2001 Archives

January 2001 February 1, 2001 March 2001 April 2001 May 2001 June 2001

July 2001 August 2001 September 2001 October 2001 November 2001 December 2001

 

 

January 4, 2001

County asks for more input on Cedarville Post Office location

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday agreed to send a letter to the U.S. Postal Service asking for a public meeting or opportunity for more public input on the location of a new Cedarville Post Office.

Following several months of scoping and open comment periods, the Postal Service narrowed four possible locations down to one, but that one location does not have universal acceptance.

The plan is to build the new facility, complete with offstreet parking, on a lot on Main Street across from the Surprise Valley Community Hospital. The plan is to construct the facility with the next year. Some people are concerned that the location across from the hospital will cause some congestion. Many people, said John Schreiber of Cedarville, would prefer the facility remain in the same location or more to a different lot, away from the hospital. One of the lots mentioned is across from the Cedarville Cafe.

However, the Postal Service said the move is predicated on a lack of space in the existing facility and a lack of available parking. The primary reason for a new Post Office is working space.

The Postal Service took a look at four of lots offered, ruled out two because of cleanup costs and settled on the one because it fit their needs. There will be future public meetings where people in Cedarville and Surprise Valley will get a chance to comment on the design and overall look of the new facility.

Vandals hit I'SOT Christmas displays

For the past 21 years, the I'SOT Community in Canby has built and maintained wonderful Christmas displays for the enjoyment of the town and passersby. Each year the displays withstand some vandalism, at some times minor and other times a bit worse. This year was one of the worst in terms of vandalism, according to Beth Mann.

She reported the vandalism to the Modoc County Sheriff's Office this week, which includes damage to mannequins, the theft of a Baby Jesus doll, general damages and the theft of two expensive Roman Centurion helmets. The I'SOT community is offering a reward for the return of the helmets. Anyone with information leading to the items taken is asked to call 233-5200.

Teen Center begins new year with burst of activity

The local Teen Center is gearing up to start the new year with exciting activities for students in grades six through eight. Teens will have a chance to exercise their foos-ball and air-hockey prowess on the center's new game-machines during tournaments scheduled throughout January.

Painting a mural and decorating the inside of the center is another planned activity that will give the teens a chance to personalize the building dedicated to giving them a place to hang out with friends.

"The center is a great place for kids to meet their friends and do fun things together," said De Funk, coordinator of the CLOAK afterschool program. Toward that goal, an organized Scavenger Hunt and various baking projects are planned in January by Teen Center Director, Becky Rouse.

Inside the Teen Center kids will also find a TV room equipped with a TV, VCR, a Playstation game system, couch and chairs and a larger room with a ping-pong table. The center is located at 1000 W. 4th Street, Alturas and will re-open on Saturday, January 6 from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. after being closed for the holidays. Subsequent weekends in January will find the center open on Fridays from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Local man forges his art

By Anthony Larson

Even though a blacksmith uses a forge to heat the metal he fashions, it's improper to call him a forger, nor can his work be called forgmetal a smith skillfully fashions with hammer and tongs on the anvil is typically not considered art. But art is the only proper word for what Bob McAdams creates.

"I try to do the artistic side because that's what I like," says McAdams. Using time-honored blacksmithing skills and equipment, McAdams creates works of art in metal while employing some innovative, self-taught techniques. He makes an assortment of wrought iron items, from lanterns to candle holders to candelabra, from key chains to belt buckles, steak turners and barbecue implements.

But the most unique and artistic things that McAdams creates are the bull heads, ram heads and metal roses. They are remarkably true to life, except that they are metal. The roses, his specialty, are truly striking. From stems, leaves and tiny buds to fully opened roses with delicate petals. McAdams makes wrought iron flowers that look so true to life, one is struck with the impression that they were once real roses, changed in an instant to metal by some magician's magic. The workmanship is detailed and exquisitely delicate, a remarkable achievement for any artist, let alone a blacksmith.

McAdams uses a modern, propane fired forge, unlike the charcoal fired forges of yesteryear, because it makes the work go more quickly and there is less delay at startup. He also uses an assortment of electric grinding equipment to finish his work, where hand work was employed in the past. Other than that, he uses all the tools of his time-honored trade.

Since his wife, Carol, passed away about four years ago, McAdam's daughter, Tammy, is his assistant. Living and working on the Madeline plains, they make the most of their solitude. He does the heavy smithing; she does the finishing work, giving it a woman's touch. She is the 'Tam' on their business card and the initial 'T' stamped next to McAdams' first initial 'B' on each piece they create.

Watching McAdams work is entertaining and intriguing at the same time. After firing his forge to a white-hot intensity, he selects about a two-foot length of quarter-inch square iron and thrusts it into the fire. In moments the end of the iron he intends to work is glowing red-hot. Using tongs, he pulls the metal rod from the forge and takes it to the nearby anvil. McAdams moves quickly, but deftly, hammering, bending or twisting the putty-like metal before it cools. Then, he returns it to the forge to heat the metal once again. With just a few seconds to shape the near-molten metal before it cools, a smith must repeat the heating and working cycle, putting his iron in the fire to reheat it many times before he can finish a project. (And yes, that's where the adage "too many irons in the fire" comes from, as did "strike while the iron is hot.")

A smith's work is somewhat tedious and obviously demanding, using a discipline that is not easily acquired.

"You learn to get the feel of the metal," says McAdams as he agilely works the metal into a leaf, alternately using the flat and round ends of his hammer to carefully shape it. Just as in the westerns you've seen, the blacksmith's hammer rings out over the Madeline plains as he pounds the near-molten metal on a massive steel anvil. McAdams' rhythmic pounding takes the onlooker back to a time when every neighborhood echoed with the sound of a smith's ringing hammer on metal. The result in this instance is not a horseshoe or a chain or a hub for a wagon wheel. This time it's sheer art.

Comparing his work to that of an ordinary blacksmith, McAdams notes, "Basically, you do it the same way." But the end result is a far cry from what a blacksmith commonly creates. McAdams' work can only be called artistic blacksmithing. Where does this unique talent come from? "I don't know," replies McAdams as he laughs out loud, "because I can't even draw a picture!"

His enthusiasm for his craft is infectious. "I can't wait to start something new," says McAdams with a chuckle. "When I make something, I try to make it appealing to the eye." Even though most of his creations are functional as well as artistic. McAdams wants them to endure. "I would like people to think of my work as a keepsake that might become a family heirloom," he says thoughtfully. Special orders for McAdams' artistic smithing talents are increasing.

"Now I'm starting to get quite a bit...especially now that they see what I can do," he observes.

Obituaries

Phillip S. Price

Former Alturas resident Phillip S. Price died Thursday, December 28, 2000 at Providence Hospital in Everett, Washington. He was 64 years old. It was a sudden and greatly unexpected death for his family. His entire family was present at the hospital at the time of his death.

Mr. Price is survived by his wife Pamela and his three daughters Laura Price and husband Marc White of Coupleville, Wash.; Julia Price of Everett, Wash. and Heather Price and husband Mac Chavarria of Kirkland, Wash. He will be greatly missed by his new grandson and namesake, Felipe and his 15-year-old granddaughter Savanna.

"He was a wonderful, righteous and generous man who love nature, sailing and fishing," shared his family. "He and Pam did a great many things to enhance the community of Modoc County during the 37 years that they lived there." Some of his contributions in Modoc County included serving as regional disaster relief chairman for the American Red Cross; working with the Modoc County Historical Society; field and stream trout restoration work, restoration of local historical buildings at he and PamÕs own expense, and providing free home repairs for elderly residents.

Mr. Price was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He also sailed in the Trans-Pacific race three times around the world. He will be cremated and his ashes spread over his ranch outside Alturas in the coming spring. A quiet ceremony will be held at that time.

Condolences may be sent to Pam Price, 2122 Crossroads Circle, Oak Harbor, WA 98277.

Sally Susan Hunter

Cedarville resident Sally Susan Hunter passed away December 23, 2000 in Walla Walla, Wash., where she had been making an extended stay. She was 37. No cause of death was provided by her family.

She was born January 18, 1963 in Frenchtown Quebec, Canada to Lois and Robert Beaudoin. She lived all over the world while growing up. Sally loved horses and she obtained her trainers license for training thoroughbred race horses. She also obtained her nurse's license. She had a great love for the elderly. An accomplished musician, she studied music in Europe and loved to play classical piano. Most of all she loved her children and living in the ranching community of Cedarville, where she had made her home for the past year and a half. She was divorced.

She is survived by a daughter Katie Hunter of Mt. Vernon, Ore.; twin infant son Wyatt Bordwell of Mt. Vernon, Ore. and her sister Juli Lott of John Day, Oregon. She was preceded in death by her daughter Emily, son Nathan, infant son Ethan, and granddaughter Brittany.

A private family service was held. Mrs. Hunter is interred at a cemetery in Hermiston, Ore.

Michele Marie Akers

Michele Marie Akers, owner of the Adin Inn in Adin, Calif., passed away Tuesday morning, January 2, 2001 at 5:30 a.m. at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Calif., from health complications which resulted in internal bleeding. She was 43.

Born Michele Marie Pierce on May 8, 1957, in Utah, she had told friends in later years, that she was raised as a Catholic among a Mormon community. She passed her driver's license test in Montana and worked for the Gallatin National Forest in Montana under the name of Michele Russell, her first husband's last name. She was a commissary manager, injury compensation officer and obligation officer in 1981. After moving to California, she enrolled at Pasadena Community College in the Spring of 1987.

Michele worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratories in Southern California where she met and married Charles Akers, who also worked for the lab. They shared 13 years of marriage and moved to Adin five and a half years ago, when they purchased the Adin Inn. After her husband died on May 19, 1999, Michele continued to operate the business. She hosted pool tournaments at the Adin Inn during Big Valley Days each summer that she owned the business. She also won first place in doubles during the Big Valley Days 2000 celebration.

Mrs. Akers supported many charities including the Leukemia, Lymphoma and Cancer Societies, American Heart Association. She was a member of Adin Chamber of Commerce. She loved her pets and called her two dogs and three cats, her "babies." She would often take her dogs for walks along nearby Rush Creek.

She enjoyed taking photographs and used both black and white and color film. She also wrote poetry and short stories. Her artistic and literary talents impressed her friends and family. Because she loved Rush Creek and its setting, friends have chosen the setting to hold a memorial service. The service will be held at the Lower Rush Creek Campgrounds on the Modoc National Forest near Adin, on Saturday, Jan. 6 at 1:00 p.m.

A potluck and celebration of life gathering will follow at Adin Inn. She is survived by her mother Madeline Pierce of Las Vegas, Nev.; two sisters, Terrie and Jeanie; brother-in-law Ron Akers in Menifeg, Calif. and a stepdaughter Heather Akers Channel, in addition to many friends. Donations may be sent to the Adin Inn, P.O. Box 379, Adin, CA 96006 or to a charity of choice.

Andrew Haskell Parks

Andrew Haskell Parks was born to Phineas and Anna Parks on November 27, 1912, seven miles south of Adin, California on Willow Creek. He passed away on December 26, 2000 at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Calif. from natural causes, at the age of 88 years.

His whole life was spent ranching on Willow Creek. He began riding the range at the age of nine. He loved the animals, and riding the open range, tracking cows with family and friends. He also took great pleasure in mowing a good field of hay. Mr. Parks was a graduate of Providence Elementary and Big Valley Joint Union High School in Adin.

On October 5, 1937 he married Devona Wolter in Reno, Nevada. Haskell's first love and total dedication was to his family. He and Devona shared 63 years of marriage.

Mr. Parks was a life-long member of the Providence Farm Bureau; a director of the Fall River-Big Valley Cattlemen's Association, a director of the Pit River Soil Conservation District, and the Adin Cemetery District. He served as an advisory board member with the Modoc National Forest, as a school board trustee for Big Valley Joint Unified School District and as an honorary member of the Big Valley Future Farmers of America Chapter. He was also a member of the California Farm Bureau.

He was born one mile from the residence where he lived with his wife Devona. He is survived by his wife Devona Parks of Adin, Calif.; sister Reita Bassett and brother-in-law Earl of Mt. Shasta, Calif.; his children, daughter Darla Mae Bartell and husband Bob of Sprague River, Ore.; son Jerry and wife Inesse Parks of Adin; daughter Belva Kay Landes and husband Tom of Lookout; grandchildren Brynina Coronado of Fairbanks, Alaska; Edward Bartell of Sprague River, Ore.; Julie Gagnon and Buck Parks of Adin; four great-grandchildren Kyle, Brett, Taryn and Natalie Rose; numerous nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents and one sister, Bertha.

Services were held Tuesday, Jan. 2 at 2:00 p.m. with the Rev. Calvin Godman of Assembly of God, Susanville conducting the service at the Adin Cemetery in Adin. Contributions may be made to the Fall River-Big Valley Cattlemen's Association Scholarship Fund, care of Earnest Bruce, Box 66, McArthur, Calif. 96056 or to a charity of one's choice. McDonaldÕs Chapel handled the arrangements.

Sports

Modoc wrestlers head to tough Anderson Invite

Modoc's wrestling team is heading to the tough Anderson High School Invitational Friday and Saturday and coach Shaun Wood thinks this is one of the best.

Wood will be without the services of his top 125-pounder Robert Flournoy and another top wrestler in Robert Veverka. Both are out this week because of shoulder injuries. He expects Blake Wilson at 215 pounds and Tony Willis at heavyweight to do well, but both will have their work cut out for them. Wilson will have an extremely strong competitor from Wooster High School in Reno to contend with this week.

Wood feels that 189 pound Ross Lundgren will do well figures David Lutz and Jesse Duran will be able to place. He also expects good things from Billy Moriarity, Jaafar Mirholi and Roger Cronley. The following week the Braves will be favored to win the Burney Invitational.

Lack of snow closes ski hill

The Cedar Pass Ski Park is suffering form a lack of snow and will not be able to open the weekend of January 6-7. It will also remained closed the weekend of January 13-14 if it doesn't receive a sufficient amount of snow. The last two weekends had great participation at the hill with over 200 participants. Those two weekends were bolstered by the Health Education About Tobacco program in Modoc who allowed skiers under age 17 to ski free. For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323.

Braves start SCL against Weed

The Weed Cougars will be the first team in the Shasta Cascade League the Braves will face, tomorrow night here at home. The Braves aren't expecting Weed to have any teams that will be forces to reckon with, but the same can't be said about the rest of the league. Even though Weed doesn't appear to be a threat "the boy's have their work cut out for them," said Varsity boys coach Lane Bates.

Trinity, Burney and Etna all seem to have well developed teams that will make it hard for the Braves to come out on top. Mt. Shasta looks to be the strongest team in the league so far. The Bears have returned all of last years starters and are at the top of their game.

"Overall this years league is pretty well balanced," commented Bates. Bates is working on conditioning, after the Braves two week winter vacation. Bates is also focusing a lot on full court pressure in hopes that it might stimulate some better results in the first halves.

The Lady Braves, however, won't have such an easy time cruising through this year's basketball season as they have in years past. Defensively the team hasn't lost it's ability to penetrate, but as for it's offense "their aren't many players this year that are consistently making baskets for us," said Mike Martin, "and also the leagues teams have really improved." Etna, Burney, and Trinity are at the top along with the Braves in competition for the league championship. Trinity has a big team which has been doing well so far, under their new coach's leadership. Burney's man power alone might also seem to be a problem for the Lady Braves this season. Burney beat Portola earlier in the season by 10 points, and Portola captured a win over Modoc by 15 points weeks ago. "And both Trinity and Etna appear to be better teams than Burney's," said Martin. Etna, though, might very well be the one team to beat. The Lions had a good season last year, and will undoubtedly do the same this year since they have returned all of last year's players.

Both Bates and Martin don't really know what to expect until the second time around with this year's teams, but they both expect that their teams will have to work hard if they want a shot at the 2001 SCL title.

Youth basketball begins

TFL youth basketball league begins this weekend with scrimmages in all four divisions. Seventh and Eighth boys are set for Friday night from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Fifth and sixth boys are set for 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday. Fifth through eighth grade girls are scheduled for 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday. All scrimmages are at the Middle School gym. Signups are still being accepted.

"If you haven't yet signed up, just come to the gym at the scheduled scrimmage time with a parent, and we will complete your signup before the game begins," said league president Kip Lybarger. "There are sponserships available to cover the $15 entry fee, so we hope that all interested young adults will sign up. We especially need more girls to fill out teams in the two girl's divisions. If you played school ball, or just want a weekend activity, come join the fun and improve your basketball skills."

Scrimmages will take place again next Saturday. The following week, teams will be selected and league play begins. Uniforms are on order, and several adults have volunteered for coaching and officiating duties. If anyone has a question, or would like a signup sheet, please call Kip Lybarger at 233-2453 or Suzie Philpott at 233-5801. League vice president David Nield will be calling all players that have signed up, to remind them of starting times this weekend. TFL Youth Football uniforms are sponsored by the Tobacco Free Program and the gym availability is sponsored by CLOAK.

Top

January 11, 2001

NCA for Black Rock desert signed

NCA for Black Rock desert signed, passed Designation of about 1.2 million acres in Nevada as a National Conservation Area is generally gaining accolades, along with some nay-sayers. But for Susan Stokke, the Bureau of Land Management Surprise Valley Resource Area manager, the designate could work out well for the area.

The U.S. House and Senate passed the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area Act of 2000 in mid December and President Clinton signed it into law on Dec. 21. The Act establishes a little more than 795,000 acres as national conservation area and about 755,000 aces as wilderness. About 379,000 acres of wilderness is within the NCA.

Stokke said a recent meeting with the Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce was very positive. She hopes to work with the Chamber to help establish the historic garage in Cedarville as an Emigrant Trails Museum and help to provide for a visitor center and interpretation area. Those items will depend on funding mechanisms in the future.

The new MCA will be administered jointly by the Winnemucca and Surprise Valley offices of the BLM. The BLM will be working over the next three years to establish a management plan for the NCA and wilderness and Stokke said the public will be heavily involved in that process.

The NCA had stiff opposition from area ranchers, off-road enthusiasts and outdoor recreation groups, who were concerned about access and a loss of use. Stokke said there will be some changes in the new wilderness areas since motorized vehicular travel is not allowed in wilderness. But she pointed out, in the case of High Rock Canyon, the road through the Canyon will remain open as it is, with the Wilderness area on either side of the road. And access to private lands within the NCA will be kept open.

While the bill prohibits most mining, geothermal activities and new roads across the land, grazing, hunting and recreational activities could continue on existing roads and trails. Livestock grazing will continue in the NCA and in the Wilderness areas, all 10 of them. In addition, festivals like the Burning Man, which operate under special use permits, will be allowed to continue. While existing mineral development continues, the NCA lands are withdrawn from mineral development. Stokke explained that NCAs offer protection a notch below national monuments and parks.

The author of the bill, Senator Richard Bryan, Nevada, calls the designation "a huge victory for not only every Nevadan, but every American," he said. "This Act will allow countless future generations to enjoy, study and marvel at this unique landscape, as well as maintaining an important part of our western heritage -- the emigrant experience."

The Act protects about 120 miles of emigrant trails, from Rye Patch Reservoir, north through the Black Rock Desert and Mud Meadows, and then west through Fly Canyon and High Rock Canyon, ending near Vya, Nevada. According to the BLM, the resources found in the new NCA and adjacent wilderness areas include segments of historic California Emigrant Trails and trails used by John C. Fremont with settings nearly unchanged from pioneer days, including wagon wheel ruts, historic inscriptions and artifacts along the way, and the Black Rock Desert Playas, one of the largest playas in the world.

The playa is important to off-highway vehicle uses, land sailors, and has been the site of world land speed records, target shooting and the famous Burning Man festival. The area includes hot springs, cultural sites of Native Americans, unique transient dunes and great vistas.

The 10 new wilderness areas created by the act include: Black Rock Desert Wilderness, North Jackson Mountains Wilderness, South Jackson Mountains Wilderness, Pahute Peak Wilderness, North Black Rock Range Wilderness, East Fork High Rock Canyon Wilderness, High Rock Lake Wilderness, Little High Rock Canyon Wilderness, High Rock Canyon Wilderness and the Calico Mountains Wilderness. Forest protection plans don't affect much in Modoc President Bill Clinton's national forest protection plan, announced January 5, really won't have much impact on the Modoc National Forest.

According to Modoc National Forest Information Officer Nancy Gardner, the plan addresses 201,600 acres of the forest's 1.65 million acres, but doesn't change management on those acres. According to Gardner, those acres are in current roadless management areas and she doesn't see any changes because of the Clinton proposal. She said there will be some issues coming up in the near future regarding the overall road management plan on the forest, but those will be open for public comment and information.

The roads plan has created quite a lot of local public interest because of road usage and access questions. Those issues will be addressed during public meetings. Last week, Clinton set his forest policy in place, which effectively bans road building in 58.5 million acres of National Forests where no roads currently exist.

Proponents of logging feel that policy will take those millions of acres of timber off the market. The Modoc County Land Use Committee is looking into the policy, but Gardner said she doesn't see any real impacts on the Modoc National Forest. She said timber harvests in the works now, although few, will continue n present course. Modoc's timber harvest, as with much of the west, has dropped dramatically over the past decade. In 1995, the timber harvest on the Modoc National Forest was 49 million board feet and that bumped up to 58 million in 1996. From that point on timber harvest has been in a steady decline. In 1997 47 million board feet were harvested that dropped to 40 million in 1998 and crashed to 14 million in 1999.

Last year, there were eight million board feet harvested. Carol Sharp, MNF Information assistant said that th forest predicts a 10 million board feet per year harvest over th next five years. Of that total, she said two million board feet are fuelwood. Sharp said timber officials don't believe Clinton's latest policy will have any impact because none of the proposed sales are in roadless areas.

MNF seeks many more firefighters

The Forest Service is aggressively recruiting wildland firefighters, hoping to hire as many as 3,500 nationwide. California will get at least 1,000 additional full-time and temporary workers over the next three years. The Modoc National Forest expects to hire 45 summer temporaries, as hotshot crew and engine crewmembers, and 14 permanent firefighters.

Crews will be stationed in Alturas, Canby, Cedarville, Adin, Tulelake and other fire stations on the Forest. Applications for permanent firefighting positions must be postmarked by Friday, January 19.

Selections for summer temporary firefighting positions will begin in February. The Forest Service is encouraging all interested to apply now. The Modoc National Forest will hold an Open House for interested applicants Tuesday, January 16, in the Conference Room of the Modoc National Forest, 800 West 12th Street, Alturas, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m Forest Service recruiters and firefighters will be available to answer questions and assist applicants.

To apply, one must be a US citizen and 18 years or older at the time of employment and have the ability to pass an arduous physical test. For information contact Barbara Burrows, Human Resource Officer, 233-8711 or Chuck McElwain, Deputy Fire Management Officer, 233-8802.

MJUSD hires new Director of Technology

By Nora Russell

Modoc Joint Unified School District recently hired Jenave Wilson as its new Director of Technology.

Wilson came to Alturas from Alameda, Calif. where she worked teaching customers how to set up technology systems built by Newtech, a company that she and seven partners built together. The company has since splintered with the partners moving in different career directions. "There are still pieces of the company out there with my name connected to them," Wilson said.

Being hired as Director of Technology has allowed Wilson to fulfill her dream of moving to this area. Wilson's mother, Paula Wilson, has lived in Surprise Valley for many years and co-owned the Tumbleweed Cafe. Though it was the tragic death of her brother in a car accident on Cedar Pass that introduced Wilson to Surprise Valley during an extended stay in 1997, the end result was a growing love of the valley and desire to live there.

Wilson's fascination with computers began in high school when she spent summers as a word-processor for a law firm. Following high school, she studied at Heald College in the Bay Area, earning a dual degree in computers and electronics.

Just a few weeks into her job at Modoc County School District, Wilson is in the process of becoming acquainted with the people and technology she'll be working with. Between the time of her interview and accepting the job, Wilson brushed up on her knowledge of Novell, the network system used by the district. She will also attend a two-part intensive training session with Novell in the near future.

Dealing with bugs and glitches and fixing bandaids and patches previously placed on the system are things that have kept Wilson busy since she started her job the end of December. "It's important to do these things now. I need to know that the foundation is solid before we build up," she said. "Besides, I love troubleshooting." Wilson supervises computer technicians, Bert Trevail and Gerry Thomas. "My goal is that we'll work together well as a team," Wilson stated.

Wilson plans to spend the month of January meeting with each of the teachers at all the different school sites. "I want them to tell me what their computer needs are," Wilson explained. "I want everyone to feel good about their computers and be comfortable using them. I want them to know that I'm available to help with whatever questions they may have."

Excitement was evident in Wilson's voice as she described ideas and goals forming in her mind for the district. From building a district-wide website where parents can chat with teachers online to starting an intern program for high school seniors interested in computers.

"I'm very happy to be here," Wilson said. "I love living here; the people are great. Dr. Jolly has been encouraging and our technical team is very hard working."

Old Post Office to deliver new services

The old and vacant Alturas Post Office on Main Street is getting an overhaul, new residents and expects to reopen with a newly-located set of services for the public, possibly by Friday, Jan. 19. As of late Wednesday afternoon, the opening date was not official.

The new Alturas center will provide the "one stop" offices of Alliance for Workforce Development, Inc. and a visible Employment Development Department to the Main Street complex, which is located across from the new Alturas Post Office. The agencies/partners are moving from the New Directions building, owned by Modoc Joint Unified School District, into the new quarters, which offer more space, visibility, ease of access, and plenty of parking for the public.

"The landlord is putting major effort and a considerable amount of money into renovating the building, and it's just the right size - not too large and not too small for us. We feel good about this," said Gary Corderman, Executive Director for Alliance for Workforce Development. A five-year lease agreement has been signed, he added.

The new and prime location has already drawn customers seeking services to stop by the yet, unfinished and unopened center. Phones and computer lines were to be installed in the coming days and only a few desks were on the floor as of Wednesday. When the center opens, Corderman says 10 computers will be open to the public's use, along with an array of workforce development services for the public, job seekers, businesses and organizations, in addition to some other "exciting possibilities," which Corderman said he will discuss with the Record soon. "We will hold an open house for the public, sometime in March," he added.

Obituaries

Norman Albert Schreiber, Sr.

Norman Albert Schreiber, Sr. passed away at the Surprise Valley Hospital in Cedarville, Calif. on December 11, 2000, just eight days shy of his 71st birthday.

Services were held at the Lake City Baptist Church with a military graveside service conducted by the Veterans of Foreign Wars 7888 at the Lake City Cemetery. Family and friends gathered at the Lake City Fire Hall, following the service.

Norman was born December 19, 1929 in Visalia, Calif. to Albert and Frieda Miller Schreiber. He grew up in central California and settled in Clovis where he completed his education. After serving two years in the U.S. Navy, Norman attended Fresno Community College for two years. He married Moyna Hickman in Fresno on Easter Sunday, 1950. They lived in the Visalia, Fresno area until 1963 when they moved to Surprise Valley.

Mr. Schreiber stayed busy working as a mechanic on various ranches in the Surprise Valley area until his death. "He was a bib over-all kind of guy," his daughter Lynit recalled, fondly. He was also an avid fisherman and "potential politician," as a member of the Libertarian Party.

Mr. Schreiber will be sorely missed by his many friends and those family members he leaves behind which include his son Bert of Nampa, Idaho; daughters Lynit Pearce of Cedarville and Arlene Schreiber of Lone Pine, Calif.; brothers Bud and John Schreiber of Cedarville, Calif.; sisters Melinda Kirby of Burney and Elaine Purves of Sparks, Nev.; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren and his special friend Carol. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Moyna of 38 years, who passed away in 1988, and a daughter Cheryl this past July 2000.

The family is grateful to their neighbor, Matt Brown of Heritage Woodworking in Cedarville, who created the beautiful handcrafted solid pine casket for their loved one. Memorial donations may be directed to the Surprise Valley Community Hospital, Cedarville, Calif. 96104.

Sports

Modoc's Willis wins at Anderson event

Modoc's heavyweight, Tony Willis continued his unbeaten string and cemented his number one ranking in the North Section by winning the heavyweight division at the prestigious Anderson Invitational last weekend.

The Braves' Blake Wilson also staked his claim to the number one ranking in the North even though he placed second at Anderson. Wilson lost the finals match to Tony Espinosa, out of Wooster High in Reno. Espinosa is rated one of the top wrestlers in the west. He's ranked number one in the nation in freestyle. Wilson beat all other wrestlers out of CaliforniaÕs North Section. The Braves finished eighth out of 40 teams, mostly big schools, in the invitational. Coach Shaun Wood has said the Anderson Invitational is often tougher than the section tournament. Modoc's 189 pounder,

Ross Lundgren also had a very good tournament, finishing fourth. That moved him up to number four in the section rankings. David Lutz took sixth at 140 pounds and Jesse Duran was seventh at 135 pounds. Landon Brown won the hardluck bracket at 145 pounds. Modoc wrestled without two of its top guys, Robert Flournoy and Robert Veverka, who both had shoulder injuries.

The Braves are ranked number one in small schools and number five overall in the North Section. Wood feels his team has a good shot and small school and a better than average shot at winning large schools sectionals this season. The Braves head to the Burney Invitational this weekend as the odds-on favorite to win the team title. Wood may have his full contingent of wrestlers available for this tourney. If so, said Wood, they will be very hard for any school at Burney to beat.

Modoc varsity whips Weed and Burney

The Modoc Braves varsity teams, brought home wins this week against the Weed Cougars and Burney Raiders, in their opening week of SCL play. The JV teams, however, didn't fare so well in their first SCL game's of the year. Both of Modoc's JV teams suffered close losses.

The Lady Braves didn't have a hard time beating Weed, Friday night. Modoc intimidated Weed with their defense as well as at the basket. The Cougars lack a gunslingers accounted for it's lack of points through out the game, which made it easy for the Braves to take the lead.

The Braves led by two points in the first quarter and went ahead in the second to widen the gap to 23 to 15. The Cougars weren't able to raise their aggression level after the half and fell short to Modoc's demanding offense. Modoc's height underneath the basket led by Stephanie McMaster, Katelyn Tate and varsity newcomer Jennifer Davis, guaranteed a win of 50-27. The Varsity girls team welcomed two newcomers to their team this week, Freshmen, Kristen Taylor and Jennifer Davis who were chosen by Martin to move up.

The Cougars came out and pressured Modoc's varsity boys with a full court press, which resulted in less time at the basket Friday night. That didn't phase the Braves much, they still managed to keep up and by quarter's end the score was 18 - 18.

Modoc remained on the Cougars tail up until Weed began to shoot from the free throw line, where five of Weed's 17 points were made. The Braves did not attempt any shots from the free throw line which is why they fell two points behind by the end of the half. But by the beginning of the third quarter it was obvious that the Braves weren't going to suffer another loss. The Braves toughened up their defense which kept Weed's scoring to a minimum. The Braves on the other hand racked up most of their points that night in the third quarter, 27 to Weed's 8. By period's end Modoc had a commanding lead of 60 to 43.

The Braves kept their lead over the Cougars scoring 17 points in the fourth triumphing over Weed, 77 to 61. The Braves headed on to Burney with one SCL win under their belt.

Girls varsity coach Mike Martin expected Burney to be a tough team but he was proved wrong, Tuesday night on the Raider's home court. "We dominated the game from start to finish," commented Martin. The Lady Braves over powered the ladies of Burney with well played offense and defense. Modoc came out and scored 21 points alone in the first quarter, where as Burney only scored six, four of which were at the foul line.

By half-time the Braves were up 35 to 15. The Lady Braves scored less in the second part of the game but still kept their lead. The Lady Braves proved to be a top SCL team with their win of 59-34. Jessica Kern had the most points of the week totaling up to 28 points. Followed by Stephanie Mc Master who had 24 points through out the week.

Burney was one of a few teams that the Lane Bates thought would be tough for the Braves to overcome for a win. And that was confirmed Tuesday night at Burney. The Braves got a view of what they were up against in the first quarter, where Burney scored 15 points to Modoc's seven.

Bates and his team knew what had to be done in order for the Braves to take a win. And the Braves got in done in the second period when they made eight of ten foul shots plus another 14 points. The Braves caught up to the Raiders by the end of the half and were down by only one basket (29-31).

The Braves cracked down on the Raider's offense while Burney helped out the Braves by playing sloppy defense. The Braves were fouled some 17 times in the second quarter and the Braves gained 14 points alone from free throws.

All that time at the foul line gave the Braves all the rest they needed in order to go ahead and take over the lead by the end of the third period 45-40. Later, Modoc went on to triumph over the Raiders 67-54.

Blake Thorn led the Braves in scoring this week with 43 points. Senior, Kris Server had a good week scoring 31 an led the team in free throws. And Tim Lauppe helped out with 31 points of his own. The JV teams suffered two close losses this week against Weed and Burney. The JV boys led in the first half in both games this week. The boys lost their momentum after the break and went on to lose 47 to 50, to the cougars.

Against the Burney Raiders JV headed into overtime but went on to lose by a mere four points. JV"s Jack Britton lead the team in scoring with a combined score of 40 points.

Girls JV were down by the half, 18-24. Modoc lost the game 42-31. The Raiders also did some damage to the Braves. By the end of the first half the were up by four but only scored eight points in the second half. The girls went on to lose 24-35.

Hornets sting Bulldogs

Surprise Valley's Hornets stung the Butte Valley Bulldogs 70-62 in Evergreen League action last weekend.

The Hornets jumped out to a 15-0 first period lead and then ended the quarter up 23-12. By halftime, the Hornets led 35-28. Both teams played well in the third, scoring 20 each and the Hornets outscored the Bulldogs 15-14 in the fourth.

Joel Ruiz led Surprise Valley with 22 points, Michael Carpenter chipped in 17 and Ivan Rangel added 14.

Butte Valley won the junior varsity boys game 65-34. Loren Harris led Surprise Valley with 14 and Adam Evans added 10. Tuesday night, Big Valley's Cardinals dropped the Hornets in Cedarville 77-50, behind Calvin JacksonÕs 27-point night. The game was close after one with Big Valley leading 18-17, but two of the Hornet starters, Carpenter and Rangel picked up three fouls in the opening period and sat out most of the second and third periods. Big Valley took advantage and led 37-27 by half. A slow third period found the Cards going up 58-34 and going on for the win.

Ruiz again led the Hornets with 17 points, Ryan Burresch added 13 and Rangel had 12. The Cards' David House had 13 points and Chris Blue added 11.

The Hornets travel to McCloud Friday night and come home to meet Dunsmuir Saturday with game time set for 1:30 p.m.

Hornet girls top Butte Valley

The Hornets of Surprise Valley beat the Bulldogs of Butte Valley girls 47-32 Saturday to start a run for the Evergreen League title. The game started slowly, with Surprise Valley up 6-4 after one and 21-14 at the half. The Hornets stepped it up in the third, taking a 37-19 lead and added 10 in the fourth to Butte Valley's 13. Camryn Mullen led the Hornets with 16 points, Traci Reeves added 12 and Cassie Cockrell netted 11.

The Hornets also beat Big Valley in a crucial game Tuesday night, but no details were reported to the Record.

Ski hill to open this weekend

The Cedar Pass Snow Park will open the weekend of January 13-14 and is expecting more snow from this current round of storms. The snow park offers free lift tickets, free rental and a free lesson to first time skiers on their first day. They have plenty of skis, boots and snowboards, but people should bring their own snowboarding boots.

For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323, which will be updated daily.

Top

January 18, 2001

Serious accidents at Pencil Road intersection

There were two very serious vehicle accidents over the week at the intersection of U.S. 395 and Pencil Road, about one mile east of Alturas.

The California Highway Patrol reports major injuries in a two-car crash at the intersection Monday at 12:55 p.m. on a cold but clear day.

A 1989 Toyota Camry driven by Judith Porter, 76, of Alturas was southbound and stopped at the Pencil Road stop sign. She apparently did not see a 1997 Honda driven by Martha Morey, 36, of Elverta, Ca. approaching on U.S. 395 and pulled into the path of that vehicle. The Honda SUV hit the front of the Porter vehicle. Porter, who sustained major injuries, was transported by ambulance to Modoc Medical Center and then flown to Redding for further care. Morey sustained unknown spinal injuries and was flown to Sutter Trauma in Roseville.

A passenger in the Porter vehicle, Kieren Porter, age unknown, was not hurt. Three passengers in the Morey vehicle sustained minor injuries, Erika Pinola, 19, Elverta, Marco Juarez, 21, Elverta and Jacob Pinola, age one, also of Elverta.

On Friday, January 12, an accident at the same location resulted in only minor injuries, but heavy damage to one vehicle. The CHP reports that Bruno Block, 71, Alturas was driving a 1999 Ford Ranger southbound on Pencil Road and because of ice on the road slid through the stop sign at U.S. 395, into the path of a 1993 Ford Explorer driven by Sheila Trevail, 48, also of Alturas. Trevail attempted to avoid the Block vehicle, but made contact and lost control, left the road and rolled over. She sustained minor injuries as did a 12-year-old passenger in the vehicle. Block was not hurt.

There were no injuries in a single vehicle accident January 14, 5:45 p.m. on Highway 395 just south of Lyneta Road. According to reports, Kristen Jarvie, 26, Bonanza, Or., was driving 1989 Dodge Ram van and attempted to pass a truck at about 65 m.p.h. He lost traction, ran off the left side of the road and rolled. The van came to rest on its wheels.

Moderate injuries were reported in a single car accident on Highway 395 north of Ash Valley Road Jan. 11, 9:20 p.m. The CHP reports that Bettina Lourenco, 44, Alturas was driving a 1993 Saturn at about 60 m.p.h.. The roadway was icy and she lost control, left the road and struck the perimeter fence. Two passengers in the vehicle, Tammy Trammel, 21, Alturas and Richard Wyatt, 31, Alturas, sustained minor injuries. All were wearing seatbelts. They were treated at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas.

County fares well in Sierra Nevada plan

Modoc County and the Modoc National Forest may have fared better than other counties and forests included in the Sierra Nevada Forest Management plan.

The Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement on the plan was released last week by the U.S. Forest Service, which covers the Modoc, Humboldt-Toyiabe, Lassen, Plumas, Tahoe, Eldorado, Stanislaus, Sierra, Inyo and Sequoia National Forests and the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.

On Tuesday, Modoc National Forest Supervisor Dan Chisolm told the Modoc County Board of Supervisors that the county's efforts, largely through its Land Use Committee, have proved fruitful. He said Modoc was the only county involved that actually was successful in many of its arguments and stances.

Supervisor Nancy Huffman said the board was very appreciative of the Forest Service and its staff for the assistance and cooperation throughout the process, which has been long and tedious.

Chisolm explained that the county's active stance in the process and its ability to provide logical alternatives served to lessen some of the local impacts of the plan.

Modoc was actually singled out in the Record of Decision in several areas where existing management plans or processes will continue, outside of some of the provisions of the Sierra Nevada plan. Some of the areas include the continuation of the Experimental Stewardship Program, the Big Valley Sustained Yield Unit, continuation of the Hackamore Ecosystem Restoration and Enhancement Project, the Upper Pit River Watershed Restoration Porject, the Warner Mountain Rangeland Management Project, the Devil's Garden Wetlands project and the biological assessment on endangered suckers.

According to the Record of Decision, the Modoc National Forest and Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Valley Resource Area is home to one of three experimental stewardship projects in the nation. The multi-disciplinary, multi-agency and multi-interest committee explores new ideas and practices and develops innovative approaches to grazing. The technical advisory work of the group will be integrated into the adaptive management process of the new plan.

The Big Valley Sustained Yield Unit is one of just three remaining units which are designed to supply a sustained timber harvest to local communities. The MNF, Big Valley Lumber and the communities are working together on a plan to explore stewardship options and development of markets for non-traditional forest products.

Currently, there are four appeals to the Warner Mountain Rangeland Management project, but if the project survives the appeal process, it will continue as planned. That project aims to improve riparian areas on the Warners and manage grazing to protect those areas. Many of the appeals involve lack of current or future monitoring ability.

The Hackamore project includes over 15,000 acres of thinning in pine stands to accelerate development of, and maintain and protect existing late seral old growth habitat. It also includes over 19,000 acres of fuel treatments including prescribed fires to help with restoration of old growth timber.

The Upper Pit River Watershed Restoration Project is one of 11 national pilot projects selected to demonstrate state-of-the-art collaborative approaches to watershed management and restoration, encompassing over a half million acres of the Modoc National Forest. It will be allowed to continue on its course.

The Sierra plan also allows a project on about 15,000 acres of Devil's Garden to use heavy equipment to construct, maintain and enhance small dikes, dams, spillways and artificial islands for wetlands. Sagebrush, juniper and dry man-made meadow will be converted to wetlands. It is the largest wetlands development project in the National Forest System. It will continue.

Also allowed to continue is the biological assessment on the Lost River, shortnose and Modoc suckers, done by the Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Service. That issue deals with grazing standards and management activities that ensure the continued existence of those fish.

Modoc's stance from the beginning was the Modoc National Forest should not be a part of the Sierra Nevada Management Plan because the Modoc is not part of the traditional Sierra Nevada range. What would work in the Sierras, or even the environmental issues facing the Sierras doesn't always coincide with Modoc, whose geological traits are not in common.

In addition, the county argued it has shown a good working relationship with the Forest Service and many of the projects identified above were the results of those efforts and were good for both the Forest Service and the communities.

County takes step to move YMCA plan into process

The plan to build a YMCA in Alturas and establish a Parks and Recreation District may soon enter the official, if not long, approval process.

On Tuesday the Modoc County Board of Supervisors took the first step by moving to hold public meetings on the issue, preferably joint meetings with the Alturas City Council. A date for the meetings or hearings has not been set.

Prior to making an application to form the district, the county needs to reorganize LAFCO (the Local Agency Formation Commission) to adhere to new law which became effective January 1. What the County and City want to do now is hold official public meetings to determine whether there is adequate support for the proposed facility and also to address issues where people may not be supportive.

The proponents of the YMCA, led by Gavin Kleiman, Modoc Medical Center Physical Therapist and local veterinarian Joe Catania, told the Board Tuesday that the building of the facility would enhance the quality of life in Modoc and would be a four-season facility. What's in the works is a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms. The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million.

Kleiman said the committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about 10 months, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. However, he said, the district needs to be formed and a small assessment passed first.

What the committee is proposing is an assessment of $19 per year, per property owner (not parcel) only within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District. That assessment would cover the cost of running the facility each year.

While the issue is a ways off, both the formation of the Recreation District and the tax question will have to go to a vote of the people of the proposed district. In order to pass, the tax issue must receive a two-thirds majority of the voters.

According to Kleiman, the facility will be used by all Modoc residents, from kids to senior citizens and all those in between. The committee expects the tax assessment to bring in $209,000 annually, with other estimated income coming from fees ($50,000), programs ($27,000), rental income ($10,000), sales ($2,000), the city ($21,000), and the hospital ($8,000).

The reason the committee is working towards a YMCA facility, other than one without that connection, is because of YMCA's expertise in planning and blueprints, program development, insurance discounts and its reputation.

A representative from the YMCA has been in Alturas and met with the committee early on. He also toured the community and has offered support and advice to the committee.

Basically, if the county and city decide to move forward on the project after the initial public hearings they would adopt a resolution of application which would be reviewed by LAFCO. Following public hearings, LAFCO, will consider the feasibility of the proposal, the need for the services and so on and prepare the proposal analysis. Another public hearing would be held and the board would decide whether to send the proposal to a vote of the people. According to County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell, the cost of the initial application and the election would be borne by the city and county. He expects the application process, plus the reorganization of LAFCO to cost as much as $20,000 and a special election between $9,000 and $12,000. The city and county could share in those costs as well as the district, if approved.

Maxwell said the new LAFCO law makes the entity neutral, independent and balanced in representation for counties, cities and special districts. The members would be as follows: two from the county, two from the city, two from special districts and one public member. LAFCO would select its own executive officer and conflict of interest laws would apply to LAFCO members and staffs. Additionally, operational costs are borne jointly and equally by each appointing category.

Mountain lion reported in town

Alturas Police investigated a mountain lion sighting on East 12th Street Tuesday night, but did not find the animal.

The call came in about 8:30 p.m. from two witnesses who reported seeing a lion walking down the street towards the El Rancho apartments. Police and Department of Fish and Game officials were unable to locate the animal or any sign. The ground was frozen. Police are cautioning residents to be aware of the sighting and report any future sighting immediately.

According to police, there have been four mountain lion sightings within the city limits over the past two years.

MJUSD school board gets good, okay news

By Nora Russell

The January meeting of the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees opened with a technology update given by Jenave Wilson, district director of technology.

Since accepting the position as director, Wilson and the district's technology team have been dealing with the fall-out from a major system breakdown in November.

Wilson explained that the servers are now up and all data will be maintained on a proxy server while the main server is being rebuilt layer by layer to provide a strong back-bone for the system. "Our goal right now is to create a backup for all district systems," she said. "That will give it stability. If any data is lost, we'll have the back up in a safe place."

An audit report for fiscal year ended June 30, 2000 was presented to the board by John Auman, of the accounting firm Haws, Theobald and Auman from Susanville. "I would like to commend the business office and administration for making the process easy, especially considering all the changes that took place with a new superintendent and business manager coming in during the year," Auman said, "The audit process was smoother than I anticipated."

The board voted unanimously to accept a donation of several hundred mouse pads from Interactive Learning Network and Kodak for use in the classrooms of the district.

Three new textbooks were given preliminary approval from the board for use in classrooms next school year. The books are: "Snow Falling on Cedars" by David Guterson for use as a supplementary text for English 11 and English Honors American Literature.

"The Language of Literature" published by McDougal Littell, was chosen by the Modoc High English Department for the ninth grade anthology. "Several texts were reviewed; McDougal Littell was selected for its timeliness, comprehensiveness, alignment with state standards, interest, and accessibility," stated Marie Neer in the request for textbook adoption to the board.

"Biology, Fifth Edition" has been chosen for use at Modoc High School.

"This is an AP (Accelerated Placement) book," explained Dr. Jolly, MJUSD Superintendent. "So it's college freshman material and we receive money from the state to purchase the textbooks." "It all goes back to test scores. Some people criticize this, but it is leading to good things like new books to meet the increased standards," he explained, referring to the emphasis that California Governor Davis has placed on the Stanford 9 achievement test scores of 1999 and 2000.

All three books will be on display at the District Office for 30 days, so they can be evaluated by the public before the final adoption as District textbooks at the February board meeting.

'Festival of Four,' concert is rare treat at Niles Theater Wednesday

The incredible musical talents of the quartet, "Festival of Four" will combine classical and Flamenco guitar with classical and ethnic flute in a single night's performance at the A.C.T. Niles Theater on Wednesday, Jan. 24. The concert will start at 7:30 p.m.

Arrangements for the award winning artists to appear in Alturas, have been made by Modoc County Arts Council, with numerous sponsorships.

Tickets will be available at the door: $7 for adults; $5 for students and senior citizens.

Area school district students will learn about the "Festival of Four" during assemblies as part of the Arts in Education program from January 24 to 26 Their music can be heard on KCHO-FM, Chico at 103.5 FM now through January 24.

The origins of "Festival of Four" date back to the early 1980s, when classical guitarist and award winning recording artist, Richard Patterson, joined talents with Soviet-emigre Emanuil Sheynkman, the late renowned mandolin and balalaika virtuoso. The two formed the dou, Dvoika, which enjoyed success and toured throughout the U.S., Canada and Asia.

In 1992, Patterson organized a concert featuring Dvoika and invited guest artist Marc Teicholz, a classical guitarist and Guillermo Rios, a flamenco guitarist. The debut engagement produced a collaboration known as "A Festival of Strings."

In 1995, Sheynkman passed away and the musicians moved into a totally new direction and renamed itself "Festival of Four," with the addition of Chilean-born and Julliard School trained flutist, Viviana Guzman. Their unique blend of classical and ethnic music and imaginative arrangements of repertoire have received critical acclaim. Marc Teicholz, the classical guitarist in the group, has recorded for Menus and Music, George Lucas' Young Indiana Jones and is now recording for Naxos and Sugo Music. He teaches at the San Francisco Conservatory, the California Summer Arts Festival and the Weathersfield Music Festival in Vermont. He received a master's degree from Yale School of Music.

Guillermo Rios was a resident of Madrid, Spain for 17 years, where he studied flamenco guitar and spent six years performing in Madrid's flamenco clubs. He has been a featured soloist and lead accompanist with every major Spanish dance company in the U.S. He has performed numerous solo guitar concerts in Spain, Canada and the U.S., including New York's Carnegie Recital Hall. In 1991, he received a Ford Foundation Composition Grant which was the first such grant ever awarded to a flamenco artist.

Viviana Guzman, classical and ethnic flutist, is a native of Chile. She was the Principle Flute for Mikhail BaryshnikovÕs White Oak Dance Project. As a composer, she has worked with electronic music and musical theater productions and recently released a music video. Her degree is from Julliard School and undergraduate degree from Rice UniversityÕs Shepherd School of Music. She has studied with Jean-Pierre Rampal and James Galway.

Richard Patterson, composer and arranger for guitar, recently completed work on the soundtrack for the feature film "Little Odessa." He has been head of the Guitar Department at College of Notre Dame since 1982 and is Director of the Omni Foundation for the Performing Arts Guitar Series in San Francisco.

Instruments used:

The instruments used by the Festival of Four include the transverse flute, a keyed instrument and part of the woodwind family; the Kena or Quena, a vertically played reed flute dating back to the Incas of Central and South America; the Siku, a type of reed panpipe from the Incas, and also referred to as Zampo–a or Antara; classical guitar; flameno guitar, a slightly smaller than the classical guitar with wooden, violin-style tuning pegs.

Sponsors for this special engagement and school assemblies are Modoc County Office of Education, Modoc, Tulelake and Surprise Valley Joint Unified School Districts, Modoc County Arts Council, Alturas Community Theater and funded in part by the California Arts Council.

Obituaries

Jason Heath Boneck

Jason Heath Boneck was an active young man who managed to beat all the odds at the time he pulled through a liver transplant on October 20, 2000.

It was totally unexpected and following a bout of flu that the 26-year-old Jason passed away at his Cedarville, Calif. home on Saturday, January 13, 2001. "He was doing awesome with the transplant and we'd just talked to his doctors," described his wife. Jason had returned recently from the National Finals Rodeo. He lived a full life, for his young years, and was doing what he wanted to do. His plans for the new year included going back to school to get his diesel mechanic license.

"Everybody loved him. He was a great guy, with a great sense of humor," described his wife. "He was a great husband, a good provider and a very, very thoughtful person."

Jason met the love of his life in Luvina Shultz, who was still in high school at the time they met. He was just a year out of high school, having graduated from Surprise Valley High in 1994. The two knew that someday they would marry, which they did on August 8, 1998 in Reno, Nev.

While in high school, Jason was active in Future Farmers of America and participated in high school rodeo competition. He had been a bull rider since his teen years. It was something he loved doing, but was told he had to give up, because of his liver. He stopped riding bulls, but remained very involved around the sport. When Jason graduated from high school, he was honored with a Southern Oregon Kiwanis Club scholarship award.

He was born on November 26, 1974 in Reno, Nev. and was the middle child of the Boneck family. His family had always been very important to him.

He was known as a young man always on the go. Jason enjoyed riding all terrain vehicles on the weekends and was an avid collector of everything from miniature toy tractors to rodeo and Nascar memorabilia. He was working as a ranch manager and mechanic for Brown Farm Equipment in Cedarville.

Jason had made Modoc County his home for the past 12 years. He knew his community and folks he didn't even know, rallied for and cared about him and his family throughout his medical journey. "He was a great guy who would want people to remember him with all smiles and laughter," his wife told the Record.

He is survived by his wife Luvina Boneck of Cedarville; his parents Dave and Sharon Boneck of Lake City; brothers Robin Boneck of Las Vegas, Nev.; KCee, Paul and Josh Boneck, all of Lake City; sister Shawna Fournier of Santa Maria, Calif.; grandparents Lawrence and Dorris Hull of Reno, Nev.; great-grandmother Bonnie Newsom, Paradise, Calif.; and numerous nieces and in-laws.

The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will conduct services at the Cedarville Community Church in Cedarville on Monday, Jan. 22 at 11:00 a.m. Interment will follow at the Lake City Cemetery.

Pearl Barbara Nelson

Pearl Barbara Nelson, age 79, died peacefully on January 13, 2001. Born Pearl Stromme on June 15, 1921 to Samuel and Pearl Stromme in Yale, Oklahoma, she grew up and graduated from high school in Little Rock, Arkansas.

In 1939, Pearl moved back to Oklahoma, where she met and married Horace E. Nelson and they reared their three children. During World War II, the family moved to California, where she and her husband worked in aircraft manufacturing and they decided to stay. Mrs. Nelson was an avid bowler and actively participated in a bowling league until her health began to fail two years ago. She was preceded in death by her husband Horace in 1992, her parents, her brother Ben and grandson Paul.

Mrs. Nelson is survived by her son Charles Nelson of Alturas, Calif.; daughter Joan Houghtby and husband Bob of Likely, Calif.; daughter Carol Fitch and husband Jim of Missoula, Montana; sister-in-law Beatrice of Sulphur, Oklahoma; 14 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren.

Mrs. Nelson will be placed next to her husband of 53 years, at the Chapel of the Chimes Cemetery in Hayward, Calif.

Sports

Modoc wins Burney mat invitational

Modoc's Braves dominated the Burney Invitational Wrestling tournament over the weekend, winning the event, again, with 199.5 points over second-place Etna's 144. The next event is at Mazama, January 20. That meet will be more intense than Burney and should prove a better test for the Braves. The Braves had four individual champions at the Burney Invite. Top seeded Tony Willis won his heavyweight class, remaining unbeaten for the season. Also, top ranked 215 pound Blake Wilson won his weight class.

Robert Flournoy, back from injury, won his 125-pound division and Billy Moriarity won the 103 pound championship.

Taking second places for the Braves were Roger Cronley, 112 pounds and Jesse Duran, 135 pounds. Third places for the Braves went to Jaafar Mirlohi, 103 pounds, David Lutz, 140 pounds and Ross Lundgren, 189 pounds. Will Sagasser took fourth at 189 pounds, Landon Brown was fifth at 145 pounds and Morgan Dunn was fifth at heavyweight.

