas. Anna did ride in that rodeo, just before the rains set in, and it was an "awesome" 6-1/2 second ride, as the second rider among three, just missing the magic 8 seconds. Family and friends called it Anna's "best ride, and said she gave it her all, with 110 percent."

"The stands went nuts," said her mother Tracy, who was sitting in the stands, while Anna's father Marc was her chute support. "She rode so well, she looked perfect-it was awesome and she came off fine, much to everyone's relief," said her mother. "That bull bucked and rolled, but she wasn't thrown around. She was so in sync, moving with the bull." Ann