Team scores in Burney were: Modoc 199.5, Etna 144, Truckee 140.5, Crane 128.5, Corning 122.4, Quincy 102.5, Bonanza 91, Fall River 90.5, Burney 73, Middletown 72, Trinity 72, Lakeview 62 Modoc II 59, Tulelake 56, Biggs 34, Greenville 23, Bishop Quinn 22, Chester 21.5 and Portola 0.

Hornet boys split in league

The Surprise Valley Hornet boys team split in Evergreen League Action, losing a tough one to McCloud and then dropping one to the league favorites, Dunsmuir.

The Hornets have Tulelake at home Friday night and travel to Happy Camp Jan. 20.

Things were working right for the Hornets against Dunsmuir Saturday in Cedarville. Things started well as Surprise Valley opened with a 15-5 first quarter lead and led 31-18 by halftime. The Tigers tried to fight back in the second half, but the Hornets held them off, winning 54-43.

Michael Carpenter and Joel Ruiz led the Hornets with 14 points each, while Ryan Burresch added 13 and Ivan Rangel hit 11.

Dunsmuir won the junior varsity game 66-31.

In McCloud, the Hornets did well in the first half, trailing just 9-6 after one and 27-20 at the half. But McCloud outscored Surprise Valley 19-7 in the third quarter and held them off in the fourth 19-16 to win 62-46.

Carpenter led the scoring with 18, Burresch added seven, and Rangel and Ruiz each had five.

McCloud also won the junior varsity game, 50-31.

Top

January 25, 2001

Black out not expected in Modoc

While most of California is subjected to rolling blackouts and the situation is expected to get worse as summer's air conditioning season nears, Modoc may avoid those problems. But costs are projected to increase.

According to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation General Manager Dan Silveria, the fact that the northwest is tied more to northwest generated power grid than the Independent System Operator, ISO, in California makes the difference.

Most of California, especially those areas of Pacific Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison fall under the ISO, which controls that power grid. The ISO has called for the blackouts in the state. Modoc County is not a part of the ISO area, and PacifiCorps generates most of its power in the northwest.

PacifiCorp is called the energy crisis real and is asking that customers do their best to conserve electricity. Turning off uneccessary lights and lowering a thermostat to 68 degreees goes a long way to concerve power, states both SVEC and PacifiCorp.

"If every customer turned off one 60 watt light during the peak hours of 4 to 8 p.m., the regional demand would be reduced 90 megawatts," said PP&L. "That's enough power to supply about 45,000 homes in our region."

SVEC says lowering the thermostat from 70 degrees to 68 degrees would save a customer 3.1 percent on his electric bill. Conversely, setting it to 72 degrees would increase the bill by 6.2 percent.

Silveria said the he feels the problem is not with the amount of power available, but rather the manner in which the system is now run. He said there is plenty of power produced in the state to match the state's needs and that, contrary to some opinions, the usage has not jumped dramatically. He said the difference between power usage in December last year and this year amounts to only a one percent increase.

With deregulation came the separation of generating, transmission and distribution factions of electrical service. In the past, electrical companies handled and owned all three aspects and could made adjustments where needed to benefit the users. Those adjustments no longer happen.

"The generation arm is no longer concerned about the rate payers, they are running their system to benefit the investors," said Silveria. As far as SVEC is concerned, Silveria said he expects rates to increase by about 10 to 30 percent last this year, depending upon water storage in the Bonneville Power Administration area. He explained that the northwest power grid is primarily hydroelectric based while the southern California generation is generally thermally produced (oil, natural gas, nuclear).

The northwest power prices can be impacted, Silveria says, if a dry year continues. Normally, he said, hydroelectric plants produce enough power for the northwest and have extra for the south during good water years. If they donÕt and the northwest suppliers have to go to the power marketplace, rates will go up more than the projected 10 percent.

In the past, electric utility companies would plan for the future and coordinate shut downs of generating plants for repair and cooperate to supply necessary power. That just doesnÕt happen under the current system. The power market price could be on a daily or even an hourly basis, making the cost of power more expensive.

"We will be exposed to that market place if our hydroelectric generation can't keep with demand," said Silveria. "A poor water year will create higher prices in Bonneville's area."

 

County, FS look to fill new resource advisory committee

Modoc County is seeking members to fill a new 15-member Forest Service Resource Advisory Committee which will propose special projects on federal lands as a part of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Act passed late last year.

The County Board of Supervisors last week took the first step in moving forward on the issue by stating the boundaries the new RAC will deal with county boundaries not national forest boundaries. The committee will actually be appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture, based upon the recommendations the county and local forest.

The Act was passed by the federal legislature to stabilize payments to counties, and move those payments away from actual forest receipts. For the next six years, the Act guarantees Modoc County $1.8 million annually, well more than projected forest receipt. In the past Modoc received 25 percent of the receipts generated on the Modoc Forest, dominated by timber harvest. Those funds were split evenly between county roads and schools.

When the timber industry dried up, so did the funding. Modoc was helped by a spotted owl ruling that actually gave the county much more money than was actually being generated. But that rule's time was running out. According to Modoc Land Use Committee's Sean Curtis, the county and forest would like to have the new 15-member RAC appointed by April 1. It must be in place by April 28.

That means anyone interested should contact the Land Use Committee between now and February 14, or come to the February 14 meeting of the Land Use Committee. People may call the Modoc County Farm Bureau at 233-3276 to place their name into the ring.

The RAC will be a very important part of the new system, said Curtis. It will have to ability to advise and propose projects to the forest. What happens under the new act is that 15 to 20 percent of the county's funding goes through the RAC for projects.

"This RAC will have the ability to propose projects that help the forest resources but also will help Main Street," said Curtis. "It could be a real benefit to the economic condition of rural communities. The committee will take a real hands-on approach."

The committee has to have 15 members, in the following three categories and areas: category A, five members -- one who represents organized labor, one for developed outdoor recreation, off highway vehicle users or commercial recreation activities; one for energy and mineral development interests; one for commercial timber or who holds grazing permits; category B, five members -- one who represents nationally or locally recognized environmental organizations; one who represents regionally or locally recognized environmental organizations; one for dispersed recreational activities, archaeological and historical interests or nationally or regionally recognized wild horse and burro interest groups; and category C, five members who -- one who holds state elected office or their designee; one who holds county or local elected office; one who represents American Indian tribes; one who represents school officials or teachers; and one who represents the public at large.

"Although this Act presents a significant challenge to implement, it provides an excellent opportunity for the Forest Service to build better collaborative relationships with communities of place and interest, and local government officials," said Mike Dombeck, Chief of the Forest Service. "In doing so, we will advance ongoing efforts to restore watersheds, manage our roads system, protect our rural and urban communities from unnaturally intense wildfires an reconnect communities to their public lands through consensus approaches to stewardship, restoration and maintenance."

The Modoc Land Use Committee meeting is February 14, 1 p.m.. at the Farm Advisor's Office on West Fourth Street, Alturas.

 

Co-gen plant in works at Canby

A juniper wood co-generation plant is in the works at Canby and is currently starting through the Modoc County Planning Department.

MacDonald Forest Products of Alturas has been working on the plan for months and the six-megawatt producing facility will be located on their mill property in Canby.

The plant will burn juniper thinnings from the surrounding area and is projected to employ around 18 people as well as a number of people to harvest and supply juniper to the plant. According to Ed Washburn, of Forest Products Consulting of Redding, the plant will add more than $2 million annually to the local economy.

Plans are to have the plant on line by the summer of 2001, Washburn said. It will be constructed primarily from used surplus equipment.

"At the present time, juniper is burned in open fields," said Washburn. "By utilizing it for the co-generaton it helps with two problems. It supplies power for energy-starved Californian and eliminates the air pollution from open field burning." The plan is currently going through the planning department for necessary permits and study.

 

MJUSD and Alturas PD join forces to hire school officer

By Nora Russell

The Alturas Police Department and Modoc Joint Unified School District are considering a grant that would enable them to hire a full time police officer to be in the schools.

"This would be an officer hired by the Alturas Police Department, but assigned to the school district," Dr. Kevin Jolly, Superintendent of MJUSD, commented. "Many districts pay for police presence on their campuses, but, in the past, the Alturas Police Department has been gracious enough to have a patrol car in the area during games, etc."

Funding for the grant flows through the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) which was established in 1994 for the purpose of "increasing the number of community policing officers funded by 100,000; to promote the implementation of department-wide community policing in law enforcement agencies across the country; to help develop an infrastructure that will institutionalize and sustain community policing after Federal funding has ended; and to demonstrate and evaluate the ability of agencies practicing community policing to significantly improve the quality of life by reducing the levels of violence, crime and disorder in their communities."

The grant funding is released in intervals, with another release of funds expected toward the end of February. If the funding is made available Officer Ken Barnes will begin the grant writing process.

According to Dr. Jolly, the grant pays a maximum of $125,000 over a four-year-period and the school district would provide matching funds of approximately $41,600.

"We would basically set aside $10,000 a year toward the matching funds, so it wouldn't hit us all at once," he explained. "The officer would mainly be around the middle school and high school and at after school events,"

Police Chief, Lary Pickett said. Pickett also explained that there is a need for an officer to be present at the schools because the department already receives calls at least once a week asking for assistance.

"I see the presence of an officer as an opportunity for the youth to develop a stronger appreciation for officers and see them in a more positive light," Jolly said. "The officer would also be available to give talks on driver's education, drugs and careers in law enforcement."

Jolly acknowledged that parents and the community may have concerns over the presence of a police officer in Modoc schools.

An example presented to both Jolly and Picket was: A student is caught smoking on campus by the police officer; is the officer bound by school policy or police procedure?

Under the Zero Tolerance - Student Conduct Guidelines the school could take up to a Level #4 Action: Parent conference; possible alternative educational placement; referral to community support service; possible restitution/correction; suspension (5 days); referral to S.A.R.B. (man-datory); possible expulsion referral; S.S.T. meeting mandatory. Under the laws of the State of California smoking is illegal for a minor.

"I would assume that school policy would be enforced in that situation," Jolly responded. "But we need to clarify things like that."

"In that case, the officer would abide by police policy, not school policy," Pickett said in a separate interview.

"There are issues that need to be addressed, that's why we want to have a meeting to receive community input," Jolly said. The school district has scheduled a meeting on February 20 at 7:30 at the district office that is open to the public. Officer Barnes will attend the meeting to answer questions and provide more information about the grant.

 

One stop job center opens

The new "Modoc Employment Center" on Alturas' Main Street will be a hub of activity connecting employment services, education, training programs and business services with local resources.

Also referred to as a "One Stop," the center has moved from its former location at New Directions to a visible and spacious location on Alturas' Main Street, in what was once the old Post Office. Now open Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 221 North Main Street, the Modoc Employment Center houses both Modoc Employment Development Department and Alliance for Workforce Development, Inc. (AFWD).

AFWD is already up and running in the new 3,300 square foot, newly-remodeled center. EDD will have all of its equipment in place by mid-February, when the State of California relocates the necessary equipment.

In addition to the open, but private floor plan, the public will find a newly-renovated center with private interviewing facilities, a classroom with 10 computers linked to a 56 K modem and an Internet service provider based in Chico, which serves the three AFWD centers in Plumas, Lassen and Modoc. Three additional computers are available for anyone who wants to access the EDD's CalJobs internet site for the most current job listings or to post their resume. Employers may review prospective resumes on-line.

The center offers "tutorials" to help residents brush up on skills such as keyboarding, building a resume, several sample tests including employment tests from Modoc County Office of Education and Modoc Medical Center, training videos and a fully-informed staff.

The staff includes EDD's Laura Yeier, Alturas Field Office Department representative with years of experience to aid both the employee and employer; Cloud Schiermeyer, a career development specialist for AWFD; Kelley Poindexter, new AWFD Community Coordinator and Employer Services representative. Poindexter also oversees the new facility. Donna Garcia is the Services Coordinator and Debbie Jeffers is the receptionist.

Because the center is so visible, the staff will be fully informed as to what outside services are also available, many of which are within walking distance to the centrally located center.

Once a month, Pat Landon, the representative from the Small Business Development Center, will meet with clients who may have questions about any aspect of owning and operating a business. The business counseling is free and appointments may be made by calling the center.

The center can be a common point of access for job seekers and employers in Modoc County and provides a wealth of resources for teens to seniors.

The Modoc Employment Center can help a person plan careers, locate job leads, create resumes, prepare for interviews or train for a new career. While a few programs are based on eligibility, the Center services are free of charge and are open for use to everyone.

Although not co-located with the Center, the AFWD works with a myriad of "partners" in Modoc County and will work with newly-locating businesses to meet their hiring needs. As a member of the Northern Rural Training and Employment Consortium, federal and state job training funds are subcontracted to AFWD for local service delivery.

"Customized recruiting" is offered where the center staff can solicit applications, screen candidates and refer the most qualified for an employer interview, which can all save the employer time.

The business resource center offers a wall of reference materials from employment laws and tax assistance to training videos, testing, a computer and personal assistance. The new Center hardly resembles the former post office on the inside.

It will receive new exterior paint in summer 2001, has a new central heating system, a new roof, is handicap accessible and is well suited to meeting the needs of its new tenants.

"The remodel was done at considerable expense by the building's owners, Gayle and Vern Plato of Lakeview, whose father and uncle originally constructed the post office in the 50s. We couldn't be more pleased with the outcome," said Gary Corderman, Executive Director for AFWD. "There were many requirements to meet and they were able to do most of the work themselves because they're in the contracting business."

The partners have signed a five-year lease and began moving in last week. The doors are open during business hours and until EDD is officially moved in, Yeier will be splitting her days between the old location and the new.

"We take our Main Street exposure very seriously and can't see an end to what the possibilities are here," added Cloud Schiermeyer.

One staff commitment will be to work with the local residents to make their skills the best they can be, to be competitive for jobs within their own area. The staff welcomes the public to stop by and urges employers to let the center's staff know what their needs are.

An open house will be planned for March, after EDD has fully moved and set up quarters in the new Modoc Employment Center. Access the Modoc Employment Center by calling 530-233-4161.

 

Modoc schools fare well in state API

By Nora Russell

The Academic Performance Index (API) scores for all public schools throughout California were released on January 17. This is the second year that the schools have been evaluated for academic performance and progress and received scores based on Stanford 9 test results.

In Modoc Joint Unified School District the Alturas Elementary School score for the year 2000 is 711, down 42 points from 1999. The API score for Modoc Middle School is 703, up 93 points from 610 in 1999. Modoc High School scored a 665, up 45 points from 620 in 1999.

In grades two through eight, the API measures student performance in mathematics, reading, language, and spelling. In grades nine through eleven, the API measures performance in mathematics, reading, language, history/social science, and science. Grades kindergarten, one and 12 are not tested.

The API is the result of the Public Schools Accountability Act sponsored by Governor Gray Davis and signed into law in April of 1999. The law established the first statewide accountability system for California public schools.

The system includes three major components: the API, the Immediate Intervention/Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP), and the Governor's Performance Award (GPA) Program. The API score is a numeric index that ranges from a low of 200 to a high of 1000. The state has set 800 as the API score that schools should strive to meet.

According to the California Department of Education the statewide median elementary school API score for the year 2000 is 675, up from 629 in 1999. The median middle school API score is 657, up from 633 in 1999; and the median high school API score is 636, up from 620 in 1999.

The median means that one half of the schools are at or above that number, and half are below. Schools with less than 99 students were not given an API score in 1999, but that changed in 2000 by placing them in a "small school" category. A small school is defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Stanford test scores. APIs based on small numbers of students are less reliable and are more carefully interpreted.

Because of its size, Arlington Elementary was not given an API score in 1999. This year it was evaluated as a small school and received a score of 525.

South Fork Elementary also received a score for the first time this year of 619.

County administered schools, community day schools, alternative, continuation and independent study schools are excluded from the API system. An alternative accountability system is being developed for these schools.

"I am very proud of how all the schools did," said Dr. Kevin Jolly, Sup-erintendent of Modoc Joint Unified School District. "The credit goes to the parents, students, teachers and support staff who work very hard every day to maximize student learning."

 

Obituaries

Billie Dale 'Dee' Dollarhide

Billie Dale "Dee" Dollarhide, 68, of Alturas, passed away January 19, 2001, at Saint Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, Nevada due to complications associated with a heart attack.

Billie Dale, known to her friends as "Dee" was born June 15, 1932 in Kansas City, Kansas to Wendell Dale Rookstool and Mariam Stone McKenna Rookstool. She spent her early childhood in and around the Kansas City and Oklahoma City area. She attended high school in Burbank, Calif., before the family moved to Cedarville, Calif. when she was 17. She graduated from Surprise Valley High School.

She met Kenneth W. Dollarhide while living in Cedarville. They were married on September 17, 1949 in Reno, Nevada and shared a marriage of 52 years. Dee worked for the Soil Conservation Service and the U.S. Forest Service for a combined 33 years, starting as a clerk typist in Cedarville, Calif. and retired November 30, 1990 as the Budget and Finance Officer for Modoc National Forest at the Alturas office. During the course of her career, she also worked on other forests including the El Dorado, Tahoe and Plumas National Forests, in Pollock Pines, Downieville and Quincy, Calif.

After her retirement, she was very active with the National Association of Retired Federal Employees. For many years, she and her family enjoyed their cabin at Medicine Lake, fishing, swimming and singing around the campfire.

She and Ken square danced for years, and traveled to many dancing jamborees. Dee always made the time to spend with her family , to whom she was very close and devoted. Dee and Ken enjoyed attending the "Country Jam" sessions on Monday nights in Alturas. On occasion, Dee would perform her Minnie Pearl impersonation or comedy skits.

She will always be remembered for her great sense of humor, quick wit, and her unforgettable laugh. She was always ready for a good joke. The lyrics to the old classic best describe how Dee approached life, appropriately stated, "I Did It My Way."

Dee was preceded in death by her husband Ken on December 1, 2000. She is survived by her two sons Dennis L. Dollarhide and his wife Mary of Reno, Nevada and Kirk Dollarhide and his wife Dawn of Las Vegas, Nev. and one grandson Brent Dollarhide who resides in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Dee was an only child, however has two very close cousins, whom she referred to as being like sisters, Gayle Campbell of Kansas City, Mo. and Jan Hansen of San Antonio, Texas; and special sister-in-law Dorothy Fornero and husband Joe of Mt. Shasta, Calif. Dee is also survived by numerous other relatives and friends.

A memorial graveside service will be held by Minister Curtis Barber at the Alturas Cemetery on Monday, January 29 at 1:00 p.m.

The family would like you to join them that evening at the Monday night Country Jam from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. in honor of Dee. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate a donation to the American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association or to a charity/organization of the donor's choice.

 

Matias Manuel Knapp

Matias Manuel Knapp, a 17-year resident of California Pines, passed away in Redding, Calif. on January 11, 2001, at the age of 85 years.

He was born in Tucson, Arizona on March 7, 1915 and attended high school in Tucson. He served three years with the U.S. Army as a Sergeant during World War II. By the time of his discharge on January 5, 1946, he had received the Asiatic Pacific Campaign medal, the World War II Victory medal, good conduct and sharpshooter medals.

Prior to his enlistment in the military, he had worked for Spreckles Sugar in Salinas and returned to the employment of the company following his military discharge. He retired as a supervisor for Spreckles after 44 years with the company. After his retirement he moved to San Jose, Calif. for almost three years.

He married Phyllis Fernandez in Reno, Nev. on November 9, 1982 and the couple moved to California Pines to start their life together.

Mr. Knapp enjoyed his retirement, woodworking, cooking and gardening. He planted many trees and enjoyed crafting wind chimes from pipe and wood, many of which he gave to friends.

The Rev. Patrick Henry from Sacred Heart Catholic Church said a Rosary at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas on January 16. Interment was at the Alturas Cemetery.

Mr. Knapp is survived by his wife Phyllis of Alturas; son Bill and daughter-in-law Jan Knapp of Fremont, Calif.; daughter Doris DeNoon of Cameron Park, Calif.; son Glenn Knapp of San Carlos, Calif.; stepchildren Donna Davis of Alturas; Lynn Bennett and husband Colin of Redding; Robert Valencia and wife Sandi of Missouri; 11 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by grandson Edward Boyer.

Sports

Hornet Homecoming-- Butte Valley comes to Cedarville

A shorthanded Surprise Valley Hornet team lost to the Tulelake Honkers Friday at home 85-58. This Friday is the Hornet Homecoming against Butte Valley. The junior varsity game starts at 3:30 p.m., the girls varsity at about 5 p.m. and the varsity boys at about 6:30 p.m.

The Hornets lost two players with four minutes left in the game to disqualification and had to finish with just four players on the floor. Tulelake jumped out big in the opening period 27-16 and by half led 53-33. The went up 71-46 after three.

Michael Carpenter pumped in 28 points for Surprise Valley, half of those in the fourth period and Ivan Rangel added 12. Shawn Cross led Tulelake with 16, Matt McEwen added 15, Che Perez had 14, Kyle Lyman had 12 and David Todd had 10. On Saturday, Carpenter put up 44 points to lead the Cardinals to a 73-64 win over Happy Camp at McCloud. Carpenter hit 17 field goals on the night including a pair of treys.

The game started fast with the Hornets taking a 19-18 first period lead and broke away in the second for a 39-30 lead by half. Surprise Valley went up 60-50 after three and held a 13-12 advantage in the fourth for the win. In addition to Carpenter, Ryan Burresch added 14 and Joel Ruiz had nine.

 

Wilson, Willis win Mazama mat titles

Modoc's Blake Wilson, at 215 pounds, and Tony Willis at Heavyweight won individual championships at the Mazama Invitational over the weekend, as the Braves came in fourth as a team.

Modoc Coach Shaun Wood was not overly pleased with his team's showing at Mazama, where he felt they could have won the event. But he was without three of his top guys, Robert Flournoy at 125 pounds, Robert Veverka at 130 pounds and Roger Cronley at 112 pounds.

Wilson decisioned Morgan McDonald, of Mazama, 11-4 in the title match. Willis pinned Mazama's Brian Peterson for at the 1:51 mark for the title. Wilson has a record this season of 26-1 and Willis is unbeaten.

"We just didn't wrestle all that well as a team," said Wood. "We were a little flat and didn't do as well as I thought we would. But, it was out first, and hopefully, only, bad tournament of the year. Missing the three wrestlers didn't help either. I am looking forward to a good showing again this weekend. We did have some guys wrestle well at Mazama."

Wood expects Flournoy and Cronley to be back for this week against Durham on Friday and for the big tourney at Corning on Saturday. He expects his team to finish in the top five. He also expects to have at least three individual champions. The Shasta Cascade League tournament is at Chester February 7.

Modoc is the number one ranked small school in the North Section and Durham is ranked number two, so the Friday night dual should prove interesting. Besides Wilson and Willis, Wood said he was very pleased with the performances of Ross Lundgren who placed second at 189 pounds, Landon Brown who took a third at 145 pounds and Doug Wellemeyer who placed fifth.

He was also pleased with Mike Main who wrestled well to take a fifth at 215 and Morgan Dunn who place fifth at heavyweight. Modoc's Bill Moriarity took a third at 103 pounds by pinning Eagle Point's Nick Alexander and Jaafar Mirlohi took a fifth. Jesse Duran pinned eagle Point's Steven Tazioli for third at 135 pounds and Modoc's David Lutz decisioned E.C. Holden of Eagle Point for third at 140 pounds.

 

Trinity Wolves bite Braves

Trinity's Wolves took a bite out of the Modoc Braves boys varsity Saturday in Alturas, 58-44, in Shasta Cascade League action. Modoc faces Weed away Friday and has Burney at home Jan. 30. Modoc started well, leading 11-8 after one, but Trinity tied the game at 24-24 in the second period.

The Wolves jumped up 38-31 after a good third period and poured in 20 points in the final stanza for the win. Three Trinity players put up double figure, Aikins, 16, Strockman 14 and Powell 10.

Blake Thorn led Modoc with 26. Modoc won the junior varsity game 41-27. The Modoc girls team apparently lost, but the Record received no informatio on the game.

 

Hornet boys split in league

The Surprise Valley Hornet boys team split in Evergreen League Action, losing a tough one to McCloud and then dropping one to the league favorites, Dunsmuir. The Hornets have Tulelake at home Friday night and travel to Happy Camp Jan. 20. Things were working right for the Hornets against Dunsmuir Saturday in Cedarville.

Things started well as Surprise Valley opened with a 15-5 first quarter lead and led 31-18 by halftime. The Tigers tried to fight back in the second half, but the Hornets held them off, winning 54-43.

Michael Carpenter and Joel Ruiz led the Hornets with 14 points each, while Ryan Burresch added 13 and Ivan Rangel hit 11. Dunsmuir won the junior varsity game 66-31. In McCloud, the Hornets did well in the first half, trailing just 9-6 after one and 27-20 at the half.

But McCloud outscored Surprise Valley 19-7 in the third quarter and held them off in the fourth 19-16 to win 62-46. Carpenter led the scoring with 18, Burresch added seven, and Rangel and Ruiz each had five. McCloud also won the junior varsity game, 50-31.

Top

February 1, 2001

MCTA at impasse over size of wage increase

The Modoc County Teacher's Association and the Modoc County Office of Education are at impasse in their labor negotiations and a state mediator is scheduled in Alturas March 7.

The teachers are unhappy the county office has offered them only a 2.75 percent wage increase, while the MCOE staff received an 8.7 percent increase and Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh received a 15.4 percent increase.

According to MCTA president Pat Swanson, the teachers do not dispute the need for MCOE staff or superintendent raises, but believe the offer for teachers is nearly an insult. Swanson said this week that the MCTA, which represents 26 teachers, will hold firm on an 8.5 percent raise, the same as the county office staff received.

Harbaugh has argued that there are no funds available for a wage increases for the teachers, even though there is an increase in funding from forest receipts guaranteed over the next six years and the County Office of Education has a reserve of about $2 million.

Harbaugh said Forest Receipt funds are not historically used for wages. According to Harbaugh, her offer includes a 2.75 percent salary increase, a 1.53 increase in the employee benefit costs and a step and column increase of 1.73 percent. She considers her offer a total of 6.01 percent increase.

The MCTA states that including the step and column increases are not part of a wage increase, since they would come automatically under the current contract. Harbaugh agrees they are there and would be paid, but insists it still is an increase in cost to the county office. Steps and columns are a normal part of government employee contracts allowing for pay increases for time and service.

The real issue in the impasse is the county is offering a 2.75 percent wage increase and the teachers are asking for 8.5 percent. That's what the mediator will try to deal with in March.

Harbaugh said the county budget for special education increased by 5.46 percent, while her budget for central office increased by more than 11 percent and that's why there is a differential in wage offers.

"First of all, our teachers (special ed) are the highest paid teachers in Modoc County," said Harbaugh. "We have asked their union to look into our increase in special education funding and show us we're wrong about it going up 5.46 percent. So far they haven't done that." She said further that she budgets for true expenses and does not want to dip into reserves for wage increases.

She said the timing of her personal wage increase was not good, but it was a fair increase and supported by the Board of Education. She said prior to the raise she was one of the lowest paid superintendents in the state and the county.

The teachers under the auspices of the County Office work primarily in special education in the Modoc Joint Unified School District, Surprise Valley Joint Unified School District and Tulelake Basin Joint Unified School District. They also help with some general education and reading programs.

While Harbaugh has told the teachers she will only use special education funding for teachers' salary increases, the reserve and forest service receipts are unrestricted and can be used for wages.

Dr. Kevin Jolly, Superintendent of the Modoc Joint Unified School District said teachers in that district received a 3.7 percent wage increase, a one percent one time wage hike and 3.0 percent increase in the cost of health coverage. Jolly explained the state released 11.4 percent more funding to the district schools for this year, freeing up some funds for raises. He said the MJUSD is in a declining enrollment situation and lost 10 percent of its students. So the actual increase in funding was negligible. He said the district chose to give a smaller raise, which kept layoffs to a minimum and had the effect of decreasing class size to about 24 students. He said a lot of districts are facing class sizes of 28.

New RAC will be important part of forest receipts

Anyone interested in sitting on the new Forest Service Resource Advisory Committee, in connection with the federal Secure Schools and Roads legislation is asked to contact the Modoc County Land Use Committee before its Feb. 14 meeting.

The committee will actually be appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture, based upon the recommendations from the county and local forest. According to Modoc Land Use Committee's Sean Curtis, the county and forest would like to have the new 15-member RAC appointed by April 1. It must be in place by April 28. Interested individuals may call the Farm Bureau Office at 233-3276 to be considered for the committee.

The Secure Schools and Roads Act was passed by the federal legislature to stabilize payments to counties, and move those payments away from actual forest receipts. Those funds are split between county schools and roads. For the next six years, the Act guarantees Modoc County $1.8 million annually, well more than projected forest receipts.

In the past, Modoc received 25 percent of the receipts generated on the Modoc Forest, always dominated by timber harvest. Had that formula continued, Modoc's forest receipts would have dwindled to near nothing.

According to Curtis, the RAC is an important part of the new system. It will have to ability to advise and propose projects to the forest. What happens under the new act is that 15 to 20 percent of the county's funding goes through the RAC for projects. Those projects, said Curtis, will have the ability to positively impact local economies.

The committee has to have 15 members, in the following three categories and areas: category A, five members -- one who represents organized labor, one for developed outdoor recreation, off highway vehicle users or commercial recreation activities; one for energy and mineral development interests; one for commercial timber or who holds grazing permits; category B, five members -- one who represents nationally or locally recognized environmental organizations; one who represents regionally or locally recognized environmental organizations; one for dispersed recreational activities, archaeological and historical interests or nationally or regionally recognized wild horse and burro interest groups; and category C, five members who -- one who holds state elected office or their designee; one who holds county or local elected office; one who represents American Indian tribes; one who represents school officials or teachers; and one who represents the public at large.

Anyone with an interest or in one of the categories above should contact the Land Use Committee. The Modoc Land Use Committee meeting is February 14, 1 p.m.. at the Farm Advisor's Office on West Fourth Street, Alturas.

Icy highways causing problems

Slippery roads are causing some problems for drivers in the area this weekend the California Highway Patrol stresses the point that people slow down.

An accident January 25, 11 p.m. on County Road 1 north of County Road 15 near Lake City resulted in minor injuries to Lisa M. Townsend, 25, of Ft. Bidwell. The CHP reports Townsend was driving a 2000 Chevy Astro van north bound at about 30 m.p.h. when the Chevy started to slip on the snow-covered road. She applied the brakes but the van started to rotate in a clockwise direction. It left the road and traveled onto the shoulder where the left side tires gained enough traction to stop the van, causing it to roll onto the driver's side. Townsend freed herself from the vehicle and walked to a nearby residence to call for help. She was transported to the Surprise Valley Hospital where she was treated and released.

Fawn M. Crippen, 32, of Medford sustained minor injuries in single vehicle accident January 26, 7:30 p.m. on Highway 395 just south of Termo. The CHP states Crippen was northbound driving a 1993 MX-6 Mazda at about 65 m.p.h. when she entered a curve and applied the brakes. The car went out of control on the ice and spun out of control. The car careened off the road into an open field and came to rest. Crippen and a passenger, Cheyanna C. Slazar, age five, were treated at the scene by Modoc Ambulance crews and released.

The CHP advises drivers to take special care when driving on mountain highways this winter. Make sure to carry traction devices and pay attention to shadowed areas and outside temperatures. In addition, during the winter always allot extra time for the trip and understand that often the posted speed limit will be too fast for conditions. Drive according to what the conditions will allow.

GPA awards for Modoc schools

By Nora Russell

The much anticipated Governor's Performance Awards (GPA) earmarked for distribution among school districts reaching their Academic Performance Index (API) growth targets, have been announced.

A total of $207,299,009 was awarded to 4,502 schools across California. Four schools in Modoc County will receive their award checks the first week in February. Modoc High School will receive $20,072; Modoc Middle School, $14,627; Tulelake Basin Elementary, $11,904 and Tulelake High will receive $16,273.

According to the California Department of Education, award amounts were calculated using a formula that includes enrollment information, IEP exemptions, parent waivers, and student irregularities. Only schools that met or exceeded their school wide 2000 API growth target, met or exceeded their comparable improvement growth target, and had participation rates of 95% for elementary and middle schools and 90% for high schools were included.

The calculation results allocated a figure of $63 per student for eligible schools. The award funds are intended for school-wide use. Decisions for how the funds are used will be made by the school site councils and approved by the governing school board.

"I'm please so many of our schools will receive recognition for improving academic performance," said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin. "More than 67 percent of public schools met their growth targets and qualified for financial awards. That in itself is a commendable achievement."

The final two awards that are part of the Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999 Awards package are yet to be announced. All schools receiving GPA funds are eligible for the School Site Employee Performance Bonus. Those awards will be appropriated in late March or early April. Schools receiving funds for the Certificated Staff Performance Incentive will be required to meet more stringent criteria than the other two awards. School eligibility is still being determined with awards scheduled to be allocated in late April or early May.

Obituaries

Debbie Rae Moniz

Debbie Rae Moniz, 47, of Reno, Nevada, passed away on January 23, 2001 at Regent Care Center in Reno, Nev., due to a long illness.

Debbie was born in Sacramento, Calif. on April 8, 1953 to Althea and Albert Moniz. She moved to Alturas in 1975 and worked for the Citizens Telephone Company as an operator. She also worked at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas. She worked at the Peppermill Hotel Casino in Reno, as a PBX operator before her passing.

She loved spending time with her friends and family and will be missed by all who loved her, both friends and family. She also loved fishing and going camping.

Debbie was preceded in death by her mother and father. She is survived by her two brothers Gary Moniz and wife Donna and their daughters, nieces Shannon Moniz of Grass Valley, Calif. and Kimberly Moniz of Reno, Nev.; Bruce Moniz and wife Billi of Grass Valley; nephew Brian Moniz and his wife of Sheridan, Calif.; nieces Amy Moniz and Chrisy Moniz of Grass Valley; sister Nancy Warren; nieces and nephew Monica Warren of Alturas; Melanie and Justin Warren of Reno, Nev.

Services were held at WaltonÕs Funeral Home in Reno on January 27. She will be laid to rest with her mother and father in Alturas. Donations may be made in memory of Debbie, to the American Lung Association.

Florence L. Fenwick

Former Alturas resident Florence L. Fenwick, 71, a Centralia, Washington resident since 1978, died Saturday, January 20, 2001 at Providence Centralia Hospital.

Born February 22, 1929, at North Platte, Nebraska to Leo and Florence (Jerry) Hoffman, she was reared and attended schools in Nebraska. She later moved to California, where she graduated from high school in San Francisco.

On July 5, 1947, she married Edward Melvin Fenwick in Grass Valley, Calif. She worked as a cook for most of her working career. Her husband preceded her in death on March 12, 1974. The family had made Alturas their home while their son Kevin was young. Mrs. Fenwick enjoyed sewing and crocheting.

Survivors include four sons, Kevin of Bellingham, Wash; Jerry of Lakewood, Wash; Paul of Sacramento, Calif.; and Randy of California; four daughters, Linda Lewis of Fayetteville, N.C.; Diane McAuley of Centralia, Wash; Judy of Plains, Montana; and Karen Walston of Richland, Mo.; a brother, Leo Hoffman of Voluntown, Conn.; two sisters, Charlotte Dockery of Isleton, Calif. and Joyce Jack of Missouri; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.

A graveside service for Mrs. Fenwick was held Thursday, Jan. 25, at the Alturas Cemetery, where she was laid to rest next to her husband. Arrangement were under the care of Sticklin Funeral Chapel of Centralia, Wash.

Sports

Hornets defeat Butte Valley

The Surprise Valley Hornets used their Homecoming 2001 celebration to beat the Butte Valley Bulldogs 68-56 Friday night.

It didn't start well for the Hornets as Butte Valley jumped out to a 17-10 first period lead and by half led, 27-19. But the second half would belong to the Hornets. Mike Carpenter and Ivan Rangel erupted to bring the Hornets back with a 27-point third period. That onslaught gave Surprise Valley a 46-45 lead and they outscored Butte Valley 22-11 in the fourth for the win.

Carpenter finished the night with 32 points while Rangel added 24, Ryan Burresch had seven and Joel Ruiz had five. Jeremiah Cardwell scored 19 for Butte Valley.

In the boys junior varsity game, the Bulldogs won 46-43 as Paul Boneck scored 28. Surprise Valley is idle until tonight when they travel to Dunsmuir. The Hornets are now 4-3 in the Evergreen League and 9-8 overall.

Wilson earns outsanding heavyweight in Corning

Modoc's Blake Wilson edged out teammate Tony Willis for Outstanding Heavyweight of the Corning Invitational wrestling tournament last weekend.

Both Wilson, at 215 pounds, and Willis, at heavyweight, won their weight divisions at the major tournament. Both Modoc wrestlers are the top ranked wrestlers in their north section divisions. Modoc is the number one ranked small school and is ranked number five of all north section schools.

Modoc finished fifth in the Corning event, with Willows winning at 170 points, Corning second with 157 points, Golden Sierra third with 151 points, Pleasant Valley fourth with 138; Modoc fifth with 132 and the remaining standings: Durham 106, Natomas 100, Central Valley 62, Etna 55, Middletown 50, Quincy 49, Las Plumas 45, Foothill 39, Live Oak 38, Corning B 35, Tulelake 34, Esparto 32, Biggs 21, Enterprise 4, Portola 4 and Greenville 0.

Coach Shaun Wood was pleased with the Modoc wrestle at Corning, after what he considered a disappointing dual meet against Durham the day before. Modoc lost the dual meet, and Wood was not pleased.

"We came out very flat and did not wrestle well at all," said Wood. "They knew I was not pleased, it was a quiet bus ride to Chico that night. But at Corning they came out and wrestled very well. We actually had some of our best efforts."

Wilson took on the number three ranked guy in the section and beat him up, winning 20-5. Willis also had a number three guy who spent the first two rounds avoiding him, but in the third Willis caught and pinned him quickly.

Modoc's Robert Flournoy placed second at 125 pounds, losing only because of an injury. He will rest this week and will be healthy for the league meet. Ross Lundgren took a third at 189 pounds and David Lutz finished third at 140 pounds. Jackson Nay of Modoc placed fourth at 160 pounds and Roger Cronley placed fourth at 112 pounds. Taking fifth places for the Braves were: Jaafar Mirlohi at 103 pounds; Matt Shepard, 112 pounds; Jesse Duran at 135 pounds; Luke Hammerness at 135; Landon Brown, at 140, Will Sagassar at 189 pounds.

Modoc Coach Shaun Wood said he was pleased with the wrestlers at Corning and felt many of them did a very good job, even some who did not place. Landon Brown, he said, broke his foot during his final match, took a minute rest as allowed, came back and won the match. After the match, Wood said Brown started to feel the pain and was treated for the injury. The coach said he was very pleased with the effort of Brown, Nay, Shepard, Cronley and Andrew Bushey.

The Braves varsity gets this week off while the junior varsity team travels to a varsity Fall River tournament. The Shasta Cascade League championships, where Modoc is favored, will be held in Chester Feb. 7 and small schools is set February 17.

Hornet girls 6-1 in league

The Surprise Valley Hornet girls are 6-1 in Evergreen League play and 13-3 overall for the year. Friday night they dropped Butte Valley 48-38 to win their Homecoming game.

The Hornets travel to Dunsmuir Friday night and come home to meet McCloud Saturday afternoon. Against Butte Valley, the Hornets led 9-6 after one and 21-19 by half. They used a good third period to go up 39-29 and played even 9-9 in the fourth. Cassie Cockrell and Traci Reeves led the Hornets with 12 each and Camryn Mullen hit 11 to lead the Hornets.

The Hornets only league loss was to Tulelake January 19, 69-47.

Cedar Snow Park will be open Feb. 3 and 4

The Cedar Pass Snow Park has been open and operating the past few weekends and looks to remain open in the foreseeable future.

The big Alturas Sunrise Rotary Snow Blast is coming up on February 4.

The lifts open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and on Sunday. The snow park offers free lift tickets, free rental and a free lesson to first time skiers on their first day.

They have plenty of rental skis, boots and snowboards, but people should bring their own snowboarding boots. Skiers should also check into the park's season punch cards which can save about 15 percent on lift costs. Those are available at the warming hut. For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323, which will be updated daily,

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February 8, 2001

County says no to Modoc Movie

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday closed the door soundly on the purchase of the Modoc Movie produced by local attorney Barry Kinman.

Modoc County Planning Director Scott Kessler told the board the movie was of high quality and entertaining, but of no real use in economic development in its current form or as a stand-alone feature.

Kessler said the county could use the movie if it could take parts of it, add other information about the county, including demographics, business opportunities, labor market, rail and highway locations and property values. All of that information, said Kessler, could be put in CD format. Kessler said the county could use the movie as part of an overall package if the board chose to purchase the film.

While the overall use of the film was debated, the tone of an offer made by Kinman and a subsequent follow up letter from him did not persuade any supervisors that the movie purchase was a good idea for the county. Kinman initially offered the movie for county publicity, economic development, travel and tourism and not-for-profit broadcast on television. His offer was for 100 movies for $2,000, 200 videos for $3,000, 300 videos for $3,600 or 1,000 videos for $5,000. Kinman stressed the copyright of the film is his and he had no intention to give that up without cost.

"I am, in fact, willing to donate the film to an organization which will use the Modoc Movie for the benefit of the county," wrote Kinman. "It would be inappropriate for the county to ask to be that organization until it purchases the movie and uses it for the benefit of the county. If the county wishes to immediately use the film in another format or edited in some other fashion, simply make a written request and I will tell you what it will cost."

None of the supervisors questioned the quality of the film, but neither did any of them embrace the notion to purchase the film. Kinman is selling the film in a variety of local businesses and on the Internet at $20 per copy and said he has sold nearly 1,700 copies.

Regardless of the initial offer, KinsmanÕs final letter to Kessler on January 27 was deemed more of a threat by supervisors and sealed their opposition to any purchase. In that letter, Kinman said that Kessler's idea of having some control over the movie format once the county purchased it would not be allowed.

"Neither you nor the county will ever own or control the film unless you demonstrate the ability to use the existing product for the benefit of the county," Kinman wrote. "To date, you are in no position to ask or demand any conditions on the purchase other than what I propose. Get with it or get nothing."

The county chose nothing, and Kessler said he look to put together a complete package on CD, that will be more user friendly and contain more relative information for economic development.

County stresses care needed in land exchanges, purchases

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday expressed their collective concern that private land going into public ownership is a major issue in the county and the west.

The Board heard two issues Tuesday concerning private land purchases or exchanges. The first was a deal between the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge and three adjacent landowners for acquisitions of parts of three parcels totaling about 600 acres. The deal had already been before the Modoc land Use Committee and Supervisors last fall.

Anne Marie LaRosa, Refuge Manager, asked the board for a resolution approving the acquisition in order to access a different funding source if needed for the purchase. Some of the purchase comes from the Modoc Refuge's inholding funds and some may come from federal migrating bird funds. She needed the resolution, said LaRosa, to access the migrating bird funds.

Those funds are federal, but the purse strings go through the California State Fish and Game Commission. Supervisors were concerned that private lands were going off the tax rolls and the current rate of payment of "in lieu" taxes by the refuge would result in a net loss in property taxes to the county.

Supervisor Willy Hagge said the board has taken a position in the past not to get in between willing buyers and sellers on these issues. But he said, the county should continue to adhere to a equal exchange of lands as well as insisting management of the lands is a priority.

The board asked LaRosa to work with County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell and come back with a resolution the board could support. In a separate presentation, Bureau of Land Management Alturas Area Manager Tim Burke explained a preliminary dart tenure adjustment plan that deals with land exchanges, disposal or acquisition by his agency. According to Burke, there are about 100 proposals to from private individuals to purchase public lands, or to exchange lands or for the BLM to dispose of public lands.

Burke said the effort undertaken by his office is to clean up a lot of the scattered parcels of public lands, primarily to make for more effective and efficient management. The plan he addressed has been in the works for some time and has had between 15 and 20 public meetings throughout the county. The plan is out for public comment and that period closes Feb. 16.

Burke explained that the public comment and scoping session were beneficial in identifying parcels. Once the plan is adopted, BLM's task will be to work out the issues in all exchanges, disposals or purchases. Each parcel will go through an environmental assessment and Burke figures about three or four parcels per year can be handled.

Obituaries

Duffy John Burrell Elliott

Services for Duffy John Burrell Elliott, will be held Friday, February 9 at 11:00 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery, Alturas, Calif. Pastor Larry James will conduct the service at graveside for his cousin.

Mr. Elliott's death on February 5, 2001 came as a shock to his family and friends. He had an apparent massive heart attack while traveling through Bakersfield, Calif., for his work. He was 43.

Born in Lakeview, Ore. on March 6, 1957 to Bill and Francis Elliott, he spent every summer in Modoc County, since 1960. After graduating from Oroville High School, he entered the U.S. Air Force. He earned his four year degree in Languages and his skills were used as a Russian and Arabic Linguist, until he retired on October 1, 1995 as a TSGT after 20 years with the Air Force.

He and wife Deborah were married in Marquette, Michigan on October 10, 1980 and have two sons and a daughter: Brandon, age 14; Sean, 16, both of Red Bluff and Nicole, 19, in Oklahoma.

After Mr. Elliott retired from the USAF, he went to work as a truck driver for Scheckla Trucking of Burney, Calif. The Elliott family resides in Red Bluff. Mr. Elliott enjoyed camping, fishing and hiking. "He really loved Modoc," shared his aunt Rose Ash of Alturas.

He is survived by his wife Deborah Elliott of Red Bluff, Calif.; sons Brandon and Sean Elliott of Red Bluff; daughter Nicole Elliott of Oklahoma; mother and father Bill and Francis Elliott of Alturas, Calif.; brothers Mike of Virginia Beach, VA and Will Elliott of Salt Lake City, Utah; grandmother Arletta Burrell of Davis Creek, Calif.; many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his grandfather Chet Burrell, grandparents Anna and James James and granddaughter Britney.

Sports

Modoc wins Shasta Cascade League Wrestling title

Modoc Braves did what they were supposed to do Wednesday, win the Shasta Cascade League wrestling title.

Team scores were: Modoc 211, Etna 164, Trinity 136, Fall River 101.5, Tulelake 51.5, Burney 47.5. Bishop Quinn 36.5, Greenville 36.1 and Chester 11.

Individual champions for the Braves were: Bill Moriarity 103 pounds, Robert Flournoy 125 pounds, David Lutz 140 pounds, Blake Wilson 215, and Tony Willis, heavyweight.

Taking second places were Ross Lundgren 189 pounds;,Robert Williams 152 pounds;, K.C. Poindexter, 119 pounds and Roger Cronley 112 pounds.

Third place finishers were: Matt Shepherd 112 pounds; Luke Hammerness 135 pounds; Jesse Duran 140 pounds; Doug Wellemeyer 145 pounds; Corey Bell 189 pounds; and Morgan Dunn HW. Coming in fourth were Mike Main at 215 and Robert Veverka at 135.

Carpenter's record night fails to lift Hornets at Dunsmuir

It was a night to remember for the Surprise Valley Hornets' top basket shooter Michael Carpenter against the Dunsmuir Tigers, but they dropped the Hornets 81-72.

Carpenter was on fire, setting two school scoring records. He hit eight three-pointers and scored 56 points. That total tops Tom Harris' mark of 45 points in a game set two years ago. Carpenter is not a stranger to scoring big. In the last four games he has hit for 56, 44, 36 and 28.

The Hornets came out quickly against the Lions, taking a 28-21 first period lead and by half led 43-40. Dunsmuir took the lead, 66-58 after three and outscored the Hornets 15-14 in the final eight minutes. Surprise Valley was down to just five players against Dunsmuir, because of a rules violation and Carpenter fouled out late in the fourth, forcing the Hornets to finish with four players.

Dunsmuir's Greg Padilla led the way for the Tigers with 31 points. In the game, there were 19 three-point shots made, 10 by Dunsmuir and nine by the Hornets. On Saturday, the Hornets dropped a second Evergreen League game to McCloud 58-47 in Cedarville. McCloud opened with a 17-10 first period lead and led just 27-26 by half. McCloud increased its lead to 43-38 after three and outscored the Hornets 15-9 in the fourth.

Carpenter put up 28 points for the Hornets, while Ivan Rangel added six on two treys. Surprise Valley meets Tulelake, away, Feb. 9.

Hornet girls win a pair

The Surprise Valley Hornet girls won a pair of Evergreen League games over the weekend, beating Dunsmuir Friday, 55-30, and McCloud Saturday, 64-44.

Against Dunsmuir, the Hornets grabbed a 13-1 first period lead and led at the half 30-18. By the end of the third, the Hornets led 40-21 and won the fourth 16-9. Cassie Cockrell led the scoring with 19 points, while Tracie Reeves added 15 and Megan Darst had 10. Reeves and Cockrell combined to lead the Hornets with 19 each in the win over McCloud. McCloud opened with a 13-1 first quarter lead, but the Hornets came out and outscored them 23-7 in the second period for a 34-20 halftime lead. By the end of three, Surprise Valley led 50-30 and each team scored 14 in the fourth.

The Hornets next game in Feb. 9 at Tulelake. Surprise Valley now sports a 7-1 Evergreen League record.

Braves beat SCL leader Mt. Shasta

After suffering losses at Etna, both varsity teams celebrated wins over the Mt. Shasta Bears. The varsity boys, who were anticipating a tough game and a possible loss, came out on top beating the number one ranked team in the SCL.

The Lady Braves suffered a loss to the Ladies of Etna Friday night and played host to Mt. Shasta Tuesday. Modoc's tough defense and a weak Mt. Shasta offense allowed the girls to come out strong in the first 12-5 and went on to make it 24 - 7 at the half.

Mt. Shasta brought some scoring back into their game by setting up a 1-3-1 offense and went on to score 22 points in the second half. The Bears, however, were kept in check by Modoc's 29 point spread in the third and fourth quarters, the Braves won the game 53-29.

Tatum Dunn was the Braves top scorer with 19 points and Jessica Kern, who sprained her ankle early in the fourth period, helped out with 13 points. Etna played host to the Braves Friday night. The Lions came out in the first quarter leading 11-20 and 25 - 37 by the end of the half.

Neither team did much scoring in the third period. The Braves but up seven points and the Lions had 10. Modoc pushed their intensity in the fourth quarter scoring 23 points, but that wasn't enough to take home the win. The Etna Lions posted a 64-55 win over the Braves, giving the Braves a 4-4 SCL record and 10-8 overall.

"Mt. Shasta looks to be the top team to beat" predicted Coach Lane Bates earlier in the season, as did every other coach in the SCL league.

Two treys from Chico Rivera from Mt. Shasta and one from Modoc's Kris Server signaled the start of the game. A half court pass to an open Ramon Molina, who put up an easy bucket, proved that the Braves were tired of being underestimated. The Braves led by the end of the first period 16 to 11.

The Braves and the Bears pushed the fast-paced game to a higher level. Mt. Shasta fell behind and the Braves took a commanding lead over them by half time 33 to 19. The Bears scored seven consecutive points at the beginning of the third period and it looked as if they might come back to take the lead. But the Braves defense shot them down and Modoc ended the third at 48 to 37.

The Braves continued to dominate the Bears who were down 69 to 55 at the one minute mark. The Bears were able to recover several of Modoc's turnovers and attempted to shoot from the outside to tie it up but they only shot bricks.

A third seeded Braves went on to beat out the number one seed Mt. Shasta 73-63. Kris Server led the Braves in scoring with 20 of 23 attempted free throws and overall Server scored 36 points against the Bears. Blake Thorn had 15 points and Tim Lauppe and Ramon Molina each had 8.

The Braves will travel to Trinity this Saturday and will play host to Fall River on Tuesday.

Snowblast 2001, great fun for all

The fourth annual, Sunrise Rotary Club of Alturas, Snowblast 2001 was held Feb. 4, 2001 for all Modoc youth.

The Alturas Sunrise Rotary Club provided free lift passes for all Modoc students for skiing and snowboarding at the Cedar Pass Snow Park. Also provided by the club was a free BBQ and an organized ski and snowboard race for Modoc students 18 and younger.

The overall top three skiers and overall top three snowboarders received trophies. The top skier in each category received a first place medal. Second and third places in each category each received ribbons. All racers received a free Snowblast T-shirt. All race numbers were entered for a drawing to give away 15 lift tickets to be used at the Cedar Pass Snow Park. Free lessons and rentals were available.

Race results were as follows: Overall best skiers: Ryan Privett, first place; Matt Krauel, second place; Andrea Harris, third place. Overall best snowboarders: Justin Wilson, first place; Brett Spicer, second place; Garett Chapman, third place. Category winners: Boys, age 7 - 8: Garret Shoemaker, first place. Boys, age 9 - 11: Cassidy Aarstad, first place; Tyler Stains, second place; Matt Mayers, third place. Boys, age 15 and up: Ryan Privett, first place; Matt Krauel, second place. Girls, age 15 and up: Andrea Harris, first place. Snowboard: Boys, age 14 and up: Justin Wilson, first place; Brett Spicer, second place; Garret Chapman, third place.

Special thanks to Cedar Pass Snow Park for use of the facilities. Billy Jacques of Alturas Pepsi for donation of soft drinks, and Danny Parker of William's Bread for donation of hot dog buns. Partial funding by Modoc County Tobacco Coalition.

Top

February 15, 2001

 

MJUSD moving forward on its geothermal well

March 1 should be a significant date in the future of the geothermal well at Modoc Middle School in Alturas.

Whether that well can be put to use will be determined, in part, by a water quality test measuring existing mercury levels in the Pit River. Dr. Kevin Jolly, Modoc Joint Unified School District Superintendent, said a water test of the existing levels of mercury in the Pit River will be done by that March 1 date and the information will be shared by the city and the school district.

The test results will be sent to the Redding office of Water Quality Control for analysis. What that office will decide is whether discharging the waste geothermal water into the river will be allowable under acceptable mercury levels.

The geothermal well at the middle school does have small mercury content, but if river flows are adequate to dilute the mercury levels, the discharge would be permitted. Initial studies, said Jolly, indicate the river flow, especially during winter months when the well would be used for heating, may be adequate.

The plan is to use the existing well which lies between Modoc Middle School and Alturas Elementary School to heat AES, the Middle School and the district offices. The buildings have already been retrofitted for the geothermal heating system. According to Jolly, the switch to the geothermal system would save the district about $25,000 in heating costs annually.

If the water test comes back with an approval, the next step will be to convince the Department of Energy to allow an existing MJUSD grant for a injection well, to be used for the drain system to the river and for some upgrades to the heating system piping in the schools.

The water coming out of the geothermal well is at 180 degrees and once mixed with city water would go through the school heating system at 140 degrees. Jolly said the cost for a proposed re-injection well is about $700,000 and the DOE has awarded $260,000 in grant funding for that project.

The problem, said Jolly, is there is no guarantee the reinjection well will work and the district would have to come up with $440,000. He figures the drainage system from the school to the Pit River west of the old Alturas Mill site and west of the refuge would cost about $240,000. The upgrade to the piping system accounts for another $60,000. Jolly feels that $300,000 would allow the district to put the geothermal system on line and make it operable. What he hopes to do is convince DOE to reallocate its grant funds to the drainage project. Even if they allocate only have the cost, it would be very beneficial, and feasible, to the district.

Jolly said he hopes to have those two facets of he project resolved by June, and if so, the system could be up and operating by December. An added benefit of the geothermal well would be to provide a heating source for the swimming pool and the proposed YMCA building. The geothermal resource would save a huge chunk of money out of the operating costs of the YMCA. Jolly said the well produces enough water to handle the schools an the YMCA.

Public invited to comment on YMCA

Public meetings on the proposed Modoc Recreation District and it's initial project, a Modoc Aquatic Center as a YMCA in Alturas, are designed to clear up any misconceptions about the proposal as well as assess public opinion.

The joint meetings will include the Alturas City Council and The Modoc County Board of Supervisors. Both meetings are set at Alturas City Hall. The first is February 27, 2:30 p.m. and the second is March 1, 7 p.m.

The county and city are both involved because the proposed boundary of the recreation district will include an area that roughly follows the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

What's proposed is a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms.

The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million. The committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about 10 months, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. A small tax would also be needed. What the committee is proposing is an assessment of $19 per year, per property owner (not parcel) only within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

While the issue is a ways off, both the formation of the Recreation District and the tax question will have to go to a vote of the people of the proposed district. In order to pass, the tax issue must receive a two-thirds majority of the voters.

The committee expects the tax assessment to bring in $209,000 annually, with other estimated income coming from fees ($50,000), programs ($27,000), rental income ($10,000), sales ($2,000), the city ($21,000), and the hospital ($8,000).

The reason the committee is working towards a YMCA facility, other than one without that connection, is because of YMCA's expertise in planning and blueprints, program development, insurance discounts and its reputation. A representative from the YMCA has been in Alturas and met with the committee early on. He also toured the community and has offered support and advice to the committee.

Hackers raising heck with hdo.net

Internet hackers were creating havoc this week for local Internet Service Provider hdo.net, according to owner A.J. McQuarrie.

McQuarrie said the FBI and the Modoc Sheriff's Department have been trying to trace the hackers, and the FBI reported it may have been getting closer. They are not just hacking into hdo.net.

"We are in the process of going through all the logs, to ship them off to a high tech task force in Sacramento who do nothing but this type of stuff to police the Internet," said McQuarrie. "The hackers never did get us cracked, they kept sending hordes of denial requests to get the server weak enough to find a hole. They never could get the server cracked. The task force is now tracking down those IP addresses and may be able to identify the hackers. Our security measures did actually finally stop them."

According to McQuarrie, the FBI believes the hackers are young, but very skilled at what they're doing.

"They started last week and are flooding us with massive amounts of email," said McQuarrie. "It's more than we can handle so it's causing the system to slow down. They are very crafty in masking their identity."

McQuarrie believes the hackers are out to just cause trouble, not really do anything sinister, and they are causing serious problems. They are trying to hack their way into the main server. She said the system in Tehama County was hit last week, probably by the same hackers. She said she has installed software to tighten security.

"It's like fighting ghosts," said McQuarrie. "You never know where they're coming from." McQuarrie said she believes the FBI will get a handle on the situation and hopefully track down the hackers. Until then, she asks that her customers be patient with the erratic Internet service that cannot be helped until the situation is resolved.

McQuarrie said her system was also hit hard in December, but she believes the upgraded security systems are working.

Clerk fielding questions on vote, election reform

The mess of 2000, commonly called the General Election of 2000, has sparked a call for election reform across the nation, and that call has even come up several times to Modoc County Clerk Maxine Madison.

Every elections officer in the state is filling out forms, reports and answering questions from throughout the nation, said Madison.

Modoc's election was clean, went on without any problems and Madison is simply answering questions or filing out surveys or reports to a variety of agencies and individuals. Some of the reports are for the Secretary of State, others are for political parties, others are for legislators and the last one came from a county in, of all places, Florida.

"The caller from Florida couldn't believe we didn't have a bunch of rejected ballots," said Madison. "I kept telling her I could count our rejected ballots on one hand. She kept asking about hanging chads and dimples, but we just don't have those problems."

Besides all of that, said Madison, in Modoc 98 percent of the voters cast a ballot for a presidential candidate. Of 4,189 pole who cast ballots n November (77 percent of the registered voters) 4,107 cast a vote for president.

Modoc uses a ballot machine and card that works much like a hole punch. When the punch level is depressed, it clicks and cuts a clear hole. It's not like the Florida punchcard ballots where a person uses a stylus to punch a hole by hand. Modoc has used the current voting machines and system since 1985.

"I explained that we have very efficient and accurate election boards who have years of experience," said Madison. "Our system works well and we have never had a real problem. A lot of our efficiency comes because of the experience and compassion of the election workers. We take a lot of pride in being accurate. We also assist voters if they have questions or make an error on their ballot."

Madison also explained that she verifies her computerized ballot counting machine a week before the election that verification is sent to the Secretary of State's office. In addition, she said checks the machine count accuracy by having hand-counts of at least one election in every precinct. She said state law requires that one-percent of the vote is counted by hand to verify the machine count.

"We were on the phone to the Florida official for a long time, she must have been filling out a long questionnaire," said Madison. "I hope our information helped, I felt a little sorry for her."

Plumas Bank survey indicates positive business outlook

The economic outlook in Northeastern California for 2001 looks very positive according to the results of a recent survey conducted by Plumas Bank.

The twenty question survey was sent to every independent commercial business between Truckee and the Oregon border in Plumas, Lassen, Modoc, and some portions of Shasta, Sierra and Nevada counties. The Bank received 631 responses to the survey which asked local business people about their business history, their last year's sales results, and their plans and expectations for 2001.

Dwight Beeson, Vice President/ Manager of Alturas office of Plumas Bank, said 321 surveys were delivered to businesses in Modoc and 81 surveys were returned. The surveys did not exclude businesses who do not bank with Plumas Bank. Modoc's area had the third highest survey responses within the Plumas Bank Service area. Ten percent of the overall responses were from Alturas and 3 percent from Cedarville.

"People here are optimistic," said Beeson, who spoke to the Sunrise Rotary Club and plans to address the Modoc County Board of Supervisors regarding the results of the survey. "Our economic outlook compares very closely with other areas surveyed," he added.

Beeson said he felt the survey answers appear optimistic for 2001, with 20 percent of the businesses in the area expecting to remain unchanged in sales to 58 percent expecting to increase sales from 1 percent to over 10 percent in the coming year.

Beeson noted the factors business owners stated as most responsible for the meeting or exceeding their goals this past year, were due to customer service, repeat satisfied customers, good staff, good reputation and quality products/ service.

The top three priorities Modoc businesses stated they would use for enhancing 2001 performance included customer service; hiring and retaining employees, marketing, and/or bringing in new or enhanced products or services; utilizing better cash management and inventory management.

The factors predicted as the most responsible for not meeting their goals in the coming year, the local businesses stated, would be due to lack of area growth, lack of regional economic development, economic downturn, rising cost, fuel prices, cattle prices, lack of tourists, poor local economy and weather.

According to the survey results, 78% of the respondents indicated that they met or exceeded their 2000 goals and expectations and an optimistic 69% project their sales to increase in 2001.

Most considered their location in Northeastern California an advantage and thought that small town atmosphere, beautiful scenery, affordable housing, and safe schools were some of the most important reasons why they live and work here.

The stability and longevity of local businesses was pronounced: 53% have been in business for over 15 years while only 7% for less than three years. Not surprisingly, this area is populated primarily by smaller businesses, with 70% of respondents reporting five or fewer employees, and 68% generating annual sales of under $400,000.

The majority of businesses are service providers (45%), while 20% are professional service firms and 17% are represented by retail stores. Fully two-thirds of all businesses surveyed expect their businesses to grow in 2001. Of those who responded, 46% plan to invest in new equipment or technology, 25% to modernize or modify existing facilities, and 15% to add more employees.

"I am looking forward to the upcoming roundtable meetings in each community," said Bill Elliott, president and chief executive officer of Plumas Bank. "Meeting with the local business community will give me an opportunity to discuss an area's specific results and learn how Plumas Bank can better meet the needs of each community. Business owners will, I believe, also find the results helpful as they plan for their future."

Roundtable meetings, open to the public and hosted by Plumas Bank will be announced in the near future for the Alturas and Cedarville area.

COPS grant considered

Alturas Police Officer, Ken Barnes, will attend the February 20 Modoc Joint Unified School District board meeting to provide information and answer questions about the proposed Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant.

The COPS grant would provide a maximum of $125,000 to hire a full time police officer assigned to the school district, the district would provide matching funds in the amount of approximately $41,600.

The school board meeting will be held on February 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the MJUSD Office, 906 W. 4th Street, Alturas and is open to the public.

 

Obituaries

 

Julia June Walsey DeGarmo

Julia June Walsey DeGarmo of Ft. Bidwell, Calif. passed away of natural causes at her Ft. Bidwell home on February 12, 2001, at the age of 70.

She was born Julia June Walsey in Ft. Bidwell, Calif. on June 10, 1930. During her high school years, she attended Sherman Indian School in Riverside, Calif. and remained away from Modoc County for 25 years.

Julia and Clarence R. DeGarmo had grown up together in Ft. Bidwell and turned their long-time friendship into a marriage on October 16, 1948 in Carson City, Nev. When they returned to Modoc County, they made their home in Ft. Bidwell. Their's was a marriage shared for almost 52 years, until he passed away on April 6, 2000.

Mrs. DeGarmo was a loving mother and homemaker to the couple's seven children. In later years she was also involved with the Ft. Bidwell Civic Club and the Modoc Indian Health Senior Center. Mrs. DeGarmo was well known for her skilled and exquisitely beautiful beadwork, hand made gloves and moccasins, which she created and sold and which were pieces treasured by their owners.

Minister Marty Barlese will hold services in the Ft. Bidwell Tribal Gym at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 16. Interment will be at the Ft. Bidwell Cemetery. Visitation/viewing will be tonight, Feb. 15 from 7:00 p.m. in the Ft. Bidwell Tribal Gym.

Mrs. DeGarmo is survived by her daughters JoAnn Arnold, Hayward, Calif.; Pat Want, Fremont, Calif.; Loretta DeGarmo, Ft. Bidwell, Calif.; Regina DeGarmo, Reno, Nev.; Julie Doerner, Smith River, Calif.; sons Jerome DeGarmo of Brewster, Wash.; Darrell DeGarmo, Reno, Nev.; sisters Caroline Torres, Geraldine Jim, Delia Walsey, Venus Strong, all of Warm Springs, Ore.; brothers Richard Walsey, Wapato, Wash.; Donald Barr, McDermitt, Nev. She was also blessed with 17 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

Kenneth Anthony Torri

Kenneth Anthony Torri made the move from his Sierraville home of 73 years, to Alturas three years ago. He was enjoying his new-found life and spending as much quality time as he could, being a grandfather to his young grandson in Alturas.

Mr. Torri passed away on February 10, 2001 of a sudden heart attack, while on his way to Modoc Medical Center, for care. He was 76.

He was a self-employed rancher for 70 years on the family ranch in Sierraville, Calif., where he was born to Pasquale A. and Irene Agnes (Logue) Torri on July 15, 1924. He graduated from Loyalton High School in 1941.

Among his many contributions to the Sierraville community over the years, Mr. Torri was a founding member of Sierra Valley Roping Club, member of CalPine Elks Lodge no. 2432, served on the Board of Directors of Plumas-Sierra Cattlemen's Association and Sierra Valley Water Board. He was a member of the National Public Lands Council and formed the Sierra Ground Water Management and served on the Board of Directors for the Sierra Valley Water Board. He was also instrumental in helping to pass the Williamson Act and served as a member for eight years on the Sierra County Board of Supervisors.

He was preceded in death by his father and brother Francis Torri. He was divorced. Mr. Torri is survived by son Casey Torri of Loyalton, Calif.; daughter Susan Stokke and son Chance of Alturas, Calif.; mother Irene Agnes (Logue) Torri of Loyalton, Calif.; sister Lucille Fox, Sparks, Nev.; seven grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

A mass of Christian Burial will be said Friday, Feb. 16 at 10:00 a.m. at Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Loyalton. Private family interment will follow at Sierraville Cemetery. Memorials may be sent to the Shriners' Hospitals for Children, Northern California Unit, Post Office Box 21-4477, Sacramento, Calif. 95821-0477.

Manni Funeral Home of Portola will be handling arrangements.

Helen Clare Thrasher

Former Cedarville resident Helen Clare Thrasher passed away February 13, 2001 in Portola, Calif. She was 102, having been born June 16, 1898.

Services will be held at 1:00 p.m. today, February 15 at the Eagleville Church, Eagleville, Calif., with interment at the Eagleville Cemetery. Mrs. Thrasher had been away from Modoc for the past 10 years.

Bernice "Bunny" Taylor

Canby, Calif. resident Bernice "Bunny" Evelyn Taylor passed away on the evening of February 13, 2001 at Redding Medical Center, Redding, Calif. where she was being cared for, following a stroke.

Services will be held at graveside on Tuesday, Feb. 20 at the Alturas Cemetery at 10:00 a.m.

Mrs. Taylor was born July 18, 1922 in Cleveland, Oklahoma. She was 78 and was very active in her community. A complete obituary will be published next week.

Tina Marie Greene

California Pines resident Tina Marie Greene passed away at her home on February 7, 2001, after a long battle with cancer. She was 39

. Born Tina Marie Mercer in Alhambra, California on November 14, 1961, she attended Alhambra High School. She married Charles Greene in Ontario, Calif. on July 8, 1983 and Mrs. Greene devoted her time to her children, a daughter Pamela, age nine and son Kodi, age five. She was a homemaker, a loving wife and mother.

She was talented and enjoyed doing needlepoint. Many of her needlepoint works grace the walls of the family home. Mrs. Greene had made Modoc County her home for the past nine years.

No services will be held. She will be cremated. She is survived by her husband Charles Greene; daughter Pamela and son Kodi, all of California Pines, Modoc County, Calif.

Evelyn M. Coppedge

Longtime Alturas resident Sarah Evelyn Myers Coppedge, 84, of Woodland, Calif. died February 11, 2001 in Woodland.

Born January 12, 1917 Sarah Evelyn Myers at Fall River Mills, Calif., the daughter of James R. Myers and Edith Dunbar Myers, she was reared in Lassen County, graduating from Adin High School in 1934.

She married Omar J. Coppedge on November 18, 1936 in Reno, Nevada. They settled in Alturas in 1949. Mrs. Coppedge was employed by the California Department of Employment from 1954 until her retirement in 1972.

She was a 50-year member of the Federated Community Church of Alturas and a member of both the Rebekah Lodge and Native Daughters of the Golden West. Her interests included traveling, rockhounding, sewing, reading, stamp and coin collecting and her family, especially her grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Omar in 1983 and one brother Norris R. Myers in 1986, as well as her parents and an infant sister, Dolores. She is survived by her daughter Beth Coppedge Walls, of Rio Linda, Calif. and her son, James Coppedge, of Forest Grove, Oregon, as well as brothers Melvin Myers and James D. Myers of Adin and Ben Myers of Pensacola, Florida. Also surviving are four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

Services will be at the Big Valley Missionary Baptist Church, Bieber, Calif. at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16, 2001, with graveside services at the Adin Cemetery, weather permitting.

Top

February 22, 2001

Proposed YMCA subject of city, county meetings

The Modoc Aquatic Center planned as a YMCA in Alturas will be the subject of a pair of meetings next week.

The joint meetings will include the Alturas City Council and The Modoc County Board of Supervisors. Both meetings are set at Alturas City Hall. The first is February 27, 2:30 p.m. and the second is March 1, 7 p.m.

What's proposed is a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms. The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million.

A representative from the YMCA has been in Alturas and met with the committee early on. He also toured the community and has offered support and advice.

The facility committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about 10 months, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. A small tax would also be needed.

Modoc Medical Center physical therapist Gavin Kleiman, chairman of the committee, said the center will serve the entire spectrum of people in Modoc, from the every young to the very old. In addition to the recreation activities, year round, Kleiman said his department would use it for water-based physical therapy.

It's important, Kleiman believes, that the public understands it will be a community based facility and open and usable for everyone for a wide variety of activities. He and the committee feel the center would be a boost to the quality of life in Modoc and can supported and managed efficiently.

The committee is proposing an annual assessment of $19, per property owner (not parcel) within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

While the issue is a ways off, both the formation of the Recreation District and the tax question will have to go to a vote of the people of the proposed district. In order to pass, the tax issue must receive a two-thirds majority of the voters.

The committee projects the tax assessment will bring in $209,000 annually, with other estimated income coming from fees ($50,000), programs ($27,000), rental income ($10,000), sales ($2,000), the city ($21,000), and the hospital ($8,000).

The reason the committee is working towards a YMCA facility is because of YMCA's expertise in planning and blueprints, program development, insurance discounts and its reputation.

The county and city are both involved because the proposed boundary of the recreation district will include an area that roughly follows the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

Warner-Carlos Streets set for repair

The $1.5 million improvement project for Carlos Street and Warner Streets in Alturas is on schedule for this summer, as long as the state gets its historic and environmental analysis done in time.

Alturas Public Works Director Stacy Chase said the project is funded, the engineering is done and the city is ready to start the project. Chase said he is optimistic the project will be done this year.

Carlos and Warner had been recognized as in serious need of repair for years and this project has been in the works for a few years. What it entails is basically a new street from base up from Main and Carlos west to Warner and north to Parker Street. It also includes repaving the portion of West Street from Carlos to the city limits.

The street will be rebuilt with new base, new asphalt and curb and gutter along the entire length of the project. Where existing curb and gutter is adequate, it will be left, while other areas will receive new curb, gutter and in some instances, sidewalks.

Chase said the city is anxious to get the project started and completed this summer. It is and has been one of the top priorities for repair.

According to Chase, over the past three to four years the city has repaved or repaired about 40 percent of its streets to very good levels. He said he and Mayor Dick Steyer have inventoried all streets in the city by block and prioritized those in most need of repair.

This summer the city hopes to do east Fourth Street from Josephine to D Street and would like to get some major work done on Howard Street.

BLM hosts open house meetings on Black Rock NCA

The Bureau of Land Management will be hosting several open houses to inform the public about the new Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area (NCA) and the new wilderness areas recently designated by the U.S. Congress.

Six open houses are on the agenda, there in California and three in Nevada. Each will be held at BLM offices, expect in Gerlach where the meeting will be held at the Community Center March 6, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

There will be a meeting in Alturas Feb. 27, from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. and a meeting in Cedarville February 28, same times.

"These will be informal gathering where people can ask the BLM about the legislation and the area," said BLM Winnemucca Field Manager Terry Reed. "we hope to have good attendance so we can discuss how the new designations may affect people. resources and land management in this area."

The open houses are not "scoping" meetings, where the public submits comments as part of a planning process.

The NCA Act designated a national conservation area and 10 adjacent wilderness areas that together, encompass 1,172,000 acres of public lands administered by the BLM. The BLM Winnemucca and Cedarville Field Offices have administrative jurisdiction. The offices are working together to ensure the public gets complete, accurate and consistent information on management of the area.

Additional information on the NCA is available on the Internet at www.nv.blm.gov.

Canby woman hurt in accident

Velma McCrary, the Modoc County Record's Canby News correspondent, was seriously hurt Tuesday in a vehicle accident on Highway 299 in Canby.

She is recovering in Redding.

According to the California Highway Patrol, McCrary was eastbound on SR 299 in her 1991 Buick and was turning left to enter the Post Office parking lot. She turned directly into the path of a 1995 Chevy S-10 driven by Randall Wright, 53, Fall River, which was westbound.

The right front of the Buick collided with the left front of the Chevy. The Buick spun completely around and ended up facing west. The Blazer veered to the right and into the Post Office parking lot. McCrary sustained a compound fracture to her left ankle and fracture to her leg, face and knee lacerations. She was not wearing her seatbelt. She was treated at the scene, transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas and then airlifted to Redding.

Two people sustained minor injuries in a vehicle accident February 15, 12:40 p.m. on Sara Lane, north of 19th Street. The California Highway Patrol reports Susan Wing, 48, Alturas, was backing a 1979 Lincoln out of her driveway and did not see a 1990 Plymouth northbound on Sara Lane and approaching her.

The Plymouth was driven by Wendy Bailey, 27, Alturas. The Wing vehicle's right rear struck the Bailey's vehicle right side. Bailey and a three-year-old passenger, Austin Cook, sustained minor injuries.

Missoula's "Cinderella-2" features local cast of young people Saturday

Students in grades Kindergarten through senior high school turned out in force to audition Monday for parts in Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT) original musical adaptation of "Cinderella-2."

Over 50 local students are participating in the Saturday, Feb. 24 shows at the A.C.T. Niles Theater.

Performances will be given at 1:00 p.m. and again at 5:00 p.m. Tickets will be available at the theater door, $7 for adults; $5 for senior citizens and students age 17 and younger.

MCT touring teams bring costumes, scenery, props, and makeup and work with the students after school throughout the week for the final production.

MCT Tour Actor/Directors Carrie Ellis will play the Stepmother and Raggedy Annie and Jonathan Townsager will play Prince Charming and Rags the Beggar. Local Cast Members Cleo will be played by Danielle Moriarity; Fido by Morgan Davis; King by Taylor Albertson; Town-Crier 1 by Christina Nardoni; Town-Crier by Ross Montague; Lovely by Caitlin Burdette; Beauty by Heather Gallardo; Cinderella by Alicia Seibel. MCT actors: Carrie Ellis as Raggedy Annie and the Stepmother; Jonathan Townsager as Rags the beggar and Prince Charming. Mice: Sara Montague, Brianna Whitlock, Amber Randall, Katie Wheeler, Amber Gallardo, Codie Leslie, Brandon Colbert and Heather Markson. Assistant Directors: Christine Abbott, Jodie Owners, Jessi Harden, Desirea Leslie and Krysten Welt. Ladies of the Court: Alysha Northrup, Marjelle Nardoni, Dee Curley, Amanda Hess, Stacie Main, Whitney Baker, Vanessa Thomason and Amanda Gallardo. Beggars: Mark Main, Darcy Holloway, Amber Vucina, Christina Worley, Savannah Hess, Alyssa Belarde, Crystle Clevinger, Amanda Moriarity, Shannon King, Becky Crites, Michael Trevail and Tara Holloway. Pumpkins: Britney Mattern, Mia Carmosino, Hanna Herley, Cheyenne King, Celeste Yamagiwa, Cheyenne Rees, Kristyn Halvorson, Ashley Widby, Monica Eppler, Jesse Silva and Dejah Montague. Technical Director: Michael Halderman. Pianist: Donna Cooley.

The week-long residency is sponsored by Modoc County Arts Council, Inc., Modoc County Office of Education, Modoc, Surprise Valley and Tulelake Basin Join Unified School Districts, Alturas Community Theater and funded in part by the California Arts Council, a state agency.

Economic Summit invites Modoc comment; "Briefing" Wednesday night

A historic one-day summit focusing on economic issues affecting California's North State region and then proposing the most effective solutions, will be open to Modoc residents and their ideas on Monday, March 19.

Although the summit will take place at California State University, Chico, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 19, it will be broadcast live over the Internet to maximize access and participation from the 20-county North State region including Modoc.

Modoc residents interested in participating, may pre-register to attend the conference on-line.

The new Modoc Employment Center at 221 N. Main St., Alturas will host a North State Economic Summit "Briefing" on Wednesday, Feb. 28 at 6:30 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres and refreshments will be served.

All conference materials will be posted on the conference website prior to the event, allowing the public to review the content and pre-register. A special outreach effort will be made to invite "One-Stop Career Centers" in the region to link up and to participate on line.

"A strong and unified voice is needed to promote a North State agenda among policymakers and state legislators who are deliberating on infrastructure and economic needs," say organizers. The focus will be on economic development, workforce training and agriculture. Information to be presented has been collected over the past six months from business leaders, policy makers, selected officials and the general public.

Their ideas have been scored and prioritized based upon geographic scope, cost, economic impact, and implementation time. The presentations will be followed by a strategy session in which the highest priority issues for the region will be identified and discussed. A panel of policy makers and elected officials will participate and offer their perspectives on the most effective methods to move the priority proposals forward to implementation. The Summit goal is to focus on short-term solutions. For further information please call 233-4161.

Obituaries

Bernice 'Bunny' E. Taylor

Long-time Canby resident Bernice "Bunny" Evelyn (Howard) Taylor passed away at Redding Medical Center, Redding, Calif. on February 13, 2001.

She had been hospitalized one week, following a stroke.

Born in Cleveland, Oklahoma on July 18, 1922, Bunny was the daughter of Jess Edward Howard and Leona Sarah (Millen) Howard. She was the step-daughter of Donald Monroe Echard. In 1936, Bunny's mother and stepfather moved to California. They purchased a ranch and their family lived in the ranch house which had been the Davis Creek Hotel, a stage coach stop on the route between Reno, Nevada and Pendleton, Oregon. Bunny graduated with the class of 1940 from Modoc Union High School. She married Eldon "Al" Taylor on September 28, 1941.

They moved to Canby, Calif. in 1942, where they purchased land, enlarged their small cabin and farmed the land, in addition to full time work away from home. In addition to rearing her family, Bunny worked for a number of years clerking at the grocery store in Canby. She worked for the Serights and later for Bob and Nancy Sherer. She also worked a few years at Bowman's Grocery in Alturas and as a relief fire lookout at Happy Canyon and Blue Mountain lookout towers for a few months. She cooked at the Canby Hotel for two different owners.

For many years, Bunny cooked for the students at Arlington Elementary School in Canby. She retired in 1983. The children gave her an apron, signed by all of them. She was very proud and appreciative of their caring.

Mrs. Taylor was a member and officer of the Arlington School Parent Teacher Association before the schools unified. She was also an officer of the old Canby Hall Board. The community could depend on Mrs. Taylor to help with barbecues and other activities. She was a long-time and faithful member of the Canby Mother's Club and a hard worker on their many projects.

On Mother's Day, 1985, Mrs. Taylor was honored as "Mother of the Year," based on her community involvement over the years. As a teenager, she sang in the choir at the Davis Creek Community Church. She wrote poetry in later years. For a number of years, she was the Canby correspondent to the Modoc Record, writing a weekly column. Over the years, she met many people through her work and had an excellent memory for names and faces.

During Canby's "Hey Days," she and Al went to all the dances. She loved to dance and loved country music. Her favorite artist was Patsy Cline. Vigorous arrowhead hunting in California, Nevada and Oregon was a favorite activity of her's for years. She was also a member of the Canby 4-Wheelers with a CB handle of "Cookie." In recent years, she attended the monthly "Teapot Fellowship" luncheons in Alturas and the monthly luncheon and Bunco games at California Pines Lodge.

For many years, friends have called Bunny for up-to- the-minute information on fires, accidents and other regional emergencies because she made such efficient use of her scanner.

A baby bobcat; Stevie, the pet pigeon, and beloved cats and dogs brought her joy throughout the years. She loved watching the deer, antelope, coyotes, cranes and other wildlife that visited outside her windows. Her spontaneous laugh, even regarding the battle with the skunks, made her fun to be near, shared friends and family. Bunny's family was the center of her universe, throughout her busy life. She was always there for them.

She was preceded in death by her half-brother Ronald Echard; her husband Al Taylor who died in 1991; grandson John Philpott and son-in-law Charles Philpott. Mrs. Taylor is survived by her son Elwood Taylor of Cal Pines, Calif.; daughter Gayla Philpott of Canby, Calif.; brother Everett Howard of Lakewood, Colorado; sister Enid Foote of Redding, Calif.; four grandchildren, ten great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Brock Elliott conducted services at graveside at the Alturas Cemetery on Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 10 a.m. Everett Howard gave the Eulogy for his sister's service and the I'SOT Choir sang. A time of fellowship followed at the Canby Fire Hall.

 

Dorothy C. Kelley

Dorothy C. Kelley of Alturas passed away of natural causes at her home in Alturas, Calif. on February 16, 2001, at the age of 90.

Mrs. Kelley was born Dorothy Catherine Hartlerode on October 10, 1910 in Davis Creek, Calif. She married Arthur Bernard Kelley on Dec. 21, 1932 and for most of their married life they lived in Modoc County.

Mr. Kelley preceded his wife in death in 1965. Mrs. Kelley was a very active person and became associated with the Alturas Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, being baptized in October 1963.

She loved the earth, seeing things grow and learning about Jehovah's creation of the earth made her appreciate it even more. She is survived by two children, Fleurette DeForest and Kelly L. Kelley, nine grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews and a host of friends that will miss her.

A memorial service for Mrs. Kelley will be held Saturday, Feb. 24 at 2:00 p.m. at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, 1400 West Fourth St., Alturas. All are invited.

Sports

Braves take runner-up spot in small schools

For most schools placing as runner-up in the North Section Small Schools Wrestling Championships would have been great -- but most schools are not Modoc.

The Braves ended up second to Durham in the tournament, which coach Shaun Wood figured would be close. But, he felt the Braves would win it by a few points. Some things just did not work out according to plan. Durham won the event with 231 points, Modoc was second at 174.5, Etna was third AR 173.5 and the remaining teams followed: Live Oak 115, Quincy 110.5, Fall River 92, Esparto 75, Tulelake 54.5, Burney 53.5, Biggs 44, Greenville 37.5. Portola 25, Bishop Quinn 13 and Chester 0. Wood said his charges were behind the entire tournament and only passed Etna on the last match. He said the luck of the draw in seeding the opening day put the Braves behind.

The Braves put five wrestlers into the finals and four of those brought home championships. Billy Moriarity won the 103 pound title by pinning Lane of Live Oak at the 1:26 mark. Roger Cronley won the 112 pound championship with a 7-4 decision over TulelakeÕs Victor Garcia. Blake Wilson won his 215 pound title with a 10-4 decision over Eric Swain of Fall River.

Tony Willis won the heavyweight championship for the Braces by forfeit over Ricci, of Durham. Ross Lundgren, at 189 pounds, placed second in his division. Andy Thompkins, of Tulelake took third. One of the real stunners of the tournament was ModocÕs 125 pound sophomore Robert FlournoyÕs fourth place finish. He was seeded number one, but lost a pair of decisions by one point each.ModocÕs Casey Poindexter took fifth at 119 pounds, Luke Hammerness took a fourth at 135 pounds, Robert Williams was fifth at 152 pounds.

The top four placers in the small school tournament qualify for the North Section Masters tournament in Redding at the convention Center this weekend. The top two finishers there qualify for the state championships March 2-3 at the University of Pacific in Stockton. Wood said Willis and Wilson, who are both ranked number one in the North Section have an excellent chance to go to state. Willis competed at the state championships last year. He was one match away from placing out of a 32- man bracket. Other probable placers at section are Moriarity, Cronley, Flournoy, Lundgren, and Lutz.

Local teams in basketball playoffs

Several local teams are in the North Section basketball playoffs, but Surprise ValleyÕs girls are the only Modoc team who gets to host a first round game.

The Hornet girls, who finished with a 16-5 record and second in the Evergreen League will meet Bishop Quinn (12-13) Feb. 22 in Cedarville in the Division VI opening round.

The Evergreen League winning Tulelake Honker girls (20-5) hosted Fall River (8-14) Feb. 20 to open the Division V playoffs winning 63-36. ModocÕs girls (12-7) traveled to Biggs (15-11) Feb. 20 to open their Division V playoffs and won 43-34. They meet Etna Friday. Big ValleyÕs girls (12-8) traveled to Pierce (11-11) Feb. 20 and won 45-36. On the boys side, Big Valley (16-4) hosted Weed (12-11) in the opening round of the Division V playoffs Feb. 21. Modoc (12-10) traveled to Liberty Christian (21-4) Wednesday. Tulelake (18-6) hosted Biggs (13-9) andwon 79-58. Surprise ValleyÕs boys (9-13) will be at Westwood (21-3) Friday.

Harlem Clowns take on Alturas Feb. 24

The famous and fun loving Harlem Clowns will take on a variety of Alturas basketball players Feb. 24 at the Griswold Gym in Alturas, with tip-off scheduled for 7 p.m.

The Harlem Clowns have taken their entertaining and excellent form of basketball on the road across the nation for the past 63 years and are always a delight to watch. They combine great humor with incredible basketball skills and donÕt make life easy for the home team.

Doors to this fun event will open at 6 p.m. and presale tickets are available at Modoc Veterinary Center. Presale tickets are $9 for adults, $5 for students and kids. Tickets at the door are $10 for adults and $6 for students and children.

Playing for Alturas are: Joe Catania, Fritz Barclay, Jeff Fredricks, Roger Dorris, Greg Valencia, Louise Dunn, Bub Slinkard, Bunk Richardson, Rex Northrup, Randy Wise, Larry Estes, Curtis Schmidt, Jay Eppler, Toby Flackus, Chris Jenkins and Ernie Givens.

The event will help fund the Alturas Rotary Sunrise scholarship fund for a high school senior. There will also be a special shooting contest during halftime, with the winner getting half the 50-50 pot. The drug, alcohol and tobacco free event is sponsored by the Alturas Sunrise Rotary, Modoc County Alcohol and Drug Services and the Modoc County Tobacco Education Program.

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March 1, 2001

Modoc's Wilson, Willis:'It's been a team effort'

For Modoc's top wrestlers Blake Wilson and Tony Willis, this weekend is the culmination of a lot of hard work, and just as importantly, proof of what teamwork can accomplish. Both wrestlers, who head to the State Championships this weekend in Stocton, credit each other, coach Shaun Wood and family for their ability to realize a dream.

Willis, who qualified for state last year by winning section, said the fact that both of them are going this year is no fluke. They each won their section titles last weekend. "We worked our butts off for this all year," said Willis. "Blake has helped me all year and we have spent a lot of time, a lot of time, in the weight room. We dedicated ourselves to this and it's paid off."

"This is a big honor and it's the fulfillment of a dream I've had since sixth grade," said Wilson. "It's still a little hard to believe it has come true. I'm looking to place in the top three." Willis went 34-0 this year and never really got tested. That will change this weekend when he meets the state's best.

In California, the state championships in wrestling are not divided by school size division, it's everyone in one tournament. "My goal is to make the state final match," said Willis. "I expect to place this year and I know what to expect from being there last year. There are no surprises."

Both Willis and Wilson, who are good friends, have worked very hard in practice this year and in the weight room. Wilson has added 20 pounds to his frame and gotten much stronger than last season. He now weighs in at 215, bench presses 300 pounds and squats 450 pounds. Willis weighs in at 250, smaller than many of the wrestlers he faces in his heavyweight division, and benches 305 pounds while squatting 550 pounds. Wilson lost just one match all year, that to a nationally ranked Nevada wrestler, but beyond that, has not really been in a difficult match. He knows he'll have a tougher road. "I have to wrestle really well and not make mistakes," Wilson said. "It's a huge tournament. I was there watching last year, so I know what to expect. I'm looking forward to it."

Both Willis and Wilson believe wrestling each other and having each other around all season and, actually, throughout their high school careers has made them both much better. Coach Wood believes that having the two of them on the team simply made everyone better, but feels that their practices are better than their tournaments. "They haven't faced anyone as tough as they are all year," said Wood. "So when they practice, they going against the best. It helps them. There is also a high level of competition between them."

What they're looking forward to this weekend is walking into the tournament together, knowing this is the pinnacle of their wrestling careers so far. And, supporting each other through the whole thing.

Oh yes, if they place in the top six, there will be another step -- the nationals. Somehow, one gets the feeling that they don't think state is their last tourney of the season.

Suggestions, info power 1st YMCA public meeting

The first public meeting concerning the proposed recreation district and the Modoc Aquatic Center planned as a YMCA in Alturas was polite, informational and without any negative comments.

There were several suggestions and questions asked by about 50 people who attended Tuesday's 90 minute meeting. The second meeting which includes the Alturas City Council and The Modoc County Board of Supervisors is set at Alturas City Hall March 1, 7 p.m. Local government is trying to get a feel for the project and decide whether to take it to a vote.

Aquatic center committee chairman Gavin Kleiman presented the proposal as well as fielded and answered questions from the public. He explained, first of all, there will be two issues placed on the ballot if the county and city choose to move the issue to a vote of the people.

The first will be a question of whether to form a recreation district. That issue has to pass by a simple majority of 50 percent, plus one.

The second issue on the same ballot will be asking for a $19 per year tax assessment to help fund the YMCA. That issue must pass by a two-thirds majority, required by California state law. The recreation district boundaries would be roughly the same as the Modoc Joint Unified School District. If that district is approved by voters, it will be governed by its own set of elected board members. The board could be either three, five or seven members.

That board would be responsible for the full operation of the district. Kleiman said it is the intention of the current committee that those people who pay property taxes to the district (property owners within the district) would receive a lower fee for use of the facility. The facility will be open to the general public for a use fee.

Kleiman said the committee is not sure what those fees would be, but estimated between $18 to $21 per month and somewhat higher for those people who do not reside in the district. He also explained that the tax measure would help fund the maintenance and operation of the facility.

Grant funding will be sought to actually build the facility. Another option for building cost could come in the form of loans, he said. He said the committee and other agencies involved are confident funding to build the facility is available, and the chances improve dramatically if the district and assessment are passed.

There were several suggestions during the meeting, including the need for a wading pool, child care, or a diving board on the pool. All of those suggestions will be studied, said Kleiman. He also invited people to get involved in the committee meetings.

Additionally, the question was asked about how many jobs would be created. Kleiman said he felt that similar facilities employ between 10 and 20 people. He also answered a question concerning Medicare or MediCal payments for aquatic therapy from a man who was having to travel out of town for that service. Kleiman said as long as the physician prescribed that form of therapy it would be covered in the new facility. Actually, as the Modoc Medical Center's Physical Therapist, Kleiman said that was one of the driving forces behind his effort to get the facility built.

The plan is to construct the facility just north of the existing Alturas pool on Warner Street in the open lot between the Alturas Tennis Courts and Warner. If this facility is built, the existing pool would be closed. Kleiman explained the current pool does not meet current standards, the heating system is inadequate and covering it, the committee felt, would be a waste of funds.

"I also want to point out that what we are planning is much more than just a pool and it will be open 12 months per year," said Kleiman. What's proposed is a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms.

The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million. A representative from the YMCA has been in Alturas and met with the committee early on. He also toured the community and has offered support and advice.

The facility committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about 10 months, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. A small tax would also be needed. Kleiman has said the center will serve the entire spectrum of people in Modoc, from the very young to the very old.

It's important, Kleiman believes, that the public understands it will be a community based facility and open and usable for everyone for a wide variety of activities. He and the committee feel the center would be a boost to the quality of life in Modoc and can be supported and managed efficiently.

The committee projects the tax assessment will bring in $209,000 annually, with other estimated income coming from fees ($50,000), programs ($27,000), rental income ($10,000), sales ($2,000), the city ($21,000), and the hospital ($8,000). The committee sites estimated expenditures as follows: wages $100,000; programs $70,000; clerical $10,000; maintenance $50,000; utilities $34,000 (geothermal heat could reduce that significantly); insurance $20,000; taxes, $20,000 a two-percent fee (YMCA) $6,000; and miscellaneous $10,000. The total income is estimated at $327,000 annually and expenses at $320,000 each year.

The reason the committee is working toward a YMCA facility is because of YMCA's expertise in planning and blueprints, program development, insurance discounts and its reputation.

The county and city are both involved because the proposed boundary of the recreation district will include an area that roughly follows the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

Final aspects of COPS program studied by MJUSD, city police

By Esteban Fernandez

As the community decides whether to embrace the Cops in School grant the Modoc Joint Unified School District and the Alturas Police Department have proposed, both law enforcement and school officials are hurrying to finish the last leg of the grant process.

The School Board will convene on March 20 at South Fork Elementary School in Likely at 7:30 p.m., where they will determine whether to apply for the grant. If the School Board decides to apply for the grant, the Alturas Police Department and the School Board will determine what type of relationship the school district and the police department will have with one another, as well how to go about the implementation of the program.

"There are a lot of pros and cons," commented Dawn West, head of the juvenile jurisdiction at the Modoc County Probation Department. "Maybe a cop on campus, if done right, could raise the rapport of the 'us against them' mentality that students have with law enforcement."

Many community and school officials are against the idea of police in schools, but most of the facts surrounding the proposed grant have been ignored. The truth is that the $125,000 grant provides for a three-year period, after which the Alturas Police Department "will be wholly responsible for funding the officers under the grant." The MJUSD will provide $41,600 during the fourth year of the program, by putting aside $10,000 a year from the annual $20,000 they receive under a School Safety grant.

The grant can only be used for safety issues, such as lights in the parking lots or more fencing around the campuses, which Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly feels is unnecessary at this time. The COPS in Schools grant also states that under the grant: Funds may not be used for any purpose other than officers' approved salaries and benefit; funds under this program may not be used to purchase equipment.

"We hope to build a stronger relationship between Alturas youth and the Alturas Police Department, which I feel will make for a better community," commented Dr. Kevin Jolly, Superintendent of Schools.

"What we got to do is set some long term goals," said veteran police officer Ken Barnes, who found the grant application on-line at www.usdoj.gov/cops/gpa/grant_prog/cis/cis_appkit.htm. "We're already getting a lot of COPS money as it is, but what we want this Cops in School money for is to have the funding to help develop a better relationship with the kids on their level . . . and help educate them about federal, state, and city laws, as well as crime prevention," said Barnes.

Before the school board decides whether to apply for the grant, a police officer, most likely Barnes, will meet with MJUSD classes individually to explain what students should expect if the grant is passed and why the police department and the MJUSD have joined together for the proposed grant.

A parent and student survey will also go out sometime during the second week of March, as well as a summary of the 25 page grant proposal. The results of the surveys will be given to the school board to help better determine whether to follow through with the grant process.

If the school board decides to apply for the grant, the police department would have to write the grant and have it submitted by the early part of June. A veteran officer would be more likely to fill the position of the on campus officer.

"If we hired someone right out of the academy, it would be about three months before they would be allowed into the schools, due to training," said Barnes.

The uniformed officer would work only at the schools at Alturas Elementary, Modoc Middle School, and Modoc High School, Monday through Friday during school hours, with weekends off. The officer would also be required to attend extracurricular or after school activities, such as basketball games, dances, etc.. The officer would work together with Child Protective Services, the Modoc County Probation Department, SARB, and teachers through the program.

"Our goal is to create a safer learning environment for the kids in this community," commented Barnes.

Grazing program progressing on BLM allotments in SV area

The Surprise Valley Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management is generally pleased with the first year results of grazing programs initiated for the year 2000.

According to Susan Stokke, area manager, since 1998 her office assessed 23 of 52 livestock grazing allotments it manages for conformance with rangeland health standards. Of those, 18 allotments were determined to me meeting or making significant progress toward standards, while five were not meeting all of the standards.

Grazing was identified as the practice creating the shortfalls. BLM proposed short-term management changes for those five allotments for last year's grazing season and Stokke said progress has been made. "Livestock permittees worked hard throughout the 2000 grazing season to implement the shirt term management changes," said Stokke. "Through their efforts, short-term objectives were met for three of the five allotments, and results were mixed on the remaining two allotments."

In addition to the short-term projects, the past year found ranchers and other interested people working on long-range strategies for improving range health. The National Riparian Service Team conducted follow-up training and provided allotment-specific recommendations for riparian management for two of the five affected allotments.

"We also sponsored a 'Monitoring for Success' workshop in which livestock permittees learned to measure livestock use of plants, and when to move their livestock, ensuring success in achieving objectives," Stokke said.

This spring, existing Allotment Management Plans, AMPs, will be revised for the Board Corral, Bull Creek, Wall Canyon East and Duck Lake Allotments. The AMP for the Wall Canyon West Allotment is also being revised in full consultation with the permittees and other interests.

Environmental analysis will be completed and proposed decisions issued in March, 2001. The BLM will also continue working to achieve consensus for longer-term management of the Home Camp Allotment. According to Stokke, rangeland health assessments are planned for five additional allotments this season: Massacre Mountain, Little Basin, Selic-Alaska, Red Rock Lake and Granger.

The permittees and others interested in rangeland health conditions will be invited to participate during the field assessments. Riparian functionality will also be determined for key riparian habitats within the five allotments. BLM staff will also be working on revising the AMPs for the Nevada Cowhead, Bally Mountain, Selic-Alaska and Red Rock Lake allotments.

What happened and a summary of concerns of the five affected allotments last year and continued long term management is explained per allotment by the BLM. On Board Corral, the proposal is renewal of two existing grazing permits and implementation of a grazing strategy which provides for two consecutive years of early use by livestock (May 1-to about July 15) followed by two consecutive years of rest.

That plan is expected to result in significant progress toward recovery of key riparian habitats, improvement in age class distribution of aspen and bitterbrush, and increased vegetation diversity in upland and riparian habitats of concern. The Bull Creek allotment will be managed to promote rapid recovery of the Willow Creek drainage.

BLM proposes construction of three to four miles of riparian pasture fence and providing additional stock water. The new field will be rested (no livestock use) until riparian objectives have been met. The BLM will furnish the necessary fence materials and complete the stock water project (diverting water from the creek to a trough); the livestock permittee has agreed to build the fence during 2001.

To address concerns about the condition of riparian habitats throughout the Duck Lake allotment, the Livestock lessee is proposing to work with Tim Westfall (a rancher and employee of BLMÕs Medford District) to implement low stress livestock herding techniques for grazing seasons 2001 and 2002.

Westfall has been retained by the Surprise Field Office because of his expertise and success in utilizing low stress livestock herding in similar kinds of country in Oregon.

Beginning in 2002, BLM proposes to renew the grazing permit for a 10-year period and the permittee has asked to work with BLM to implement a five-pasture deferred rotation grazing system. The permittee has offered to build the 13 to 17 miles of new fence, with BLM supplying the material. By controlling the timing and duration of livestock use, significant improvement in riparian conditions is anticipated.

The Wall Canyon East allotment was review by a Technical review team consisting of the BLM, the permittee, and representatives from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the environmental community.

The recommendation of that team was implementation of a two-pasture deferred rotation (using herding as the primary means of livestock control), and a change in the number of livestock and season of use. Cattle numbers will drop from 1,200 to 600, and the season will change from May 1-July 15 to May 1-Sept. 30.

A full time herder will be employed and livestock will be removed from the allotment when three to five inches of th plants remain in key riparian Areas or cattle have consumed 20 to 40 percent of the available forage in the uplands, whichever occurs first.

Significant progress toward riparian recovery and improvement in plant vigor, species diversity an productivity of uplands is anticipated. Protecting wilderness values and maintaining current free-roaming conditions for wild horses is also expected.

Consensus regarding a long-term management option cold not be reached on the Home Camp Allotment and until agreement can be reached, interim utilization criteria will be applied. Livestock will be moved into the next scheduled use pasture or home when allowable use criteria have been met.

"We are encouraging the livestock operators to work with a certified range consultant or a representative from the Nevada Department of Agriculture to propose a management option which meets their needs, can be affordable to implement, and makes significant progress for achieving landscape goals," said Stokke.

The BLM plans to renew the four existing grazing permits which expire in February 2002 and to issue a decision regarding longer term management by early 2002.

Polls say not too much public land

The Modoc County Record's Internet pulse poll, indicates most people do not believe there is too much public land in Modoc County.

The poll was run on the RecordÕs website from Feb. 8 through Feb. 22 and 66.7 percent said no to the question "Do you think there is too much public land in Modoc."

The poll is open to anyone wishing to cast an opinion and each person is allowed one vote. People vote on the Internet site by clicking yes or no. The Record doesnÕt claim any scientific polling, but the pulse poll is used to assess public opinion on a variety of issues.

The current poll on the site asks whether people think their families will be better off financially this year. All votes are anonymous. The polls usually run for two weeks.

Some past polls showed some interesting results. The following is the poll and the results: Do you think Modoc schools need a full time police officer? no 73 percent, yes 27 percent; Are you in favor of a YMCA in Alturas? yes 89.6 percent, no 10.4 percent; Which team will win the Super Bowl? New York Giants 59.1 percent, Baltimore Ravens 40.9 percent; Do you feel there is equal justice in Modoc? no 64.3 percent, yes 35.7 percent.

Letters to the Editor

Loud music is annoying

Dear Editor:

I was not going to write the editor this year. But, A.S. of Phoenix complaint about our police picking on our youth has irked me into a response.

I am grossly offended by the "music" that some of these young people dig on. Screaming is not singing. Rapping makes no sense when it is only vulgar words designed to insult, shock, or embarrass.

Worst of, all is, the noise is so loud I seldom can make out what the words are. When I hear your thump, thump, thump of the 20" bass, 300 watts, I wonder just how stupid you are or what kind of drugs you're using. It is not pleasant for me. I also believe that it is a waste of money. I think you should buy the finest high quality headphones, and plug it directly into your head without confronting me.

My assumption of A.S. is a young adult who visited here and found out that we expect some respect to the community. You may have a cool car, and at an auto show it may be popular and win awards, but on the street going past my house it may be an annoyance.

Alturas is a crossroads and stopping point for some of the coolest autos around. Their owners know we appreciate their vehicles as they tour our city. But they have respect for us also. Those Hot Rods, that I know have Mega Watt Audio systems are well within listening levels.

What makes you think you have the right to disrupt and insult us? Tell us more about how our police treated you? I've met several at the fair, I have found them to be friendly and very helpful. If you get offended because someone advises you, that you are out of line then that is your problem, isn't it? Please stay in Phoenix.

--Mike Leahy Alturas, CA

Obituaries

Dorothy Meredith Spring

Dorothy Meredith Spring passed away in Alturas, Calif. from natural causes on February 24, 2001. She was 89.

Dorothy Forrest Meredith was born in Missouri on January 17, 1912. Her family moved to California before 1920 and before she entered junior high school. She grew up in Southern California and worked as a pharmacy assistant for many years.

She and Richard Spring were married on March 31, 1934 in San Diego, Calif. He preceded her in death in 1986. After a lifetime of living in Southern California, Dorothy relocated seven years ago to Alturas, Calif., where she was a member of Arrowhead Golf Club and leaves many golf friends. She loved playing golf and enjoyed cooking as well as having a good time.

She is survived by her daughter Madge M. Nolan of Alturas; sister Betty Jo Sechrest of San Bernardino, Calif.; sister Nellouise Keene of Indiana; brother Gordon Swing of Las Vegas, Nev.; and many relations throughout the western states.

Thomas Mathew Rea

Long-time Surprise Valley resident Thomas Mathew Rea passed away in Cedarville, Calif. on February 22, 2001 of natural causes at the age of 89.

Born in Lakeview, Ore. on November 25, 1911, the Rea family moved to Cedarville, Calif. in 1912. Thomas was the first born, followed by siblings, Leo Walter, born November 28, 1913; Wilma Ellen, born Oct. 24, 1915; Carmelita Bessey, born Dec. 14, 1922 and Samuel Allen born July 24, 1925.

Thomas graduated from Surprise Valley Elementary and Surprise Valley High School. He spent one year in the Bay area studying at the Electrical Engineering School. He returned to Cedarville and worked on ranches and farms until induction into the U.S. Army during World War II. He served four years and received his discharge August 11, 1945 at the rank of T-4. He had been a medical technician with the 318th station hospital during the service and served much of his service time in England.

After being discharged in 1945, he worked as a lab technician and X-ray technician for many years at the Surprise Valley Medical Clinic and Hospital. After his retirement, he enjoyed reading technical material and working in his yard. He was a member of the National Rifle Club, California State Sheriff's Association. "Tommie, as he was affectionately known to his many friends, will leave a spot in our hearts that will never be replaced," say family and friends.

Any memorial donations may be made to Surprise Valley Hospital, Medical Clinic or charity of the donor's choice. Services were held at graveside on February 26 at 10 a.m. at the Cedarville, Cemetery.

He is survived by his sisters Wilma E. Freeman of Benicia, Calif.; Carmelita, B. Newbry of Sparks, Nev.; and brother Samuel Allen Rea of Cedarville, Calif., and numerous nieces, nephews and relatives.

Martha Fee Cahill

Former Surprise Valley resident Martha Fee Cahill passed away at the family ranch in Adel, Oregon on Saturday, February 24, 2001. She was 76.

She was born Martha Diane Fee on January 22, 1935 to Laurance and Edna Fee in Reno, Nev. She attended Mt. Bidwell Elementary School and graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1952. Martha was a Modoc County Fair Princess in 1953. A member of the Gamma Phi Beta Sorority, she attended the University of Nevada at Reno for two years. Martha returned to the Fee Ranch in 1954, helping her mother cook for the ranch crew and assisting her father in ranch operations.

Martha married Terry Cahill in Cedarville, Calif. on June 3, 1956. When they returned from their honeymoon, they began their life as a married couple at the Cahill Ranch in Adel, Oregon, where they raised four sons. Martha's lifelong passions were her family and her horses. As she raised her sons, she also developed her quarter horse business, providing working Quarter Horses for the ranch and for sale. She was a 44-year member of the American Quarter Horse Association.

She also assisted for several years with a cattlemen's play day at the Leavitt Ranch in Goose Lake Valley. For more than 30 years, Martha was involved in the Lake County Horse Show, also serving as chairman.

Martha found time to be extremely involved in community activities. A member of the Adel School Board for many years, she also helped procure bus service for Adel students to attend high school in Lakeview. As a 20-year 4-H leader, Martha instructed many young people in leather work and horse activities. She was instrumental in establishing the Adel Cemetery. For many years, she helped with dinners and dance to raise money o the United Way and the March of Dimes.

Mrs. Cahill is survived by her sons and daughters-in-law Frank and Cynthia Cahill, Joe and Chandra Cahill of Adel; Hugh and Lesa Cahill and Will and Susie Cahill, Lakeview; grandchildren Terry and Carly Cahill of Adel and James, Jackie, Bill and Donna Cahill of Lakeview; sister Patricia Barry and brother and sister-in-law Jim and Susie Fee of Fort Bidwell; and sister-in-law Anna Sullivan of Adel and Helen and Margaret Cahill of Klamath County, numerous nieces and nephews and special family friend Josh Prom. Mrs. Cahill was preceded in death by her husband, Terry Cahill and her parents Laurance and Edna Fee.

Recitation of Holy Rosary was held Monday, Feb. 26 at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Lakeview. The Rev. Raymond Hopp held a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. on February 27 at St. Patrick's Catholic Church. Private inurnment will be at a later date.

Memorial contributions may be made to Lakeview Home Health and Hospice, care of Lake District Hospital. Ousley Osterman Huffstutter Funeral Chapel had charge of arrangements.

SPORTS

Willis, Wilson head to state championships

Modoc wrestlers Tony Willis and Blake Wilson were all business Saturday during the North Section Master's Tournament at the Redding Convention Center.

They both won their individual championships, Willis at heavyweight and Wilson at 215 pounds, and head now to the California State Championships in Stockton this weekend.

"It's the first time we've ever sent two champions to the state finals," said Modoc coach Shaun Wood. "It was pretty impressive at sections to have the two biggest, baddest guys in the final two matches from Modoc. And they dominated. It was never close." Wood said both wrestlers were on a mission and conducted themselves in a very focused, sportsmanlike and deliberate manner. Wood said he never doubted the outcome in the final matches.

Willis finished this part of the season at 34-0 and Wilson ends up being 38-1. Both have solid chances of placing at the state tournament, said Wood. It's no easy task. There will be 33 wrestlers in each division at the state tournament and in order to place, a wrestler will have to win at least four matches.

Last year, Willis finished just out of the medals when he went 3-2. Wilson whipped West Valley's Tanner Lovette, 10-4, to win the title and Willis won a lopsided 17-5 win over Reid Martin of Trinity.

In a freak accident, one of Modoc's top wrestlers Ross Lundgren, 189 pounds,, who had a good shot a placing high in sections was hurt in practice the day before the section began. Oddly enough, Lundgren was wrestling coach Wood, when he dislocated his knee on Thursday. Wood put the knee back in place, but it was too sore for Lundgren to wrestle Friday.

Modoc's Robert Flournoy, a sophomore, ran into a tough 125 pound weight group and did not place sections. Sophomore Billy Moriarity also had a strong 103 pound group and didn't place. Modoc's David Lutz also fell victim to some tough opponents, and didn't place. Wood said those three wrestlers did a good job, and also had praise for the efforts of Casey Poindexter, Luke Hammerness and Roger Cronley.

Surprise Valley whips Maxwell for berth in final game

The Surprise Valley Hornets beat Maxwell 52-50 Tuesday night to earn a berth in the North Section Division VI championship against Loyalton tonight. It took four free throws, two from Cassie Cockrell and two from Camryn Mullen in the closing seconds of the game to give the Hornets the lead.

Maxwell opened with a 14-12 first period lead, but Surprise Valley took the lead 29-25 by half. A cool third quarter allowed Maxwell to jump back in 38-36. Both teams scored 12 in the final period.

Mullen led Surprise Valley with 21 points, Cockrell added 19 and Alyssa Tierney had eight.

The Surprise Valley Hornet girls beat Bishop Quinn 49-34 in the opening round of the CIF North Section Division VI playoffs in Cedarville last Thursday. The game started tight with Surprise Valley leading 8-6 in the first and 22-16 by half. The Hornets held a 31--23 lead after three and outscored BQ 18-11 in the final period. Cassie Cockrell led he Hornets with 17 points, Alyssa Tierney added 10, and Tracy Reeves had eight.

Marchlooking great for Cedar snow park

The month of March can be one of the best snow sports months in Modoc, because there's plenty of winter left.

Anyone interested in next year's ski race team, check in and sign up at Cedar Pass Snow Park lodge. The age groups will be from six through high school.

The next regular meeting of the Cedar Pass Snow Park board is March 8, 7 p.m. BLM Alturas.

The Cedar Park lifts open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and on Sunday.

This season has been one of the best in recent years. Skiers should also check into the park's season punch cards which can save about 15 percent on lift costs. Those are available at the warming hut. The punch cards are good for the life of a card and can be used as gift or trade. They are good until they are punched out, this season or even into the future.

The snow park offers free lift tickets, free rental and a free lesson to first time skiers on their first day. For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323, which will be updated daily,

 

Harlem Clowns Beat Alturas

The Harlem Clowns did well living up to their name by clowning, dominating, and reeking playful havoc on the Alturas Rotary Basketball team, to a packed house at the Griswold Gym Saturday night.

There was no clowning around with the Clowns basketball playing that consisted of alley-opps, slam dunks, three man weaves and plenty of laughs. The audiences involvement was greatly encouraged and received as the Clowns gave a wonderful show of athleticism and comedy.

During the half time show children and parents alike, were given the opportunity to rub shoulders with the Harlem elite, as well as get their autographs. A 50/50 raffle was awarded at half time and an around the world basketball shoot out, that proved economical for all participants.

Over all a fun time was had by all. The proceeds the Rotary Club brought in will be awarded in form of a schloarship to a graduating senior.

Basketball ends in overtime

The Mododc 2000-2001 girls asketball season officially came to an end last Thursday at Etna when the Lady Braves lost by four points in overtime, in Round II of NSCIF Playoffs, 56-52.

The Braves opened with eight points, only one behind the Lion's nine. In the second period, Modoc toughened up both sides of their game, putting up nine points as Etna put up eight, tying the game at the half at 17 points.

Modoc came out strong in the third. Etna's zone defense made for an open field and Tatum Dunn took advantage of it as she hit three treys. Jessica Kern did the same with one of her own three's as the Braves racked up 16 points. The score was 33 to 30 at the start of the fourth quarter.

Etna hit a bucket that put them ahead by one point with 25 seconds left on the clock; their first lead in the quarter. After a time out, Jessica Kern got the ball and was fouled under the basket. Shw sank both shots, putting Modoc up by one, with 7.2 seconds left in the game.

Etna inbounded the ball to Brown who passed it to Journey, under the basket. Kern stepped in and fouled Journey, forcing her to the free throw line, with just under one second left Journey missed the first bucket, and sunk the second, sending the game into overtime, tied at 55. Staci Harris banked a three at the start of overtime, setting the pace for the rest of the period. Kristin Taylor broke up the pace with a steal and a pass to Rachel Gover, who brought it down court for and easy lay up.

Etna scored four points at the free throw line, and Modoc had five, but buckets by Perlman and Journey, gave the Lions the lead and the number one seeded team in the league went on to win. Leading scorers for that game were Tatum Dunn with 16, Jessica Kern had 13 points, and Stephanie McMaster rounded out the top three with 11 points.

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MARCH 8, 2001

Arrest of former student may have prevented tragedy Alturas

Police are crediting a Los Angeles Sheriff's Department arrest of a former Modoc High School student with possibly averting a major tragedy in Alturas this week.

On March 2, L.A. Deputies stopped a suspected stolen car driven by Jeffrey Scott Doss, age 20. Following the stop, Doss was arrested on charges of car theft, possession of a loaded and stolen firearm, possession of stolen credit cards and possession of marijuana. Doss attended Modoc High School as a junior in 1997-98. He had been back in Alturas and left about a month ago. Doss was already wanted in Modoc for failure to appear for a court date on a drug-related charge.

What happened following the Los Angeles arrest was of grave concern to Alturas Police. According to Chief of Police Larry Pickett, Doss allegedly told LA detectives that he was on his way to Alturas to kill five young people and then go to Modoc High School. In an interview with LA authorities, he explicitly named five local people he was going to kill, said Pickett. Four of those people were Modoc High students and another was a former student.

Pickett said Doss allegedly stole the car and stole the handgun in San Bernardino. Prior to that, said Pickett, he was arrested in Florida on drug paraphernalia charges. Pickett said Doss apparently called an Alturas friend, a juvenile, March 2 and said he was on his way to Alturas to carry out his plan He told the juvenile he would be in Alturas within 12 to 15 hours. Subsequent police interviews with local youths, many of them on the hit list, confirmed that Doss had made comments relating to "getting" some people who had caused him trouble. He also allegedly told local youth, and LA Detectives, that he was going to be shooting at Modoc High School. None of those young people, including the teenager he called Friday, said anything to anyone to warn them. "We, and the LA detectives believe he was definitely on his way to Modoc to carry out those threats," said Pickett.

"We should consider ourselves very fortunate that he was stopped in the stolen car." Had Doss carried out his threat, it would have come on the heels of a Monday shooting at a San Diego High School where two students were killed and 13 people injured. A 15-year-old freshman was arrested and will be tried as an adult for murder in that case.

Pickett said LA authorities are holding Doss on $1 million bail and Modoc is seeking an additional $100,000 bail on the failure to appear charge. Modoc District Attorney Tom Buckwalter said he will file five counts of making terrorist threats against Doss and will ask for a no-bail warrant.

Modoc High School staff addressed students Wednesday and will be working on efforts to improve communication with students. Dr. Kevin Jolly, Modoc Joint Unified School District Superintendent, advised staff Tuesday of the incident and they are in the process of reviewing their methods of training on how to deal with intruders. Jolly also said an effort needs to be made to train students to tell someone if they hear threats of this nature.

Doss is not related to the well known local Doss family, who have been in Modoc for generations.

Music students will perform at Spring Music Festival

The Griswold Gym will be filled with the sounds of music Wednesday, March 14 as students from grades four through 12 from Alturas Elementary School, Modoc Middle School, Modoc High School, and Arlington Elementary will perform at 7:00 p.m. at this year's Spring Music Festival.

Music Directors Darva Campbell of Alturas Elementary, Karen Siegel of MMS and MHS, and Eleanor Dorton of Arlington Elementary, will lead the student musicians through a variety of music. The fifth and sixth grade bands will jointly perform "Big Surprise" arranged by Sebesky, as well as "Krazy Klock." The seventh and eighth grade bands will play "Tribal Drums" and "Power Trip" with solos on Clarinet by Brittany Berchtold; Joey Catania on tenor saxophone, and Allison Campagna on Flute.

Modoc High School music students will perform several songs ranging from "Stars and Stripes" to "Peter Gunn" and "You Believed in Me," sung by the Modoc High choir. .

Lions helping kids in a very special way

When Modoc Child Protective Services workers respond to protect a youth and remove a child from harm, for any number of reasons, the rush to action does not allow for advance packing of a youth's belongings. Often their necessary items are loaded into a large plastic bag. To help remove some of the stress of relocating the child, Alturas Lions Club has stepped in and taken on a new project. It's one that began this week and provides backpacks, personal hygiene items, school supplies and more, to help the child make a smoother transition during unpleasant circumstances.

After contacting Pauline Cravens at Modoc Social Services about the Lions project, Pat Schluter asked if suitcases would be appropriate, but Cravens suggested backpacks due to their multiple uses. The Lions have pledged to continue to provide the backpacks, which can be used during the child's relocation, as well as to carry their school work in the days that follow.

Schluter credits this first time donation of 20 backpacks to Jeff at Chico Impact Sports. In addition, the Lions purchased toothbrushes, toothpaste, combs, school pens, pencils, crayons, coloring books, plus packages of disposable diapers and pacifiers for the youngest needs. Social Services staff will contact the local Lions Club as the supplies run low. It is through their many projects throughout the year that the Lions are able to provide for the project.

Little building in February

There was little building in the City of Alturas during February as eight building permits valued at $22,614 were issued.

Repair work, remodeling and re-roofing made up the bulk of the permits. The city collected $353 in fees.

The City of Alturas issued only three building permits in the month of January, valued at $7,570. ThatÊwas down from December, when four permits were issued valued at $32,880.

Letters to the Editor

Thanks for the Effort

Dear Editor:

The youth basketball was a huge success.

It took a great deal of time, every Friday night and Saturdays for almost two months to make this happen. That doesn't count the numerous hours that it took to get the program up and running.

A tremendous thanks to Kip Lybarger, David Nield and Susie Philpott. They did a fantastic job. A special thank you to the coaches and referees: Darlene Estes, Larry Estes, Kim Winbigler, Jodie Pence, Jolie Caughey, Dale Gaskey, Mike Morgan, Fritz Barclay, Bill Hall and Jay Eppler. It was a great first year!

--De Funk, Alturas

Kids like loud music

Dear Editor:

This is my response to your response to A.S. of Phoenix, Ariz. AS has been in the area all of his life, so he is not just passing through like you thought!

AS talked about the police harassing the teens but you were too focused on the loud music. Well, I'm sure when you were a teen your music got turned up, but did people wonder what kind of drugs you were on?

Just because kids like to listen to loud music, it doesn't mean they're on any drugs. I love to listen to my music and it's better when it's loud. I remember when I couldn't wait to slam in the old eight-track and crank the sound up!

Well, Bucko, I hate to shock you but your parents surely didn't like your music just like my parents didn't like mine. Usually they would say, "Sooner or later they will grow out of it," and that was that. Be thankful the kids have a hobby (fixing up their cars) which keeps them away from drugs and trouble.

So I think you need to wake up and get back to reality, Mr., because I don't find the "thump, thump" annoying. Every teen enjoys it so let them enjoy themselves and leave them alone. Sorry you couldn't make out the words in their music so stop listening! I'm sure your parents didn't know the words to your music.

Just for your information, I enjoy hotrods. I grew up around them, and have many of them in the family. We played our music loud when we were restoring them (and we were not on drugs!) So get a hobby or get a life!

--Julia Shepherd, Alturas

Obituaries

Joe T. Allen, Jr.

Joe T. Allen, Jr., 77, of Apache Junction, Arizona, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2001 in the Apache Junction Health Center.

Mr. Allen was a long-time Alturas resident and 52-year member of the Elks Lodge and a Life member of both the Lions Club and Elks Lodge, always willing to help wherever needed.

He was born in Wallawa, Oregon. For many years, he was a salesman and driver for WilliamÕs Bakery serving the Alturas area and made many friends. He was an avid golfer and softball player during his years in Alturas, Calif. and a member of the Arrowhead MenÕs Golf Club.

Following his retirement, he and wife Helen spent winters in Apache Junction, Ariz. and returned to Alturas during the late Spring through Fall seasons. Mr. Allen was the winner of many golfing awards.

He is survived by his wife Helen of Apache Junction; daughter Sandee Holiday of Surprise, Ariz.; son Kenneth of Springfield, Va.; sister June Tedrick of Roseburg, Ore.; and stepbrothers Bob Allen, Ed Allen and T.J. Allen. Mr. AllenÕs grandchildren include Marcie Burnett and Jodie Grittman of Phoenix; Jeff and Brian Allen of Springfield, Va; great-grandchildren Konnor Burnett and twins, Alexis and Elizabeth Grittman of Phoenix.

A memorial service will be held at Prospector Park in Apache Junction at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, with aerial scattering of his ashes on Superstition Mountain in Arizona.

"Andy" Lloyd J. Anderson

A memorial service for "Andy" Lloyd James Anderson will be held today, March 8 at 11:00 a.m. at the Alturas Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Alturas, with President Harold Montague giving the service.

Mr. Anderson, a resident of Alturas since 1991, passed away peacefully on March 4, 2001 in Alturas, Calif., after a courageous battle with cancer. Born in San Diego, Calif. on January 11, 1930 to Lloyd Joseph and Goldie Anderson, the family moved to Pagosa Springs, Colo., when he was young. He graduated from high school in Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Mr. Anderson was a veteran having served his country with the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict in the early 1950s. He married Mary Camacho-Velasquez on November 11, 1962 and the two have shared 38 years of marriage.

Mr. Anderson worked as a supervisor for Precision Aluminum Plant and Valley Precision Sheet Metal and retired from Neal Feay Company in Goleta, Calif. after 18 years. Mr. Anderson lived life to its fullest. He also enjoyed hobbies of oil painting, fishing and hunting. He and wife Mary enjoyed building their own cabin in the mountains above Alturas, They began their cabin construction in 1981. When he retired in 1991, he and Mary came to Alturas to live in their completed cabin. Mr. Anderson was an active volunteer with the California Pines Volunteer Fire Department during his years in Modoc County.

He is survived by his loving wife Mary; two children, Sherman Lee Anderson of Buellton, Calif.; Robert William Anderson of Ventura, Calif.; three children by a previous marriage, Stephen Crouse of Pagosa Springs, Colo.; Janet Reiger of Fruita, Colo. and Sharon Schultz of Grand Junction, Colo.; nine grandchildren; a brother, Franklin Anderson of Ignacio, Calif.; sisters Myrtle Snow of Pagosa Springs, Colo. and Evelyn Anton of Corbett, Ore.

Nettie Gaustad

Private cremation rites were held for Nettie Lavina Gaustad of Florence, Ore. who died Feb. 12, 2001 of age-related causes. She was 85.

Gaustad was born March 14, 1915, in Madeline, Calif., to Clifford and Myrtle Turner McCarter. She married Norman Gaustad in Lakeview, Ore. on Jan. 11, 1933. He later died. She and her husband spent several years ranching before they went into the grocery business in Wellington, Nev. They retired to Salem in the early 1970s. She moved to Florence in 1997. She was a homemaker and enjoyed cooking, canning, reading and needlework. She especially enjoyed tending her yard and rose garden.

Survivors include a daughter Linda Steward of Florence; a sister, Evelyn Ducasse of Alturas, Calif.; three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. At her request, no services will be held. Burns' Riverside Chapel/Florence Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Memorial contributions may be made to Shangri-la Services for the mentally and physically challenged.

Evelyn O. Goss

Graveside services for Evelyn O. Goss, age 65, will be held March 10, 2001, 11 a.m. at the Likely Cemetery Mrs. Goss died March 6, 2001 in at her home McMinnville, Oregon.

She was born January 1, 1936 in El Centro, California to Lee and Nolia Bailey Lain. At an early age, she moved to Santa Rosa and later attended Santa Rosa High School. She married Darrel Goss August 5, 1954 in Santa Rosa where she raised her family. Following High School graduation she went to work for AT&T telephone company. She later worked in a dry cleaning business and in 1973 went to work for Optical Coating Labs and worked here into the mid-80s. She continued her working life through 1993 when she and her husband retired and moved to McMinnville. They spent there retirement years traveling and enjoying her family. Her family was very important to her.

Mrs. Goss is survived by her husband, of McMinnville; a son Darrell Goss of Alturas; daughters, Deana Hodson, Olathe, KS; Marie Shelton, Lower Lake, Ca.; Sue Tatton, McMinnville; brothers, Arnold Lain, Redding; Estle Lain, Imperial, CA.; John Lain, Kinnear, WY; sisters, Maxine Lancaster, Likely; Joy Neal, Likely; Thelma Lancaster, Klamath Falls; Bervelene Lancaster, Fruitland, ID.; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a brother, Aaron Lain and a grandchild, Amy Goss.

There will be a time of visiting at Kerr Mortuary in Alturas, March 9 2 p.m. until 7 p.m. The Pastor Robert Lake will officiate.

SPORTS

Willis fourth, Wilson fifth in state;

Modoc runner-up in state Modoc's Braves had the best showing ever at the California State Wrestling Championships in Stockton last weekend, with heavyweight Tony Willis placing fourth and 215-pound Blake Wilson taking a fifth.

In addition, the Braves earned the runner-up award for the small schools state championship. Small schools at state were those with enrollments of fewer than 1,500 students. Modoc has an enrollment of about 320 students. Modoc placed higher than any North Section School, including powerhouses like Anderson who took six wrestles to state, but only one placed, an eighth.The winner of the Small Schools state title was North View (of Covina) with 31.5 points and Modoc was second with 31.0 points.

In the state championships, there are no division breakdowns for individual titles, so Willis and Wilson were fourth and fifth, respectively, of all wrestlers in the state. And along the way, they beat several wrestlers who were ranked in the state.

"To give you an idea of how well they did, the North Section sent 28 wrestlers to state, and only four placed," said Modoc coach Shaun Wood. "And two of those were from Modoc. The kid from Durham took a seventh and a kid from Anderson took an eighth. We did just great. We've never had anyone place at state.

" By placing in the top six, Wilson and Willis have qualified for the National Championships. Wood said he isn't sure just where and when that tournament is set.

Willis opened the tourney with a 7-3 win over Jimmy Hasset, of Terra Nova. He then pinned Chase Gormley of Torrance at the 2:55 mark in the second match.

Willis met six-foot, nine inch Ed Blanton of Napa in his third match and won 7-0.

In the semi-final match, Willis lost in overtime by one point to Jerry Cearley of Lincoln. Had he won that match he would have been in the championship. Cearley placed second overall.

Willis came back in the next match to beat Jacob Hallmark, of Clovis 3-1. Hallmark had beaten Willis in double overtime last year to knock him out of the medal round and Willis was up to the task. "I was afraid Tony would be down after the overtime loss, so there was no one I'd rather have seen him have to wrestle next than Hallmark," said Wood.

In the third place round, Willis was victimized said Wood by an illegal hold by Mitch Quist of Elk Grove. The hold caused Willis to hyperextend his elbow and he could not go on.

Willis beat several state ranked wrestlers including, Gormley who was ranked number two, Hallmark, number five, Quist was number three and Blanton who was ranked ninth.

Wilson opened with a 10-7 win over Gary Ullrich, of Capistrano and then beat Nick Flores of Galt, 11-8 in his second match. Ullrick was ranked sixth in the state and Flores was ranked third. In his third match, Wilson ran into the eventual state champion, Allen Kennett of Mayfair, and lost 13-6.

Following that match, he beat Brandon Mead of Poway, 6-3, and followed that by pinning Darrin Murphy of Vacaville in 38 seconds. Wilson then lost a tough match to Apollo Johnson of Elk Grove 10-11.

One of the real highlights for Wilson came in the match for 5th place. He met Sandeep Gosal, of James Logan High, the number one ranked wrestler coming into the tournament. Wilson stepped on the mat and pinned Gosal in 19 seconds.

"It was pretty impressive," said Wood. "Even the ref looked around in disbelief. Blake just stuck him.

" Wood said Wilson and Willis have worked hard all year and the success at state tournament was not surprising. "But we were, by far, the smallest school to have kids place in the top six," said Wood. "We also had a lot of fan support down there. We really appreciated those folks."

SV varsity girls win Division VI section

The Surprise Valley girls varsity basketball team beat Loyalton last week to win the CIF North Section Division VI Championship.

The Record received no information on the game, but hopefully will be able to update next week.

Modoc hosts baseball, softball

By Esteban Fernandez

Modoc's varsity baseball and softball teams will get out on the field this Friday and Saturday for some long awaited ball playing, as the Braves will play host to their annual baseball tournament. The Braves will meet up with Hayfork, Portola, Liberty Christian, and Butte Valley.

The tournament will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Friday the 9th, with the varsity boys facing off Portola and the girls playing Liberty Christian. Both teams will play again Friday afternoon at 3:00 p.m., and at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday. According to Brad Server, head coach of Braves varsity baseball team, "We're doing really good. We've had a lot our best players come back this season and I predict we're going to be at the top." Eight players from last year's squad will be returning to Server's leadership, seniors Sheldon Bensen, Glen Christensen, Ramon Molina, Brett Spicer, Lucas Tramatonas, junior Blake Thorn, All-league Kris Server, and All-league and Team MVP Anthony Northrup. Top newcomers are juniors Eric Miller, Jared McGarva, Logan Wilson and rounding out the rest of the team are James Brogan, Christian Hagge, Adam Fitzpatrick, Matt Krauel, and Chris Ridgway. Tim MacDonell, a former high school baseball All-league athlete and four year college baseball veteran, will help out the Braves with his expertise as assistant coach, along with Mike Server.

The Braves are returning all their pitchers this season except for one. Kris Server and Lucas Tramontonas will be the Braves two main rotating pitchers, but Sheldon Benson and Ramon Molina can expect to see a lot more playing time on the mound as well, and McGarva, Miller, and Spicer will be trading off from behind the plate.

Modoc baseball has been moved up from Division IV to Division III, but the expansion in playoffs from four teams to eight will better the Braves odds to getting a league title.

Dennis Banister will lead this year's varsity softball team again for his fourth year with help from assistant coach Dave McMaster, into what they hope will be the top three slots in league.

Returning seniors are Stephanie McMaster, who will provide strong pitches for the Braves, Jessica Kern, Laura Toaetolu, Mandy La Plante, and Niki Poindexter.

The Lady Braves squad continues with Charlene Stevens, Kayla Cruse, Jilene Mastangi, Shay Farmer, Kristen Clough, Julie Watters, and sophomores Stephanie Parnow and Brianna Berchtold.

Banister feels that he has a well rounded team all through out the field and behind the plate, and if the ladies hit well it will be hard to stop them.

Banister looks forward to the rest of the year and commented "It's going to be a good season."

Cedar Pass Snow Park going strong

Skiing at the Cedar Pass Snow Park has been great and the hill is in the midst of one of its best seasons ever.

According to snow park officials, the latest storms had added great snow and the season is "far from over."

The next regular meeting of the Cedar Pass Snow Park board is March 8, 7 p.m. BLM Alturas. The public is invited. The Cedar Park lifts open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and on Sunday. Skiing is a good way to get into shape and to stay in shape during the winter.

Skiers should also check into the park's season punch cards which can save about 15 percent on lift costs. Those are available at the warming hut. The punch cards are good for the life of a card and can be used as gift or trade. They are good until they are punched out, this season or even into the future.

Anyone interested in next year's ski race team, check in and sign up at Cedar Pass Snow Park lodge. The age groups will be from six through high school.

The snow park offers free lift tickets, free rental and a free lesson to first time skiers on their first day.

For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323, which will be updated daily, or check the sports page of the Modoc County Record web site at www.modocrecord.com.

MARCH 15, 2001

Tulelake farmers stage peaceful rally for future

The possibility of low, late or no irrigation water delivery forced Tulelake Farmers into the streets -- in a peaceful demonstration last Friday to bring some public attention to their plight.

About 8 a.m., more than 200 tractors made a trek from Merrill, 19 miles north to Klamath Falls and on to the Bureau of Reclamation Offices. Many of the tractors flew American Flags and were posted with a variety of sayings, including: "No water, no farms," "Wake up! BabbittÕs Gone," "We feed America," and more.

The streets of Klamath Falls, especially Washburn Way, were lined by supporters of the demonstration, many in pickups sporting American Flags and kids. The parade attracted a lot of attention along the Highway 39 route to Klamath Falls.

The issue concerns water and an impending drought that may mean not enough water for all users. Reclamation officials have advised Tulelake Farmers they will get water later than usual and may have no water by summer because of tribal trust rights and endangered suckers whose standing are of higher water rights priority.

On normal years, onions would be in the ground by now and if the water delivery is delayed until projected as April 1, itÕs going to mean more money for labor and water.

According to Tulelake farmer and Modoc County Supervisor Nancy Huffman, the basin is usually full of farming activity by this time each year and the current silence is foreboding. She said she has never seen things quite this bad.

And things were not made any better this week when the Fish and Wildlife Service issued a draft biological opinion condemning the BORÕs operation in the basin.

That draft opinion states that Reclamation's long-term operation of the Klamath Project threatens the continued existence of two federally protected native fish species, the endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers. The Service expects to issue its final opinion prior to the start of the irrigation season the first week of April 2001.

"The water quality and quantity in the wetlands surrounding Upper Klamath Lake needs to improve and canals need to be screened," said Michael J. Spear, manager of the Service's California/Nevada Operations Office, which includes the Klamath Basin. He further stated that "high nutrient levels cause algae to grow, which in turn creates low levels of dissolved oxygen and ammonia which are toxic to fish."

The Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker are prized by the Klamath Tribes. The Tribes voluntarily closed their treaty fishery for these species in 1986 because of population declines, losing a centuries-long food source and a central aspect of their culture. Both species were listed as endangered in 1988.

Today's draft biologist opinion of the Klamath Project marks the fifth time the Service had found ReclamationÕs long-term operation of the Klamath Project to be in violation of the Endangered Species Act. The Service published previous opinions in 1989, 1991, twice in 1992, and in 1994 that allowed operation of the project with modified lake levels. Sucker populations continued to decline, however, because of poor water quality.

The draft opinion calls for fall lake levels that are one foot higher than have been previously maintained, and outlines other alternatives for the Klamath Project including screening irrigation canals, the need for passage of suckers at dams, and further study of the Basin's ecology. According to FWS, the Lost River sucker and the shortnose sucker, face the possibility of extinction primarily because of poor water quality and loss of habitat in the basin, which has cut their range and number by about 95 percent since the beginning of the 19th century. High mortality rates are also due to juvenile suckers being lost through irrigation canals.

Between 1995 and 1997, an estimated 80 to 90 percent of both populations died as a result of poor water quality and unscreened irrigation canals. The Klamath Project consists of three main reservoirs totaling about 100,000 acres. That area includes about 500 miles of canals and ditches, and numerous water control structures. The project provides irrigation water to 220,000 acres of private lands in California and Oregon, as well as to the TuleLake and Lower Klamath national wildlife refuges.

Farmers in the Tulelake Basin have come up with plans of their own to help the endangered suckers, without cutting off their own water supply and livelihood.

They suggest removing a dam on the Sprague River which blocks the suckersÕ access to traditional spawning grounds and they also argue the FWS higher level for Klamath Lake has no historical basis.

They also suggest adding gravel to spawning areas, improving access to some spawning areas, aerating shallow waters and removing some nonnative fish which prey on the suckersÕ young.

In addition, seven conservation groups have threatened a lawsuit against BOR and the Klamath Project for what it calls a continued failure to protect the endangered fish and bald eagle population.

Exit exams "fair" according Modoc High School Dean

This year, 43 of Modoc High SchoolÕs 91 freshmen students volunteered to take the new, state-required High School Exit Exam covering both English and math.

The English portion of the test was taken March 7 and the math portion was taken on March 13. For the most part, said Modoc High School Dean of Students Jim McLaughlin, students felt the test was fair.

Prior to this year, Modoc High students had to pass a proficiency test in order to graduate so the new tests are not completely foreign. The difference is the current 10th, 11th and 12th graders do not have to take the new exit exam and the current ninth graders wonÕt have to take the proficiency test.

There are differences in the test, said McLaughlin, including the addition of algebra components. McLaughlin said the test standards have been viewed by staff and administrators and they know what students are expected to learn.

He feels the test will be a good measure for the school. For students who pass, it will be a step forward and students who fail will know where they need to improve.

"Most of the students I talked with after the test Tuesday felt it was fair and not all that difficult," said McLaughlin. "They felt pretty good about the test. If they had problems, those were generally in areas they hadnÕt been exposed to yet."

This is not a one chance test. Students have ample opportunity to pass and will be able to get remedial help on areas that may cause them trouble. Students will have three test dates in each of their sophomore, junior and senior years to take the test, plus one test will be given after graduation for those who have not yet passed. The state will require one year of algebra to graduate high school soon, and is recommending first exposure to algebra for all students in eighth grade.

State Board of Education President Reed Hastings said the new test represents a higher level of accountability for both school and students and will be a challenge to high school students, who will have multiple examination opportunities between the ninth and 12th grades.

"At this point in the California educational system, we are working diligently with our school districts to implement CaliforniaÕs rigorous standards," said Hastings. New standard-based core curriculum materials in mathematics are now available at our schools. Algebra will soon be required for all high school students. The state is moving to make certain that a sufficient number of mathematics instructors available."

McLaughlin said the new exit test are a good tool for students, teachers and for parents. He looks at the new test as a way to help students in areas where they may be struggling. The high school will able to address its strengths and possible weaknesses.

"LetÕs be quite clear that this yearÕs test marks the beginning of the program -- not its completion," said Hastings. "Other states that have similar programs have found that, in the early years of testing, a large number of students did not pass during their first attempt. In the short term, the plan is to guarantee that those students who did not pass the test get the remedial assistance necessary in order to be successful on this exam. In the long term, we believe that our students will be better equipped for success not only in school, but life in general."

Modoc DA charges 5 counts of attempted murder, threats

District Attorney Tom Buckwalter has filed charges alleging attempted murder in Modoc against Jeffrey Scott Doss, age 20, who was arrested this month in Los Angeles.

Doss will face charges in Modoc Courts on five counts of attempted murder, five counts of making criminal threats and a no-bail warrant has been issued here. He first faces several felony counts in Los Angeles and arraignment in L.A. County this Friday.

While initial reports said L.A. Deputies stopped Doss because he was driving a suspected stolen car, the actual cause for the stop was a seatbelt violation. Following the stop, Doss was arrested on charges alleging car theft, possession of a loaded and stolen firearm, possession of stolen credit cards and possession of marijuana.

Doss attended Modoc High School as a junior in 1997-98. He had been back in Alturas and left about a month ago.

According to Chief of Police Larry Pickett, Doss allegedly told L.A. detectives that he was on his way to Alturas to kill five young people and then go to Modoc High School and continue shooting. In an interview with L.A. authorities, Doss named five local people he was going to kill, said Pickett. Four of those people were Modoc High students and another was a former student.

Students at Modoc High School have maintained calm and were generally pleased with how the situation was handled by the school and police. Students believe Modoc High is safe and the district administration is working with local police on preparedness. "I think things are back to normal this week," said Dean of Students Jim McLaughlin.

Pickett said Doss allegedly stole the car and handgun in San Bernardino. Prior to that, said Pickett, he was arrested in Florida on drug paraphernalia charges.

Pickett said Doss apparently called an Alturas friend, a juvenile and said he was on his way to Alturas to carry out his plan. He told the juvenile he would be in Alturas within 12 to 15 hours. Subsequent police interviews with local youths, many of them on the "hit" list, confirmed that Doss had made comments relating to "getting" some people who had caused him trouble.

He also allegedly told local youth, and L.A. Detectives, that he was going to be shooting at Modoc High School. None of those young people, including the teenager he called last Friday, said anything to anyone to warn them.

Pickett said L.A. authorities are holding Doss on $1 million bail and Modoc is seeking an additional $100,000 bail on the failure to appear charge. Doss was already wanted in Modoc for failure to appear for a court date on a drug-related charge.

Rail cars prove new home for AFD Fire Training Center

There is nothing quite like hands-on training to a firefighter. To meet that need, Alturas City Fire DepartmentÕs new vision for a fire training center is becoming a reality.

Currently in its rough stages, the facility should be in partial use by early summer, figures Roger Dorris AFD Fire Chief.

The proceeds from the recent AFD fund-raiser drawing ticket sales will boost the construction efforts of the center.

The center is unique in that it is recycling and making use of three defunct railroad cars donated by Union Pacific Rail Company, removed from the tracks, and CO-located side by side.

Access to the AFD Fire Training Center is through a locked gate and the "center" is hidden behind old Alturas Mill buildings, out of view from the surrounding Alturas Railroad Museum and the future Lost River Amphitheater. The location is perfect with water easily accessible and plenty of parking for fire training participants and of no disturbance to neighbors.

With no nearby fire training center, other than one located in Mt. Shasta, AFD volunteers currently have been simulating training by creating conditions such as poor visibility in a smoke-filled room, then placing "dummies" to be rescued.

Few practice "burns" take place in the city, with so many restrictions and no burning of asbestos siding which covers many older homes, some of which were used in the past for practice burns. Hands-on training is limited.

Leaving the area for training is not practical, notes Dorris. The first point being everyone is a volunteer, scheduling the travel and time is difficult in addition to the major drawback of leaving the area without fire protection. "We just canÕt do that," said Dorris.

The concept to use the rail cars was a brainstorm after AFD members visited the Mt. Shasta facility. Now, the task is underway to re-create the interior of the rail cars into a 3,000 square foot "residence."

Lined up side by side, all the heavy metal rail car sliding doors have been pushed open, making it possible to walk from one car directly into the next. The shell of the cars will remain the same, but the car interiors will be converted to resemble a home, using concrete board material for the interior walls. Some of the interior walls will be moveable to allow for floor plan changes.

"When you respond to a fire at a home, often, the home is smoke-filled and visibility is poor. A firefighter can never know exactly where everything is located in each house," explains Dorris. "With the moveable walls in the fire training center, weÕll be able to change the floor plan around, so the training is always effective and never quite the same. WeÕll be able to show the conditions and changes that cause a flashover, just before it happens, instead of trying to describe those conditions. And it will all be in a controlled setting."

The ceilingÕs grid beam work is in place, created by Al Arena and two new vents are visible.

A series of vents will be placed into the ceiling, to make both the type of flame and heat controllable. Radio contact will be maintained continually by those in training, with those controlling conditions.

Metal residence doors will replace the sliding train car doors at the entry and between rooms to resemble a residence. Five thousand dollars in city funds and Alturas Fire Department funds initiated the project. Much of the work will be donated. The recent AFD ticket sale fund-raiser proceeds will enable the AFD to continue the construction, notes Dorris.

The expense of the cement board is hefty and the wall covering must be replaced for safety, as its effectiveness wears down. Dorris credits AFD volunteer Gary Spicer with obtaining the first two units of concrete board siding through a donation from Certanteed Siding.

The goal of the Alturas City Fire Training Center will be to offer training for the local volunteers, those within the county, and in the future to offer the facility to neighboring needs, whose only cost may be the donation of units of concrete board to replace the interior walls, after a practice fire inside the center.

Eventually, a nearby tower will be constructed for fire rescue training, on a higher level, notes Dorris. The facility will be the only one of its kind in Modoc County. "ItÕs something we are really pretty excited about," said Dorris.

Sierra Nevada team coming to Alturas

The Sierra Nevada Framework Implementation team will be in Alturas Tuesday, March 20, to explain how the project will be implemented.

A Record of Decision for the Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment Environmental Impact Statement was signed in January, which culminated a two-and-a-half year effort. The five problem areas analyzed were old forest emphases; fire and fuels; aquatic, riparian and meadow ecosystems; lower westside hardwoods; and noxious weeds on 11 national forest of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and Modoc Plateau.

Scientist and specialists representing each of the problem areas comprise the Implementation Team for the Sierra Nevada Framework. The Team's visit to Modoc will be the first in their schedule of forest visits. The Modoc County Board Framework personnel throughout the process.

Team leader, Steve Clauson said the visit to Modoc will be pivotal in this process. "we are looking forward to meeting with the people of Modoc County and hearing their comments and concerns," said Clauson.

The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m., March 20 at the Sacred Heart Parish Hall, 507 East 4h Street, Alturas. Restrictions in place for Delta Lake, Nelson Corral areas.

The Bureau of Land Management's Alturas Field Office has announced the seasonal road closure of the Delta Lake Road in Modoc County, and travel restrictions in the Nelson Corral Reservoir area of Lassen County. Both travel restrictions went into effect March 12.

The Delta Lake Road is closed to motor vehicles at the north end of Bayley Reservoir Dam. Vehicle access to Nelson Corral Reservoir is limited to existing roads. These measures are designed to reduce road damage and watershed impacts when wet and muddy conditions prevail, according to BLM Alturas Field Manager, Tim Burke.

"Although precipitation has been below normal this winter, these roads are still muddy and susceptible to damage," Burke explained. "Restrictions will be lifted when conditions improve." Up-to-date road condition information is available at the BLM office in Alturas, (530) 233-4666, or on the BLM website at www.ca.blm.gov/alturas.

The plan for seasonal road closures and travel restrictions was developed last year, when staff from the Alturas Field Office worked with a group of local outdoor enthusiasts to develop a way to provide for spring access to popular fishing lakes, while avoiding damage to roads and adjacent wetlands.

Letters to the Editor

Teach respect for law, others

Dear Editor:

I couldn't resist responding to the letter of the individual who sees nothing wrong with the kids breaking the law. It's unfortunate that there are parents that actually encourage their kids to be disrespectful and irresponsible in a vehicle.

I cringe every time I see these kids driving around the park, running the stop sign in front of our house, playing "chase" with their buddies, (with their rap music rattling our windows and their car windows rolled up!) I fear one of these days, a child is going to get hit that has been playing at the park.

I know that after a good snowfall, I have had to listen to the "kids" spinning brodies in front of my house until midnight. The really intelligent ones turn back halfway down the block to spin out again and again, they want to make sure I know their make, model and year of their car. They get on our sidewalk, barely missing our fence, on occasions. My husband has often gone out to check our fence and to see that no one was hurt, believe me, he won' t hear "sorry" because they were our just having "fun."

Apparently, it's ok for people to vandalize, play vulgar music, race around town etc. After all, it's only in the name of "fun."

I will give credit where it is due, though. I will say that there are young adults in the junior/senior classes that are driving better than those in the last few years. There are a few "kids" that have been out for years, still cruising around. They refuse to mature. They are the ones who give a bad name to all the young adults who may cruise around, but are respectful.

Sure, I cruised Main when I was a "kid," but I had total respect to the law and those around me. If I got pulled over, it was no one's fault but my own.

I also had a healthy respect for my parents and if they so much as heard I was up to no good, they would meet me at the door with their hand out for my car keys and driver's license!

I've lived many years on the street the kids use for cruising to get back on Main. Mrs. Shepard, we too have had many hot rods in our garage over the years, but that does not mean we do not respect those around us.

--Jodi Pence,

Alturas

Take care of your dogs

Dear Editor:

People of Modoc, when the sun goes down and your dog is not at home, it means they're up to no good.

They are your responsibility. Don't make me the bad guy.

--Greg Knuepel

Alturas

Batteries, shooting of firearms

Dear Editor:

We're a new concerned resident of Pit River Estates. We're concerned about our water and property. There's a lot of dumping going on behind Pit River Estates and Centerville Road toward Cal Pines. Our biggest concern is the dumping of so many batteries. These batteries will eventually end up in our water system.

We, as residents, wonder why they drive by the dump or transfer station with these batteries when they can be dropped off free of charge at the transfer station. There must be 24 to 30 batteries out there. These batteries post a lot of danger to our environment.

We assume it's someone who deals in batteries, then they just dump them there, along with old refrigerator, stoves, couches and what ever unwanted trash from their residents.

These refrigerators and things only give them something to shoot at. By the way, there's a shooting range in this area, for shooting your guns. There are small children, men, women and animals in this area and bullets do stray and go a long way.

When these shooters are confronted, they say, "Well, we've done it for years." Time and things change and this area is becoming populated. It's no longer open range or country. You're invading our privacy and our private property.

There's also off road vehicles going across private property tearing up the terrain. How would you like it if we drove across your lawn or property, dumped our unwanted trash, batteries and old refrigerators in you back door, and took our guns and started shooting at them?

Some of these things have been there for years and some of then have been dumped recently. Think about our environment and health. Keep our community clean and free of trash. A very concerned citizen.

--Barbara Weaver Pit River Estate Citizen,

Alturas

Is the water tank leaning?

Dear Editor:

Is the water tank leaning?

It is a simple question.

So why can't I get an answer?

I know it will not tip over soon and if it did, it wont affect me. So, neighbors take a look at the North Water Tank on West 19th Street. Especially looking South from Sara Lane

Then, explain why, in a town where it seems that the only news comes from our local schools, and the Editor's article "Off the Record" encompasses the week's news events, are our public officials so busy they have no time to respond to a question of concern and safety? I sought the Editor's advice on Monday the 5th. He advised a letter to our mayor, which I delivered the next morning. A week has passed, and I have not received an acknowledgment. You judge my story.

I moved here in 1996. In my leisure time, I became aware that the water tank seemed to lean, but only a few inches. I think it was in '98 that the tank was relined. I spoke to a city employee then, thinking it was 8 to 10 inches out, but I realized my concern was passed off. For some reason, I now see the tank as having moved even more, closer to a foot or more. I decided to address the city officials.

And now I wait, and wait. Since I have not been advised other wise, I believe the community might want to be aware.

If we should get an earthquake, will it lean more? How fast is it moving? When was it built? Who built it? How many tons does it weigh? What geological studies were made? Was bedrock found? Was the site and soil preparations done properly? Is the base of proper size for a tank that large? Will it pose as a threat? Are you ready for an instant flood of city water of thousands of gallons?

Will the cost of damage to surrounding property be less than the cost for the city to fix it?

I'd be concerned. Property values are low and assessed valuation for structures are nowhere near replacement prices. Do you have money for the lawyers?

I can see at least four homes, businesses and the federal offices having water damage. I wonder if it would get the DMV/CHP or the school.

I must sound like Chicken Little, but I live on the other side, so why should I care? Mr. Steyer or Mr. Chase do not appear to have ordered an inspection this last week. Oh, well, maybe later.

Since it seems my concern is of little value, I will leave the matter here. You make up your own mind as just what should be done. I tried.

--Mike Leahy

Alturas

Concerned over CPS attitudes

Dear Editor:

I am a concerned citizen in our community, because the Child Protective Services just goes around and takes children from their homes.

They just know for sure that the parents are drug addicted and drunks or abusive without knowing for sure if these facts are true. You can't go on hearsay.

The Child Protective Services should find out the truth of the matter before they just start yanking people's kids from parents. But not in Alturas; they don't know what they truth is.

I would like to know what kind of smart school did these Child Protective people here in Alturas go to, because they just think they're so smart. But they are not as bright and smart as they think they are.

You have to have true facts before you can take a child out of its home. CPS, here in Alturas, doesn't go by the truth. They go by hearsay and allegations.

Well, what's up with that? Well, let me tell you, they're crooked and railroading people in our community and people should stick up for they're rights and don't let these CPS people run all over us parents for no reason.

--Sherri Larson

Alturas

Good Samaritan a Godsend

Dear Editor:

Last week, I was treated to being the recipient of a very kind act and I'd like to publicly thank Carol Adams for her help.

My husband and I were driving home from Reno on Wednesday, and we stopped our car at Standish. When we returned to our car, it would not start. It was dead and no amount of tinkering could get the motor to start again. It was 5 p.m. We had animals 94 miles away needing to be fed and put indoors.

Panic. How to get to Alturas before nightfall? My husband called for a tow truck from Susanville and I made a sign saying, "Need ride to Alturas." I found Carol Adams at the gas station there checking her luggage. She was just returning home from Florida.

When I hesitantly asked her if she was driving to Alturas and could I have a ride, she sized me up, took and gulp, and said, "Sure." My husband stayed with the car in Susanville.

Thanks for the trust, Carol. And thanks for being a good Samaritan.

--Emilie Martin-Sharpless

Alturas

Obituaries

Ruth Adele Asher

Word was received late Wednesday, that Alturas native Ruth Adele Asher, passed away in Redding, Calif. on March 13, 2001.

Mrs. Asher was born in Alturas, Calif. on August 12, 1908.The gracious Mrs. Asher was a longtime member of the Native Daughters of the Golden West, Alturas Parlor.

Arrangements are pending at this time.

Mable Ann Richmond

Services for former Alturas resident Mable Ann Richmond, were held Wednesday, March 14 at 2:00 p.m. at the Likely, Calif. Cemetery.

Mrs. Richmond passed away in Klamath Falls, Ore. on March 10, 2001, a few days following her sixtieth birthday. Born Mable Ann Roberts in Alturas, Calif. on March 4, 1940, she attended Alturas schools. On November 21, 1974, she and John Richmond were married in Reno, Nevada. The couple made their home in Bly, Ore. where Mrs. Richmond was a beneficial partner to their self-owned corporation.

"She was a terrific wife, a wonderful mother and an outstanding grandmother," say family members. Her family was her top priority. Mrs. Richmond spent 40 years in Modoc where she loved to hunt for deer. She killed some very fine, large mule deer and also enjoyed fishing. She had been away from Modoc, for the past 21 years. Mrs. Richmond was an avid dog lover and she enjoyed training and giving the dogs attention and care. She spent a lot of time in her yard and flower gardens, which brought her much pleasure. She was extremely talented at decorating, flower arranging and landscaping. One of her favorite places to be was the desert. She enjoyed what nature had to offer and leaves many friends.

She is survived by her husband John Richmond of Bly, Ore.; son Warren and daughter-in-law Laurey Patridge of Bly, Ore.; granddaughters Christina and Michelle Partridge of Bly, Ore.; sisters Donna Roberts of Rocklin, Calif. and Arlene Gann of Sacramento, Calif.

SPORTS

Braves Baseball & Softball sweep home tournament

The Braves proved to their guests and themselves during their first games of the year their capability of battling for league titles. This weekend the Braves baseball, softball, and JV baseball teams went undefeated and brought home first place trophies. Managers Brad Server and Dennis Banister hope to do the same this weekend when the Braves will travel to the Liberty Christian Tourney.

Baseball

Ramon Molina warmed up the mound Friday afternoon against Portola, as he pitched two and one third innings, striking out six and giving up three runs.

Lucas Tramontonas finished up the inning striking out two hitters. Blake Thorn took the mound for, what would be the last two innings of the game, giving up only one hit with no runs and went on to strike out four batters.

Jared McGarva lead the Braves with three RBI's, Brett Spicer went three for three, Kris Server scored four runs for the Braves and Tramontonas brought home a guaranteed win with two home runs. The Braves went on to beat Portola 18-3

Sheldon Benson had three strike outs in the first three and one third innings of the Braves second outing against Hayfork.

However, it was Tramatonas who got the win for the Braves as he pitched nearly three innings, chalking up four strikeouts with no walks.

Server finished pitching the last inning striking out all three batters . Anthony Northrup led the Braves hitting three for four with two RBI's and Ramon Molina was two for four. Modoc scored on two infield home runs, totaling eight runs on 10 hits and no errors. Brad Server managed to get around to all six pitchers as Logan Wilson started the Braves off in the first three innings of the Braves final game against Liberty Christian, throwing three no hitters and one walk.

Kris Server came in as relief pitcher for the last two innings of the game with four strikeouts and one hit. Server was three-for-three in the batters box, scoring four runs, totaling 10 runs this weekend, which earned him a position on the All-Tournament team. Brett Spicer was voted MVP as he hit seven of 11 including a Grand Slam during the championship game against Liberty Christian that gave Modoc an 11 run spread, giving them the win.

Softball

The Lady Braves' Stephanie McMaster pitched a no-hit 7-0 shut-out over Liberty Christian, giving Modoc a win to open the tournament. McMaster pitched to 27 hitters, stuck out 12 and walked five. The Lady braves played host to Hayfork later in the afternoon, with sophomore Brianna Berchtold starting on the mound. Modoc shut out Hayfork in the first inning, scoring six times with six different runners.

Hayfork hit and scored with an infield home run, but Berchtold brought an end to all that by striking out the next three batters. Hayfork's six runs in the third and fourth innings encouraged Banister to bring in McMaster to finish out the rest of the game, which she did, only giving up one hit. The Lady Braves scored three more runs in the last three innings of the game and the ladies beat Hayfork 12-7.

Banister and his team had a field day against Butte Valley, the Braves' last game of the tournament. Butte Valley's inability to throw any heat over the plate allowed the Braves to score 22 runs. Brianna Berchtold pitched all five innings, striking out 10, walked three, giving up three runs.

Cedar Pass celebrates end of ski season

This weekend will mark the season-ending ski celebration for the Cedar Pass Snow Park, after a strong and good overall year pass for Saturday will get a free lift ticket for Sunday. This weekend is "wear anything" spring skiing finale, so organizers say to come dressed wild and crazy to celebrate.

The Cedar Park lifts open at 10 a.m. on Saturday and on Sunday. Anyone interested in next year's ski race team age six through high school, should check in and sign up at Cedar Pass Snow Park lodge. The age groups will be from six through high school.

The snow park offers free lift tickets, free rental and a free lesson to first time skiers on their first day.

For weekly status of the snow park, call 233-3323, which will be updated daily, or check the sports page of the Modoc County Record website at www.modocrecord.com.

Carpenter, Cockrell all-league

A pair of Surprise Valley Hornets, Michael Carpenter and Cassie Cockrell, was named to the Evergreen All-league basketball team for the 2001 season.

The pair will also compete in the Lions All-star game in Redding this weekend and the All-the-Best game in Chico March 25. Coach John Christie is coaching the north team.

All-League B-Ballers

Tatum Dunn and Jessica Kern earned positions on the SCL All-League girls basketball team, due to their exceptional playing efforts during the 2000-2001 season and an honorable mention was given to Stephanie McMaster.

As for the Varsity boys team, Blake Thorn earned a position on the SCL varsity boy's All-League team and senior Kris Server was awarded with an honorable mention.

Modoc JVs face Big Valley today

Modoc's junior varsity boys baseball team will face Big Valley's varsity today in a double header in Alturas with the first game at 1 p.m. and the second beginning about 3:30 p.m.

The Braves are coming off a 3-0 performance in their opening tournament of the year last weekend.

They opened with a lopsided 19-6 win over Portola. Modoc scored 19 runs on 15 hits while Portola had nine hits. Jered Pierce was the winning pitcher and he also went four-for-four at the plate with a home run.

In the second game, Modoc's Justin Ratliff tagged the game-winning hit in the bottom of the seventh for the 4-3 win over Hayfork. Robert Flournoy was the winning pitcher. Modoc scored four runs on four hits and Hayfork had six hits.

The Braves beat Portola again in the third game, 15-3, slamming 11 hits while limiting Portola to six hits. Chris Beahan got the win and Des Kiesel went two-for-four at the plate.

Arrowhead sees return to better golf weather

Only the diehards played golf through the winter at Arrowhead in Alturas, but most of the regulars are starting to return as the weather improves.

The clubhouse is open seven days per week, from 8 a.m. until dark with green fees $10 for nine holes and $18 for 18. The junior (high school) and senior rate is $7 for nine and $14 for 18.

Annual memberships are available for $425 for individuals and $600 for families. Children who are attending college may be included in the family membership. Cart storage is also available. Inside storage for electric carts is $300 annually and for gas carts it's $250; outside storage is $250 for electric and $220 for gas.

Call Arrowhead at 233-3404 for more information.

MARCH 29, 2001

School Board passes COPS program 5-0

By Esteban Fernandez

The Modoc Joint Unified School District along with the Alturas Police Department will be applying for the COPS in school program as a result of the School Board's unanimous decision, Tuesday night. The Alturas Police Department now has the job of writing the grant and submitting it for approval before June. If approved the APD will hire a new officer, sending him through police academy, and will replace the veteran officer that will act as the in school patrol officer. All of this is predicted to be accomplished by the beginning of the new school year.

"The School Board passed the grant proposal process on the conditions that each year the board would evaluate the program to determine if the program is working efficiently," said Superintendent of School Dr. Kevin Jolly.

The School Board received a "combination" survey summarizing the results of the parent and student survey that were handed out during the second week of March. Coincidentally,the surveys coincided just days after the arrest of Jeff Doss, who was traveling to Modoc County to, as he stated, "shoot up the school."

According to Seab McDonald, newly-elected School Board president, he felt that the majority of the Board had plans on voting in favor of the COPS program prior to receiving the combination survey and the arrest of former Modoc High student Jeff Doss; the survey proved positive.

Doss' arrest in McDonald's words "just made us more aware that we needed it (COPS program funding). It proved that we're not the little county that's isolated and where nothing can ever happen."

A total of 59 students (freshman, sophomore, junior) responded to the survey and of those who did, 42 believed the program would help prevent crime on campus or solve problems that might lead to crime; 41 believed the school would be safer, 35 thought that the program would not affect them, 20 said the program would develop a better working relationship with local law enforcement, 14 students thought the idea would have a negative result that would increase intimidation and paranoia, 13 saw it as a loss of freedom and would increase legal consequences, and nine of the surveyed students predicted that the COPS program would have educational benefits.

Of the 10 parents who responded to the survey, 10 thought it would provide safety, 10 saw it as having a positive outcome, four saw the program creating increasing paranoia among students, three thought it would create a greater level of respect for law enforcement; two thought that the funds should be spent elsewhere. Of the seniors who did respond, even though the program would be implemented next year and would not affect them, two-thirds said the program would make for a safer learning environment, would prevent crime on campus, and would resolve problems quicker. And over 50 percent of the seniors saw the program improving the relationship between students and law enforcement.

County sets hearing on YMCA project

A public hearing on the proposed recreation district, the first step in establishing a YMCA facility in Alturas, is scheduled in the Modoc County Board of Supervisors Chambers April 3, 1:45 p.m.

The public hearing was set by Supervisors Tuesday afternoon. The board and City Council held two public meetings on the issue and both of those meetings were very positive, leading to the formal public hearing. Supervisors can decide whether to start the LAFCO process on April 3, to establish a special district, which would then have to go to a vote of the people in the proposed district for ultimate approval.

The county and city are both involved because the proposed boundary of the recreation district will include an area including Alturas, and outlying areas of Supervisor Districts Two, Three and Four. That's roughly the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

What's proposed is a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms. The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million.

The YMCA committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about 10 months, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. However, they said, the district needs to be formed and a small assessment passed first. That assessment is estimated at $19 per year per property owner.

Supervisors also held a first reading of an ordinance that will add one meeting per month to their schedule. Currently, Supervisors meet the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Once the new ordinance goes into effect, in about 45 days, they would meet the first, third and fourth Tuesdays of each month. Supervisors believe the amount of business coming before them necessitates adding a meeting.

People who attend functions at the Modoc Veteran's Memorial Hall in Alturas will get some needed relief as the county agreed to purchase 100 new folding chairs and six tables.

The Board of Supervisors voted to spend $3,000 on the tables and chairs Tuesday morning. Those funds come out of the rental money collected at the Vet's Hall.

The county also agreed with a project to have household hazardous waste picked up by an outside agency one day this year. The program has been in effect for some time. The agency comes to the county and picks up the household waste at the landfills and dump sites in the county.

The Board also formally hired Pauline Cravens to take over as the Director of Social Services. Cravens is a longtime administrative staff member at Social Services.

The board also agreed with a request from County Treasurer Cheryl Knoch to sell 388 tax-defaulted properties over the Internet. Many of those properties are in California Pines. Normally, the county holds public auctions for these properties but opted for the Internet this time around.

According to Knoch, a computer will be available in her office for people who are interested in parcels but do not have access to a computer or the Internet.

The county also presented a Plaque of Appreciation to Jeri Standley, Assistant Director of Administration, for her 12 years of high quality service to the county. She is leaving county employment on March 30.

The board also heard from Kate Crosby, of the CalWORKS program, that the number of cash assistance welfare cases dropped from 350 in 1998 to 150 cases currently. In most cases, said Crosby, the drop in cases was because those individuals found employment. In several cases, she said, that meant they had to move out of Modoc County for jobs. She said her office has assisted between a dozen to 15 families in relocating.

They approved a request from Crosby's Department for an $80,000 expenditure amendment and fixed assets purchases. Part of that funding will go for computers for training of clients. Funding comes from the CalWORKS program.

Alturas woman hurt in accident

An Alturas woman sustained moderate injuries in a solo accident March 16, 8:45 a.m. on Centerville Road just west of County Road 76.

The California Highway Patrol reports that Patricia Clark, age 55, was eastbound on Centerville at about 50-55 m.p.h. when she reached down to adjust the temperature control of her 2000 GMC Jimmy. She allowed the vehicle to leave the south edge of the road and attempted to get the vehicle back on the road, but was unable to regain control and it left the road and overturned. Clark was wearing her seatbelt. She was treated at the scene by Modoc Ambulance crews and then transported to Modoc Medical Center in Alturas. There were no injuries reported in a March 18 accident on Highway 395 north of County Road 133A (near Davis Creek) about 12:30 p.m.

The CHP reports Bonni M. Oliver, 20, of Ontario, Or., was southbound at about 65 m.p.h. and allowed the right side tires to drift off the roadway onto the gravel shoulder. She steered sharply to the left and overcorrected. She then applied the brakes and steered sharply to the right, which caused her to lose control of her 1991 Plymouth Acclaim. The car traveled off the main highway while spinning in a clockwise manner, went off the road into a field and overturned, coming to rest on its tires. Oliver was wearing her seat belt.

CHP advises: stop for school buses The California Highway Patrol office in Alturas is advising motorists to stop for school buses when their red lights are flashing or stop signals are out while loading or unloading children.

According to the CHP, motorists on state highways in Modoc are failing to stop and safety is a major concern.

The law requires all vehicles to stop (going both directions) for a school bus with its red lights on or stop signal arm deployed, and to remain stopped until the bus driver turns those red lights off or retracts the stop signal.

Sierra Nevada team meets with Modoc people on plan

Members of the Forest Service's Sierra Nevada Forest Planning Team (SNF) met with Modoc County residents Tuesday. The presentation was designed to help people understand how to implement the Sierra Nevada Record of Decision (ROD) and to answer questions. About 50 people attended the Alturas held meeting, the first of a series of meetings planned on the Sierra Nevada Forests and the Modoc Plateau.

Forest Service SNF Team members from the Sacramento office included Steve Clauson, Team Leader; Laurie Perrot, writer editor; Mike Gertsch, wildlife biologist; Dave Arrasmith, Planner.

In his opening remarks, Steve Clauson said, " We are not here to get comments. We have the document and the Regional Forester has made his decision. We are here to talk about how the decision affects Modoc National Forest." Since 1991, the Modoc National Forest has been managed under a Forest specific Plan;the Sierra Nevada Plan amends that Plan. The Sierra Nevada Framework EIS and ROD addresses five urgent problem areas: old forest ecosystems; aquatic, riparian and meadow ecosystems; fire and fuel management; noxious weeds; and lower Westside hardwood ecosystems. Team member Dave Arrasmith said the way the Forest Service was managing the problem areas was inconsistent Forest-by-Forest. "We needed consistency so we looked at the problem areas using a bioregional approach; some things that were unique to specific Forests remained (as if.)"

Modoc County residents and Forest Service employees made an impression and a big impact on the SNF team and its leaders. As a result, significant projects unique to the Modoc National Forest have been exempt.

Team members gave an overview explanation of the decisions through a slide program. Contact Robert Haggard, Modoc National Forest, (530) 233-8840 for information. A question and answer period followed.

People wanted to know about exemptions. What did "to be exempt" mean to Warner Mtn. Rangleland Project? Clauson said, "The intent of exemption is to leave the project under current rules for the duration of the project. Local rules apply unless something else occurs outside that decision such as changes brought about through the courts." The key is how the direction for the project is worded. How about the exemption for the Big Valley Federal Sustained Yield Unit? Clauson said this Team did not have all the answers, "...and this was one of them."

People expressed concern about funding for watershed and landscape analysis and monitoring. The intent is to do the job, work things out at the local level.

Livestock permittees were especially interested in the Willow Flycatcher direction which can alter current grazing practices. Mike Gertsch explained that there are 82 known Flycatcher areas (PACs) in the Sierra Forests and analysis for the Record of Decision was based on that information. Modoc National Forest has five known PACs. Grazing is restricted to late season in a known area. A member of the audience said, "I understand that five known Willow Flycatcher areas are within the Warner Mtn. Rangeland Project area and the Rangeland Project trumps with PAC." Clauson responded, " that depends on how the Project direction is worded."

Modoc National Forest Planner, Robert Haggard is working on integrating the Sierra Nevada Framework decision into the Forest Plan; it will be available in a few weeks on the Modoc National Forest website at www.r5.fs.fed.us/modoc or through the local Forest Service offices. Copies of the Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment EIS and Record of decisions are also available locally.

PacifiCorp files for California price change

PaciCorp filed an application today with California Public Utilities Commission requesting an interim rate increase of one cent per kilowatt-hour. If approved, it would result in an overall increase of 13.77 percent, effective April 15.

Through Pacific Power, PacifiCorp serves 40,000 retail electricity customers in northern California, primarily in Yreka, Cresent City, Alturas, Mt. Shasta and surrounding communities.

Pacific Power residential customers in these communities currently pay electric rates that are approximately 56 percent of rates paid by PG&E and Southern California Edison customers.

"Also, our residential and small commercial customers are currently paying prices that are 10 percent lower than they were in June 1996," said Sally LaBriere, Pacific Power regional community manager in Yreka. The last price change, a decrease, took effect in January 1998 as a requirement of California's restructuring legislation.

Skyrocketing wholesale power costs and generated increasing cost pressure have created the need for PacifiCorp to request a price increase at this time.

The company proposes the interim increase as the first part of a rate stabilization plan designed to shield customers from large increases that would be incurred if customers were provided service at current market prices or under traditional cost-of-service regulation. The rate stabilization plan includes a general rate case that will be filed no later than September 1.

Under the proposed interim increase, a typical residential customer using 900 kilowatt-hours per month would see a $9 pr month increase in their bill. The interim increase would be subject to refund in the unlikely even the CPUC later finds that lower rates are warranted.

In this filing, the company also seek clarity on some issues related to California's restructuring law, including the conclusion of rate freeze period and valuation of the company's generating assets. "No matter what the circumstances, we know price increases are not easy for customers," said LaBriere. She encouraged customers to continue to conserve energy, especially during the peak hours of 4 to 8 p.m.

Suggestions include: turn off lights and computers when not in use; use dishwasher in early morning or late evening; do laundry on weekends; set furnace thermostats between 65-68 degrees during the day; keep forced-air furnace filters clean to keep efficient air flow through the system; close chimney dampers as soon as you're certain fire is completely out, to prevent the escape of warm air up the chimney; keep drapes and blinds closed on cloudy days as an extra layer of insulation; open drapes and blinds on sunny days to let in the sun's free heat; remember that setting the thermostat to a high temperature won't heat your home any quicker and leaving it there can waste a lot of energy.

MNF begins 2001 spring prescribed fire programs

With the onset of Spring, prescribed burning is being scheduled throughout the Modoc National Forest.

Fire, under prescribed conditions is one of the most important tools for restoration and sustainability of ecosystem diversity and productivity.

Randy Hall, Forest Assistant Fire Management Officer, announced that burning is scheduled for several locations throughout the Forest starting immediately and continuing into June as weather permits. Areas involved are located near Long Bell, Donica, Letterbox, Tournquist, Crowder, Four Mile, Hackamore, Sugar Hill, and in the Howard's Gulch and Cottonwood Campgrounds, for a total of about 6,000 acres.

Hall said that this is an aggressive agenda. "Most of the burning will be in pine and mixed conifer stands. The main objectives are hazard fuel reduction, protection of investments, range land and wildlife habitat improvement and overall forest health."

The Modoc National Forest usually begins its prescribed burning program late April or May. "This is the earliest we have been able to begin burning," added Hall. "It is an indication of how dry the woods are. People need to be extremely cautious while they are in the forest."

Modoc NF fire management is coordinated with the Modoc County Air Quality Control Board, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

MPAT rehearsing 'Give My Regards to Broadway'

By Amber F. Gentry

MPAT Producer The play has been cast and rehearsals are underway for MPAT's spring musical "Give My Regards to Broadway," to take to the Niles Theater stage at the end of March.

"Give My Regards to Broadway" is a lighthearted romp through a struggling off-Broadway production. The music and lyrics are by George M. Cohan; book by Shubert Fendrich. The production is trying to get off the ground while plagued by lack of money, difficulty finding a star, and mobsters running amok in the theater.

"Give my Regards to Broadway" is sure to tickle a funny bone. The play's director, Richard Foster is played by Bill Tierney, and the wisecracking pianist, Eddie Cowles, is played by Craig Flournoy. Trixie, a chorus girl and sweetheart of mobster Legs Ruby is played by Karen Hays. Heather Gregory plays Betty, the chorus girl from Virginia. The cast of chorus girls is rounded out with; Flossie played by Sally Clark, Suzie played by Linda Lucier, Connie played by Jeanetta Lucier, and Hilda played by Midge Dier. Kerry Davis plays the Broadway star, Mona Monroe, whom the director is trying to sign for the lead. Christina Worley plays Mary Collins, an aspiring actress. Robin Brush plays one of the mobsters, Legs Ruby, while David Ash plays another mobster, Mugsy. Christi Kleiman plays Mugsy's moll, Babs. Millie, Betty's niece from Virginia is played by Shawna Gibson and college man Donald Harper is played by Joe Waterman. The stagehand, Norman, is played by Morgan Davis, the costumer, Anna, is played by Marya Gates and the properties mistress, Emily, is played by Wendy Clark.

On the technical side of "Give My Regards to Broadway", Chip Massie and Karen Hays are sharing the directorial duties, Jerry Cooley is the musical director, and Amber F. Gentry is the producer. Nancy North-Gates serves as the costumer, Mike Halderman is both the set and lighting designer, Kerry Davis is the makeup designer, and Karen Hayes is the properties mistress.

"Give My Regards to Broadway" opens March 29 and will play March 30, 31, April 1, 5, 6, 7 and 8, 2001 at the Niles Theater. For more information call 233-5600.

Health Fair opens seventh year; offers free screening for all ages

For the past seven years, Modoc County's Health Fair has provided free admission and free health screening to all ages. The popular event will open Saturday, March 24 from 8:00 a.m. until 12 noon behind the orange double doors that lead into the Griswold Gym at Modoc High School, in Alturas.

Everyone is encouraged to take advantage of the free health screening opportunity and enjoy the free information and giveaways, which will be provided by a wide assortment of local groups. Bring the kids and the grandparents; everyone can benefit.

For those who want to take advantage of a blood chemistry panel for $10, don't forget to fast 12 hours before the test, for the most accurate results. Take your medications and water, but no food or beverages should be taken prior to the test.

To beat the hunger or break the fast, feast on the Pancake Breakfast, which the Modoc High Cheerleaders will be providing for $3 per person.

In addition to the many health screenings available including blood pressure readings, there will be a Depression questionnaire, breast cancer awareness information, dental screening, diabetes information and much more.

Learn about telemedicine HIV/AIDS prevention, family planning, respiratory and occupational therapy and much more. Games for children and drawings for prizes will also be part of the festive atmosphere and fun.

The event is sponsored and financed by Modoc Indian Health Project, Modoc Medical Center, Modoc County Public health, Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug, and Families Matter.

Letters to the Editor

Band will be representative

Dear Editor:

I just sat through Modoc High School's Monday evening band practice prior to the group flying off for Disneyland on Friday. As I sat there enjoying the music our children were making, I was struck by how wonderful the trip and the experience was going to be.

Mrs. Karen Siegel is such a gift to this community! In a town the size of Alturas, the fact that nearly 70 students are headed to Disneyland to represent our music program is remarkable. I can only imagine the hours and effort it takes to put a trip like this one together. Four long years in the making and as soon as they are home, she will start for the next trip in another four years.

Mrs. Siegel works magic with our children at the Middle School and High School on a daily basis. Listening to a practice reminds me that it's a difficult process for the band and choir to sound as terrific as they do and she manages to pull it off instilling a love for music and sharing a great sense of humor.

I want to thank Mrs. Siegel for the infinite hours and the tremendous effort she gives in order for our children to have a weekend they will remember for the rest of their lives. I also want to thank this community for all it has done to support our kids so they can make the trip.

Thanks to everyone who bought candy, cake tickets, raffle tickets, wrapping paper, gave rock-a-thon pledges, etc. Without that support, most of the students would not have been able to take advantage of this great opportunity.

I hope they have a wonderful time. I know they will represent us well.

--Laura VanAcker

Alturas

Country Jam has surprise

Dear Editor:

Most every Monday night, our fans at the Country Jam are surprised by something new and/or unrehearsed. This is what keeps things interesting and fresh. Yet, once in a while, we are surprised more than normal.

Yes, during our Monday Night Country Jam, of March 12, we were pleasantly surprised to find out that two of the new performers that had signed up that night, were from over seas.

In fact, after a brief discussion with them, it was revealed that they were Scotsman Donnie MacDonald and Irishman James Keigher; the singing/playing duo, known as "Men of Worth," who were scheduled to perform throughout Modoc County the week of March 12th through the 16th.

As it turned out, the duo performed several pieces that were from their homeland and were roundly applauded by our local fans for their wonderful talent and great showmanship on stage as well as their great manner off stage.

These two have a show that everyone should enjoy, and are invited back to the Country Jam and Modoc Country should they pass this way again.

The Country Jam wishes to extend this invitation to all who wish to perform, or who would like to just sit and listen. Remember, it's free every Monday night at 7:30 p.m. at the Veterans Hall on Main Street, Alturas.

--Ron McIntyre

Alturas

Slash needs cleaned up

Dear Editor:

It seems as though Cal Pines has a problem once again with yet another logging outfit in the hills. Not the logging of timber on property owners lots as before. This time it is a potential fire danger that California Department of Forestry should be looking into.

I do not know if the C.D.F. has been up there to check out the practices of this logging outfit? If they haven't, I would say that this article should suffice as a warning to a possible danger of a very volatile situation up there. Number one is this year being a very dry winter. Number two: the possibility of a thunder storm with a lightning strike.

The home owners living up in the hills are reluctant to call the C.D.F., because of previous action or non-action regarding Thena when they logged up there. Their concern is the slash being left by the logging company. The loggers claim the chip market is down and that it is not cost worthy. This is a crock.

I called and checked around. The chip market though not at a peak, is at a normal rate for chips. I wonder if these loggers would like to have this mess they're leaving in their backyards. I doubt it seriously.

So, the residents have but one hope left and that is for C.D.F. to get involved and tell these loggers to clean up their mess. And, if they don't clean it up, fine them and show people that you care.

--John C. Schneider

Cal Pines

Seniors invited to lunch

Dear Editor:

For many years, Senior Citizen luncheons have benefited seniors in the area. A delicious meal, friendship, and Bingo have been a meaningful event in a senior's day. Marie Smith, Site Manager for the Alturas Center, has expressed that attendance has declined recently. The Senior Center staff is looking for more seniors to serve.

So, how can you help? Would you believe by having a meal like: Roast Beef, pepper steak, hot turkey sandwich, chicken, cabbage rolls, with salad, dessert, milk, tea or coffee for $2.50? That's got to be a winner in any game

So how do you get in on this sure win? Call Marie, 233-4438, the day before you want lunch, that's so the cooks can put another shrimp on the barbie. Marie can give you all the information you need (plus the previous night's basketball scores). So do yourself and other seniors a favor and come on down. If you need transportation, call the Senior Center at 233-4438.

--Marve Handley

Alturas

Obituaries

Virgil Roman 'Guy' Anderson

The family of 'Guy' Anderson of Alturas notified the Record Wednesday, that Mr. Anderson passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday, March 20, following open heart surgery at Redding Medical Center, Redding, Calif.

Services for Mr. Anderson will be held in Alturas on Saturday, March 24 at 10:00 a.m. at the Veterans' Memorial Hall, So. Main Street.

Mr. Anderson was born April 26, 1943 in South Dakota. He has numerous relatives in the local area, but his immediate family includes his wife Michelle of Alturas; son David of Shasta Lake City, Calif.; daughters Nikki Anderson of Alturas; YaVette Armstrong of Sparks, Nev. and very special family friend Pam Hasting Mize.

A complete obituary will be provided next week.

Melvin Henry Delaney

Melvin Henry Delaney, 77, a resident of Adin, Calif., passed away March 3, 2001, of natural causes at Redding Medical Center, Redding, Calif.

Mr. Delaney had made Adin his home since 1974, when he moved from Norco, Calif., where he retired as a plant manager for Azusa Western.

He was born July 13, 1923 in Copan, Oklahoma and was a veteran of the Korean Conflict, having served his country with the U.S. Army.

Mr. Delaney is survived by his wife Shirley of Adin, Calif.; sons Randy Delaney of Fontana, Calif.; and Brian Delaney of Las Vegas, Nev.; daughter Becky Delaney of Indiana; sisters Dorothy Coleman and Jesse Aimisgger, both of Kansas City, Kansas. Mr. Delaney is also survived by five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

A private family service will be held.

SPORTS

Modoc Teams take 1st at Liberty Christian Tourney

The Modoc Braves brought home another tourney title after sweeping the Liberty Christian Tournament held in Redding on Friday and Saturday. Both baseball and softball will begin their road up into the Shasta Cascade League today at home against Etna at 1:00 p.m.

Baseball

Modoc started the tournament against Hayfork with leading pitcher Lucas Tramontanas at the mound, who according to Manager Brad Server pitched really well the entire weekend, striking out six of 10 batters.

Sheldon Benson pitched the last three innings of the game giving up only one run to Steve Patton, Hayfork's only run of the game. Brett Spicer lead the Braves in the batters box, hitting two-of-three with two home runs, followed by Blake Thorn, who was also two-for-three with one home run.

Overall the Braves sent five balls over the fence, in a field, according to Server's explanation, would have made the little league fields in Alturas seem spacious. But Server stressed that most of the home runs would have been out in most ball parks.

After the Braves 7-1 defeat over Hayfork, they faced an underestimated and undefeated Mercy baseball team, who had control throughout the field and good batters all the way down the line up.

Logan Wilson led as pitcher for the Braves and had a difficult time controlling his pitches, due to "nerves," said Server. Wilson gave up two walks and a base hit that loaded the bases and was replaced by Kris Server who gave up a grand slam to Steve Bradley.

The Braves trailed by five by the time Mercy made their first out. Modoc managed to fight back, tying the game at the bottom of the second, but Mercy once again took the lead in the top of the fourth because the Braves made three straight errors.

The Braves, still with a few tricks up their sleeve, had two consecutive walks and a home run by Glen Christensen, followed by a solo homer by Kris Server that tied the game in the bottom of the fourth. Spicer than hit a single, stole second, stole third, and was sent home by a fly ball from Lucas Tramontanas. The Braves earned a win over Mercy due to the two hour time limit 10-9.

The Braves' two wins sent them into the Championship bracket along with once beaten Liberty Christian.

A home run from Christensen, a base hit from Spicer, a double from Anthony Northrup, and a home run by Jared McGarva, put the Braves in the lead by the top of the fourth inning.

Modoc increased it's lead in the fifth, 8-2, from base hits, up and down the bench. A base hit from Server and a home run from Tramantonas expanded their lead to 10-2 by the top of the sixth. Tramontanas, who had been pitching really well all weekend, was sent out of the game and was replaced by Sheldon Benson. Benson gave up three walks, two errors and three Liberty base hits, decreasing their lead to 10-7.

Blake Thorn took the mound and struck out Liberty Christian's last batter and the Braves went on to take first place increasing their record to 6-1.

The All-Tournament team included Glen Christensen, Lucas Tramontanas, Kris Server and for the second consecutive week, Spicer was chosen as Most Valuable Player.

Softball

Stephanie McMaster led her team to victory this weekend at Liberty Christian. McMaster struck out 18 of 49 batters, walked two, and gave up only three hits for three runs, pitching a total of 14 innings during the weekend.

The Lady Braves opened the tournament with Hayfork, who they had beaten the weekend before at their own tournament 12-7. Stephanie McMaster struck out the first two batters and gave up a line drive to short stop, Kristen Clough, for an easy out at first. The Lady Braves scored two runs in the first inning and scored another in the second.

McMaster continued to throw the heat pitching a no hitter in the second.

Modoc scored twice in the third and fourth innings give them a lead of 5-0 by the end of the fourth. Hayfork attempted to fight back but were unable to get a run due to McMaster's hot arm and good infield play. The Lady Braves eased their way to a victory over Hayfork of 5-0.

Brianna Berchtold took the mound during the Braves second game with Bishop Quinn. The Lady Braves stole five bases and had three RBI accounting for their six runs in the first inning. They padded their lead in the bottom of the second with three RBI and three stolen bases to 13-1.

Modoc continued to sweep the bases and the infield giving up only two runs in the fifth while scoring eight runs, ending the game in four and a half innings, 20-5.

McMaster returned as pitcher for Modoc in the Championship game against host Liberty Christian.

McMaster struck out the first two batters and a caught fly ball to right field, sent the Braves to the batters box.

Shay Farmer was the only one to get on base but was taken out of commission with two outs.

The Lady Patriots and the Lady Braves continued to pass the puck to the other team, giving up out after out. The Lady Patriots ended their streak, however, when Ashley Stanfford hit a triple sending Gabby Noll home for a run.

Crystal Magnasin sent Stanfford home with a bunt but was plucked out with a throw from second to home.

It was now the Lady Braves turn. Farmer was sent walking to first, stole second, and was sent home by Laura Toaetolu, with a double. Jessica Kern struck out as did Brianna Berchtold, and the Braves were sent packing back onto the field but not before a bunt from Kristen Clough allowed Toaetolu to run home tying the game at 2-2, at the bottom of the fifth.

The Lady Braves shut out Liberty Christian the rest of the way, and scored a run for themselves in the fifth inning, giving them a win of 3-2 over Liberty Christian and the first place trophy. The Lady Braves will now begin SCL play with a untouchable record of 8-0.

As a result of her excellent pitching during the tournament, Stephanie McMaster earned Tourney MVP and team mates Laura Toaetolu, Shay Farmer, and Charlene Stevens earned positions on the All-Tournament team.

Modoc track thin, talent in areas

Modoc High SchoolÕs 2001 track team is thin in numbers, but should be very competitive in the girls division overall and competitive in the boys in the weights and distance events.

Coach Mike Martin has 14 girls out for the team and 10 boys. ÒWe donÕt have a lot of sprint or jump people for the boys, but we do have good throwers and distance runners,Ó he said. ÒOur girls team has talent spread throughout and we should be competitive.Ó

Leading the boys team will be returnees Tyler Belarde and Luke Hughes in the distance events and a whole field of throwers led by newcomers Blake Wilson and Tony Willis and returnees Rich Tate and John Richert. Also on the boys team are Clayton Broman, Todd Clark, Scott McMaster and Clint Tate.

The girls team will be led by Kayla Harness in the distance, Tatum Dunn, Rachel Gover, Colleen McElwain in the sprints and jumps, Katelyn Tate in the middle distance events, Amy Gentry in the hurdles, Amanda Moriarity in distance, Maggie Baker and Jami Kuhn in the sprints and middle distance, Liz Young in throws and running, Christina Nardoni in running, Amanda Dennis in running events and Caitlin Cook in the throws. Vanessa Thomason is out because of injury, but should return strong in distance.

The track team started with a dual meet at Lakeview Tuesday and will take nine athletes to the West Valley relays this weekend. Many of the track team members are also in the band who heads to Disneyland this weekend.

Youth wrestlers do well at Tulelake

ModocÕs youth wrestling team did well at the Tulelake Invitational last weekend with several wrestlers placing and winning. First places in the six-and-under division went to Zach Goulden, Patrick Bell, and Fernando Acala.

In the eight-and-under division, Tyler Wood took two firsts, Alex Moreo took a first and third, Brandon Veverka took a second and Adam Pence took a fourth.

In the 10-and-under group, Justin Estes took a first and third, Josh Wood took a first, Miguel Quezada took a second and Tyler Stains took a fourth.

In the 12-and-under division, Tim Cruse took a first, Josh Wood took a second, Jack Veverka took a second, Garrett Chapman a third, Sheridan Crutcher a third and fourth, and Brian Weed a fourth.

For the 14-and-under group, Travis Wood took two firsts, Ian Jacques took a first, Joey Catania took a first, Brad Bell took a first and second, Jeremy Lucier took a second, Justin Weaver too a second and fourth and Bud Groff took a fourth.

The youth team goes to Quincy this weekend.

Modoc JV whips Lakeview

Modoc junior varsity boys baseball team whipped Lakeview 13-4 last week behind winning pitcher Jered Pierce who tossed a four hitter. He also went three-for-three at the plate with two doubles. Modoc had 16 hits in the game.

Thursday, the JV topped Big ValleyÕs varsity 10-1 in the first game of a double bill, but lost the second game, 11-9.

In the opener, Robert Flournoy went two-for-three at the plate with a home run and a double. Danny Aandazzo got the win, going six innings and allowing just three hits. Modoc had nine hits in the game and Big Valley had five. Chris Blue was the losing pitcher and David House doubled for Big Valley.

In the second game, Big Valley scored 11 runs on just five hits, but seven Modoc walks and errors helped their cause. The Braves scored nine runs on nine hits and left the tying runs on base in the bottom of the fifth inning.

Chris Beahan was the losing pitcher for the Braves. Dane McCombs and Skyler Oates each had two hits in the game.

The Braves travel to Etna for a double bill this weekend.

Golf hits the ball rolling

"We played fairly well," commented Harold Montague, head coach of Modoc High School's Golf team, at the Central Valley Invitational at the Tierra Oaks golf course. Modoc took third place with 422 strokes just one stroke from second place that was captured by Weed High School.

The Modoc High Golf Team consists of returning members Michael Bates, Jack Britton, Bill Moriarity, and Jerry Wheeler. New comers to the team include Mariano Correa, Robert Cummings, Charlie Knox, Chris Panner, KC Poindexter, Adam Server, Kris Server, Landon Brown, and Blake Thorn, with help from assistant coach Lane Bates. "Most of our golfers got some pre-season jitters out of the way and I expect their scores to be better as we progress through the season," says Montague.

Modoc's league consists of Bishop Quinn, Burney, Fall River, McCloud, Modoc, Mt.Shasta, and Trinity High Schools, with a possibility of Etna fielding a team.

Kris Server led the team score at Tierra Oaks with 80 stokes and tied for first place for individual medalists. Jack Britton swung 88 and took fifth as an overall medalist, Adam Server had 90, Jerry Wheeler had 94, and Michael Bates rounded out the top with 109.

Central Valley won their own invitational with 418 and had four members of their team place within the top six. Weed finished second with 422, and Trinity High School, the only league other them in Modoc's league, had a handicap of 555.

Modoc will begin league play tomorrow at Bishop Quinn. The match begins at 12:00 p.m. at Palo Cedro Golf Course.

APRIL

APRIL 5, 2001

March snow survey confirms area is dry

On Tuesday, the Modoc County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to send a letter to the Governor Gray Davis requesting a disaster declaration for the county because of probable drought conditions.

While it snowed early this week, the federal agency March snow survey confirmed that it is very dry. There is much less snow than the January survey and the snow depth and water content is not coming close to averages.

According to the Modoc County Agriculture Commissioner's office, the total precipitation is 30 to 50 percent of average and reservoirs are very low. Big Sage is at 50 percent of capacity, West Valley at 37 percent and Dorris is at 15 percent. The snow survey isn't adding many positives to the reservoir level outlook.

According to surveyors Tim Hill of the Natural Resource Conservation Service and Jake Coffey, U.S. Forest Service, the snow levels are down significantly in all areas.

In late March, 2001, Cedar Pass had 13.2 inches of snow containing 4.4 inches of water. In January, the area had 24.7 inches containing 6.6 inches of water. The March, 2000 measurement had 35 inches of snow with 14.2 inches of water and the 10-year average is 39.8 inches and 15.74 inches of water.

Blue Lake had 9.3 inches of snow this March, compared to 20 inches in January. In March the water content was just three inches, compared to 6.6 in January. Last year at this time, the area had 27 inches of snow containing 11 inches of water. The 10-year average is 26.1 inches containing 9.7 inches of water.

Sweagart Flat had 19.2 inches of snow this March, with 5.2 inches of moisture, compared with 29.8 inches of snow in January. The 10-year average is 33.98 inches containing 12.9 inches of water.

According to Ken Romberger, Big Valley Ranger District, while the current situation is 40 percent of average, seven winters have been drier. The worst year of snow water content was 0.9 inches in 1988. Total precipitation in Adin for the period of July 1 through March 31 was 6.12 inches, said Romberger. The average for Adin since 1943 is 12.56 for that period. Only the winter of 1943-44 was dryer with 5.13 inches total by March 31.

Sue Becker, Hydrologist for the Modoc National Forest, reported that total precipitation form January through March, 2001 was only 1.52 inches, compared to last year of 4.4 inches. The breakdown is January .28 inches; February .54 inches and March .70 inches. The snow measurement for Mt. Bidwell this March shows 33.9 inches with 13.1 inches of water. In January, there was 32.2 inches of snow and 10.2 inches of water. But those numbers pale from last year's 66 inches of snow and 26.3 inches of water and the 10-year average of 64 inches of snow and 25.05 inches of water.

The Barber Creek survey, south end of the Warners, shows 8.7 inches of snow with 2.9 inches of water this March. In January, it had 25.5 inches of snow containing 5.4 inches of water. Last year, there was 26 inches of snow containing 9.3 inches of water and the 10-year average is 24.9 inches of snow and 9.01 inches of water.

Hays Canyon, in Nevada, had no snow in March, down from January's 10.4 inches and 1.9 inches of water. The area didn't have any snow last March either, but the 10-year average is 2.6 inches of snow and .78 inches of water.

Also in Nevada, 49 Mountain had no snow this March, down from 10.8 in January. Last March the area had 4.0 inches of snow and 1.4 inches of water. The 10-year average is 7.2 inches of snow and 2.2 inches of water.

As far as snow depth averages go, the picture isn't pretty. Blue Lake is at 33 percent, Cedar Pass at 29 percent, Mt. Bidwell 52 percent, Barber Creek 30 percent, Hays Canyon and 49 Mountain at 0. Water content averages look even worse, with Blue Lake at 29 percent, Cedar Pass at 26 percent, Barber Creek at 27 percent, Mt. Bidwell at 51 percent, and the Nevada sites at 0.

County, and city move forward on Rec District

Both the Modoc County Board of Supervisors and the Alturas City Council passed resolutions Tuesday to send the formation of a Recreation District to the Modoc Local Agency Formation Commission.

The Recreation District is proposed within the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District and the first project on the list for the district is a YMCA facility.

LAFCO has been reorganized and will hold a public hearing April 11, 5 p.m. at Alturas City Hall. The commission, which has the responsibility of studying new special districts, will decide on board membership, review proposals to fill the Executive Director position and review new laws that affect the operation of the agency.

City representatives to LAFCO are councilmen Jack Ochs and George Andreasen with Dick Steyer, alternate, and county representatives are Terry Williams, Mike Dunn and Willy Hagge as an alternate. LAFCO will affirm or appoint two members from the public and two special district members.

Once the LAFCO process is complete, the Recreation District issue will be put on a ballot for voters in the proposed district. To pass, it needs a simple majority. Another question will be on the same ballot, requesting an annual assessment, estimated now at about $19 per property owner, will be asked. The assessment must receive a two-thirds majority to pass.

There was no opposition voiced at two public meetings on the Recreation District or YMCA and supervisors and councilmen expressed hope the voters would feel the same way.

Both the county and city are involved because the proposed boundary of the recreation district will include an area including Alturas, and outlying areas of Supervisor Districts Two, Three and Four. That's roughly the boundaries of the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

The proposal calls for a full YMCA facility of about 30,000 square feet which would contain an indoor 25-meter heated pool, spas, weight room, a new gymnasium, exercise room, kitchen, meeting and conference rooms, and locker rooms. The total cost of the facility is projected at about $3.6 million.

The YMCA committee, which has been working on the facility plan for about a year, believes it can be built with grant funding or by other means of financing. However, they said, the district needs to be formed and a small assessment passed first.

Modoc hires county counsel

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday agreed to hire attorney Vickie L. Cochran, of Redding as County Counsel.

Cochran, who has been representing the Child Protective Services Division in Modoc, was recommended highly by the state's County Counsel Association as one out of seven applicants for the position. Mike Maxwell, County Administrative Officer, said the contract will start in May and will run for four years at $162,000 annually.

.Cochran will be moving to Modoc to serve as county counsel only and not continue in private practice.

Maxwell said the contract is structured so that she will be able to give the board her legal advice without having to consider the political atmosphere.

Supervisors late last year opted to separate the District Attorney/County Counsel positions. Tom Buckwalter remains in the elected position of District Attorney.

The board also passed an ordinance adding one more meeting per month to its schedule. When the ordinance becomes effective, in 30 days, they will meet the first, third and fourth Tuesdays of the month.

.. The county also adopted a computer use, Internet and e-mail policy designed to reduce or eliminate potential legal liability to employees and third parties and to protect confidential and proprietary information of Modoc County and to prevent waste of computer resources.

The policy points out that employees should not believe they have any privacy on county computers and that the county has the right to monitor computer use.

The policy prohibits material that is fraudulent, harassing, embarrassing, sexually explicit, profane, obscene, intimidating, defamatory or otherwise unlawful to be sent by e-mail or other forms of electronic communication (bulletin board systems, newsgroups, chat groups) downloaded from the Internet or displayed on county computers.

The new policy also prohibits employees from downloading and using games or entertainment software. Employees will get a copy of and must sign the policy.

The county also approved feasibility study grant applications for a Co-generation plant at Canby an another planned in the Tulelake area. Those grants will go to the U.S. Forest Service.

Modoc will also go to an optical scan voting system for the next election. The board approved a request from County Clerk Maxine Madison to contract for the new system, which will save money over the long haul and will be more accurate.

The new system will use a pencil and paper ballot that will be counted at the polling place electronically and the result submitted over phone lines to the clerk's office. The system is accurate and easy to use, said Madison. It will save both time and money.

Madison said the company will demonstrate the new system in the near future and she feels it will be a big improvement over the current punch card ballot system used in Modoc. There have been no problems with the punch cards in any election here, but support for the system is no longer adequate.

The county also passed an amendment to its Groundwater Ordinance that will take in geographic water basin areas, rather than county borders only.

The issue came to light in the Tulelake Basin, where groundwater is needed, but must be exported across Modoc and Siskiyou County borders. Maxwell said it made more sense to use geographic delineations for water basins and exporting water. Farmers in the Tulelake Basin may be selling groundwater this season to help stave off a severe drought.

Modoc loses ground in Year 2000 Census

While the trend in America was for about a 10 percent growth in population for rural areas in the 2000 Census, Modoc actually went the other way, losing about 4.7 percent of its population.

Modoc was one of few counties in the state which actually lost people, according to the U.S Census Bureau. Other counties which lost population, less than Modoc, however, were Trinity and Inyo.

Modoc County had a population of 9,921 in 1990, which has dropped to 9,449 for 2000. That's a loss of 472 people. The number of people age 18 and over on the year 2000 Census is 7,026. That compares to 7,165 in 1990. The number of people age 18 and under went from 2,756 in 1990 to 2,423 in 2000.

Siskiyou County grew at 1.77 percent while Lassen and Shasta Counties were up over 10 percent.

More detailed local information will be available in the near future.

No favor says DFG on big fish plants at Blue Lake.

Alturas resident and fishermen Richard Hight just happens to be the brother of California Department of Fish and Game Director Robert Hight.

That relationship was brought to the forefront this week in a San Francisco Chronicle column by Outdoor Columnist Tom Stienstra, which accused the DFG of a special fish planting favor.

Stienstra said records he obtained from DFG, through the Freedom of Information Act, show that 198 trophy brown trout from the Mt. Shasta Fish Hatchery were planted in Blue Lake last summer. The fish were up to 30 inches long, weighing an average of 3.3 pounds.

Stienstra contends that Blue Lake was a favorite fishing spot of the DFG Director Hight and Richard and was done as a special favor. Both Hights strongly disagree.

Richard told the Record Wednesday that he and wife Stella don't fish Blue Lake much any more and haven't caught any large trout out of those waters for 20 years. Most of their fishing trips these days are in Oregon.

"We didn't know anything about the plant and it's pretty ridiculous overall," said Hight. "And Robert hasn't fished Blue Lake for years. He hasn't been up here much in the last 20 years."

Richard Hight is locally famous for catching some very large trout out of Blue Lake in the past. The biggest one was 19 pounds caught about 25 years ago. But, he said the big fish at Blue Lake haven't been caught in years......................... Stienstra says Robert Hight denies any knowledge of the plant and DFG Regional Manager Don Koch said he made the decision to make the plant without consulting Hight.

Blue Lake hadn't been planted with brown trout since 1987, and Regional Fisheries Biologist Paul Chappell said that was because the lake had a naturalized population of browns.

While Stienstra remains committed that the plant came as a favor, no one at the DFG is coming forward with that view. Koch is saying, according to Stienstra, that it was his decision alone.

One thing's certain, said Stella Hight, now that the word's out, those 198 browns (generally easier to catch than natives) won't last long once the anglers show up.

Letters to the Editor

SV Hospital has problems

Dear Editor:

I am writing this letter to set the record straight as to why I resigned from the Surprise Valley Health Care District board during the summer of 2000.

It was not for "personal reasons"

Unprofessional and unethical conduct was not being addressed by the administration of the hospital. A friend of mine made public statements to that affect and a restraining order of false charges was attempted to silence him. It failed, but nothing has happened since then to address ongoing problems.

The result is that much pain and suffering has been caused needlessly by the SVHCD administration choices. Employees are pressured to conform and not rock the boat. The community has the idea that to say anything negative about the hospital will jeopardize its existence. At this time the board and administration are responsible for not addressing cover up and coercion and this does jeopardize the future our hospital and health care on a daily basis.

I have waited much too long to tell my side of why I resigned. I had wanted nothing more to do with the district at that time and was sad and mad that nobody on the board wanted to hear anything about the other side, "pending litigation". I've learned that ignoring something does not make it go away, try as much as I might. Therefore, here I am.

--Steve Hicks, Cedarville

Let's just eat tofu

Dear Editor:

Hopefully Mr. George Breunig of Berkeley will only remain a Modoc property owner and not a resident; we have enough liberals in the area. Mr. Breunig, you disrespectfully refer to President Bush as George II. I guess you liked the lying, cheating, crook we had in office for eight long years.

President Bush may hopefully be able to undo some of the Clinton disasters which only tend to undo the economics of some small communities like ours.

Big Brother has watched us so long that our lives are definitely restricted. We need access to our forests. Maybe there is some arsenic in some mountain streams, but they are sure nice to drink from. Also it is hard to control carbon dioxide unless we only breathe in and don't exhale.

So if we don't use fossil fuels, to generate electricity and quit eating beef and fish, we can sit in the dark and eat tofu.

--Fred Urbanek, Alturas

Someone special in Modoc

Dear Editor:

I find living and working in a small town has its benefits. I am continually impressed with the way this community supports its members, but I was pleasantly surprised when Carol Callaghan, Director of T.E.A.C.H., gave personal support when my husband became ill and was unable to work.

There have been many, many people who have offered support and assistance to myself and my family. Good friends have demonstrated their value in many ways, and acquaintances alike have offered help and encouragement. Still, Carol Callaghan, who is my husband's superior, has reaffirmed my belief that people are good. She is not a personal friend, yet she has behaved as one coming to my family's assistance in a time of need by making personal contributions that were unexpected and greatly appreciated.

Thank you Carol Callaghan from the bottom of my heart for your kindness and compassion.

I also want to thank Julia McCoy, Director of Child and Family Resources, who has proved repeatedly she is someone I can count on when the going gets tough. Gail Eppler, Pat Larkin, and Donna Cooley all from MCOE have been a breath of fresh air being both kind and accommodating. There are many others too numerous to mention who I appreciate. Every time I walk down the street or go to a store someone offers a kind word and true concern. Yes, Modoc County is a nice place to be.

--Jan Ross, MCOE Alturas

 

Obituaries

Georgina P. Ballard

Long-time Alturas resident Georgina P. Ballard, passed away on March 29, 2001, of natural causes at the age of 92, at Modoc Medical Center's Skilled Nursing facility in Alturas, Calif.

Born Georgina P. Lewis on May 17, 1908 to Lucy (Platt) Lewis and Henry Lewis on the family's 160-acre homestead, on Big Ranch Road, five miles north of Napa, Calif., she was voted "Healthiest Baby" and named Napa's "Little Bo Peep." Georgina loved animals and was fond of gardening.

Finishing high school in Napa, she went to work as a secretary for Shell Oil Company in San Francisco, for many years until 1948. She married "Jack" Gibbons on December 12, 1948 in Redwood City and the two moved to Modoc County. Jack passed away in 1960.

Georgina went to work from 1961 until 1973, with the Modoc County Tax Collector's office. She married Francis "Frogs" Ballard in Reno, Nev. on June 8, 1973. He owned Alturas Building Materials. Mrs. Ballard was an avid bridge player and homemaker, until Mr. Ballard passed away in 1997. Georgina's brother Ted Lewis also preceded her in death.

Georgina's grandmother Lucy (McCabe) Platt was born in Ireland in 1833 and came to America in 1850, where she lived until 1853. She sailed around 'The Horn' to San Francisco and traveled to Napa to live with her aunt in 1854. Lucy was married in 1856 to George Platt, who was born in Germany and had traveled by horseback with the wagon train across America to Napa. Georgina's father was born in New York and had spent time in Alaska before moving to California. Mrs. Ballard is survived by her stepdaughters, Marsha Gaskey and Jolene Caldwell, both of Alturas; niece Gay (Decious) Boehme of Brentwood, Calif.; nephew Daniel Decious of Sacramento; cousins Catherine Platt Maddux, Joanne Finnegan Shannon, Dr. Mary Gonzales, Lee Maddux of Santa Rosa; and special friends Dee Berlin and Christine Jobe of Alturas.

Services for Mrs. Ballard were conducted by the Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra on April 3 at 10 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery.

Donations in Mrs. Ballard's memory may be made to the High Plateau Humane Society, P.O. Box 1383, Alturas, CA 96101.

Mary Ethel McMullan

Mary Ethel McMullan, a Modoc County resident for many years, passed away at the age of 87, at the Life Care Center of Reno on March 30, 2001 in Reno, Nev.

Mrs. McMullan had relocated from Likely to Reno about three months ago to be closer to her family.................. While living in Modoc County, rearing her children, she also assisted within her community by working with the schools and Parent Teacher Association, as a 4-H leader and as a member of the California and Modoc County CowBelles organization. In addition to her duties as a mother and homemaker, she kept busy as a cattle ranch cook.

She was born December 9, 1913 in Republic, Wash. She was preceded in death by her husband Bert McMullan in August of 1997 and her daughter Janice Tarp in 1994.

She is survived by her sons, Kenny of Reno, Nev.; John of Lovelock, Nev.; Irvin McGarva of Orovada and Douglas McGarva of Redding; sister Lyndall Fisher of Portland, Ore.; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.

Services were held at graveside at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, April 4 at the Likely Cemetery in Likely, Calif. O'Brien-Rogers & Crosby Funeral Home of Reno handled arrangements.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of the donor's choice.

Edith Ruby Schadler

Former Surprise Valley resident Edith Ruby Schadler, also known as Edith Stewart, passed away March 9, 2001 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Edith was the youngest of eight children in the Nils and Amelia Muhr family of Fruita, Colo. She was born December 16, 1916 in Fruita.

She has one surviving sister, Signa Weston of Palisade, Colo. and three surviving sisters-in-law, Helen Stewart of Garden Grove, Calif. and Lorrena Roland and Sally Best of Grand Junction, Colo.

She married Ray Edgar Stewart on February 2, 1935 and moved to northeastern California. He passed away in 1967. They reared four daughters, Linda Gooch of Cedarville, Calif.; Lorna Chandler of Lafayette, Calif.; Ruth Bettandorff of Acworth, GA; and Janeil Payne of Salem, Ore.

After working as a nurse's aide for many years, Edith became a Registered Nurse, graduating from Shasta College in 1971. She worked as a cardiac care nurse in Redding, Calif. and Grand Junction, Colo. She later worked as an RN at Surprise Valley Medical Center in Cedarville, Calif. and at Warnerview Convalescent Hospital in Alturas, Calif. She was married to George Schadler from 1979 to 1983.

Mrs. Schadler is also survived by 10 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and many nieces and nephews. She was greatly loved by all.

A Celebration of Life service will be held August 4, 2001 in Cedarville, Calif. For information about location and time, contact Lorna Chandler, 3875 Quail Ridge Road, Lafayette, Calif. 94549 or chandlerfam@home.com.

Memorial gifts may be directed to the Surprise Valley Health Care District, Cedarville, CA 96104.

Lyda Laura Brown

Lyda Laura Brown, 78, a 10-year resident of Rossmoor in Walnut Creek, Calif., died suddenly at her home on the evening of March 21, 2001. Memorial services will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 8 at Lafayette Orinda Presbyterian Church (LOPC), 49 Knox Drive, Lafayette.

Mrs. Brown always considered herself a "Modoc'er," says her husband Vernon. Lyda's grandfather by marriage was John Davis, a past Assessor of Modoc County. Her uncles Dan A. and John C. Davis and cousins Paul D. Davis, Richard M. Davis, and Dorothy C. Kelley preceded her in death.

Mrs. Brown retired in 1981 from the William Feria Academics Plus School in the Cupertino School District, where she taught third grade at Feria for three years, a magnet school that stressed 'back to basics approach to education.' She spent 11 years at Panama School, involved from the beginning with the A+ program. Prior to this, she taught in two schools in the Arcade District of Sacramento County, Wyda Way and Dyer Kelly.

She graduated with Honors from Sacramento State College in 1955, with a B.A. degree in Education and Music. She taught piano. For two years she attended the Sherwood Conservatory in Chicago, IL. She was born in Chicago and graduated from Roosevelt High School as its' Valedictorian in 1940. She received the outstanding student award from the American Legion while in the eighth grade at Von Struben School.

For 38 years she was active in square dancing and at Rossmoor was a member of the Happy Squares until her health failed. She kept active as the secretary/treasurer of the Big Band of Rossmoor, and as a parish coordinator and collator for her church.

She is survived by her husband Vernon Brown of 58 years, whose father William S. Billy Brown was a past assistant Supervisor of the Modoc National Forest. She is also survived by her daughter Karen Phillips of Walnut Creek; son Bill of Fall River Mills, Calif.; four grandsons and one granddaughter and cousins Lulu Grivel and Lola Dollarhide of Davis Creek and Michael Grivel, Alturas................. Memorial gifts may be made to the Diablo Vista Retired Teachers' Association scholarship fund, (DVRTA), 4254 Heights Ave., Pittsburgh, CA 94565.

John Edward Vega

Alturas resident John Edward Vega, 48, died of a heart attack on March 30, 2001 in Reno, Nevada. Mr. Vega had made Modoc his home for the past eight years, moving to Alturas in 1993.

He worked as a truck driver and mechanic over the years, working in Modoc County driving trucks for Walter Sphar Trucking of Likely, Fitch Sand and Gravel, Rene Larranaga of Alturas and most recently Martin Transportation of Medford, Ore.

Born in Gilroy, Calif. on October 31, 1952, he received his education in Morgan Hill, Calif. As hobbies, Mr.Vega enjoyed fishing and working on cars.

He will remain in the hearts and memories of many relatives, friends and co-workers.

Mr. Vega is survived by his wife Tomie Guzman Vega of Alturas; sons, John Ed Vega, Jr. of Ft. Irwin, Calif.; Alberto Vela of Salinas; Jesus Ray Vela of Alturas; uncle Alfred Vegas, Alturas; grandchildren James, Steven and Andrew Vega; Richard, Naomi, Sabino, Lucas, Quentin, Albert, Jr., Gilberto and Brenda Vela; step-grandchildren, Patricia, Vanessa, and Luis Madrigal; sisters Victoria, Madeline and Sylvia Vegas of Gilroy; brothers, Albert, Anthony, Edward Vegas and Rafael Hernandez of Gilroy.

Visitation will be held at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas from 2 p.m. until 7 p.m. today, April 5 with a Rosary at the Kerr Chapel at 6:30 p.m. tonight. Graveside services will be held on Friday, April 6 at 11:00 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery.

Veva Bonacina

Graveside services were held in Chico, Calif. on Saturday, March 24 for former Modoc County resident Veva Bernice Bonacina, 93, who passed away on March 21, 2001 of natural causes in a Chico hospital.

Born Veva Watkins on May 26, 1907, to Charlie and Josephine Watkins of Davis Creek, Calif., she spent much of her life in Modoc County. She graduated from "the Grammar School of South Davis Creek District" in 1920. When she was young, she worked with her father at the Davis Creek Store. She also was manager of the NCO building on Main Street for a time, and a charter ember of the local Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen Auxiliary. She volunteered to teach arts and crafts at Alturas Elementary School. Before leaving Modoc County in 1971, she owned the two-story house which once sat near the corner of Fourth and Main and was later moved to 11th Street.

During the service, she was remembered as a person who often made sacrifices to help others. "A mother to many, a friend to all," is how great-grandson Joseph Torsitano, described her. Although she was 57 when Joseph was born in Alturas, she raised him until he left home at 19. She often assisted members of the local Indian community. When friends and family found themselves between jobs or otherwise in tough circumstances, they were always welcomed by Veva and given a place to "get back on their feet."

Veva was also remembered as a person who had a great will to live. Cancer surgery in 1979 was performed to enable her to live up to another five years. But, she held on much longer because she always said, "I want to see how it all ends."

She was preceded in death by her parents and brother Noel Watkins, Sr. Survivors include a son, Burnell Shelton of New Jersey; a sister, Reva Gray of Chico; and two nephews, one grandchild, one great-grandchild and two great-great grandchildren.

SPORTS

Squirrel Round-up a success

The tenth annual Squirrel Round-up was held this past Saturday in Surprise Valley. Ninety registered hunters gathered from California and nearby states to help the participating ranchers deal with the squirrel infestation.

Following a day of hunting was the Round-up dinner in the Four Seasons Building at the County Fairgrounds. After a social hour, the hunters, ranchers, guests and residents sat down at a hearty dinner of barbecue steak and chicken, beans, baked potato, salad and dessert.

A continuous raffle was held during dinner for those who had registered to hunt. Raffle prizes were generously donated from businesses in Klamath Falls, Alturas, and Surprise Valley. The final grand prize raffle was held at the end of the evening. It was a trophy squirrel encased in glass, awarded to Patrick Chladek of Sacramento. Also, during the evening, a silent auction took place. Everyone could bid silently on various impressive articles donated by individuals or businesses. The SV Rotary Club raffled off a rifle. In all, it was a successful event. Thanks to everyone who participated.

Wood brothers top honors at Susanville

The Wood brothers, of Alturas, earned a triple no family can top at last weekendÕs Susanville Invitational Youth Wrestling Tournament. Travis Wood, age 14, Josh Wood, age 10, and Tyler Wood, age eight, were each named Outstanding Wrestlers in his age group at the event. Each of them won his age group with Travis and Tyler getting two wins, and Josh getting a win and a second.

Their efforts were even impressive to their coach Shaun Wood, who just happens to be their father and the Modoc High football and wrestling coach. The awards were given by the coaches, and Wood abstained from voting.

Modoc did well at the event, with other first places won by Jason Jones with two, Joey Catania, and Patrick Bell.

Second place finishers were Brad Bell, Taylor Dunn, Ryan Carrithers, Sheridan Crutcher, Jeremy Lucier, Nick Hawes, Justin Estes and Justin Mason.

Third places went to Ian Jacques, Mark Main, Hank Raabe, Bud Groff, Tim Cruse, Preston Dennis, Justin Weaver and Nick Hawes. Fourth places went to Chris Houghtby, Garrett Chapman, Gabe Fletcher and Sheridan Crutcher.

Taking fifths were Bryan Weed, Liam Iverson, and Adam Pence. The team wrestled a dual against itself Wednesday to complete the season and 15 wrestlers from youth through high school will be competing at the Worlds this Friday, Saturday and Sunday in Reno.

Dead end for Lady Braves winning streak

Varsity softball coach Dennis Banister would be at the top of the league along with Modoc. That proved to true for the Lady Braves as they suffered their first loss of the season, 3-9, after beating the Bulldogs in their first game 4-0, which puts their record to 13-1, and a 5-1 SCL standing.

The Lady Braves pulled out in the lead in the third and fourth innings of their first game of the day, as Fall River pitcher Libby Decoito walked six batters, but at the same time only gave up two singles to Shay Farmer and Laura Toaetolu.

Stephanie McMaster wasn't throwing the heat that is usually expected. She pitched to 29, batters struck out one, walked two, and gave up six hits for no runs. The Braves, however, managed to steal six bases allowing them to take the lead and a win, 4-0.

In the second game, Modoc faced new pitcher Laura Dye as McMaster continued to throw for the Braves.

The Bulldogs lead by the top of the third, 4-1. Charlene Stevens brought in the run with a RBI and she would do the same in the fourth inning to bring the Braves up to three runs, but by that time Fall River had already brought in eight runs.

In the nightcap, McMaster pitched to 34 batters in seven innings after having to pitch to 29 in the first. McMaster managed to chalk up three Srike-outs, but gave up four hits and four walks.

Trinity

McMaster pitched a no hitter in the second game of the Lady Braves double header against the Ladies of Trinity, last Friday.

McMaster struck out 13 and walked three batters in the opening game of the Lady Braves against Trinity. In the second game, she managed to strike out four while giving up one walk, pitching to only 17 batters. But the girls win of 8-7 was too close for comfort according for coach Dennis Banister. "We got off the bus and it was like the girls forgot how to play," he said.

The Ladies of Trinity were up 7-0 by the top of the fifth inning. Laura Toaetolu and McMaster made it on base and followed through with runs.

Charlene Stevens hit a single in the sixth and stole home for another run, but the Braves were still down by four. That was until two K's and an out at first put the Lady Braves up to bat again in the bottom of the seventh.

Jessica Kern and Charlene Stevens both hit singles, that were shortly followed by runs. But it was a triple by Niki Poindexter that put the Lady Braves over the top, with the winning run.

The second game, on the other hand, was quite opposite, in that the Lady Braves dominated the field from start to finish with the greatest of ease. Modoc opened the game in the bottom of the first inning with six runs.

Trinity's inability to hit the ball out of the infield put them out of the game as Modoc took advantage of Trinity's slow pitches and weak infield.

Shay Farmer had four hits, McMaster three, Kern had two, and Stevens had a single and double on each game.

Braves hit a few homers

Ramon Molina and Lucas Tramontanas led the Braves to victory as they battered Trinity's batters from the mound. Together, the two struck out 12 batters and gave up eight walks, last Friday.

With Molina controlling Trinity from the mound, the Braves line up controlled the game from the batters' box. Kris Server, Brett Spicer, Blake Thorn, and Eric Miller accounted for five Modoc home runs.

The Braves went on to beat Trinity 12-7 and 6-3 in the second.

Tramantonas pitched eight innings striking out seven batters, walked four, and gave up six hits. The Braves scored four runs in the top of the 8th inning, adding to their two runs from the seventh inning.

Matt Krauel laid down a suicide bunt that advanced Thorn to score while Krauel lucked out on his struggle to first.

Leading hitters were Blake Thorn, 3-4, Kris Server and Jared McGarva, 2-4, and Brett Spicer with a home run. The double win over Trinity set the Braves with a 3-1 league record and an overall history of 9-2.

The Braves defeated Fall River twice in a mid-day double header Tuesday, 12-1 and 10-1. Ramon Molina threw a no-hitter, pitching eight K's and chalked up two walks.

Blake Thorn hit 3-4, Glen Christensen was 2-3, Kris Server and Brett Spicer were both 2-3 with a home run, and Christian Hagge managed to bring in a few runs as he sent a ball flying over the fence.

Sheldon Benson won the second game for Modoc, pitching six innings and only giving away one hit, while striking out and walking three.

Lucas Tramantonas led in the hitting department with 3-4, Thorn was 3-5, and Benson was 2-4.

MHS Golf starts SCL on top

Modoc High's Golf team finished first on the front nine, 195 over pare, and the back nine with 187 handicap. The Braves worked the course facing Bishop Quinn, Burney, Etna, Fall River, McCloud, Mt. Shasta, and Trinity, with Mt. Shasta taking home second with a total score of 398, and Trinity managed to place third with 417.

Kris Server, Blake Thorn, and Jerry Wheeler earned positions in the top ten individual medalists. Server placed third with a 68 handicap, Thorn took sixth with 76, and Jerry Wheeler finished out the top at eight with a total of 78.

Jack Baritone and Adam Sever also did well at the varsity level, both totaled with a score of 80.

Modoc placed forth, Tuesday, at the Shield Crest Golf Course in Henley. The team totaled a score of 368. Jerry Wheeler and Jack Baritone tied for sixth place with a handicap of 86, and Adam Server tied with Joe Hardin of Mazama High School with 88.

The Braves will be on the road today to Mt. Shasta, where they hope to bring home another SCL victory.

Hunter Safety course offered

California Hunter Safety course will be taught in Alturas at the Alturas Elks Lodge, 619 North Main St., Alturas on April 16, 17 and 19, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. The class will start at 6:00 p.m. Pre-register or gain further information at the Sports Hut, Main St., Alturas.

Participants must attend all three nights to receive credit for the course, which is required for a first time California hunting license. A donation of $3 will be accepted to help cover the cost of course materials.

APRIL 12, 2001

Tulelake farmers get worst news, zero water

Farmers in the Tulelake Basin received the worst news possible last week -- they would receive no irrigation water from the Klamath Project this summer. This week, the farmers opted to bring suit against those federal agencies responsible for the decision.

The suit is alleging the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service failed to provide protection of the irrigators' contract rights as required under federal law.

The announcement that no water would be available for most farmers in the Tulelake area sent shockwaves through the basin and has bonded the communities together to fight for their very livelihood.

Today, farmers and supporters in the Tulelake Basin will hold a demonstration of support with a bucket brigade down a dry canal. According to Bob Gasser, of Basin Fertilizer, about 1,000 people are expected to attend. He said surviving World War I and Word War II veterans who homesteaded the land will be on hand and U.S. Flags in honor of deceased veteran-farmers will be displayed. Gasser said the rally will begin at 12:30 p.m. at the Klamath County Fairgrounds.

A public meeting with Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber is set for 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. at the Fairgrounds, Senator Ron Wyden and Representative Greg Walden will attend the rally and empty bucket brigade. A public meeting with the governor will follow. A public meeting with Wyden is set for 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Oregon Institute of Technology Auditorium.

According to Gasser, the loss of water means an expected $300 million to $400 million economic loss for the basin economy. "This is the first time in our nation's history that the Endangered Species Act has totally decimated thousands of jobs, businesses and the heritage of such a widespread area," Gasser said. "The loss will make it almost impossible for this area to survive."

The irrigators are claiming the "no water" decision is based upon "unsubstantiated biological opinions" by the FWS and National Marine Fisheries Service. The agencies have stated the biological opinion represents the best science available for the protection of the endangered coho salmon and the Lost River and shortnose sucker. In addition, a federal court has ruled the Bureau of Reclamation violated the Endangered Species Act in the past by delivering water to the Klamath Project.

In addition to the farmers, Gasser points out that area parks, homes, and the huge Tulelake area refuges will not receive water. Modoc County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said the situation in the Tulelake Basin represents the Endangered Species Act run amuck. He said the agencies failed to consider National Environmental Protection Act, NEPA, requirements that social and economic harm be taken into account before the decision is made. No one is arguing there is abundant water in the area, and agree that the drought covering the northwest is largely to blame for the water conditions. But farmers in the area believe they did not get a fair shake in the decision-making process. The rain and snow over the past 10 days has done little to ease the low-water conditions.

City of Alturas drops 10% of resident population

The City of Alturas lost 10 percent of its population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2000 count, dropping from 1990's 3,231 residents to 2000's 2,892.

The County as a whole dropped 2.4 percent off non-adjusted population or 4.7 percent when 1990's adjusted figures are used. The county population stands at 9,449.

Most local officials agree the reason for the population loss is a lack of jobs and no economic development success. Additionally, there has been an impact from the welfare to work program that has seen some families move out of Alturas and Modoc to find jobs. "It's a lack of industry, and many companies have dropped from large full time crews to skeleton crews or to part-time employees," said City Treasurer Kathie Alves. "So much of our funding, such as gas tax, is based upon population, so we'll take a cut."

Both major utility companies who serve Alturas, Pacific Power and Citizen's Utilities had seen their employee numbers dip. Over the past 10 years, the county and city have also seen the closure of all lumber mills of any size, including the last major operation of Calandor Pine in Alturas in 1991.

The enrollment picture in the Modoc Joint Unified School District has continued to decline from the 1995-96 high of 1,237 students. The 2000-2001 enrollment was 1,114, the lowest of the past 10 years. The enrollment levels are as follows: 1990-91, 1,163; 1991-92, 1,230; 1992-93, 1,156; 1993-94, 1,159; 1994-95, 1,205; 1995-96, 1,237; 1996-97, 1,222; 1997-98, 1,182; 1998-99, 1,124; 1990-00, 1,117 and 2000-01, 1,114.

In contrast, the City of Susanville gained from 1990's 7,279 to 2000's 13,541 residents, an 86 percent gain. Some of that gain is attributed to the expansion of the High Desert Prison, which has also dramatically increased jobs in that community, offsetting some of the timber industry losses.

The City of Redding also saw strong growth, from a population of 66,462 in 1990 to 80,865 in 2000.

Siskiyou County grew slightly, from 43,531 people to 44,301. In that county, Tulelake grew 10, up to 1,020 residents; Dorris dropped from 892 to 886; Etna dropped from 835 to 781; Mt. Shasta grew from 3,460 to 3,621; Weed dropped from 3,062 to 2,978; and Yreka gre.

KCNO radio station operator dies in two-car auto wreck

The operator of KCNO Radio in Alturas was killed April 6, in a two-vehicle accident on U.S. 395, just south of Jones' Lane.

According to the California Highway Patrol, William "Bill" Hansen, age 87, who is listed as a Merrill, Or. resident, was stopped on the northbound shoulder in a 1990 Dodge van. He made a U-turn in front of a 1998 Ford pickup driven by Stephen Godfrey, 61, of Alturas, who was northbound on US 395.

The Ford pickup struck the Dodge in the driver's door, which caused fatal injuries to Hansen. Godfrey was not hurt.

Seatbelts are credited with preventing injury to a family in a single vehicle accident April 7, 12 p.m. on SR 299 east of U.S. 395.

The CHP reports that Michael P. Brown, 31, Empire, Nevada was driving a 1998 Dodge Durango from Empire to Alturas westbound on SR 299 at about 40 m.p.h. when he encountered a patch of slushy snow and his vehicle lost traction.

The CHP states Brown was driving too fast for conditions on the slippery highway. The Durango veered out of control, went off the road and overturned as it careened down a steep snow-covered embankment. It came to a stop on its left side about 75 feet from the roadway.

Brown attributes the lack of injuries to himself, Dianna Brown, age 28, Judith Brown, age 55, and Hannah Brown, age one, to the fact they were all restrained in safety equipment, including a car safety seat for the infant.

There were no injuries in another snow-related accident April 6, 7:50 p.m. on Highway 299, west of County Road 84. The CHP reports Walter Layton, 34, Lakeview, was driving a 1991 Ford westbound on SR 299 in a snow storm and the road was covered with snow and ice. He was traveling at an unsafe speed for conditions, lost control and the vehicle left the north roadway edge, causing minor damage to the vehicle's left side.

Fatigue was cited as the cause of a single vehicle accident on SR 139, April 4 5:47 p.m. near Loveness Road.

According to the CHP, Diane Howen, 67, Union Wa., was driving a 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee northbound and had been driving since leaving Reno earlier in the day. She was feeling a little tired and closed her eyes for a moment. When she reopened her eyes, she had allowed the Jeep to veer right and onto the dirt shoulder. She turned to the left, overcorrected and tried to correct by making a hard right turn. The Jeep left the road, and started to rotate in a counter-clockwise direction. The right side tires regained traction causing Jeep to roll to its roof as it went back on the highway. It skidded across both lanes coming to rest on the southbound dirt shoulder. Howen and passenger, George Howen, age 77 of Union, WA, both exited the Jeep and were attended to by Canby Fire Department/paramedics. Neither was hurt.

MMS honored as Distinguished School

Modoc Middle School has been honored by the California Department of Education as one of the state's 157 Distinguished Schools for 2001.

"I feel it's terrific recognition for the Middle School," said Modoc Joint Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly. "It's a credit to the Middle School and to the entire district staff. When one school is recognized, it's a reflection of the effort of the entire school district."

"These schools are leaders in the education community," said State Superintendent of Schools Delaine Eastin. "They are a tribute to California and are living proof of what is possible when schools are committed to meeting high standards. Academic achievement, parent and community involvement, dedicated staff, and outstanding professional development are exemplary in these schools."

During the May 11 awards ceremony at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, Modoc Middle School will be presented its Distinguished School plaque and school flag.

The Distinguished Schools underwent a rigorous selection process conducted by the California Department of Education with the help of county offices of education and local educators throughout the state. The schools were selected after their applications were judged to be exemplary at a state-level competition. Each school also received a site visit to validate information provided in the application.

The Middle School joins both Alturas Elementary who was named a Distinguished School in 1999 and Modoc High Schools which earned the honor in 1994.

Building remains slow in March

Building activity in Modoc County remained slow during the month of March, 2001 as the county issued just 11 building permits and the city only five.

The value of the county building permits totaled $95,663 and the city's was $9,943. The county collected $771.98 in fees and the city $261.98.

There was also little building in the City of Alturas during February as eight building permits valued at $22,614 were issued.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Objectivity, a viewpoint

Dear Editor:

As a new resident of Modoc County, I found several items in your April 5th issue to be of interest. First was your proposal for a secret organization of us liberals to be called "MOLES" and to skulk about in caves holding secret meeting and such. Having grown up in a family of southern liberals in Oklahoma with branches of the family in Louisiana, I am for the organization, but against the caves and skulking part.

My family was almost always in the minority, but felt that that obligated them to be much more up front about their opinions. At the turn of the Century, my grandfather, Frank Johnson, was the only white man in Frederick, Oklahoma who wouldn't join the Klu Klux Klan. He didn't hide the fact and wasn't run out of town or anything like it. He was a well liked farmer and nurseryman who quite possibly changed a few minds by being outspoken about his views.

I once saw my tiny grandmother, Rena, face down a huge Okie City policeman who was harassing a black family for fishing in a lake in the white part of town. Later, my sister asked her if she hadn't been afraid of the cop and I will always remember her reply; it has become my mantra, "Afraid? Hell no, with enlightenment comes fearlessness!"

As far as an organizational names goes, I suggest that instead of "MOLES" we call it "OWLS", the Objectively Wise Liberals' Society. This might even cause a few right wingers out there to turn off Rush Limburger for minute so they can borrow a dictionary and look "objective."

Mr. Fred "We have enough liberals in the area" Urbanek's letter was mildly amusing. I won't bother dissecting it line by line, just thank Mr. Urbanek for his cordial welcome to Modoc County and in return, wish him all the "nice" arsenic flavored stream water he can drink. His comment about "Big Brother" seems to typify right wing conservative viewpoints regarding State and Federal government and this brings me to the third and fourth article of interest in this issue of the Record.

In a front page article, we are told that the Modoc County Board of Supervisors is requesting a disaster declaration for the county from the state because of probable drought conditions, and on page 15 an article entitled "Crop Disaster payments available now" farmers and ranchers are told how and when they can sign up for federal crop disaster payments for last year and for this. Objectively, it appears to be inconsistent if anti big government, ultra conservative ranchers and farmers with their oft proclaimed independence and self-reliance to deride government programs such as those for children and single mothers in one hand while filling out forms for federal assistance with the other. Maybe one hand hasn't realized what the other is doing.

--Ben Van Meter Alturas

Watch out for M.U.L.E.S.

Dear Editor:

The news of the establishment of the M.O.L.E.S. has sent shock waves through the conservative community. The gauntlet has been thrown down and the conservatives are energized! M.U.L.E.S. (Modocers United Liberal Elimination Society) is hereby announced!

The revelation that there are so many liberals (two is too many), in our county should inspire all red blooded Modoc Conservatives to rally to the cause. We will meet brazenly and openly at high noon and proclaim the truth for all who draw near, even liberals. Freedom of religion and speech will be stressed and the constitution will be revered and liberally (Ack! I hate that word) quoted.

The second amendment will be exhibited openly and proudly. Pride in our great American heritage, along with patriotism will be our guiding principals and the elimination of liberals (by persuasion, of course), our goal. Federal infringement of our private property rights will be met head on and as the liberals see the light and abandon their radical agenda, common sense will reestablish justice and true American Character will once again reign.

We M.U.L.E.S. won't rest until liberals are extinct - the only possible salvation for M.O.L.E.S. will be the Endangered Species Act.

--Bill Benner, Eagleville

OBITUARIES

Dorothy Dorris

Long-time Modoc resident Dorothy Dorris, 81, passed away in her sleep the morning of April 4, 2001 at Modoc Medical Center Long Term Care in Alturas, Calif. She had been in declining health for the past two years, suffering from congestive heart failure.

Born Dorothy Atkinson on August 24, 1920 in New Castle on Tyne, England, to Thomas and Alice Atkinson, she attended schools in Newcastle and served in the English Land Army during the war, farming the English countryside while the men were off fighting. After the war, she first visited the United States in 1944 staying with an uncle who lived in Alturas.

She met her future husband George Bailey Dorris during that visit and the two struck up a special friendship. Dorris was the grandson of one of the pioneering Dorris family that began ranching in Modoc County in the late 1800s. After she returned to England, months later she received a letter from Bailey asking her to marry him. The letter included a boat ticket to New York for the following week. Needing more time than a week to put her English affairs in order, she changed the ticket and arrived in San Francisco, where Bailey met her. The two drove to Reno where they were married and took up residence on the Dorris Lazy UF Ranch, just south of Alturas. In later years, the ranch was sold to the United States Department of Wildlife and became what is today, Modoc National Wildlife Refuge. While building a new home at the top of Parker Creek Canyon, the couple lived in Alturas. In 1972 Bailey died suddenly while visiting Dorothy's family in England. She sold the Parker Creek home and moved back into Alturas.

Dorothy approached every aspect of her life with an enthusiasm and zeal that endeared her to everyone she met. She learned to ride horses and was often a part of the Dorris Ranch buckaroo crew. When the ranch cook didn't show or quit, Dorothy would cook for days on end for a full hay or cowboy crew, sometimes for as many as 40.

One of her favorite past times was hunting ducks on one of the many ranch ponds, often sharing a duck blind with long-time friend Evie Younger. She also enjoyed playing bridge, an activity that proved to build lasting friendships. Three of her friends, Evelyn Lederer, Lillian Fitzpatrick and Pat Conwell played almost every Tuesday afternoon for 30 years. Later in life she took up golf and enjoyed the game.

Although she never had children of her own, she was an aunt, Godmother and second mom to numerous kids throughout her life. She followed their horse shows, sporting events, often bringing picnic lunches and carting kids around when a mom's schedule conflicted. Dorothy was a member of the Federated Church and contributed and volunteered for several local charities.

Since she met Bud Porter, the two have been inseparable as companions throughout the past 21 years, dividing their time between Alturas and Palm Springs, with annual trips to England to visit her family.

She is survived by long-time companion Bud Porter of Alturas; her sister Monica Mollath in England; cousin Jimmy Barker and wife Mildred of Woodland; nieces Sandy Poupeny, Reno; Jill Clarkson, Belgium; and nephews Rick Parker and John Harvey; grand nieces and nephews. John and Evie Younger's children Liz, Jay, Dorothy and the late David, knew Dorothy as a second mom.

Cremation is under the direction of Kerr Mortuary. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will hold a graveside memorial service on Wednesday, April 18 at 11 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery. Following the service, everyone is invited to attend a gathering at the Federated Church Hall to celebrate Dorothy's life.

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that contributions be made to the Modoc County Historical Society, 600 So. Main St., Alturas, CA 96101 or to the American Cancer Society.

William Hosken 'Bill' Hansen

KCNO Radio operator, manager and long-time radio broadcaster William Hosken Hansen, 87, lost his life in an auto accident outside of Alturas, Calif. on April 6, 2001.

Services will be held at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas today, April 12 at 10:00 a.m., with burial at the Cedarville, Calif. Cemetery. William Hosken Hansen was born in Long Beach, Calif. on February 5, 1914 to Emile and Kate Hansen. He completed ninth grade in Long Beach schools. He married Thelma D. Beckwith in September 1934. She preceded him in death.

Mr. Hansen worked as a spotter in a dry cleaning plant in those early years.

A son, Robert, was born in 1935 and another son, Richard, was born in 1940. During his years in the dry cleaning plant, he began studying radio. This led to a career in radio repair and his final goal of obtaining his First Class Commercial Radio Engineering License. In the early 1940s, he worked as an engineer and announcer in several Oregon radio stations.

In 1953, he started the K-Boy radio station in Medford, Ore., followed by K-Lad, Klamath Falls, Ore. and K-Dan in Eureka, Calif. He then managed K-Dov, Medford, Ore. and KCNO, Inc., Alturas, Calif., for the past 35 years.

As a Christian, his faith in Jesus Christ was his inspiration to spread the Gospel to all who would listen.

He and Mona McClain of Alturas, were married in Elko, Nev. on April 18, 1975. They were to have celebrated 26 years of marriage this month.

Clergy Marvin Newell will hold today's services. Mr. Hansen is survived by his wife Mona Hansen of Cedarville, Calif.; two sons, Robert Hansen of Camano Island, Wash. and Richard Hansen of Redding, Calif.; seven grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. In addition he had four stepchildren, Peggy, Pam, Don and Dan and numerous step-grandchildren and step-great-grandchildren.

The family suggest memorial donations be directed to the Lakeview Nazarene Church, Lakeview, Ore.

Bob Bunyard

Long-time Surprise Valley rancher Bob Bunyard passed away from cancer on April 4, 2001 in Cedarville, Calif. He was 70.

Mr. Bunyard was born in Lakeview, Ore. on October 17, 1930 to Susan Elizabeth Toney Bunyard and John Elvy Bunyard. He spent his first three years of life in Oregon. He attended Surprise Valley High School in Cedarville where he met his future wife Mary Lartirigoyen. The two were married in Reno, Nevada on December 26, 1948 and shared a marriage of 53 years, until his passing.

The couple purchased a ranch outside of Cedarville, where they raised sheep, cattle and grew alfalfa. They owned and operated the ranch for 50 years and sold it three years ago when they "moved into town" in Cedarville. Mr. Bunyard was a great fan and big supporter of all the Surprise Valley High School sports events.

"He loved them all and enjoyed watching his boys and grandchildren participating in sporting events," said his wife. He also very much enjoyed branding cattle in the spring and fall. He was a past member of the Modoc County Cattlemen's Association and Modoc County Farm Bureau.

He was preceded in death by his sister Irene Sanderson. Mr. Bunyard is survived by his wife Mary of Cedarville; two sons, Michael and John; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren in Surprise Valley; a brother Elvy Bunyard in Salt Lake City, Utah and several nieces and nephews.

The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra held services at graveside on April 7 at 1 p.m. at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Donations in Mr. Bunyard's memory may be directed to the Surprise Valley Hospital, Cedarville, CA 96104.

Edwin Clarence Stopp (Photo not available)

Edwin Clarence Stopp's closest kin and friends consider him an extraordinary person. They recall their unforgettable summers on the Stopp's ranch near Lake City, where he showed them his sense of humor, taught them to love the Creator, the soil and at the end of each summer day he would drive everyone out for a swim at the old Leonards' Pool on 40 Lane. His zest for hard work and honesty were traits that he imparted to all close to him.

He led an interesting life flying biplanes, racing cars and as a master mechanic for the Carmel elite, and a Franklin and Hupmobile agency owner during his younger years living in Monterey. Few really knew what a unique person he was, notes his daughter Cynthia Charles, because his ranch absorbed him. Mr. Stopp passed away in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif. at the age of 94 on March 5, 2001. He and wife Lucile celebrated 66 years of marriage last year.

Born in Toledo, Ohio on January 27,1907, he moved with his family at an early age to Las Cruces, New Mexico, where he learned Spanish while playing with neighborhood children. "He had two, first languages, Spanish and English, throughout his life," said his daughter. Clarence spoke Spanish so fluently, he was asked while in Mexico, what part of Mexico he was from. His parents and their seven children moved from new Mexico to California where they camped in a tent and the children played on what is now Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles. His father was hired to build the arched windows of the Ambassador Hotel there.

In the late 1920s Clarence graduated as a master mechanic from Heald College in San Francisco. He moved to the Monterey Peninsula near his brother who owned a Jersey Dairy in Pacific Grove. Clarence started a Franklin and Hupmobile Agency and Garage where he worked on cars of the Carmel elite. Among his customers and friends were actors, Col. Fitch of Ft. Ord, and Charles and Anne Lindbergh. Clarence became a specialist in working on the air cooled Franklin cars and people brought their cars to him from as far as New York. He enjoyed Anne Morrow Lindbergh's company as they used to ride around the Peninsula together. "She could shift at stop signs with a Franklin, like a race car driver," he told his family.

While Lucile Cramton of Lake City was attending the birth of her niece in Pacific Grove, she met Clarence. They fell in love and married in Reno, Nev. August 20, 1934. Lucile's parents lived on the 49 Lane near Lake City and her father, Oliver Cramton, telegramed that the Enich Reynolds ranch was for sale. The newlyweds sold their new home overlooking the Monterey Peninsula directly above what is now Monterey Bay Aquarium and purchased the Reynolds Ranch. That ranch was Clarence's joy. He loved his angus, reservoirs, the wildlife and the solitude. The family later realized that the ranch, surrounded by its beautiful mountains and cloud formations, must have reminded Clarence of his happy childhood in New Mexico. Mr. Stopp never ceased to amaze his Spanish-speaking caregivers with his fluent Spanish, even near the end of his life.

A celebration of Clarence's life was held in the home of his daughter Cynthia Charles in Healdsburg. Mr. Stopp was a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and was President of the Soil Conservation Service for many years.

He is survived by his devoted wife and working partner, Lucile; daughters Cynthia Charles of Healdsburg and Charlynn Long of Montague; grandchildren, Christopher Robertson of Santa Rosa, Chester Robertson of Mill Valley, Leticia Brent of Peoria, Ariz. and three great-grandchildren.

_ His cremains will be placed at the Lake City Cemetery at a later date.

Correspondence may be sent to the Stopp family, c/o Lucile Stop, Dutra Guest Home, P.O. Box 4, Montague, CA 96064.

Dale Weigand (Photo not available)

Dale Weigand, 61, passed away from cancer on March 27, 2001 at his home in Chico, Calif.

He was born September 17, 1939, on the family ranch to Lawrence and Norma Weigand. Dale attended Center School, Bieber Elementary, Bieber High School and Healds Business College in Sacramento. He married Janice Clark of Adin in 1960.

Mr. Weigand operated his own logging truck in Burney for seven years, then moved to Chico and drove fuel trucks and freight trucks for 35 years. He received a one million mile safety award from Yellow Freight.

Funeral services were officiated by Jeff Jones and his father and lifetime friends Donald Jones. Interment was at Glen Oaks Memorial Park, Chico.

Dale is survived by his wife, Janice; two daughters and sons-in-law, Vicki and Dave Sayer of Chico; Valerie and Jim Dugan, two grandchildren, Nicholus and Jacquilin of Clovis; sister Cleo Hunt and brother Stan Weigand of Adin. He was preceded in death by his parents and sister Avis Crews.

Donations may be sent to Big Valley Historical Museum, Bieber, Hospice or any organization of the donor's choice.

Lyda Laura Brown (Photo not available)

Lyda Laura Brown, 78, a 10-year resident of Rossmoor in Walnut Creek, Calif., died suddenly at her home on the evening of March 21, 2001. Memorial services will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 8 at Lafayette Orinda Presbyterian Church (LOPC), 49 Knox Drive, Lafayette.

Mrs. Brown always considered herself a "Modoc'er," says her husband Vernon. Lyda's grandfather by marriage was John Davis, a past Assessor of Modoc County. Her uncles Dan A. and John C. Davis and cousins Paul D. Davis, Richard M. Davis, and Dorothy C. Kelley preceded her in death.

Mrs. Brown retired in 1981 from the William Feria Academics Plus School in the Cupertino School District, where she taught third grade at Feria for three years, a magnet school that stressed 'back to basics approach to education.' She spent 11 years at Panama School, involved from the beginning with the A+ program. Prior to this, she taught in two schools in the Arcade District of Sacramento County, Wyda Way and Dyer Kelly.

She graduated with Honors from Sacramento State College in 1955, with a B.A. degree in Education and Music. She taught piano. For two years she attended the Sherwood Conservatory in Chicago, IL. She was born in Chicago and graduated from Roosevelt High School as its' Valedictorian in 1940. She received the outstanding student award from the American Legion while in the eighth grade at Von Struben School.

For 38 years she was active in square dancing and at Rossmoor was a member of the Happy Squares until her health failed. She kept active as the secretary/treasurer of the Big Band of Rossmoor, and as a parish coordinator and collator for her church.

She is survived by her husband Vernon Brown of 58 years, whose father William S. Billy Brown was a past assistant Supervisor of the Modoc National Forest. She is also survived by her daughter Karen Phillips of Walnut Creek; son Bill of Fall River Mills, Calif.; four grandsons and one granddaughter and cousins Lulu Grivel and Lola Dollarhide of Davis Creek and Michael Grivel, Alturas.

Memorial gifts may be made to the Diablo Vista Retired Teachers' Association scholarship fund, (DVRTA), 4254 Heights Ave., Pittsburg, CA 94565.

William Boyman (Photo not available)

Former Cedarville and Alturas resident William E. Boyman died April 3, 2001 of cancer in Springfield, Ore. He was 74.

Mr. Boyman was a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars in Cedarville, Calif. and served as chaplain for the Veterans of Foreign Wars for a couple of years. He moved from Los Angeles to Cedarville and then to Alturas, Calif. and Springfield, Ore., where he had lived since 1984.

Boyman was a seaman first class during World War II. He was discharged in 1946 in San Pedro, Calif. He attended school in Los Angeles.

He was the owner of Bill's Market across from Springfield High School from 1984 to 1990 when he retired. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and reading. He was born October 24, 1926 in Los Angeles to Otto and Lucretia Boyman. He married Melba Brown in Tijuana, Mexico on April 20, 1968.

Survivors include his wife Mildred; three sons, Michael Boyman of Gold Run; Tony Mansfield of Antioch and Michael Mansfield of Weldon; a daughter Janet Terral of Springfield, Ore.; sister Elaine Pritchard of Dover, Ark. and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A daughter Patricia Boyman, died in 1978.

No services will be held. Springfield Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Brent Taylor

Former Cedarville resident, Brent A. Taylor, 29, died on April 6, 2001 in San Diego, Calif. from injuries sustained in a pedestrian-vehicle accident. At this time, no services are planned. Interment will be in the Cedarville Cemetery. Desert Rose Funeral Chapel of Lakeview, Ore. is in charge of arrangements.

Brent was born in Arizona on April 14, 1971 and grew up in Cedarville. He was a 1989 graduate of Surprise Valley High School, Cedarville. He worked in the Surprise Valley Hospital for approximately two years, before enlisting in the Marine Corps for four years. After his service, he settled in San Diego where he worked as a restaurant cook.

He was a very loving person with a big heart and enjoyed family activities and cooking.

He is survived by his mother, Sera Rico Taylor of Cedarville; sister Christine Bailey of Cottonwood; brother Mel Taylor of Palo Alto and numerous cousins.

Contributions in the memory of Brent may be made to the Surprise Valley Hospital, 417 Main St., Cedarville, CA 96104 or to a charity of the donor's choice.

Veva Bonacina (Photo not available)

Graveside services were held in Chico, Calif. on Saturday, March 24 for former Modoc County resident Veva Bernice Bonacina, 93, who passed away on March 21, 2001 of natural causes in a Chico hospital.

Born Veva Watkins on May 26, 1907, in Modoc County to Charlie and Josephine Watkins of Davis Creek, Calif., Veva was reared in and spent much of her life in Modoc County. She graduated from "the Grammar School of South Davis Creek District" in 1920. When she was young, she worked with her father at the Davis Creek Store.

She also was manager of the NCO building on Main Street for a time, and a charter ember of the local Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen Auxiliary. She volunteered to teach arts and crafts at Alturas Elementary School. Before leaving Modoc County in 1971, she owned the two-story house which once sat near the corner of Fourth and Main and was later moved to 11th Street.

During the service, she was remembered as a person who often made sacrifices to help others. "A mother to many, a friend to all," is how great-grandson Joseph Torsitano, described her. Although she was 57 when Joseph was born in Alturas, she raised him until he left home at 19. She often assisted members of the local Indian community. When friends and family found themselves between jobs or otherwise in tough circumstances, they were always welcomed by Veva and given a place to "get back on their feet."

Veva was also remembered as a person who had a great will to live. Cancer surgery in 1979 was performed to enable her to live up to another five years. But, she held on much longer because she always said, "I want to see how it all ends."

She was preceded in death by her parents and brother Noel Watkins, Sr. Survivors include a son, Burnell Shelton of New Jersey; a sister, Reva Gray of Chico; and two nephews, one grandchild, one great-grandchild and two great-great grandchildren.

SPORTS

Modoc wrestlers place at Worlds

Three of Modoc's 12 wrestlers placed at the huge Reno World Wrestling Championships last weekend, where 2,400 wrestlers competed.

Tony Willis took a third place, going 5-1 after losing that first match. Travis Wood also took a third place, going 5-1. Tyler Wood placed sixth in is age group.

According to coach Shaun Wood, the competition was extreme and some age groups had around 150 kids. He said the parents who went with the team for the three-day event were instrumental in coaching throughout the weekend.

Warner Elk banquet readied for May 12

The Warner Mountain Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will hold its third annual Big Game Banquet and Auction at the Veterans' Hall in Alturas May 1. Tickets went on sale early this month and the banquet sells out quickly so interested people should get tickets soon.

 

The first year of the banquet, the local chapter was number one in the nation for funds raised and last year it ranked 45th out of 535 chapters nationwide. Many of those chapters are in metropolitan areas whose attendance far exceeds the local chapter's 220.

Tickets are $55 single or $75 couple and include an annual membership in RMEF.

Auction and prize items include 50 firearms valued at $30,000, original artwork from internationally known artists, artwork from local artists, two browning gun safes, a progressive raffle for a rifle and exclusive elk hunt in New Mexico and much more.

The Warner Mountain Chapter committee includes: Bill Madison, Jim Hays, Dan Silervia, Vern Seevers, Rusty Stanford, Mark Pence, Paul Bailey, Chuck McElwain, Jerry Hoxsey, Walt Tamagni, George Wistos, John Dederick, Wayne Bethel and Keith Jacques.

Get ready for 2001 Rotary Duck Race

Tickets for the 2001 Great Pit River Duck race go on sale Monday and the Alturas Rotary Clubs believe this race will raise the remaining funds needed to complete the Rotary Youth Park facility. The big ticket item left to be built at the Youth Park is an additional set of restrooms, which will be disabled accessible and a second concession stand.

There will be some new things in this year's race, but the main deal is 3,000 ducks will be sold at $25 each, giving the buyer a chance to win a new vehicle and many other prizes.

The top prize this year is a new black Jeep Wrangler. Second prize will be a hot tub and third will be a fishing boat and trailer, and the list goes on. As usual, with each duck race ticket purchase comes a coupon book full of great savings. Both the prize list and the coupon list will be published in the next week's newspaper.

The race is scheduled for Fandango Days July 7 this year. The Rotary Clubs have sold out the entire 3,000 ducks well before each previous race, so it's advisable to purchase ducks early.

Something new this year will be a Turbo Turtle category, which will be explained next week.

Tickets will be available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Braves idle, will get back into fray soon

The Braves didn't make it onto the field last Friday, as a result of the less-than-wonderful weather. The Braves were to meet with Burney, in what would have been two good games, since both Burney's softball and baseball teams are predicted to be some of the toughest teams in the SCL. The game will be rescheduled for later in the season.

Modoc is scheduled to play Mt. Shasta, another SCL leading team, on April 27 following the Braves bye week.

The last game of the season will be against the Weed Cougars May 4, who according to Brad Server and Dennis Banister, don't seem to be blocking figures in the Braves road to playoffs.

The SCL baseball playoffs are scheduled for May 11th, allowing for make-up games. The Braves are expecting better competition and a few more games in this year's playoffs, as a result of the Braves being moved up from Division IV to Division III, a big step up according to Server.

The playoffs have also been expanded from four teams to eight, leaving a lot of breathing room for the Braves.

The Lady Braves will most likely be meeting Fall River and Burney in the Playoffs May 15th, if they manage to keep Mt.Shasta and Weed at bay.

Dedication of Rotary Fields set for season

Opening day of Modoc Little League season on Saturday April 28, is the chosen date for the Dedication of the Rotary Fields in Alturas. Sunrise and Noon Rotary Clubs will host the dedication and provide free hot dogs, soft drinks and hamburgers for everyone. The 250 ballplayers in uniform will each receive a ticket for a chance at prizes.

"The community has been behind this project 100 percent and this is our way of thanking everyone for the building of these fields," offered Noon Rotary President Roger Dorris. "This is the result of five years of Duck Race support."

Special presentations and the dedication will be staged in the center of the new fields, to be witnessed by the ball players and the public. The event will begin at 10:00 a.m. Sponsors for the event include both Sunrise and Noon Rotary Clubs, Modoc Tobacco Coalition, Modoc Drug and Alcohol and Modoc County Little League.

Rotary's Great Pit River Duck Race 2001 tickets will be available for sale during the event. Proceeds from ticket sales continue to benefit the Rotary Field Project.

APRIL 19, 2001

County opts to appeal Sierra Nevada plan decision

Modoc County Supervisors Tuesday voted to send an appeal to the U.S. Forest Service on the Sierra Nevada Framework decision, even though that decision treated Modoc favorably in several areas. The appeal came from the Modoc Land Use Committee, a sub-committee of the Board, which often tends to decide the county's stance on land use issues.

According to Sean Curtis, of the Land Use Committee, the board could meet the deadline of filing an appeal by adopting a short form appeal presented at the meeting, but not read, or a long form appeal coming from a variety of agencies and organizations, which would not be available by the end of the meeting. The Board could, he said, attach its name to the long appeal as an intervener within the next 20 days.

The board asked that the long appeal be placed upon the next agenda for action. Some of the groups involved in that appeal are the production oriented folks, including the Farm Bureau and California Forestry Association, as well as several counties.

The Rural Council of Rural Counties (RCRC) is also appealing the Record of Decision and is asking that a team be convened to analyze the numerous complaints made regarding the Framework.

The Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement on the plan was released by the U.S. Forest Service in January, which covers the Modoc, Humboldt-Toyiabe, Lassen, Plumas, Tahoe, Eldorado, Stanislaus, Sierra, Inyo and Sequoia National Forests and the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.

Modoc National Forest Supervisor Dan Chisolm has said Modoc was the only county involved that actually was successful in many of its arguments and stances.

According to the appeal filed Tuesday, the county is now saying the Forest Service did not comply with the county's land planning ordinances in a full and open manner. The appeal also states the decision is contrary to proper resource management on the Modoc National Forest.

The county is now also saying in its appeal that the Forest Service failed to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act to discuss possible conflicts between federal action and local land use plans.

The county is asking that the Forest service comply with planning regulations in the county's land use management plan and the NEPA sections requiring local developed plans, as well as removal of all standards and guidelines relating to the Willow Flycatcher and conduct an open review of the valid science relating to the species as it relates to livestock grazing.

The county appeal also asks the Forest Service to "examine the decision for all direction that is incompatible with valid resource management on the Modoc Plateau and make any necessary adjustments. For those projects already identified as exempt in the Record of Decision, clear direction needs to be developed that shows projects are not to be governed by the Framework."

Modoc was actually singled out in the Record of Decision in several areas where existing management plans or processes will continue, outside of some of the provisions of the Sierra Nevada plan.

Some of the areas include the continuation of the Experimental Stewardship Program, the Big Valley Sustained Yield Unit, continuation of the Hackamore Ecosystem Restoration and Enhancement Project, the Upper Pit River Watershed Restoration Project, the Warner Mountain Rangeland Management Project, the Devil's Garden Wetlands project and the biological assessment on endangered suckers.

The county is now arguing in its appeal that "during recent implementation meetings it has become evident that the uniqueness of these exceptions is becoming lost. It is unclear how the exemptions will be applied on the landscape. These are nationally recognized projects and their protection from the frame work must be crystal clear and unequivocal."

Local forest officials expressed some wonderment as to Modoc's stance on the Record of Decision. They believe their cooperation and coordination with the county were substantial and effective. According to the Record of Decision, the Modoc National Forest and Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Valley Resource Area is home to one of three experimental stewardship projects in the nation. The multi-disciplinary, multi-agency and multi-interest committee explores new ideas and practices and develops innovative approaches to grazing. The technical advisory work of the group will be integrated into the adaptive management process of the new plan.

The Big Valley Sustained Yield Unit is one of just three remaining units which are designed to supply a sustained timber harvest to local communities. The MNF, Big Valley Lumber and the communities are working together on a plan to explore stewardship options and development of markets for non-traditional forest products.

The Warner Mountain Rangeland Management project has survived the appeal process (including Modoc County's) and it will continue as planned. That project aims to improve riparian areas on the Warners and manage grazing to protect those areas.

The Hackamore project includes over 15,000 acres of thinning in pine stands to accelerate development of, and maintain and protect existing late seral old growth habitat. It also includes over 19,000 acres of fuel treatments including prescribed fires to help with restoration of old growth timber.

The Upper Pit River Watershed Restoration Project is one of 11 national pilot projects selected to demonstrate state-of-the-art collaborative approaches to watershed management and restoration, encompassing over a half million acres of the Modoc National Forest. It will be allowed to continue on its course.

The Sierra plan also allows a project on about 15,000 acres of Devil's Garden to use heavy equipment to construct, maintain and enhance small dikes, dams, spillways and artificial islands for wetlands. Sagebrush, juniper and dry man-made meadow will be converted to wetlands. It is the largest wetlands development project in the National Forest System. It will continue.

Also allowed to continue is the biological assessment on the Lost River, shortnose and Modoc suckers, done by the Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Service. That issue deals with grazing standards and management activities that ensure the continued existence of those fish.

Modoc's stance from the beginning was the Modoc National Forest should not be a part of the Sierra Nevada Management Plan because the Modoc is not part of the traditional Sierra Nevada range. What would work in the Sierras, or even the environmental issues facing the Sierras doesn't always coincide with Modoc, whose geological traits are not in common.

In addition, the county argued in January that it has shown a good working relationship with the Forest Service and many of the projects identified above were the results of those efforts and were good for both the Forest Service and the communities.

Supervisors pass groundwater ordinance to clarify basins

In an effort to deal fairly with groundwater issues, the county amended its groundwater ordinance Tuesday as it applies to exporting that water across county boundaries in recognized groundwater basins.

In Modoc, those basins include Alturas, Tulelake, Goose Lake Valley, Big Valley, Round Valley and Surprise Valley. The reasoning behind the amendment is that groundwater exportation is prohibited across county political boundaries. In areas such as Tulelake, those boundaries could prohibit the transfer of that water from one farm to another, if the farms are not both in Modoc.

The amendment changes the issue to reflect that exportation within known groundwater basins is permitted without going through a massive permit process and sets up those basins as officially recognized by county law.

The county also agreed to go with the "Full Safety Net" payment concerning Forest Receipts. The Forest Coalition Counties organization was successful last year in getting legislation passed that allotted a stable amount of funding from Forest Receipts. What the bill means for Modoc County is a net gain of $827,497.22 over fiscal year 1999. The full payment under the bill is $3,218,668.28, broken down by $2,735,868.04 split between county roads and schools and $482,800.24 for investment dollars for local projects.

In the past, those receipts were based primarily on timber harvest. Most of the northstate counties have seen timber production drop dramatically over the past 10 years and with that, the decline in timber receipts funding.

Those funds are split evenly between county roads and county schools and were based upon 25 percent of the Forest Receipts generated in the county.

The new formula provides the county with a stable funding which is well more than any actual Forest Receipts would generate. The county also voted to support a grant request for North CalNeva RCD from Calfed. That grant, of over $1 million, would be used in the ongoing Pit River Watershed project.

City, county get park funds from Prop. 12

Parks in the City of Alturas and in the County of Modoc will benefit from an allocation of Proposition 12 funding announced by the state this week.

Prop. 12 was passed by state voters in March, 2000 and provided $824.5 million for local park projects including $388 million distributed on a per capita basis. The park funds are allocated three ways, on a per capita basis (where this round comes from) on a competitive basis and those allocated by the legislature and governor.

Modoc County's share of the park funds is $180,000 and the City of Alturas will receive $30,000

 

Get ready for 2001 Rotary Duck Race

How would you like to win a new Jeep Wrangler? How about a hot tub or a fishing boat or new stove?

The 2001 Great Pit River Duck race tickets went on sale Monday and the Alturas Rotary Clubs are nearing completion the Rotary Youth Park facility. This race may put them over the top.

The big ticket item left to be built at the Youth Park is an additional set of restrooms, which will be disabled accessible.

There will be some new things in this year's race, but the main thing is the same -- 3,000 ducks will be sold at $25 each, giving the buyer a chance to win a new vehicle and many other prizes.

The top prize this year is a new black Jeep Wrangler. Second prize will be a hot tub and third will be a fishing boat and trailer, and the list goes on. As usual, with each duck race ticket purchase comes a coupon book full of great savings. Both the prize list and the coupon list will be published in the next week's newspaper.

The race is scheduled for Fandango Days July 7 this year. The Rotary Clubs have sold out the entire 3,000 ducks well before each previous race, so it's advisable to purchase ducks early.

Something new this year will be a Turbo Turtle category. The Turbo Turtles will be sold in groups of four at $25 each, and will be entered into the race for an All-terrain vehicle. The turtles will replace what was the Gold Crown blue ducks that were sold in groups of 10.

Organizers believe the fact that people can now buy four instead of 10 ducks will enable more people top get involved in the race for the ATV.

Tickets will be available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Born to sing-- Modoc 9-year-old is heading to Nashville

Megan Moore was born to sing. The Alturas nine-year-old is on her way to Nashville, Tennessee, where she has been awarded a professional shot at recording a promotional music video with Affinity Music.

The video will be e-mailed to recording companies throughout the country. Don Reed, owner of Affinity, has worked with such greats as Garth Brooks, Stevie Wonder, Dixie Chicks and many more.

Moore's powerfully expressive voice comes acappella on short notice, with just a second of composure and no formal training. The largesse of her voice almost stuns listeners, with such a depth of emotion and style for such a small and young girl.

The invitation to sing came like lightning, and over the phone last Tuesday to the home of Kathy and Lieutenant Brett Moore, Camp Commander of Devil's Garden Conservation Camp in Alturas. At the encouragement of family and friends, Kathy had captured her daughter's voice on a "demo" tape with three "country" style songs with the family's Karaoke set up, and mailed it to a contest she had seen on the Internet.

To her surprise, within less than a week's time, she received a phone call one evening, from Affinity, telling her Megan was the sole winner, selected from hundreds of men's, women's and children's submitted tapes the company had received. Affinity asked that Megan be in Nashville on April 28 to record a music video at a cost of $1900, which includes everything from sound engineers to studio musicians and materials. The cost does not include her transportation, lodging or meals.

Since that phone call, things have been moving at time warp speed. Megan has been working hard to raise the funds for she and her mother's trip. She has another $1600 to raise.

Her community will hear her sing the National Anthem at Fandango Days 2001 and she is scheduled to provide entertainment at the Modoc County Children's Fair next month.

Megan won first place with her singing in a Janesville talent contest while in second grade and was invited to sing at a Janesville church. By the end of second grade, the family had relocated from Janesville to Alturas, when her father took the position at Devil's Garden Conservation Camp. She had a singing role in "Beauty Lou and the Country Beast" with Missoula Children's Theater in Alturas last season and loves to "sing around the house."

Not at all shy, Megan says she would love to be a "pop" singer and sings both pop and country, with style. She often sings to her fourth grade friends at Alturas Elementary and her older brother Tyler, 11, who plays the piano. Since she was five, she has been singing along to her mother's guitar accompaniment. Come June, Megan will turn 10. She already has aspirations to become a marine biologist or a designer, as she loves to draw.

"It's a gift from God," she says openly about her singing talent ,"and something I love to do."

Anyone who might like to contribute to her Nashville music opportunity, may write to Kathy Moore, HC4-Box 40502, Alturas, CA 96101.

Letters to the Editor

The perfect animal

Dear Editor:

While I disagree with the acronym of M.O.L.E.S. (Modoc Only Liberal Environment Society) as a name for an organization of us local liberals, and suggested O.W.L.S. Objectively Wise Liberal's Society) in it's place, I have to admit that for one I agree wholeheartedly with a conservative.

Mr. Bill Benner has hit the nail on the head with his announcement of M.U.L.E.S. (Modocers United Liberal Elimination Society). This is a perfect choice. No other animal could more closely represent self-righteous, narrow-minded right-wing thought than one that is half jackass and sterile.

Ben Van Meter, Alturas

Farmers built this country

Dear Editor:

Along with hundreds of local citizens, I attended the meeting with Senator Gorden Smith at the Shilo Inn.

We listened to master politicians spin his story of being our "whipping post" and why Vice President Dick Cheney gave his personal approval to stop any allocation of irrigation water for Klamath and Tulelake farmers.

That re-enforced my heartfelt belief that the one world government so many warned us about gained another victory!

Cheney should show his support for the American farmers by not signing the order! He should have held a press conference to explain why our federal government wants to end farming and ranching on our soil! He should have pointed out how the millions of dollars are given as soft money to the two party system from Archer Daniels Midland Company influences federal farm policies! He should have made it clear that the NAFTA is the key to the demise of American agriculture as we know it!

Smith should stand up everyday on the floor of the US Senate and demand action, not only on the behalf of Basin farmers, but for farmers all across the nation who are fighting for their way of life! American farmers built this great country. Our founders knew our strength came from the agrarian citizens, not the city dwellers! Being number one on the information highway won't feed our people!

When America ceases to produce its own food the end won't be far off! It's not about the fish, it's about control!

"We hold these truths to be self evident, that all en are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and they Pursuit of Happiness. . ."

That said, our government can and does dictate what we do on our own private land, and has its sticky fingers in our private lives at every level!

We are lied to so often, we no longer know the truth. Our elected officials don't serve the voters, they serve masters that paid for their election!

The rulers no longer follow the US Constitution, rather they work to hide it from view!

If the Bill of Rights were being debated in Washington, don't care today, it would never pass!

". . .that whatever any form of Government becomes destructive of these Ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it. . ." When they outlaw Freedom, only outlaws will be free!

David Porter Misso, Tulelake

We don't need to take sides

Dear Editor:

Well, isn't this just dandy! We "Modocers" now have the chance to join much of the rest of the world is taking sides against each other because we don't always agree with one another. It isn't enough that we had - "The Good Ol' Boys, and the Old-Timers and the New Comers, The Town People and the County People". We now have the "M.O.L.E.S." and the "M.U.L.E.S."!

If this keeps up the next thing we will have will be martial law with National Guard tanks plying Main St., or, maybe even U.N. troops! Sounds silly? Well, take a look at what goes on in the Middle East, the Balkans, Afghanistan, Ireland, India, Pakistan, and several African countries. Read world history. All of these "hot spots" are the result of hundreds or thousands of years of intolerance, persecution, and power struggles.

One of the things I like best about living here is most of the people are friendly and helpful. One can feel relatively safe walking on our streets. In times of need for individuals and families and community, people can be counted on for comfort and help. Could these be the same citizens who are "M.O.L.E.S." or "M.U.L.E.S."?

How could you both good caring citizens and belong to warring factions? Where would we set the boundaries between the liberals and the conservatives. The Pit River? Highway 395 or 299? Maybe even Main St. How about the Warner Mountains? Who would be forced to live where? Who would do business or not do business? Things could really get absurd.

A scripture in the Book of Mormon states that. . .the natural man is an enemy to God. . . and it goes on to explain that the natural man is, by nature, without attributes of deity, which makes him not much more than an animal. Man, however, is capable of more than living by animal instincts. A Biblical reference is that we cannot serve both God and Mammon. Mammon being representative of the selfish nature of man.

To my knowledge, most of the religions of the world depend upon a belief in a "Divide Being" to raise and teach its adherents to a level above their natural selves. Only the natural man's intrusion and adulteration of the original religion have led to the mutations that foster the world situations we see and hear in the news each day. If you do not embrace the idea of religion, there are always what is considered the basic descent behaviors and attitudes of civilized man, which are, honor, fidelity, and nobleness. Two of our favorite patriotic songs, "America the Beautiful" and "My Country 'Tis of Thee" express the ideals of our country.

We, as citizens of Modoc County, need to think of ourselves individually as a necessary part of a beneficial whole. There will always be differences of opinion. That is good, a monopoly of any kind is suffocating. Our basic freedoms depend upon mutual respect. The true answer lies in balance. There will always be those who need the kinds of support government programs provide, but there needs to be a balance between government control and individual needs and freedoms. I don't think the "liberals" are ready to give up their private properties to be given to those who cannot or will not provide for themselves and I don't think that the "conservatives" are willing to let the truly needy go without help. Balance.

Diana Fuller, Alturas

Obituaries

James Raymond Brennan

Ray Brennan, resident of Alturas for 70 plus years, passed away on April 16, 2001 at the age of 93, at Modoc Medical Center's Skilled Nursing Facility in Alturas, Calif.

Services will be held at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas on Friday, April 20, with Rosary at 10:15 a.m. and Mass to follow at 11:00 a.m. After the Mass, interment will be at the Alturas Cemetery. The family invites friends to join them at the Alturas Elks Lodge for a time of fellowship, following the interment.

Ray was the youngest of three children born on October 22, 1907 to James and Josephine (Gordhamer) Brennan in Ranier, Minnesota. Ray was the first child born in the newly-formed Koochiching County. He spent his childhood on the family farm, which was located on shores of Rainy Lake. He told many stories of hunting, fishing and canoeing with his father. The family also owned and operated the Border Hotel and Buffet.

Wanting to move to a warmer climate in the early 1920s, the family moved west, first settling in Portland, Ore. where Ray attended Portland Polytechnic. Still not satisfied they moved several more times ending up in Alturas where they built and operated the Buckhorn Court, which was located on North Main Street.

On August 30, 1930 he married Dorothy Ballard who was the daughter of Thornhill and Amy (Sapper) Ballard in Lakeview, Ore. To their union two children were born, Garry in 1933 and Janice in 1935. Ray and Dorothy enjoyed 58 years of marriage with most of those years spent in Alturas.

During his lifetime, Ray worked at many jobs and owned several businesses. He often talked of haying for Bailey Dorris. He sold Ford cars for Crate Jarmin. He drove school bus for Modoc Union High School, with his main route as the Davis Creek run. During World War II, he operated a dump truck, helping to build roads at Beale Air Force Base. He was a spare parts expert at the Stockton Ordinance Base in Stockton, Calif. This was the only time the Brennan family did not live in Alturas. In the summer of 1946, he opened Brennan's Automotive Service on the corner of Fourth and Main Streets, where he sold Associated Gas and Studebaker cars. In 1950 he purchased the Alturas Garbage Service, which he operated for five years. From 1955 to 1973 he was Distribution Engineer for Surprise Valley Electric. It was noted at his retirement party that he had worked on the REA Plant as a construction worker in 1940.

He always had a project going on that would benefit the community or wildlife. He helped organize the Alturas Little League; was the chairman of the March of Dimes in the late 1940s; was a member of the Alturas city Council in 1980 and was instrumental in getting the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas designated as a historical building. He had a power pole erected at Bailey Reservoir for an eagle's nest just to name a few things. One of his proudest moments was being Grand Marshal of the Fourth of July Parade in 1994, when he was nominated by his granddaughter Lynn Uchida. He was a Charter member of the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756 and a member of the Alturas Fire Department.

The great outdoors was Ray's life. Nothing pleased him more than to go hunting or fishing with his wife Dottie, son Garry and Garry's friends from Crescent city. He loved showing Modoc to his grandchildren, going camping with all his wonderful friends and the great stories they would tell about the 'one that got away.' He was a daily visitor to the Modoc Refuge. As he aged, he would make the statement that Bailey should be more careful with the water.

Mr. Brennan was preceded in death by his son Garry on February 16, 1976; his wife Dorothy February 1, 1989 and sister Eve Ridgeway. He is survived by his daughter Janice Flynn and husband Robert of Grass Valley, Calif.; sister Ada Calkins of San Rafael; nephew Dr. Jim Ridgeway and family of San Mateo; grandchildren Lynn Uchida and husband Alan of Alturas; Bob McGarva of Taunton, MA; Jim McGarva and wife Lori of Olympia, Wash.; Robin Palmer and husband John of Pleasant View, Utah; Kelly Brennan of Rockport, Texas; and Dawn Brennan of Sparks, Nev. Also, great-grandchildren Jessica Davis of Alturas; John Davis of Bedford, Texas; Amie McGarva of Playa del Rey, Calif.; Daniel McGarva of Maui, Hawaii; Kelsy McGarva of Olympia, Wash.; Travis Palmer of Pleasant View, Utah and Cody Brennan of Rockport, Texas.

Donations in Mr. Brennan's name may be made to the Alturas City Fire Department, 103 So. Howard St., Alturas, CA 96101 or to a charity of one's choice.

Francisco "Pancho" Ruiz

Francisco "Pancho" Ruiz, 43, was on his way to do some early morning fishing before attending Mass last Sunday, when ill health forced him to the hospital. Mr. Ruiz was flown to Merle West Medical Center in Klamath Falls, Ore. where liver disease was determined the cause of his death on Monday, April 16, 2001. Mr. Ruiz was a kind and well liked person who loved Modoc County's Warner Mountains, where he spent several seasons as a self-employed obsidian miner and a good ambassador for those from all over the world, who traveled into the Warners in search of obsidian needles. He also loved fishing and being in the outdoors.

He was always willing to lend a hand if someone needed help and he had a "big heart" recall friends. He loved music and he loved to dance.

The Alturas resident was born in LaCienega, Jalisco, Mexico where he completed his education and moved at the age of 15, to California with his mother. He took adult education classes in Los Angeles to learn English and worked in construction in Los Angeles and later in San Jose.

After meeting Rebecca Stafford of Alturas, in Madera, he relocated to Alturas six years ago to marry her. Judge Dier officiated their wedding vows in Alturas on September 15, 1996 and the two shared parental duties in rearing Mr. Ruiz's three young daughters, Jessica, 18; Lydia, 15 and Analie, 12 in their Alturas home. Mr.Ruiz attended Mass every Sunday.-

He is survived by his wife Rebecca Ruiz of Alturas; mother Felizitas Gomez Ruiz of Jalisco, Mexico; his daughters Esther, Ruiz, 21 of San Jose, Calif.; Jessica, Lydia and Analie Ruiz, all of Alturas; grandsons, Sunny and Angel of San Jose; three brothers and one sister in Mexico; one brother and one sister in Los Angeles and a sister in North Carolina. He was preceded in death by his father Valentine Ruiz.

Services for Mr. Ruiz will be conducted by the Rev. Patrick Henry of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas with a Rosary at 10:15 a.m. and Mass at 11 a.m. at Sacred Heart on Tuesday, April 24. Visitation will be from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Kerr Mortuary in Alturas on Monday, April 23.

Memorial contributions to aid the family in their time of loss, may be sent to Rebecca Ruiz, P.O. Box 273, Alturas, CA 96101.

Jess L. Russell

Longtime Alturas resident Jess L. Russell passed away at his Alturas home Monday night, April 9, 2001 at the age of 65.

Jess was born just outside of Alturas on August 7, 1935. He was the only son of Jess H. Russell, Sr. and stepmother Opal Russell.

Jess was raised at Dry Creek Basin and served in the Army. He was stationed in Germany for two years and the last eight months were spent at Fort Lewis, Washington. Jess served his country at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

After the service, Jess worked as the County trapper and packed mules for the U.S. Forest Service. He spent most of his life working on various ranches in Modoc, Lassen and Lake counties. Jess was well known for always having good horses, good dogs, and chickens that laid. He was an excellent horseman and spent many days chasing wild horses.

Jess is survived by his companion Dyan Sponseller and her daughter Dylan, with whom he lived and shared his life. He is survived by his son Frank L. Russell, daughter Deena Marie Pena, son-in-law Jose Pena, grandchildren Kaelie and Ramon Pena all of Susanville, Calif. Jess loved his family and friends and will be greatly missed by all. Pastor Destry Campbell gave a celebration of his life memorial service at the Alturas Park April 14.

Lyda Laura Brown

Lyda Laura Brown, 78, a 10-year resident of Rossmoor in Walnut Creek, Calif., died suddenly at her home on the evening of March 21, 2001. Memorial services will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 8 at Lafayette Orinda Presbyterian Church (LOPC), 49 Knox Drive, Lafayette.

Mrs. Brown always considered herself a "Modoc'er," says her husband Vernon. Lyda's grandfather by marriage was John Davis, a past Assessor of Modoc County. Her uncles Dan A. and John C. Davis and cousins Paul D. Davis, Richard M. Davis, and Dorothy C. Kelley preceded her in death.

Mrs. Brown retired in 1981 from the William Feria Academics Plus School in the Cupertino School District, where she taught third grade at Feria for three years, a magnet school that stressed 'back to basics approach to education.' She spent 11 years at Panama School, involved from the beginning with the A+ program. Prior to this, she taught in two schools in the Arcade District of Sacramento County, Wyda Way and Dyer Kelly.

She graduated with Honors from Sacramento State College in 1955, with a B.A. degree in Education and Music. She taught piano. For two years she attended the Sherwood Conservatory in Chicago, IL. She was born in Chicago and graduated from Roosevelt High School as its' Valedictorian in 1940. She received the outstanding student award from the American Legion while in the eighth grade at Von Struben School.

For 38 years she was active in square dancing and at Rossmoor was a member of the Happy Squares until her health failed. She kept active as the secretary/treasurer of the Big Band of Rossmoor, and as a parish coordinator and collator for her church.

She is survived by her husband Vernon Brown of 58 years, whose father William S. Billy Brown was a past assistant Supervisor of the Modoc National Forest. She is also survived by her daughter Karen Phillips of Walnut Creek; son Bill of Fall River Mills, Calif.; four grandsons and one granddaughter and cousins Lulu Grivel and Lola Dollarhide of Davis Creek and Michael Grivel, Alturas.

Memorial gifts may be made to the Diablo Vista Retired Teachers' Association scholarship fund, (DVRTA), 4254 Heights Ave., Pittsburg, CA 94565.

Brent A. Taylor

Brent A.Taylor had informed his family he would visit them this June, but the former Cedarville resident died on April 6, 2001 in San Diego, Calif. from injuries sustained in a pedestrian-vehicle accident. He was 29 years old.

Memorial services are pending and will be conducted by Pastor Conrad Marzuola of Church of the Living Water. Inurnment will be at the Cedarville Cemetery.

Brent was born in Arizona on April 14, 1971 and grew up in Cedarville. He was a 1989 graduate of Surprise Valley High School, Cedarville. He worked in the Surprise Valley Hospital for approximately two years, before enlisting in the Marine Corps for four years. After his service, he settled in San Diego where he worked as a restaurant cook.

He was a very loving person with a big heart and enjoyed family activities and cooking.

He is survived by his mother, Sera Rico Taylor of Cedarville; sister Christine Bailey of Cottonwood; brother Mel Taylor of Palo Alto and numerous cousins.

Contributions in the memory of Brent may be made to the Surprise Valley Hospital, 417 Main St., Cedarville, CA 96104 or to a charity of the donor's choice.

Desert Rose Funeral Chapel of Lakeview, Ore. is in charge of arrangements.

Charles Lester Vernon

Charles Lester Vernon, 104, born on April 8, 1896, at the old Boyd Ranch (now Hapgoods) near Lake City, Calif., died February 12, 2001 at an Arroyo Grande hospital in California.

Mr. Vernon, son of Stonewall and Arilla Boyd Vernon, lived most of his life in California and Oregon and the past 20 years in Grover Beach, Calif. A man of many trades throughout his life, he held jobs as a livery stable hand, stage coach driver, Indian School Superintendent, farmer, carpenter, author and poet.

He married Manilla (Dewey) Chandler in a double wedding ceremony with his sister Ruby Vernon and Erle Daniels on October 13, 1916 at the Niles Hotel in Alturas, Calif. That winter, he ran a mail route over Fandango Pass and did some daily farming before serving in France during World War I. He was one of 11 people (out of 375) to be cited for specially meritorious service and courageous conduct under fire in the "Meuse-Argonne" Battle. He was also awarded and entitled to wear the Silver Star medal for gallantry in action on Sept. 28, 1918.

After the war, he and his wife Dewey worked at the Indian School in Ft. Bidwell where their son Darrell was born. In 1938, he received a homestead in Tulelake, Calif. and farmed there for many years. He later moved to the Fresno area. After the death of his first wife, he married Bessy Alexander. Mr. Vernon was the chairman of the Tule Lake Weed Control District, active in the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Boy Scouts.

He is survived by two granddaughters, Daralee Gregory of Ft. Wayne, Ind. and Barbara Treadwell of Lincoln City, Ore.; grandson David Vernon, Baja; eight great-grandchildren; and long-time friend and caregiver Mrs. Evelyn Biggs and her family. He was preceded in death by his wife of 48 years, Dewey Chandler Vernon and son Darrell Lester Vernon in 1984.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Veterans Memorial Fund, c/o Lloyd Qualls, P.O. Box 441, Grover Beach, CA 93483. No services will be held. Burial was at the Fresno Memorial Gardens in Fresno.

SPORTS

 

Coordinated effort saves 1000s of Eagle Lake trout

Three million trout eggs are quietly incubating at a hatchery and hundreds of trophy trout are safely back in Eagle Lake, thanks to the usual work of the Department of Fish and Game and some usual work by the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Fish and Game said crews from Crystal Lake Hatchery near Burney collected the 3 million Eagle Lake rainbow trout eggs during hurried spawning operation at the DFG's Pine Creek Trap in late March and early April. Trout hatched from the eggs will replenish Eagle Lake with fish while supplying trout for dozens of other state waters. No sooner had the annual spawning procedure ended, said DFG fishery biologist Paul Chappell, than Pine Creek's flow began falling, threatening to strand hundreds of Eagle Lake rainbow that had entered the lower mile of the stream.

"The stream was still loaded with huge fish and the surface area was diminishing rapidly," Chappell recalled. "It was drying up right before our eyes," he said.

After weighing and measuring some 1,100 late arriving trophy trout at the trap and hauling them back to the lake, Fish and Game found itself overwhelmed by the number of spawners still in a creek fast losing its flow. Enter CDF.

"Warden Cal Albright made contact with CDF and before we knew it they were on the scene with a conservation crew and helicopter to help rescue those valuable trout," Chappell said.

In a few hours of twilight work on April 5, the CDF airship equipped with a fire fighting bucket moved more than 1,500 trout from Pine Creek to the center of Eagle Lake. A second CDF crew and DFG personnel using backpack shocking devices rescued another 500 to 700 trout the next day, Chappell said.

Chappell said workers braved icy conditions to carry our the rescue work. He said a combination of the stream's 40-degree temperature and the "prop wash" from the helicopter cause some personnel's clothing to freeze.

"I've never been so cold in my life," he said.

But, the cold took a back seat to CDF's response, according to Chappell.

"If it hadn't been for the heroic efforts of that chopper pilot, his crew and the conservation workers, we would have lost at least 1,500 trophy trout," he said.

As it was, at least 50 Eagle Lake rainbow that the agencies couldn't reach died in isolated pools of water left in rugged areas of Pine Creek, the DFG said. The lower portion of the creek, fed by sub-par precipitation this year, was dry two days after the fish rescue.

Trout waters prime

Redding - With a twinge of anxiety about impending summer and fall water conditions, the Department of Fish and Game's Region 1 office today predicted excellent opportunities for anglers taking advantage of the April 28 and 26 opening weekends for stream trout fishing. "Overall, water and fishing conditions should be great in the early part of the season," said DFG Lt. Ken Taylor, whose patrol territory covers much of eastern Shasta County.

The May 26 opener will kick off stream fishing in the remainder of the region's Sierra District and on North Coast District streams that flow into and north of Humboldt Bay and that are outside of the Klamath-Trinity river drainage's anadromous fish zone. Tributaries to Lake Almanor in Plumas County and those in Lassen and Modoc Counties east of Highway 385 and north of Clarks Valley Road also do not open until May 26.

With some exceptions, streams opening April 28 have a daily bag limit of five trout, a possession limit of 10 and remain open through November 15.

Most lakes and reservoirs in the eight-county Region 1 are open year around under five-trout daily and 10-trout possession limit, DFG said. Exceptions include the lakes of Fall River Valley, which opens April 28, and famed Eagle Lake in Lassen County, which opens May 26.

Anglers should consult the DFG's free "Sport Fishing" regulation booklet to learn if the water they intend to fish carries its own special fishing rules. Such exceptions are found within the booklet's alphabetical listing of waters.

Daily fishing hours for trout run from an hour before sunrise to an hour after sunset. Anglers must possess a valid 2001 fishing license, this year costing $29.40 for residents.

Fish and Game's Redding office said Mt. Shasta, Darrah Springs and Crystal Lake trout hatcheries plan to have 56 north state streams and lakes stocked with an estimated 103,720 sport-sized trout in time for the April 28 opening. The fish plants will continue into fall, with a total of 732,300 fish planted in a total of 85 waters by season's end.

The "roadside" hatchery trout plants supplement extensive wild trout populations found in hundreds of miles of Region 1 streams, the DFG said. The eight-county region has estimated 4,000 miles of streams, including salmon, steelhead waters not planted with trout. For the counties of Shasta, Tehema, Trinity, Siskiyou, Modoc and Lassen, anglers can learn each Friday which waters have been planted that week by calling a recorded message at 530-225-2146. The first weekly recording will be made May 4.

On the flip side, Fish and Game is a little concerned about how well stream trout populations - and those of salmon and steelhead, too - will fare in late summer and fall because of low snow pack in many mountain areas and because of generally poor precipitation in areas such as the northeastern Great Basin habitats.

"Lassen and Modoc counties received less than 50 percent of normal precipitation this year, as a result, most trout streams will not be up to their usual standing," said Paul Chappell, DGF fishery biologist in the northeast.

Chappell said streams such as Susan River, Goodrich Creek, Ash Creek and Clear Creek are expected to have acceptable flows - and good plants of trout - early, but fade fast as the spring turns to summer.

Openers plants listed

The Department of Fish and Game said today it has tentative plans to release an estimated 103,720 sport-sized trout in 56 northern waters in time for the April 28 opening day for stream trout fishing. Many of the same locations plus an additional 29 waters will receive trout plants as summer and early fall months unfold, according to the DFG. By season's end, about 732,300 fish will have planted in the 85 scheduled waters.

If road, weather and water conditions permit, Fish and Game said, the following waters, listed by county, will be stocked with trout before the April 28 opener: Lassen County - Ash Creek, Goodrich Creek, Lower Susan River; Modoc County - Pine Creek Reservoir, South Fork Pit River.

As the trout season progresses, the DFG said additional trout will be planted in many of the same waters stocked for the opener and in the following additional waters: Lassen County - Blue Lake, Caribou Lake, Crator Lake, Eagle Lake, Shotoverin Lake, Silver Lake, Middle Susan River, Upper Susan River; Modoc County - Lily Lake.

Like Elk? Don't forget banquet

Don't forget the Warner Mountain Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will hold its third annual Big Game Banquet and Auction at the Veterans' Hall in Alturas May 1.

Tickets sell out quickly so interested people should get tickets soon. Tickets are $55 single or $75 couple and include an annual membership in RMEF.

Auction and prize items include 50 firearms valued at $30,000, original artwork from internationally known artists, artwork from local artists, two browning gun safes, a progressive raffle for a rifle and exclusive elk hunt in New Mexico and much more.

The first year of the banquet, the local chapter was number one in the nation for funds raised and last year it ranked 45th out of 535 chapters nationwide. Many of those chapters are in metropolitan areas whose attendance far exceeds the local chapter's 220.

The Warner Mountain Chapter committee includes: Bill Madison, Jim Hays, Dan Silervia, Vern Seevers, Rusty Stanford, Mark Pence, Paul Bailey, Chuck McElwain, Jerry Hoxsey, Walt Tamagni, George Wistos, John Dederick, Wayne Bethel and Keith Jacques.

MAY 3, 2001

Former patient files lawsuit against SV hospital, doctor

A former patient of Surprise Valley Hospital and Dr. Terence Parr has filed a lawsuit in Modoc Superior Court alleging misuse of medication and sexual misconduct.

The suit is alleging that Dr. Parr treated Cedarville resident Mary Worley from 1998 through the 2000 for severe head pain and his treatment caused her to suffer addiction and dependence upon the medications. The suit is alleging that Dr. Parr "carelessly and negligently prescribed narcotics and other pain medication so as to render plaintiff (Worley) dependent upon defendant (Dr. Parr) and compliant in order to facilitate a sexual relationship with plaintiff (Worley)."

The Surprise Valley Hospital, Dr. Parr, Dr. Lois Roberts, and Steve Johnson, Nurse Practitioner are named in the suit. Much of the suit alleges medical negligence and failure of the physician and hospital to diagnose or inform Worley of her condition and possibility of drug dependence.

All of the defendants have denied all the allegations of the suit and have denied that Worley suffered any damage because of either hospital or Dr. Parr's actions.

- Joyce Gysin, Surprise Valley Hospital Administrator said it is not in the hospital's interest to address the issue and declined comment on the suit. She said the hospital's legal counsel, Leo H. Schuering, Jr. of Sacramento, has advised the hospital to refrain from public comment.

Based upon that advice, Gysin also issued a memo to hospital staff in late February that placed the staff under a gag order, prohibiting their comment on the case.

According to Worley, in addition to the suit in Modoc Courts, there have been four local complaints concerning Dr. Parr filed with the California Board of Medical Examiners. An investigation into those complaints is underway, but will not be made public until it is complete. Additionally, a complaint has been filed with the Oregon State medical authorities.

Worley has been under the care of a different physician out of Modoc County and is recovering.

The issue was brought to public light two weeks ago when former Surprise Valley Hospital Board of Director President Steve Hicks wrote a Letter to the Editor explaining why he resigned as President of that Board. He had been in that position since about 1983. Hicks said he had brought the issue of Dr. Parr and his treatment of some female patients to the attention of Gysin. He said he also presented Dr. Parr with some of the issues.

Part of the reason he resigned, he said, is because neither the board nor administration of the hospital saw fit to do anything about the complaints or allegations against Dr. Parr. Some of the allegations, said Hicks, were of sexual misconduct and should have been investigated.

The final straw for Hicks was when the hospital obtained a short-lived restraining order against Bob Worley, Mary's husband. The hospital had alleged Worley was a danger to the facility and employees. A temporary restraining order was issued, but in a subsequent hearing, was dropped. The Modoc Sheriff's Department report on the case concluded that Worley was not a threat to hospital staff.

"I dragged my feet on this too," said Hicks. "I'm not looking for any credit or to damage the hospital. The hospital is concerned because Dr. Parr has a good following and there are good dollars with his acute care patients. But, the unethical and unprofessional conduct at the hospital is not being addressed. At this time the board and administration are responsible for not addressing cover up and coercion and that does jeopardize the future of our hospital." Since his resignation, Hicks said he sees the hospital from a different angle and while he believes the board must support the administration, it also must listen to the staff and the staff's concerns.

According to Hicks, many of the current staff members have contacted him recently, complaining of work conditions and morale at the facility.

Refuge manager explains probable water situation

The Modoc Wildlife Refuge Manager, Anne Marie LaRosa, knows full well that the fishery at Dorris Reservoir is in serious danger, and knows also full well that the only perfect solution is enough water. And that solution simply doesn't look like it's in the cards.

"Because of unusually dry conditions for the last two years, Dorris Reservoir storage is currently at less than 25 percent of its 11,000 acre capacity," LaRosa wrote in a letter to the Modoc County Fish, Game and Recreation Committee Friday. "This year's spring runoff into the reservoir is expected to provide a minimal supply of 2,000 to 3,000 acre feet for management of refuge habitat units. To conserve water, the refuge began irrigating refuge meadows on April 9, 2001, a week later than normal, with minimal water releases of five to seven cubic feet per second."

LaRosa explained the normal spring releases are from 15-25cfs for meadow irrigation and pond maintenance. During normal years, the Refuge uses an average of between 6,000 and 9,000 acre feet of water annually from Dorris to maintain refuge wetlands.

"Using a combination of available stored water from Dorris, direct diversion water available to the refuge and water pumped from three irrigation wells, we should be able to maintain approximately 1,200 acres (50 to 70 percent) of wet meadow habitat through mid July and allow haying to proceed on 75 percent of permitted areas," said LaRosa. "Additional wetlands on the west side of the refuge are maintained with the refuge's riparian water rights from the South Fork of the Pit River."

She said flooding of those meadows in the early fall and associated grazing on those areas will be largely dependent upon any remaining available water in the system. That situation is very uncertain.

"However, holding back additional water for a minimum conservation pool for fisheries will also help carry us into the fall irrigation season," LaRosa said. "Secondly, the Refuge has an objective to provide opportunities for wildlife-oriented recreation. Management objectives for recreational use during drought conditions are to attempt to maintain a recommended minimum conservation pool of 1,100 acre-feet in Dorris Reservoir for maintenance of the sport fishery and enhance hunting opportunities by fall flooding of selected wetland areas in the refuge's hunt unit while maintaining habitat units in the sanctuary portion of the Refuge."

LaRosa said that in addition to maintaining the 1,100 acre feet pool in the reservoir, she has been working with Department of Fish and Game Biologist Paul Chappell, who has recommended several strategies to maintain the fishery during this drought.

"Over the past few weeks, I have been working cooperatively with Mr. Chappell and Jerry Sanders, of the local committee, to provide additional aeration to fish later in the summer when water levels are low and temperatures are high," said LaRosa. "With the assistance of the committee and local anglers, I am optimistic this strategy will maintain the fishery. In the event these efforts fail in preventing a fish die-off, Mr. Chappell has agreed that the Department would restock the reservoir with bass and catfish, the primary gamefish of interest to local fishermen."

LaRosa explained that the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1960 for the management of migratory birds of the Pacific Flyway. It is an important nesting site for Canada geese, ducks and the greater sandhill cranes, among other species.

Wildlife management priorities for use of refuge water include the following: one, maintaining ponds at water levels suitable for brood habitat and disease control; two, maintaining wet meadow habitat for breeding greater sandhill cranes in areas of traditional use; and three, providing irrigation to short grass meadows for spring and fall migratory habitat for geese, cranes and several other species of birds.

Fire Permits required May 1

Residents of the City of Alturas are reminded that Fire Permits for open burning of burn barrels, weeds, limbs, brush and more are required as of May 1.

Permits can be obtained at the Alturas Fire Department at 103 South Howard Street, Alturas or by calling 233-4500 during business hours.

Modoc teachers accept pay raise

The Modoc County Teachers Association has agreed to a 6.3 percent salary increase with the Modoc County Office of Education. That agreement was ratified by the MCTA members last Friday.

The county office had originally offered a 2.75 salary hike, which was well below the MCTA's requested 8.5 percent, and that put the situation at impasse in January.

The new agreed to pay raise is retroactive to July 1, 2000. In addition, the minimum salary for credentialed teachers is set at $34,000 annually, so any teacher falling below that level will be increased to that salary. The agreement is in effect through June 30, 2003.

Additionally, the current 183-day school year has been increased to 189 days, with a 3.6 percent increase to pay for the additional work days. Those additional days will include three staff development buy-back days and three work days, one of which will be for classroom preparation prior to the start of school and the other two will be for inservice and training.

While not getting the full 8.5 percent across the board increase it sought, MCTA's negotiator Patt Swanson and President Jan Clough were generally pleased with the outcome and the effort of their organization during the negotiations.

The agreement also leaves the health benefit package at the same level and any increase in those costs will not be configured into the 6.3 percent raise.

MCOE teachers and speech therapists will receive $300 for classroom budgets as well as an additional $95 from lottery funds for the 2000/2001 school year only. Any unspent money can be carried over to the next year.

Other provisions include that notice of pending involuntary transfers shall be given at least 30 days in advance.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

We need to lighten up

Dear Editor:

Your M.O.L.E.S. and my M.U.L.E.S. have apparently been taken seriously by some of your readers.

I thought your M.O.L.E.S. proposition was funny and couldn't resist countering with what I thought would also be amusing. Apparently nerves are more exposed and raw than one might think. Let's lighten up! Civil war is not imminent; the M.O.L.E.S. and the M.U.L.E.S. are not drawing ammo and forming skirmish lines! Good natured banter requires nothing more dangerous than a well placed word.

Although a Conservative, I don't assume Liberals are evil and Liberals should not assume Conservatives are potential Klansmen. People on both sides of the political spectrum basically want a good life for themselves and society in general; they simply have different ideas on how to achieve their goals.

Oliver Wendell Homles said "If there is any principal of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thoughts - not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate."

Bill Benner

Eagleville

Land use needs "green" members

It was with interest that I read your Off the record comments "In the dark" in the April 19 Record.

The Modoc County Land-use committee runs in the open light of day. It is a volunteer advisory committee to the Modoc Board of Supervisors and focuses on the use of Federal lands in Modoc County. It is open to all the public, and held on the second Wednesday afternoon of each month. As you mention in your article there are 25 member slots on the committee. The seats were designed in hopes of creating a balanced committee, however, and unfortunately, people representing what you have alluded to as addressing many sides on any issue, do not attend. Their volunteer time is no more precious than those people that do not show up for most of the meetings.

Your statement in the article, "Actually, in most cases, few of its 25 members actually attend" appears to be a statement by you in an attempt skew the truth. The word few is a relative term. The truth is that there are 11 members that consistently show up to most meetings, and there are five or six members that come quite often, but not always and there are two or three members come occasionally. Also there are usually one or two Modoc County Supervisors at each meeting and in addition all of the present Supervisors are well informed on the issues the Land Use Committee spends its efforts on and they are not in the dark on the issues!

Sean Curtis has been paid, a small amount at times, by Modoc County, however it is a mere pittance when compared to the time he spends and the work he accomplishes. He is one of the more moderate members of the committee and works well with the several Government agencies the County deals with on a continuing basis. If you were not wearing a Lone Ranger's mask with no holes in the eyes, you might become a real reporter and ask some of the good people at the local Federal agencies about their working relationship with Sean.

As for the Sierra Nevada Frame Work, there's been a reference to this on each of the agendas for land-use committee for the last several months. It is commonly known that the Modoc Plateau and Warner Mountain are not part of the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem. There was great concern by many on the land use committee that the standards and guides setup to manage the Sierra Forests, did not necessarily fit what is needed locally in Modoc. The Modoc National Forest consists of the Devil's Garden or Modoc Plateau, the east toe of the Cascades and the Warner Mountains. There are too many features of the Modoc National Forest that do not fit the Sierra framework. As an example one of the main focuses of the Sierra framework is hardwoods management, Modoc has few hardwoods. The implication for the county under Sierra Nevada Frame Work has been followed closely for over a year by the Supervisors and the Land Use Committee. You may have had a greater understanding had you crawled out of your dark shelter and attend some of the meetings. I believe that the committee, which does not exclude people with green lone ranger masks, does represent the profile of the county. While it is obvious it does not represent your view, we need to look back only a few months at two political events in Modoc to see where the majority stands. The first event, election of two new Supervisors which tend to agree with the Land Use Committee. The second event, in which over 70% of the Modoc Voters voted for the winning Presidential Candidate. I am happy to identify with the wise Modoc People.

In closing, the Modoc Land Use Committee is here, and the Supervisors do listen, and the Federal Agencies have cooperated, and may positive actions have been achieved, and we do need more people with green mask on the committee.

Please, come out of the dark, pull off your dark green mask, see the light of day, come, join the Land Use Committee, who knows your presence and input may even begin to cast a green light on its actions.

Ray Page,

Modoc Land Use Committee Member, Cedarville

OBITUARIES

Dorothy Winset Quinn (no photo available)

Graveside services for former Modoc resident Dorothy Winset Quinn, will be held at the Alturas Cemetery at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 5. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will officiate the interment service.

Mrs. Quinn passed away April 22, 2001 in Santa Rosa, Calif. where she had been a resident for many years at London House, a long-term care home.

She was born on December 23, 1916 in Stettler, Alberta, Canada to homesteaders Vernia and Mabel Graham Winset. The family relocated to California in 1926 and settled on a farm in Windsor. After she completed her education, she was employed in San Francisco where she met Dr. William Quinn, who was a major in the Army Medical Corps at the Presidio in San Francisco. They were married in 1943.

After the war, they went looking for a place to set up Dr. Quinn's medical practice and came through Alturas, where Dr. Stiles had recently died and left a practice and office vacant.

The couple moved to Alturas in 1946 and lived here for many years, until retiring to Pebble Beach, Calif. in 1972. Dorothy was preceded in death by her husband in 1982; her grandson Vladimir Quinn in 1993 and her brother Donald Winset in 1998.

She is survived by two sons, John Quinn of Oakland and Michael Quinn of Wilson, Wyoming; grandsons Alexander Quinn of Davis and Cooper Quinn of Wilson; sisters Helen Young of Reno, Nev. and Mary Woodward of Alturas, Calif. and brother John Winset of Santa Rosa.

Hazel Hutchinson Voorhees (no photo available)

A memorial service for Hazel Hutchinson Voorhees will be conducted by her nephew Pastor Larry James on Saturday, April 28 at 1:00 p.m. at the Lake City Cemetery in Lake City, Calif.

She was born to Hester and Josh Hutchinson in Cedarville, Calif. on June 6, 1908 and was reared in Surprise Valley, where she graduated from high school. She first taught at the age of 19 in a one room school house in Surprise Valley, then went on to become a high school teacher. For 40 years she taught high school classes in Woodland, Calif. She retired in 1973 and relocated to Auburn, where she worked as a substitute teacher for many years. She also kept active with her church activities and enjoyed spending time with friends and gardening. She passed away in Auburn, Calif. on April 8, 2001.

A memorial service was held in Auburn on April 22, with her nephew Pastor James conducting the service.

Mrs. Voorhees was preceded in death by her parents, her sister Beatrice Steil and brother Harold Hutchinson.

She is survived by her daughter Jane Aven and son-in-law Steve of Nevada City and several nieces and nephews in Modoc County.

SPORTS

 

Trout season opens on west side of Modoc Saturday

This Saturday is the trout stream fishing opener in Modoc County, but anglers need to remember the creeks on the east side of Highway 395 do not open until May 26.

Basically, for the second year of a new restriction, the Warner Mountain streams are closed for the traditional opener. That includes most of the best fishing creeks in the county. That restriction was approved by the Department of Fish and Game at the request of the local Trout Unlimited Chapter two years ago. All streams west of Highway 395 are open on Saturday, and there are plenty of good areas to fish. The stream conditions this year are very good, according to DFG Warden Cal Albright.

The low water year has streams flowing at about mid-June or July currently, which makes for a good opening weekend, but may look very poor come mid-summer.

The current drought will also have an impact on trout plants in area reservoirs, said Albright. He figures trout plants will be canceled in at least 11 Modoc reservoirs this summer because of unusually low water levels for this time of year.

Just remember, while many trout streams open Saturday, none of them east of US 395 in Modoc open until May 26.

Braves inch their way to Playoffs

The Modoc Braves varsity baseball and softball teams have been lying low these past few weeks, trying to maintain their momentum, that's allowed both teams a 5-1 league record tying them at first and second in the SCL.

The weather has played a key role in the Braves inability to face any competition, or even practice. Team managers Brad Server and Dennis Banister have had to cancel games against Burney, which was scheduled for April 6. Lassen was another team to back out from playing, mostly due to the lack on sun.

Modoc is coming off its three week bye with games against number two seeded Mt. Shasta, tomorrow on their field, and a home game against the top baseball and softball teams, the Burney Raiders, on May 30.

The Lady Braves are currently 5-1 in league tying them at second along with Fall River. The Lady Braves will have to fight off the undefeated Ladies of Burney without the help of Laura Toaetolu, one of the Braves strongest hitters. Shay Farmer will replace Toaetolu behind and beside the plate, which Banister feels will keep the Braves strong and on top of their game.

Stephanie McMaster is in for a stretch. She'll most likely be pitching the entire double header unless the Braves pick up a lead. But according to Banister, the long break has done the entire team some good, by healing some strained arms and relaxing some muscles. With Mt. Shasta and Weed, scheduled for May 2 and 4 still ahead, Banister says that both teams look to be in the middle of the road, but really don't have the power to weaken the Lady Braves inertia as they head on to playoffs.

"It's hard to get back into the swing of things after spring break," commented Brad Server. Server is looking forward to two of his teams' hardest games of the season against the number two seeded teams in Division III and IV.

- "It just depends where we're seeded," said Server. This year's playoffs will be a little different, according to Server. The new format will include eight teams and will follow the NSCIF football format. In that, the first ranked team will play the eighth seed and the second plays the seventh, and so on.

With nine different hitters having already hit homeruns, five strong pitchers, one of whom is 3-0, and a determined team, Server is hoping to travel the long hard road to an SCL championship victory.

Modoc has 3 Golfers in SCL top 10

As of last Friday the Modoc High Golf Team is leading the SCL standings in first place. Modoc's first place win at their home invite at Arrowhead Golf course earned the Braves seven points totaling their overall league score to 49 points. Rounding out the top three teams in the league are Mt. Shasta with 41 and Bishop Quinn with 34.

"A few pairings didn't finish due to the snowstorm that rolled in," commented team coach Harold Montague. As a result, only the front nine scores were used to calculate the team scores.

Kris Server and Adam Server served as the perfect duo last Thursday, by leading Thursday's medalists earning first and second place. Adam Server scored 39 front and back for 78 points, a personal-best in league play.

Kris scored a 38 on the front nine and a 36 on the back, totaling a 74 point score, tying his season low match score. With Server's best scores in the high sixties and his worst in the high seventies, he has managed to earn first place in the Shasta Cascade League Top 10 medalists.

Modoc had two other top contenders place in the top five of Thursday's match as well as in league. Jake Britton and Blake Thorn have continuously managed to keep one stroke ahead of the game. Britton, who scored 39 on the front nine and 42 on the back at the Arrowhead Golf Course last Thursday, earning him 4th place, as a sophomore, has distinguished himself as one of the leagues top golfers by holding the third seed in the SCL top 10.

Thorn scored 41 back to back on 18 holes placing him in fifth place last Thursday, at the Modoc Invitational guaranteeing his 5th place position in league.

The Modoc High Golf Team will be in McCloud today for one of its last two SCL meets of the season. The team will travel again on May 1 to Portola and on May 3, to the Fall River Golf Course to compete, for the last time before playoffs, at the Fall River/ Burney invite. As of now the NSCIF Small Schools playoff is set for Monday, May 7 with NSCIF Large Schools playoff scheduled for Monday, May 14. The NorCal Championship playoffs with be on Monday, May 21, where Montague is looking forward to sending several of his top golfers, or rather the league's top golfers.

Dedication of Rotary Fields Saturday

Opening day of Modoc Little League season on Saturday April 28, will allow the public to witness the Dedication of the Rotary Fields in Alturas starting at 10:00 a.m.

Sunrise and Noon Rotary Clubs will host the dedication and provide free hot dogs, soft drinks and hamburgers for everyone. The 250 ballplayers in uniform will each receive a ticket for a chance at prizes.

ÒThe community has been behind this project 100 percent and this is our way of thanking everyone for the building of these fields,Ó offered Noon Rotary President Roger Dorris. ÒThis is the result of five years of Duck Race support.Ó

Special presentations and the dedication will be staged in the center of the new fields, to be witnessed by the ball players and the public. The event will begin at 10:00 a.m. Sponsors for the event include both Sunrise and Noon Rotary Clubs, Modoc Tobacco Coalition, Modoc Drug and Alcohol and Modoc County Little League.

RotaryÕs Great Pit River Duck Race 2001 tickets will be available for sale during the event. Rotary hopes to have several of the big prizes on display. Proceeds from ticket sales continue to benefit the Rotary Field Project.

MAY 5, 2001

Judge rules ESA trumps other concerns

U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken ruled late Monday in Eugene that the Endangered Species Act trumps all other concerns for water, dashing Tulelake farmers' hopes to get irrigation water this season.

The Tulelake Irrigation District, Klamath Irrigation Water Users Association and individual farmers had asked the federal courts for a preliminary injunction which would have prohibited the Bureau of Reclamation from cutting off the water for most of the Basin's farmers.

The decision to hold water was made by the BOR on April 6, sending shock waves through the basin's agriculture community. Because of the current drought conditions, the decision was made to protect the coho salmon in the lower Klamath river and the endangered suckers in the basin, primarily in Klamath Lake.

In the decision, the judge contends that the needs of the area's farmers were weighed against the needs of the fish and other users, including fishermen and the Native American tribes. The judge found no overriding legal circumstance that would lend a decision in favor of the farmers.

Modoc County will send a contingent of supporters to the Klamath Basin Bucket Brigade, which is primarily a show of community support, set for May 7, 12 noon at Klamath Falls Veteran's Memorial Park.

The Modoc group will meet at the Alturas Junior Livestock Showgrounds at 9 a.m. and will travel by bus to Klamath Falls. The group is expected to be home by 5:30 p.m.

Contact Kathy Porter at the Modoc County Farm Bureau Office in Alturas for more information at 233-3267.

The Bucket Bridge is designed as a peaceful protest, stressing the need for irrigation water by Klamath Basin farmers. The buckets will be provided. The plan in Klamath is that 50 buckets representing the 50 states will be filled with water from the lake at Veteran's Park down Main Street to Modoc Field and will be emptied into a dry irrigation ditch. A rally will be held at Modoc Field and people are asked to bring their signs and families.

The protest is in response to the Bureau of Reclamation's order not to deliver any irrigation water this year to those farmers because of severe drought conditions in that area. The farmers are placing the blame directly on the Endangered Species Act and are working to get that law changed to reflect what they say is more of the peoples' needs.

A farmer's group filed suit against the federal agencies, but were rebuffed this week when a federal judge rule that the agencies were correct in their interpretation of the law. Earlier this year, another federal judge ruled that the Bureau of Reclamation had violated the law last year when it failed to consult with the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service on water needs to coho salmon and the shortnose and Lost River sucker. They released water to farmers last year.

Farmers contend the loss of water will cost the Klamath Basin a minimum of a $300-$400 million economic loss. They argue the area will lose jobs, businesses, and revenue for schools, fire departments, libraries, parks, churches, community organizations and county and city governments.

One of their major concerns is also the loss of invaluable topsoil which is blowing away in the wind. They are also arguing that the lack of water is impacting the environment negatively, including parks, wildlife habitat and the Tulelake-Lower Klamath Wildlife Refuges.

Big Valley Lumber closes Bieber mill

Big Valley Lumber Company has closed down its mill operations in both Bieber and Burney, at least in part, because of the bankruptcy declaration of Pacific Gas and Electric.

The shutdowns affect 65 employees in Bieber, a town which depends on the mill for its economic health, and about another 85 employees at Burney.

Main has stated he was unable to work out operating plans for the next several months with lenders. PG&E owes the company "a lot of money" according to Main.

He said he intends on reopening both the Burney and Bieber mills and is working out a new finance plan, with his first choice being to reopen the operations.

Rumors as of late Wednesday indicated the mills would be re-opening, but the Record could not confirm that report by deadline. In addition to the sawmill operations, the Bieber plant also includes a co-generation plant that produces some five to six megawatts of power. That plant, operated by chips, can continue to run.

Big Valley Lumber is one of the last remaining sawmill operations in the northeast part of the state.

Museum opens doors for 2001

The Modoc County Museum opened its doors for the first time this year on Wednesday, May 2 and will remain open until the first week of October.

Paula Murphy, Curator of the museum for the ninth consecutive year, along with Historical Society Secretary Dixie Server, have been hard at work putting together the final touches for the opening. Murphy and Server have been placing together several photographs for the new county wide Pictorium display, one of several new arrivals that have been added to the museum's show items.

The Pictorium incorporates several photographs from towns and spots of interest throughout the county. The display includes photographs of older years, as well as newer ones, providing the public with a look at the past and present.

"We have to be very accurate and that makes things very hard," commented head of the Pictorium project Dixie Server. Server stresses that accuracy is the most important aspect of restoring history to its once vibrant self.

The Pictorium includes pictures of a bus depot in the 1950's, now the current City fire station.

Server also expressed that the Pictorium project has been a slow operation since the county and its inhabitants haven't seen much change in the past decades. The museum would be pleased to have the public's participation with the project. "We would really like it if people from around the area would donate any old photos of Alturas or other neighboring towns that showed what it was like, say a hundred years ago," said Murphy.

Other new displays that have been donated include pioneer clothing, a turn of the century saddle donated by Pauline Thomas which belonged to husband Stanley Thomas, a wedding display with wedding gowns dating back from 1880 to 1953, and one of the most exciting finds, a Colonial Doll Trunk dating back to 1792.

Kim Parker of Alturas, great grand daughter of Parethenia Dorris, donated several articles of clothing, that have been passed down to her, dating back to the turn-of-the century and earlier.

Judith Carlsburg-Garamendy, third generation Modocer, donated the wedding gown she wore on January 27, 1953 when she, then Judith Goulden, married Arthur W. Carlsberg Jr. in Alturas.

Arthur H. Eggleston of Klamath Falls donated a Colonial doll trunk which dates back to 1792. The trunk, which will not be on display until next year, is lined with newspaper from the same time period. The publication gives reference to the construction of the federal city, Washington DC., during which time Philadelphia was the nation's capital.

Wilson says "We've had pretty steady funding and donations, considering the size of our county." Although there has been a steady flow of donations, the museum is looking for an existing pair of taxidermy Canadian Snow Geese in flight along with some animal pelts, such as Beaver and Elk, to put on display.

The Modoc County museum will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and will be closed Monday and Sunday.

Vandalism found on forest

Modoc National Forest has had an ongoing problem with vandalism over the past several years. According to Law Enforcement Officer, Jim McKeehan, "We have recently discovered several new sites of vandalism on the forest and would appreciate any assistance we might receive from the public in preventing this sort of damage." Signs that have been knocked over or cut down have been located on Big Valley, Doublehead and Devil's Garden Ranger Districts. This senseless vandalism adds extra cost to limited funding that is planned for recreating improvements on the forest. In an effort to solicit help from the public, Modoc National Forest Supervisor Dan Chisholm has authorized up to a $500 reward for information leading to the identification and prosecution of suspects. Chisholm states, "Our tax dollars could be used in a much more productive way to maintain and improve existing signs instead of replacing signs destroyed by vandals."

Help prevent this type of damage to your national forest. For more information or to report vandalism, please call the U.S. Forest Service at (530) 667-8660, (530) 252-6400, or contact the Modoc County Sheriff's Office at 1-888-233-4416.

You deserve better treatment of your national forest and your tax dollars.

Moore gets return trip for July promotion

Little Megan Moore of Alturas, "rocked the video sound crew" as well as Don Reed, owner of Affinity Music, during her first video filming at the Nashville, Tennessee studio last weekend.

Affinity had purposely scheduled the Moore's video taping for last in the day, from the experience that most children take at least "10 takes" to get a video "right." But after patiently waiting in the lobby for several hours, as adults and teens went before her and each taking two to three hours to tape, the nine-year-old Moore was more than ready to sing when it was her turn.

"She slammed it the first time and didn't have to do a re-take," said her proud father Brett Moore.

"She was just glowin'- she turned into this little performer, with the headphones on and mike in hand, surprising even me," said her mom Kathy. "She had so much fun, she begged them to do it again. She wasn't nervous."

All of the sound, video and production engineers and Affinity Music's Reed, truly loved everything about her.

"Her personality, the way she danced to her song, and her BIG voice. They were stunned the minute she belted out one of her high notes (not high to us), in the first high part of "Come on Over" . . . that's when they all looked at each other with huge smiles," described Kathy. "They let her do it again just for the fun of it and she loved it."

While taping the video, Reed pulled Megan's mother out to the hallway to ask if Megan could be back in Nashville on July 21 for an even bigger promotion. He asked that Megan be Affinity's "Kid Star" this year. Affinity promotes an Adult, Teen and Kid star.

"There was no doubt in any of their minds that Megan is the one to fill the part," said Kathy. "My head began spinning. It was pretty overwhelming and I was trying to watch Megan's video at the same time."

The family will know more after a phone conversation today, when Reed returns from a trip and goes over his promotion plans. The April 28 video will be e-mailed to recording companies and be shown on Affinity's Internet website, which should be ready for public viewing within 10 to 14 days.

After the July 21 return to the studio, Megan will earn 7.5 cents every time someone accesses her video site on the Internet. Because she had signed no contract with Affinity or any other company, her parents are in the process of "burning" compact discs featuring her singing. Those CDs will be available for a $5 to $7 donation from the family and at the Children's Fair, May 19, where Megan has been asked to perform. Her mother will also have available a limited number of videos from her Affinity taping which will be available for a $5 donation. All proceeds will help fund Megan's trip back to Affinity in Nashville just before her July 21 appointment there. "It's all happening so fast. Like lightning and just being able to ponder it is good for us this week," said Kathy. Megan returned home from Nashville at 3 a.m. Monday and headed out to school. "The trip couldn't have been better. It didn't go quite like we'd expected; it went even better, and everyone has been so supportive," said Kathy. "Megan loves Nashville. She loves the mall and the limos. She especially loved recording her video."

A true performer, on her way to catch a plane in Reno, last Thursday morning for the weekend in Nashville, Megan stopped into the Alturas Sunrise Rotary meeting at the request of Rotarian Rusty Stanford, where she sang for the club at 6:45 a.m. The impressed club members reciprocated by donating $216, which aided her trip at the last minute to Nashville.

Migratory Bird festival promises fun, education

The 2001 Modoc Migratory Bird Festival promises fun and education over the May 11-13 event.

The kick-off for the event will be a presentation at the Niles Hotel by Kent Clegg, on "Flying with America's Cranes" May 11, 7 p.m. Clegg will tell of his experiences in training cranes to fly along with him and his ultralight aircraft and should be a fascinating presentation. On Saturday, May 12, the movie "Fly Away Home" will be presented free at the Niles Theater in Alturas.

Saturday, May 12 is a big day at the Modoc National Wildlife refuge and the first 100 Moms who attend will receive a free carnation in honor of Mother's Day.

There are plenty of activities that day including bird watching, the Honker Highway, a Kid's Korner, waterfowl identification, traditional Native American stories, taxidermy, free bird houses for the kids, duck decoy painting, bat biology and houses and other demonstrations in wildlife photography, art and fly-tying

The High Desert Museum in Bend, Or. is sending its Raptors of the Desert Sky live bird presentation for the event. It's well worth seeing and the raptors are impressive.

In addition, a butterfly walk and identification and wetland plant walk are scheduled.

A silent auction and raffle for a basket filled with local products is on hand. These items will be on display at Friday's coffee reception at the Niles Hotel.

Commemorative t-shirts and coffee mugs will be available for purchase.

On Sunday, there will be a pancake breakfast at the Niles Hotel followed by ranch and birding tours. It's recommended that participants to the event remember to bring lunches and binoculars. The Modoc National Wildlife Refuge is one of the key stops for migratory birds on the Pacific Flyway and is home to one of the major breeding areas for Sandhill cranes.

Historical Society tours Goose Lake Valley locations Saturday

The Spring Quarterly meeting of the Modoc County Historical Society will include a field trip to historic locations in the Davis Creek area, Saturday, May 5.

A bus will leave the Modoc County Museum parking lot in Alturas at 600 So. Main Street at 9:30 a.m. Members and guests are welcome. The MCHS tour will cover some of this history and heritage of the east side of the Goose Lake Valley, which was first settled between 1869 and 1871. The group will tour the Willow Ranch Cemetery, visit the old town site of Fairport and the New Pine Creek Cemetery. Lunch will be provided at the Davis Creek Grange Hall on Plum Street for $6.50 per person at 1 p.m.

After lunch, Doug Dollarhide will present a program, followed by a visit to the Davis Creek Cemetery and Church. The tour will return to Alturas at 3:30 p.m.

Call Dixie Server at 233-2944 or 233-6368 to make a transportation reservation. The group will be using a Modoc Joint Unified School District bus.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The truth will prevail

Dear Editor:

The timing of your article concerning the lawsuit filed against the Surprise Valley Health Care District and certain staff members is unfortunate for all concerned. The Hospital Administration and the Board cannot comment publicly on an ongoing investigation and those alleging a cover up are fully aware of that fact. Now that you have opted for sensationalism at the expense of due process a just conclusion will be more difficult to reach.

Those so anxious to make accusations should consider the consequences to themselves and those they support, should those accusations turn out to be false. Everyone should understand that the truth will emerge and the innocent and the guilty as they are portrayed today may experience a roll reversal tomorrow.

Bill Benner, Eagleville

We're heading to Modoc

Dear Editor:

A few weeks back I wrote a letter to the Modoc Record accusing George II of being a criminal recidivist, placing the greed of his corporate cronies above the health of the public while further destroying our fragile environment.

An Alturas resident, someone by the name of Urbanek, wrote his own letter accusing me of not respecting Bush and hoping I would not become a resident in Modoc County. He also wrote some other stuff that didn't make any sense. . .

Well, I grinned and shook my head, showed Urbanek's missive to some friends, and we all had a good laugh. One thing led to another and pretty soon the things was being passed around, send via e-mail, and eventually out through cyber-space on the Internet. Some reader finally asked the now growing groups, "What's this Modoc County and, for that matter, where is the silly place?" Several rushed to their maps and found it snuggled in the northeastern corner of the state. A few even read the Modoc Record website, and then, something wonderful happened.

Once people began to learn that there is a decreasing population, no fast-food joints or Big Box stores, no air pollution, plenty of wide open spaces, blue skies, and real estate that is almost "free" it's so cheap, the obvious idea hit everyone: "Why not move to Modoc County?"

So, Mr. Urbanek, your worst nightmare has come true. Hundreds of us will be moving to Modoc this summer. Just imagine, old hippies, freaks, lefties, radicals, homos and lesbos, black, brown, yellow and red. We are bringing all the equity from our overpriced Bay Area real estate and we are going to buy up the whole county (the private land at least). Most of us are registered to vote as Greens, Peace and Freedom, and there are even a few still registered as Socialists. With a county as small as Modoc, it wont take many of us to get elected to all the pubic offices from Board of Supervisors to the local school boards.

Once we own the real estate and control the political power, what can you expect? First of all, the cows will be replaced by buffalo and the out-of-work cowboys will be offered work repairing all the damage their bovine charges have caused. Riparian stream-sides will be returned to their original condition. Trout and other wildlife will again flourish. Chemicals that kill birds and small animals will be taxed so that there is no incentive to ever use them. Alfalfa growers will have to pay the real price for all the water they use and will be fined if their use continues to overdraft the aquifers as they have been for these past many years.

No large chain-stores will be issued a use permit to operate that drives local merchants out of business. The County Office of Education will be downsized and the money saved will be used to increase teachers' salaries. All the school principals will be fired and offered real jobs, i.e.. teaching. The money saved will be used to double the school secretaries' salaries. (They run the schools anyway.) The police and sheriff departments will be directed to stop harassing you people, the poor and other powerless members of the community and instead give top priority to white color and environmentally destructive crimes.

These are just some of the ideas that have been discussed among the new Modoc Argonauts who will soon be your neighbors, Mr. Urbanek. Don't get too upset though, these and many more changes won't happen overnight. You still have time to move to some other community. Might I suggest Elko County, Nevada?

George Breunig, Berkeley

Dr. Parr is a treasure

Dear Editor:

I am appalled over these ridiculous claims against Dr. Parr. I have seen this fine example of the medical field, as have my family for quite some time now.

I have a very complicated and very painful condition. What my life has been like due to my illness, to say the very least, well, I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy!

It took 20 years of doctor's visits to finally get a diagnosis, let alone any proper pain management. What most people do not realize is that there are many disabilities that don't show on the outside.

I have been chastised for using my handi-cap placard and the spaces for their use right here in town by fellow Christians. Let me tell you, that hurt more then my physical pain, but I can forgive, I have to. I tell myself, if they only spent one hour in my body, they would run screaming to their medicine cabinets for help!

So leave it to say, I was thrilled to finally find a competent doctor in Dr. Parr. I have, from the very first visit, felt comfortable with him, I have gone through two different female type surgeries with him as my doctor and there was a female nurse always in the office with us.

Dr. Parr made me feel safe and confident during these events. His personality is wonderful, very much like a kind, curious and sympathetic professional man.

I personally feel, as a community, we all would be at a severe loss without his competent and understanding care, especially those of us that suffer from debilitating diseases and have to deal with chronic pain on a 24/7 basis.

For ten years I went to M.M.C., here in town and having to tell all those different doctors of my complicated illnesses was just intolerable. All I was ever told was take your 800mgs of Ibuprofen, lose weight, and come back in a month, not to mention the damage to my liver, kidneys, and stomach that I endured. This, to my mind, was clearly unacceptable.

I will absolutely stand by Dr. Parr as will hundreds of his other grateful patients.

A kind, compassionate and competent doctor is so hard to find, and one that is not a ego freak is a definite treasure to our community. Well, as you can see I have a great deal of faith in the good doctor. I trust him with not only my life, but the lives of my family. God Bless Dr. Parr.

-Theresa Bibeau, Alturas

SV Hospital valuable

Dear Editor:

I was appalled that your newspaper could publish that bent and vindictive letter from Mr. Hicks and sensationalizing what is going on at S.V. Hospital.

A previous statement in the SV News section stated that Mr. Hicks had resigned! What goes?

Mr. Hicks and I were two of the five Directors when the Hospital was reopened in 1986.

Only through the strong efforts of Supervisor John B. Laxague was this accomplished. Her peers and Modoc Medical Center did everything possible to prevent the reopening.

The fact that the reopening would generate $1,000,000 or more to the Cedarville and Modoc economy meant nothing.

A lot has been accomplished since and contributed much to Surprise Valley and Modoc County.

Mr. Hicks should recant and let the present Board do their job. If you don't like that - vote them out.

John Janisse, Alturas

Alturas is friendly

Dear Editor:

We broke down a short time ago and spent nine days in Alturas. We found your town very friendly and accommodating.

I would like to express our deepest appreciation to Pioneer Body and Towing for rescuing us from the top of Cedar Pass late in the evening. They also let us park our R.V. at their lot and hook up power, which was a blessing, as Wayne is on oxygen.

Also a big thanks to Ron Cambell Inc., they were able to put our transmission in within 24 hours after it was received. Again thanks to all and God Bless.

Wayne and Barbara Ness, Castle Rock, Wa.

OBITUARIES

Sherry Helen Hinds Stewart

Sherry Helen Hinds Stewart, 56, of Hamilton, Montana passed away Thursday, April 26, 2001 at Marcus Daily Memorial Hospital in Hamilton, Montana. She was born March 19, 1945 in Lakeview, Oregon and was reared and educated in Surprise Valley.

As a young girl she enjoyed many fond memories of her grandfather Frank Addington. Following high school, she married and was a homemaker and mother to five children. She lived in various places throughout her life. In 1995, she moved to Hamilton, in the Valley, where four of her five children also live. Sherry lived the last two years of her life alone at the Bitterroot Manor and enjoyed many close friendships there and was blessed by the closeness of her children and grandchildren.

Survivors include her five children Kim (Dale) Balled of Carboy, Mt.; Scott (Anna) Vale and Ed Vale of Hamilton; Frank (Tarok) Hinds of Lovesick, Nev.; Cell (Jay) Bierer of Victor, Mt.; and 12 grandchildren who referred to her always as "Granny;" sister Sandy Rosendahl of Cedarville, Calif.; half sister Nancy Conner of St. Helens, Ore. and special father J.C. "Pa" Tierce and father Thomas Ahlf, and two brothers.

Graveside services will be held at the Cedarville Cemetery on May 14 at 2:00 p.m. for family and friends. A time of fellowship will follow at the Surprise Valley Community Church Hall.

SPORTS

Lady Braves split with unbeaten Burney to tighten up SCL race

The Lady Braves brought an end to the Lady Raiders undefeated season after losing the first game due to several errors and some arguable calls. They came back in the nightcap to hold off Burney, bringing the Lady Braves record to 8-2. --------- Modoc got out to a slow start against the Raiders Monday afternoon, here at home. The Braves suffered three consecutive outs to start the game, while Burney got off to a 1-0 lead, by the top of the second inning.

The Lady Braves' Jilene Mastagni, Niki Poindexter, and Jessica Kern all had singles in the third, with two runs scored off an RBI hit by Shay Farmer, but the Raiders had just begun to put on the show. Burney managed to hit seven singles which brought in four runs. The game ended in the top of the fourth as neither team was able to score another run and the Ladies of Burney once again came out on top, but that was all about to change.

"Prove to me how bad you want this," said head coach of the Lady Braves, Dennis Banister, to his team between double headers. Banister thought to ask, and he received four runs in the nightcap's first inning.

Stephanie McMaster hit a double to begin the game, followed by another RBI from Farmer. Kristen Clough and Charlene Stevens came through with singles and Brianna Berchtold and Julie Watters brought in two more runs with RBI's.

Burney was able to get a run with a triple but was unable to beat the Braves' strong defense. Burney scored again in the top of the sixth, but two runs were not enough to win over the Lady Braves, who proved to want it more.

McMaster threw to 63 batters in 14 innings, striking out 10, giving up one walk and 19 hits for seven runs.

- The Lady Braves swept through their double header against Mt. Shasta Friday.

Stephanie McMaster ripped a triple during her second time at bat in the first inning, bringing in three runs totaling seven runs in the first inning. The Lady Braves continued to run up the score board ending the game at 14 to 5.

- Brianna Berchtold led the Braves with three hits and McMaster had three RBI's followed by Charlene Stevens with two, and Jessica Kern brought in a run with one RBI. The Braves also managed to steal eight bases in the first game.

Charlene Stevens, Brianna Berchtold, and Jilene Mastagni all had two hits for the Lady Braves, taking the nightcap 15-5.

McMaster pitched to 59 batters, striking out 24, walked nine, and gave up seven hits for 10 runs.

The Lady Braves will be in Weed today to battle the Lady Cougars for their last league game before they enter playoffs on May 15.

Braves make playoffs after loss

The Modoc Braves eased through their double-header against the Mt. Shasta Bears Friday, sweeping the first game 5-3, and the nightcap 9-7.

- The Braves were down by three in the top of the ninth, but came back to score five winning runs in the last inning of play.

Winning pitcher, Lucas Tramontanas, hit a double and a single bringing in two runs to help his pitching efforts, where he finished with ten K's and no walks.

Blake Thorn and Jared McGarva both were two for four and Eric Miller had a single, adding to the Braves five run victory.

In the night cap, Kris Server was the winning pitcher striking out seven while walking four. Both, he and Jared McGarva were 3-4 in the batter's box, with doubles. Blake Thorn and Glenn Christensen both added to the score with two of four hits.

The Braves gave up four errors during their games against Mt. Shasta, but with 18 errors against Burney, the number three team in Division IV, in one afternoon the Braves appeared as if they forgot their fundamentals.

The opening game lasted 10 innings with Tramontanas pitching the majority of the game. He got the loss, 6-5, but pitched "extremely well," said Server, striking out 13 batters while only giving up four walks.

Blake Thorn lead Braves in the hitting department with three of five hits. Glen Christensen had a home run, hitting 2-4, and Jared McGarva added a double.

The Braves had a 6-0 lead by the fifth inning, but with 12 errors in the nightcap, Modoc would have to fight hard to keep that lead for the win. Burney, however, took full advantage of the Braves misfortune, scoring twice in the sixth, four runs in the seventh and three runs in the eighth would set them over the top for a SCL shut out of 9-8.

Down but not out, the Braves have been notified that their 7-3 league record has allowed them to advance to the North Section California Interscholastic Federation playoffs. The team will find out their first-round opponent Wednesday, after it has finished it's season with Friday's afternoon games with Weed, here at home.

Thinclads head to Mazama invite

Modoc thinclads are getting in some meets, with the weather finally showing some improvement. They travel to the Mazama Invitational this weekend in Klamath Falls.

For the varsity girls at the big John Frank meet in Redding, sophomore Colleen McElwain did very well, taking third in the 200 meters and fifth in the 100. The Braves 4 x 400 meter relay team of McElwain, Kayla Harness, Tatum Dunn and Amy Gentry placed fourth.

For the junior varsity girls, Caitlin Cook took sixth in the shot put. None of the varsity boys placed at the Redding meet. In the junior varsity division, Clint Tate took a third in the shot put and Scott McMaster was fifth.

Last weekend, the Braves traveled to Burney, where McElwain won the 100 meters and was second in the 200. She was also on the second place 4 x 400 meter relay team. She and Tatum Dunn also placed in the jumps. Harness took a third in the 800 meters.

Blake Wilson took a second in the discus for the varsity boys while Tony Willis was fourth in the shot. Luke Hughes was fifth in the two mile. The boys 4 x 400 meter relay team was fourth.

Clint Tate won the jayvee boys discus and shot and McMaster was third in the shot.

Rotary Fish Derby is Saturday, May 5

The Alturas Rotary Club will be hosting its 45th annual Fish Derby May 5, 8:15 a.m. at Pine Creek Reservoir.

The derby is open to all children age 12 and under and kids must bring their own fishing gear. Transportation will be provided. Any child needing a ride should be at the park next to the Alturas Chamber of Commerce Office by 7:30 a.m. Saturday.

The Rotary Club provides hot dogs and soda pop free during the event.

There are prizes of a new rod and reel for the boy and girl who catches the first fish, the biggest fish and the most fish. Also a drawing for a boys and girls bike will be held that morning at the reservoir.

Brave JV goes 2-2

Modoc High School's junior varsity baseball team beat Bishop Quinn 8-3 and 11-1 April 27, after dropping a pair to Mt. Shasta 11-0 and 14-8 April 25.

In the first game against Bishop Quinn, the Braves scored their 11 runs on nine hits and scored 10 in the bottom of the fifth. Jered Pierce was the winning pitcher and Robert Flournoy went two-for-three at the plate.

n the second game, Modoc scored their eight runs on seven hits with Danny Randazzo getting the win. He limited Bishop Quinn to six hits. Flournoy was two-for-three.

Against Mt. Shasta, Modoc allowed 14 hits and 14 walks, and eight walks. The Bears also hit three home runs. Pierce got the loss. Rich Culp was three-for-four on at the plate. Modoc had 12 hits and scored eight runs.

In the Bear nightcap, Modoc suffered its first shut-out of the year. The Braves picked up just three hits while the Bears had seven hits and received seven free base on balls.

MAY 10, 2001

Bucket Brigade draws a crowd

Several thousand people descended upon Klamath Falls Monday to take part in the Bucket Brigade protest of the shut off of irrigation water to Klamath Basin farmers.

The basin farmers, stuck in the second year of a severe drought, were told April 6 by the Bureau of Reclamation that no irrigation water would be delivered to them, instead water would be stored for protection of the Lost River, shortnose suckers and coho salmon. That decision by the BOR erupted in a firestorm of charges aimed at the Endangered Species Act and the federal government. Monday's rally was peaceful and was aimed partly at calling attention to the severe ramifications of enforcing the Endangered Species Act.

A contingent of people from Alturas and surrounding areas boarded a Modoc Joint Unified School District bus Monday morning, sponsored by the Modoc County Farm Bureau, and took part in the protest.

"It brought tears to my eyes," Betsy Ingraham, of Davis Creek, said. "The support those ranchers and farmers had was just overwhelming. We not only had the group we took on the bus from Alturas, there were many people who went up there in their own cars."

Ingraham said the one thing that struck her was the peaceful and well-organized manner in which the protest was handled.

"There was no trouble, no radicals," she said. "I just hope people across the nation take notice and that it did some good."

The only part that bothered her was a lack of national news coverage that evening. She said she rushed home to flip on the television and see how the networks, who were in Klamath Falls, handled the story. In this neck of the woods, not much was aired. She was hoping there would be more coverage down the line.

Ingraham said she and the crowd were very pleased with the attitude and federal and state representatives who attended and spoke at the rally. She hopes their efforts will provide some changes in the Endangered Species law.

U.S. Representative Wally Herger, who participated in the bucket brigade has asked the House Committee on Resources to hold a meeting in the Klamath Basin to examine the situation and issues of the Endangered Species Act.

"This year's zero-water decision was driven in part by the fact that the area is currently experiencing what may ultimately be the driest year on record," Herger said. "But drought is not the major problem. In prior drought years, all legitimate interests got by with a little belt-tightening and without serious impacts to anyone including fish. At no time in the history of the project has one group simply been forced to do without."

According to Representative Greg Walden, of Oregon, who was also at the bucket brigade, the resources committee has agreed to meet in the Klamath Basin in the near future.

Refuge is setting for 2001 Migratory Bird Festival

This weekend will be time to migrate to the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge for the 2001 Modoc Migratory Bird Festival May 11-13.

The festival celebrates and educates the community on its wonderful and valuable refuge and the myriad of birds and animals that call the area home.

Saturday is the biggest day at the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge and the first 100 Moms who attend will receive a free carnation in honor of Mother's Day.

There are plenty of activities that day including bird watching, the Honker Highway, a Kid's Korner, waterfowl identification, traditional Native American stories, taxidermy demonstrations, free bird houses for the kids, duck decoy painting, bat biology and houses and other demonstrations in wildlife photography, art and fly-tying.

The High Desert Museum in Bend, Or. is sending its Raptors of the Desert Sky live bird presentation for the event. It's well worth seeing and the raptors are impressive. This program is one of the most popular at the High Desert Museum and draws thousands annually. In addition, a butterfly walk and identification and wetland plant walk are scheduled.

The kick-off for the event will be a presentation at the Niles Hotel by Kent Clegg, on "Flying with America's Cranes" May 11, 7 p.m. Clegg will tell of his experiences in training cranes to fly along with him and his ultralight aircraft and should be a fascinating presentation. On Saturday, May 12, the movie "Fly Away Home" will be presented free at the Niles Theater in Alturas.

A silent auction and raffle for a basket filled with local products is on hand. These items will be on display at Friday's coffee reception at the Niles Hotel.

Commemorative t-shirts and coffee mugs will be available for purchase.

On Sunday, there will be a pancake breakfast at the Niles Hotel followed by ranch and birding tours. It's recommended that participants to the event remember to bring lunches and binoculars.

- The Modoc National Wildlife Refuge is one of the key stops for migratory birds on the Pacific Flyway and is home to one of the major breeding areas for Sandhill cranes.

Prices may go up, but rolling power blackouts not inevitable

While prices for electricity may bounce up this year, there is little probability of blackouts in this part of the state. At least that's the view of local suppliers.

Nonetheless, both Surprise Valley Electric and Pacific Power are asking their customers to conserve energy, especially when summer hits and the irrigation seasons starts. SVEC rates are expected to increase between 10 and 12 percent in October. There will be no rate increase for summer.

SVEC has offered irrigators financial incentives not to pump, and according to Manager Dan Silveria only about 10 have signed on to that program.

"The northwest is facing possibly the lowest water year in the 72 years of record keeping," Silveria said. "This lower water situation could reduce the total amount of power generated on the Columbia River Power System by 4,700 megawatts--the equivalent of power consumed by four Seattles."

Silveria said the next two to three years will be difficult for the entire electrical distributions system.

"BPA recently announced it could have a Cost Recovery Adjustment surcharge on wholesale power of 250 percent," said Silveria. Silveria said conservation efforts are being stressed to reduce the overall power load requirement, which could in turn decrease the Cost Recovery Adjustment which comes into play next year.

"We're not sure just what that Cost Recovery number will be at this time, but it certainly is worrisome," said Silveria. BPA was able to secure low-priced power for irrigators, so they will not be subject to a huge rate increase.

Pacific Power remains convinced that conservation efforts in their service areas will avoid blackouts, but has asked for a moderate rate increase. PP&L is also asking customers to use only what power they need and to conserve whenever possible.

The power crisis is creating other major concerns in Modoc County, as well as most counties in the state. First of all, said Modoc County Chief Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell, Pacific Gas and Electric's declaration of bankruptcy has put counties on notice that their tax payments will be late.

PG&E in Modoc generally owes about $146,500 in taxes each year. This year they've paid $69,570 and owe $76,894. That money owed is in the current county budget but will not likely be paid by July. The county, and PG&E's creditors are currently at the mercy of the bankruptcy courts.

Maxwell said the county will continue to accrue the tax amount, plus penalties.

County Supervisors are concerned about that tax money not being paid timely and have discussed freezing fixed asset purchases and tightening the county departments' belts.

What concerns Modoc and counties across the state is a possibility that the state will acquire the utility power lines. If that happens, said Maxwell, the counties may receive no tax funds. The state could acquire the lines and still obligate the tax, but Maxwell said the state's past history of taking care of counties' needs is not good and he doesn't expect that to change.

"The easiest target the state has to balance its budget is the counties," said Maxwell. "We're all very concerned."

Over 100 Klamath basin farmers use emergency dust control program

USDA's Natural Resource and Conservation Service (NRCS) are experiencing overwhelming interest from drought-plagued farmers in the Klamath Basin who wish to participate in an emergency program to control wind erosion.

Within five days of opening a temporary office in Tulelake, CA, additional funds were necessary to continue the emergency program in California. An additional $500,000 is being made available, for a total of $2 million earmarked for NRCS's joint California-Oregon emergency venture. The agencys' offices in Klamath Falls, Oregon and Tulelake, CA, have signed agreements with 122 farmers to plant cover crops on over 20,000 acres.

"Soil is getting drier and drier each day and soil moisture is key to getting a protective cover crop in place," says Hank Wyman, Interim State Conservationist for NRCS-California. "We are racing against the clock on this practice and farmers are responding in that matter." Nevertheless, say NRCS agronomists, a successful cover crop is not guaranteed without additional moisture for the emerging plants. Other conservation practices NRCS field conservationists are analyzing to tame the dust problems include mulching, vegetation wind barriers, cross wind trap strips, crosswind ridges and critical area plantings.

Three local conservation districts will cooperatively share the duties as project sponsors: California's Lava Bed Resource Conservation District and Butte Valley Conservation District and Oregon's Klamath Soil and Water Conservation District. The three districts will administer the program.

"We realize that cover crops and mulching are not going to turn the water back on or make the crops grow," says Martin Kerne, a farmer and volunteer director of the sponsoring Klamath Soil and Water Conservation District, "but it's the right thing to do to protect public health, and the fields of Klamath Basin."

The work will be funded under the Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program, designed by Congress to assist communities with post-disaster protection to protect lives and property.

Modoc National Forest implements national fire plan

Modoc National Forest is implementing the National Fire Plan and that is good news for the Modoc Forest and residents of Modoc County.

2000 was intense, costly, and outstripped the country's fire fighting resources to provide fire suppression. Nationally, nearly 10 million acres burned compared with the ten-year average of 3 million acres. As a result, Congress acted to make some changes, which were outlined in the "National Fire Plan". The National Fire Plan contains five key features designed to respond to the effects of severe wildfires, to reduce their impacts on rural communities and to enhance fire fighting capabilities in the future. This equates to additional dollars to the Forest Service for new equipment, personnel, training, and facilities, and dollars to the communities to assist volunteer fire departments and enhance community capacity and local economic opportunities through grants.

"This is the most exciting time in my career," says Elizabeth Cavasso, Modoc National Forest's Management Officer. A twenty-year veteran of the Forest Service, Cavasso sees the National Fire Plan as a concerted means to reduce costs of large fire suppression, have less destruction to natural resources and property, and once again have fire play a more natural role in the wildland ecosystem. "It also means new employees and families moving into our communities and that's a real bonus."

This year, $7.5 million has been allocated to Modoc National Forest to implement the National Fire Plan.

$4.6 million is allocated for purchase or upgrade of equipment and vehicles and to hire staff. Work begins in a few weeks to reconstruct Happy Camp Lookout, lost in a structure fire last year. A total of five lookouts will be staffed this year. Forest Service is aggressively recruiting twenty-four new permanent employees, including nine wildland firefighter apprentices and two coop education students, and eleven new temporary employees. A national Type 1 Hotshot crew is being headquartered in Canby, a new engine crew stationed in Alturas, and new type II water tender placed in Adin. One major wildland fire can cost millions of dollars; early detection and prompt initial attack suppression can reduce suppression costs and resource loss.

Nearly $3 million has been allocated to fuel management and reduction of hazardous fuels on high priority within the Modoc National Forest, particularly wildland-urban interface areas. 15,590 acres are scheduled for treatment through mechanical means and prescribed fire. Because of drying conditions, the spring burning program has come to a close. Two forest health projects are scheduled and money is allocated to identify future hazardous fuel reduction treatment projects in the Big Valley area.

Six and one half miles of dozer line within the 35,237 acre Yellow/Pine Complex near the Oregon border is being restored to minimize erosion. This project will be completed next week. Funds are available for community assistance through economic action grant program managed by the Forest Service, and to assist volunteer fire departments for training and equipment. Funding for the volunteer fire department assistance is routed through the California Department of Fire Protection. Locally, about $90,000 has been requested for National Fire Plan Community Assistance activities including forest hazard reduction plans, a feasibility study for a cogeneration plant in Canby, a fire safe council, high school fire awareness academy, and juniper biomass harvest test. Grand funding decision will be made at the end of May.

All of this adds to a very important year in our forest and our communities.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Not until hell freezes solid

Dear Editor:

Mr. Breunig, from Berkeley, and his diverse group of soulmates, will occupy and control Modoc right after hell freezes over. What a hostile attitude he has. While he may be book smart, he is clueless about what it takes to provide food, clothing, and shelter to the masses of this country, and the need for law enforcement to provide for a civil society. I wonder how he earns his bread.

And, Rick, I would argue that the economic problems of rural America are a direct result of policies put in place during the Carter Administration and expanded during the Clinton Administration. The Republicans did not close our mill. They have not halted logging and mining and harassed ranchers who use public lands. People of Mr. Breunig's persuasion did.

Give President Bush a chance to prove his leadership.

Vaudine Cullins, Canby

In the interest of harmony

Dear Editor:

Although I live in Lassen County, the Modoc County lands I explore and appreciate are an important part of the wonderful quality of life I enjoy here in north eastern California. I would never want to encounter any strife or hard feelings from the people I meet in Modoc County, who have been almost universally kind and welcoming to me, whether I have been hiking, driving through, or landing my hang glider in their Surprise Valley field. Hence, it was with some amusement and concern that I read the recent letter to the editor titled: "We're heading to Modoc".

I think most of us, whatever our political or ideological leanings, want some of the same things each side of this tongue-in cheek exchange wants. All of us with any concern for our children and for their children want to leave a functioning ecosystem and beautiful countryside behind us. Each of us must also face the practical demands of providing for ourselves and our families. I think the only real conundrum of each side of the debate must solve is how to achieve both of these goals simultaneously.

Remember, your enemy is never a villain in his own eyes. Neither old hippies nor third-generation ranchers want anything but the very best of outcomes for all that we hold dear. Surely, in the interest of harmony and the truest spirit of the American tradition, we can find ways to work with each other in a concerned effort toward a common goal.

With six billion of us currently making demands on this planet, we can only be assured of one thing: the future will look different than the present does. Our methods of providing for ourselves are taxing this ecosystem, and we will need to gradually move toward other methods. Perhaps the biggest part of the solution will simply be a reduction in the number of humans . . . perhaps some bright boy or girl will come up with other, more amazing answers. For now, though, I would welcome Mr. Breunig and his friends; he sounds thoughtful and energetic. I would ask, however, that he leave any divisive notions of "us verses them" back in the ultra-competitive world of the big cities. In the pleasant life of a small town, we have the benefits and the consequences of meeting face to face, the bank or the store, or out on the land we all care about. Up here in our smaller communities, we are still close enough to one another to work together, without rancor and ill-spirited feelings. Aren't we?

Bruce Rhymes, Susanville

Bruenig's letter interesting

Dear Editor:

Nice letter George! I'm proud of you! It is about time someone took a stand and pointed out just what a fiend George Bush really is! I would like to remind you that President Bush hunts animals and birds and eats them? Can you imagine that? Killing and eating an animal! Did you know that Supreme Court Justice Andrew Scalia hunts animals and eats them too! I'll bet President Bush and Justice Scalia trade hunting stories. I'll bet they even drink coffee and listen to country music; it's just despicable!

See George, that's the problem with Modoc County. About 80% of the people eat red meat, shoot ground squirrels, catch fish, drink beer, and last, but not least, pollute the air with methane gas! That's where you and your friends come in. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to educate those poor foolish souls about all these evils, and especially eating red meat, and . . . you know . . . expelling methane gas! Disgusting!!

Did you know that a bunch of these hicks in Modoc, and in Texas, take red meat, grind it, or chop it, and mix it with beans and secret spices, invite all of their buddies over, and digest it? Yeah, they do! They expel enough methane to supply Berkeley with fuel for a year and two days! They call it a country chili cook off, but we know what it really is! It's a right wing conspiracy to pollute the air with methane, and it has to stop!

Hopefully some of your friends are animal rights activists, and you can convince the Modocers to quit taking enjoyment in watching a squeak vaporize in their rifle scope, or pulling a Modoc sucker out of a trout stream and tossing him over a bank to watch the ravens peck his eyes out! Isn't that just awful? I'll bet you never see anything like that in Berkeley? They only do things like that to people down there. It's really a nice safe place to live, isn't it George?

My suggestion to you would you to wear a "squeak" costume and run out in front of the shooters waving your arms and squeaking. It would scare them so badly that they will never again perforate a poor little squirrel. As for the sucker fish, if you put on a large dorsal fin and snorkel up to the hick's fishing hole, it will have the same effect as the squeak costume, whatever that might be. They wouldn't even thing about the rifle in the rack, they would just load up Momma and the kids and high tail it for home. I'm telling you the truth George, because I used to be one . . . really.

There are just a few of the things that you and your friends will be burdened with then you move to Modoc. But I know ya'll are up to the challenge, because you gave away your profession when you said teachers need more money; and I know that teachers are the smartest people in the whole world.

I'm convinced every year when the NEA expresses its dislike at being tested, and having to compete in the private sector. I have been trying for a long time to find a way to have a tenure, but my employer expects me to work, or they will find someone that does! Can you imagine that? That's what I get for not being a teacher, serves me right!

I'm sure you will be greeted with open arms and most likely the folks will throw you a welcoming party. (i.e. High Plains Drifter) Don't despair George, if things don't work out for you in Modoc, you can always take your green friends and move to Merrill, Or. They will have a welcoming sign at the city limits that says, "Welcome to Merrill, an environmentally friendly town. We Recycle." Sincerely, Paul "Butch" Clark, former Modoc County resident who had to move because I didn't have a government job.

Paul Clark

Hey, you are not welcome

Dear Editor:

This letter is written to Mr. Breunig. How dare you talk about how you are going to move in and take over my precious Modoc County! Who do you and your friends think you are?

You talk about Mr. Urbanek's intolerance, well buddy, you have him beat by a mile! If all these problems you talk about are so terrible, then why does Modoc County continue to be the beautiful place it is and has been for the last 150 years since those disgusting pioneers settled here?

We have managed to live in peace with the birds and deer and elk and fish and each other without folks like you telling us of our evil ways. Cows and sheep and cowboys and farmers are the best thing for the land. The riparian areas are just fine. The range is just fine. The mountains and forests are as pretty as they can be considering all the management they receive from the government agencies posted hither and yon. Please, stay in Berkeley where you can expound from your ivory tower. You'll feel a lot smarter there. Once you get here and get your first reality check, you will realize that you have a lot to relearn. We work hard in this county, we are God fearing, down-to-earth folks who love our land and our way of life. We don't need your help. The reason this country is so wonderful is because folks around here use common sense and hard work to get through the day. We don't worry about the color of your skin, the origin of your birth or any other aspect that obviously seems to be important to you. We are too busy trying to make a living and a legacy for our children. We don't have time to sit and think of all the bull that obviously clutters your mind. You haven't got a clue of what really matters in the scheme of things. Want to go on vacation? Might I suggest Sheldon Game Refuge. . . or what is left of it? Get out your map!

Kathy Pulfer, Cedarville

We do have air pollution

Dear Editor:

I find an irritating item of misinformation in Mr. Breunig's letter of May 3, one that I have seen others, the usual undisconcerning outsiders, make in the Modoc Record before.

While it is true that Alturas often has no discernible pollution and could be entirely free of it very easily, Mr. Breunig and the others have obviously not been in town when the troglodytes fill burn barrels with their nasty household trash and, illegally, set them ablaze, thereby filling the air for a number of blocks around with a foul, penetrating, lingering skugg.

Thomas Whitehead Alturas

We need hospital

Dear Editor:

I disagree with your front page article of April 26, 2001, "Former patient files law suit against S.V. Hospital doctors" also the letter of the past President of SV Health Care District Board

If this is interesting reading in the paper, it does hurt our doctors and hospital and the Valley.

I support our doctors, hospital - clinic - staff, member, Administration and Board members. We should let them know and appreciate their time and hard work to give us health care - "Let us not loose it all" - call them if you agree.

Barbara Jones, Cedarville

OBITUARIES

Mary Carmen Downard

Memorial Services for Alturas resident Mary Downard will be conducted by the Rev. Patrick Henry of Sacred Heart Catholic Church on Friday, May 11 at 10:00 a.m. at the Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas.

The Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary 113 invite all Mrs. Downard's family and friends to a time of fellowship at Veterans' Memorial Hall, immediately following the service.

Mrs. Downard fought a long and courageous battle, but succumbed on Friday, May 4, 2001 in Alturas, Calif. She was 76.

She was born to Carmen and Jesus Aguilera on April 17, 1925 in Mojave, Calif., and graduated from high school there. Her father worked for the big railroad yard in Mojave, and Mary worked in the yard office for a time. At the age of 23, she was given three years to live, and had a portion of one lung removed in 1948. After recuperating, she embarked on a career with the banking industry. Over the years, she worked with San Diego Savings & Trust and in San Francisco with Bank of America. She ultimately retired after 25 years with Bank of America.

Mary and Gerald Downard were married in August of 1979 in San Diego and moved to Modoc County that same year. Mrs. Downard continued to work at the Alturas Branch of Bank of America for several years.

She was a charter member of the Modoc Chapter 113, Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary and a member of the Native Daughters of the Golden West, Alturas Parlor.

When Mrs. Downard wasn't busy helping a friend or other worthy person or cause, she volunteered her time in the gift shop of the Modoc Medical Center, as a member of the MMC Auxiliary. She rarely missed attending the Country Jam music sessions, enjoying the varied talents, which her husband video taped each Monday night. She loved cats, of which she had three, and enjoyed making quilts for newborns, as well as a wide variety of crafts, which she gave freely to friends. She also served as a volunteer receptionist at the Alturas Chamber of Commerce office.

She is survived by her husband Gerald Downard of Alturas, Calif.; brother Ray Aguilera of Roseville, Calif.; stepdaughter Mary Margaret Stephen of Coarsegold, Calif.; step daughter-in-law Nell Orndorf of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; step son-in-law Fred Downard of Byrdsville, Tenn.; grandchildren Jerry Stephen of Calif.; Jim Stephen, Montana; Terri Stephen of Calif.; grand nephews and nieces, David, Jim, Carmen, Nancy, Beverly and Pat.

Mary was interred at the Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale, Calif. In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to the D.A.V. Flag Fund, care of D.A.V., P.O. Box 715, Alturas, CA 96101.

Patricia L. Williams

Madeline native Patricia Lee Williams passed away November 18, 2000 in a hospital in Oroville, Calif., due to heart failure. She was 59. Family members gathered at the Likely Cemetery to place her ashes in the Williams Family plot on May 9.

Born on June 30, 1941 in Alturas, Calif. to George E. Williams, III and Sybil Smith Russell, she was reared on the family's Madeline ranch and attended Modoc High School in Alturas. She was a believer in the Mormon faith.

She is well remembered by her adopted daughter Fileana Landera of Janesville; half-brother Michael Williams of Lincoln, Neb.; half-sister Susan Williams Paulson of Menaha, Minnesota; two sons, John George of Detroit Lakes, Minn. and Patrick George of Salmon River, Calif.; daughter Kathy Easterlin of Washington; numerous cousins among which are Peg Woodrich of Termo and Betty Reid of Chico and Mona Melvill; and numerous nieces and nephews.

SPORTS

Lady Braves share as Co-Champions

The Lady Braves were knocked into the first place seed, after Fall River split with Burney due to a controversial decision by the umpires.

Modoc's 10-2 Shasta Cascade League record, 18-2 overall, has earned them a co-championship seed in league and a high seed in playoffs, marked for Tuesday, May 15.

Head coach of the Lady Braves, Dennis Banister, won't know until later today who his team will have to play, but due to their high seeding Banister is expecting to sweep through his team's beginning playoff game.

The Lady Braves swept through their last league games against Weed Thursday, winning the first 6-1 and sent the Lady Cougars home sore and bruised after their win of 12-1.

Laura Toaetolu hit a single and stole second and home, giving the Braves their first run of the day. Stephanie McMaster, Brianna Berchtold, and Julie Watters all hit singles along with Toaetolu, who hit two.

Seven hits for six runs and six stolen bags gave the Braves the win over the Lady Cougars.

The Lady Braves began the nightcap with two runs by Shay Farmer and Kristen Clough. Both stole second and third and were sent home by a wild pitch.

Poor pitching from the Cougars, amounted to Modoc's 10 hits and six walks, making for 12 runs, ending the game early, due to the ten run rule.

Toaetolu and Farmer lead the team with two singles each. Charlene Stevens had a double and a bunt, pulling in an RBI. Jessica Kern, Brianna Berchtold, and Clough all had singles.

Stephanie McMaster threw to 52 batters striking out 19, walked two, and gave up eight hits for two runs.

Modoc track girls look to win

Modoc's girls track team will be trying to win the Shasta Cascade League title Friday at the league meet in Susanville.

According to coach Mike Martin, the girls have a very good chance at taking the team title, even though they may not come back with many individual championships.

Leading Modoc will be Colleen McElwain, a sophomore who figures to score a lot of points in the sprints and jumps. She has a nemesis from Fall River, a junior, who is one of the leading runners in the north section.

Kayla Harness is also running very well in the mile and the 800 meters. Martin is expecting good showings from Amy Gentry, Tatum Dunn, Katelyn Tate, Christina Nardoni, and Amanda Moriarity. For the junior varsity girls, Caitlin Cook is expected to do well.

Martin figures the race for the league title will be between his Braves and Fall River's Bulldogs. At a meet in Burney this season, the Bulldogs just nipped the Braves for that title.

Modoc boys team will be led by Blake Wilson, Richard Tate and Tony Willis in the throwing events and Tyler Belarde and Luke Hughes in the distance events. Martin said it looks like Trinity has a lock on the league title.

For the junior varsity boys, Martin expects very good showings from Clint Tate and Scott McMaster in the throws and Clayton Broman in the running events.

While none of Modoc's varsity boys placed in the huge Mazama meet last weekend, Martin said Belarde ran extremely well. He was also pleased with McElwain who took a fifth in the 100 meters and Kayla Harness who ran well in the 1500 and 800 meters.

Braves 2nd in Division III set to play lower Biggs

The Braves finished the regular season Friday, after showing Weed now Mercy beating them 17-6 and 21-2. Modoc ended the season at 15 wins and four loses overall and a 9-3 record in league, losing ground only to Etna who is leading Division III with a 10-2 record.

Modoc will host seventh seeded Biggs, with a 5-6 Mid-Valley record and are 8-9 overall, in the first round of NSCIF playoffs tomorrow afternoon at 2:00 p.m. The winner of that game will go on to play the winner of the Mt. Shasta (10-10) and Durham (9-5) game. The Braves hammered the cougars into the ground Friday, ending the SCL season on a high note. Modoc had a season high in the batters box with 20 hits for 17 runs, but more importantly the Braves only had one error in the first game and another in the nightcap.

Blake Thorn lead the Braves with four of five hits. Sophomore, Robert Flournoy, who was moved up to finish off the season and start the playoffs with the Braves, was 3-3, followed by Glen Christensen, who was 3-4 with a home-run and a triple. Brett Spicer and Eric Miller brought in a few runs with two doubles each. Sheldon Benson was the winning pitcher for the Braves in the first and second game.

Modoc hit 21 balls, bringing in 21 runs in the night cap. Jared McGarva and Kris Server lead the Braves around the bases with two doubles each, but it was Lucas Tramantonas who lit up the score board with two home-runs and one double.

Great Pit River Duck Race has Wrangler

The 2001 Great Pit River Duck race has a shiny new black Jeep Wrangler as the top prize. The race is scheduled for Fandango Days, July 7 in Alturas.

A hot tub is second prize and a fishing boat, trailer and motor is third.

Tickets are $25 each, which buys a duck for the race and a coupon book filled with super values. Tickets have always sold out prior to the race, so it's advisable to purchase tickets early.

There are other great prizes as follows: Monitor heater; set of four tires; Buzz Electric Scooter, family membership at Arrowhead, D-Z Lift Chair, Whirlpool 14 cu ft. refrigerator; Hunter ceiling fan and installation, 18-speed mountain bike, one dozen donuts per week for a year, 55 gal drum Guardol Oil, $300 gift certificate, load of driveway rock, one $5 car wash per week for a year, $250 in Modoc Bucks, Optimus stereo keyboard, $250 gift certificate, free muffler and tail pipe, Husqvarna chainsaw, two-tons of grass hay, facial cosmetic makeover, pedicure, manicure, color or perm, two night stay at hotel, one night stay and dinner for two, one night spa retreat, one night weekday spa retreat, 25 movies passes to Niles Theater, one American Standard or Universal toilet and tank, truck lettering, a pair of shows $70 or less, a hand-crafted clock, one dozen roses, 12 tanning sessions, $100 Savings bond, and a Tidal Wave rocket kit. Only 3,000 ducks will be sold at $25 each, giving the buyer a chance to win and many other prizes.

New this year will be a Turbo Turtle category. The Turbo Turtles will be sold in groups of four at $25 each, and will be entered into the race for an All-terrain vehicle. The turtles will replace what was the Gold Crown blue ducks that were sold in groups of 10.

Tickets will be available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Golf takes 2nd at Northern Small School Semis

Kris Server was the only member of Modoc High School's Golf Team who qualified to advance to NSCIF Large Schools, which will be held at the Fall River Golf Course on Tuesday, May 15.

The Braves earned first place with 207 on the front nine and 202 on the back, combined for a total of 409 points, at the Shasta-Cascade League Tournament last Thursday at the Fall River Golf Course. Five of Modoc's golfers earned positions in the top ten individual medalists.

Jack Britton finished in first place with a score of 78, followed by Server, who finished with 79 points. Jerry Wheeler walked away as the fourth best individual with 82, and Blake Thorn and Adam Server tied for sixth with 85 points.

Modoc's win at the SCL Tournament allowed them to advance to Northern Small School Semi-finals at Tierra Oaks Country Club, Tuesday, where they finished second out of 15 teams with an overall score of 443 points, 20 points behind first place Colusa High School. "It was a really hard course," said Jack Britton, who placed second in team standings with 86 points. "You had to drive the entire length of the lane which was only the width of a road."

The entire Colusa High School golf team, whose golfers hit all within the 80's except for Thomas Steinhoff who scored 78, the top score of the day, will advance to large schools. Also, advancing to large schools will be the top four individuals outside of Colusa High School, which includes Kris Server of Modoc with 81 points, Chase Tapella of Rio Vista, Ray Davis of Maxwell and Aaron White of Wheatland both scored 84.

Jack Britton finished second for the Braves with 86 points, Blake Thorn finished with 89, Adam Server had 94, Jerry Wheeler finished with 93, and Michael Bates scored 96 points, which was not added to the team total.

MAY 17, 2001

Bieber reels in wake of mill closing

The closing of Big Valley Lumber in Bieber last week has stunned their community.

"If you look at it right now, it looks pretty grim," says Bruce Main, owner and manager of the mill. "But there have been grim situations before that we've fought through, and we're going to use the same energy to see if we can get something happening here, too." However, he cautions, "It will take some time."

Some in the community share Main's guarded optimism. "There's definitely going to be some impact. How much, we don't know," says Steve Gagnon, owner of Big Valley Market, adding, "We're going to survive; we're going to make it." Others are less optimistic.

"It really hasn't affected us yet," observes Bill Graham, local Realtor, "but in another three months, it's going to completely annihilate some of our businesses. That just stands to reason."

Brian Dahle, Lassen County Supervisor, put it succinctly, "It's going to be devastating!"

In reality, Big Valley Lumber is an early casualty of the California energy crisis. The mill generates electricity in its co-generation power plant and sells that power to Pacific Gas & Electric, which recently failed to make payments for power provided.

As with most Californians, the PG&E default caught Big Valley Lumber completely by surprise. The mill, already strapped by log shortages due to ever tighter Forest Service restrictions on cutting into local forests, suddenly found itself in financial trouble.

"That's what began some of our financial problems," laments Main. "We produced a lot of power in the months of December, January and February that has not been paid for. Without collecting those funds, we did not have the working capital to continue to operate." According to Main, some have quietly expressed doubt that the mill could long survive in the current climate of government restrictions on logging. And while the economy and new construction have been good, lumber prices have been generally depressed due to NAFTA and an abundant supply of wood from outside the U.S. Domestic supplies of lumber have been tight, too, because of Forest Service restrictions on logging and private land owners who are unwilling to seal their timber for harvest due to the depressed prices.

"So all those issues have been ones that concern people," says Main. "Can they anticipate radical change all at one time? Pretty tough. We didn't. We didn't think it would happen.

"We've been going forward. We just invested a lot of capitol into this mill to make it more versatile and make it more able to handle any kind of timber - small, large, any species. It's a good saw mill. My hope is that it will get running again."

Employees were told that the shutdown will be permanent "because we can provide no certainty that the resources will be available to operate the plant," says Main. "We've had approximately 80 people employed here year round for 30 years. We will end up with nine (employees) operating the Co-generation plant."

Main estimates the mill payroll, now lost to the community, at $2.5 to $3 million annually.

Says Main, "I'll do everything I can to see this mill operating again. That's what our hope is."

The company hopes to avoid foreclosure or bankruptcy. Either of those eventualities would make it almost impossible to bring the mill back.

"I'm pretty discouraged, but I haven't given up hope. It's a setback, no question about it. One thing we're going to work through," said Main.

Support from the community and employees will be essential to overcome problems.

"The community has stepped up and asked where they can put their energies to try to save what's here," says Main. "It's real simple. If there is timber available to be harvested, then there is a need for a sawmill. That's what I've said to focus their energies on, asking the federal government to live up to the promise that was made to this community.

"And these are good people. These communities are full of hard working people who are proud of what they do. They're not going to give up without a fight. Nor am I."

Big Valley Lumber is a second generation, family-owned business. Main's father started the Bieber mill in the late 60s. "Our family has made a commitment to these communities, and we feel strongly to do everything we can to keep that commitment alive," notes Main. "It's a great community; a great group of people. The outpouring of support has been tremendous. And we're working real hard to remain a part of it."

The community is equally quick to vote support for the Main family and the mill.

"I think that it's probably one of the best run little mills in the world," says Graham. "They (the Mains) have been short-changed by the federal government in more ways than one."

"I feel absolutely horrible for Bruce and his family," adds Gagnon. "I feel just terrible about it. We met with him last Thursday, and he explained the whole thing to us. It's very devastating for he and his family."

"Over the years, they've done a lot of good things for our community," says Dahle. Noting that the Main family has weathered many crises in the past, he adds, "I've got a lot of respect for them. They've held on a long time."

Additionally, the community is rallying around families of laid off employees.

"I think people around here are survivors," says Gagnon. "Some families have already moved. Some have got jobs with local logging companies, so on and so forth."

"EDD has been here working with guys, I guess. They've offered them relocation monies and job training monies and things like that. Some of the people will take advantage of that."

Janie Trueblood, employer service manager for the Employment Development Department (EDD) and Alliance for Workforce Development (AFWD), says that both departments are doing all they can with the welcome assistance of the staff at the mill. Eight staff members from both EDD and AFWD were present, ready to answer questions and offer assistance when final paychecks were issued to furloughed mill employees and their families.

Trueblood notes the assistance her office offers varies, according to individual needs, from retraining and relocating to job search and placement. Funding for these programs comes from the department of Labor and is set aside specifically for dislocated workers and their families laid off due to closures.

Of the 60 discharged mill employees. Trueblood says that 40 have already been assisted in one way or another.

For the present, the company's sawmill in Burney will continue operations as will the electricity Co-generation plant in Bieber. The Bieber mill, however, will remain closed until the company finds a solution to its woes.

Perhaps Dahle summed the situation up best. Noting first, that the loss of water to farmers in the Tulelake area will have far reaching consequences, he adds, "We lost the gold mine, the timber industry has been . . . a dying industry, and now we lose the mill. It's a sad thing."

Given all the bad economic news the year 2001 has brought, "It's going to be a year you'll be telling your grandchildren about," sighs Dahle.

After first year, Forest Supervisor sees changes, progress

Modoc National Forest Supervisor Dan Chisholm will finish out his 41-plus year career here, but certainly hasn't announced any retirement date at this time.

Chisholm has been heading the Modoc Forest for a year, and has seen some progress and change in that time frame. Overall, he said, the Forest Service mission has changed from primarily commodities production to more conservation and overall land management. He believes that will work out as an improvement for the national forests in the long run.

Unfortunately, that probability of increasing timber sales to meet the needs of mills like Big Valley Lumber, which closed this month, is unlikely. Chisholm said there are timber resources out here that need attention, but most will be small log and the past history of large sawlogs just isn't in the picture.

This forest is now completing an inventory of available timber, said Chisholm, which should be available in about 60 days. He doesn't expect that report to generate any large numbers of sawlogs.

Modoc used to produce 50 to 60 million board feet annually, but Chisholm expects that level to be substantially lower. He said the Forest will be working with the lumber industry to help with the adjustments.

"It's unfortunate, but that working circle capacity is only about nine million board feet per year on a 10-year plan," said Chisholm. "And much of that is biomass or small logs. There is not a lot of saw timber available. Most of it will be in the six to eight inch trunk diameter range. Times have changed and industry will have to adapt. "

He said that the Forest Service and lumber mills have been "caught behind the curve" on some issues, including timber, and are playing catch-up. Neither the Forest Service nor the timber industry, he said, saw far enough into the future to see the change in emphasis of the public on forest management.

"There are other multi-use factors coming into play on public lands with values other than timber production, mining or grazing," said Chisholm. "We just can't go back to the way we used to do things. I feel we're balanced now. We're a grazing county, for instance, and we can graze and do a good job. But we're not going to back off on what we need to do for the land."

Chisholm's management style can best be described as calm and deliberate, with emphasis on detail. He also believes cooperating with local government is beneficial and most often productive. The Modoc Forest, he said, is unique and varied, something that makes it very special. Within miles, people can go from high mountains to low deserts and hit most anything in between. The varied landscape is part of Modoc's attraction, but also requires differing management strategies.

Chisholm came to Modoc from the Mendocino National Forest, headquartered in Willows, and has enjoyed his first year. He expects some challenges in the near future, but believes the Forest Service will be able to work with the local government for what's best for the area.

"I don't think we'll ever see a time where we go back to the commodities production levels we once had," said Chisholm. "I believe we're doing a much better management job now, and I understand that all rural areas may not agree with us." A federal judge has blocked the Roadless Plan adopted by the Clinton Administration, but Chisholm said the plan didn't really impact the Modoc Forest that much. Few of the areas included had any possible or probable timber sales planned. That decision may be appealed by environmental groups, so the forest will still be seeking local input on the process.

He really doesn't see much change in the Forest Service's mission with new federal administration. If anything, he said, a balanced approach will continue on the maintenance of the land. He started out with new Chief of the Forest Service Dale Bosworth in Montana and sees him as taking a balanced approach to management.

"There will certainly be a case of multi-use," said Chisholm. "But commodity use will be more of a bi-product of management goals than a primary tool. I also believe the wilderness areas will be protected."

He applauded the National Fire Plan implemented this year. "This is something I haven't seen for awhile and it will give us the chance to get some important work done for forest health," he said. "It's also a benefit for the community since we're hiring several new permanent people. This is a very good time for people to get into fire. "

Chisholm said the advent of the environmental consciousness of the public and the passage of several new laws, including the Wilderness Act, the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Protection Act since the sixties changed the emphasis of forest management.

"I think we're doing a better job now, but we changed over the years," said Chisholm. "In the past, we were mostly foresters and engineers. Now, we don't have many foresters and have gone to more 'ologists' on staff -- biologists, hydrologists, archaeologists and so on."

In the short and long term, Chisholm sees a cooperative effort at forest management, and said the Forest will make its decisions on the best land use alternatives. He sees a need for continued cooperation between local government and federal agencies and plans on effective and logical dialogue between all users and interests.

Anderson man, 62, dies at Blue Lake

An Anderson, California man died at Blue Lake May 15, about 12:46 p.m. and the exact cause of death is unknown pending an autopsy. The call came in to the Lassen County Sheriff's Office as a drowning. The victim, Edward B. Davis, age 62, is the former Auditor of Shasta County, and was vacationing at Blue Lake.

According to the Lassen County Sheriff, Davis was in a boat with his wife and two friends when his fishing rod was pulled over the side of the boat. He reached for the rod, lost his balance and fell into the water. Davis then reportedly started swimming for the shore, about 50 yards away and never made it.

The people in the boat pulled Davis from the water and CPR was started, but attempts to revive him were unsuccessful. He was pronounced dead at the scene and the cause of death is pending the autopsy.

Wells drilled to check Chevron groundwater

PC Exploration Inc., based out of Rocklin CA, has been hired by Ed Staub & Sons to install a series of ground water monitoring wells after the detection of an increase in the concentration of ground water contaminants.

"Chevron has some fairly high levels of petroleum contaminants including MTBE, Penzine, TPH gas, and an array of others in the ground water," said Environmental Specialist Dale Stultz from the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board state agency in Redding.

Faulty gas tanks and piping led to gas line contamination prior to 1988, when Chevron was sold to the new ownership, which gave way to a sequence of clean-up operations including the replacement of underground gas tanks, pipes, and plumbing, under the direction of the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board.

At that time, several ground water monitoring wells were placed to test the MTBE concentration and a multistage graphite Filtration System was installed to decrease the intensity of pollutants and contaminants in the ground water before it was extracted into the sewage system.

The quarterly testing for MTBE, since the implementation of the filtering system, proved that the level of contaminants had been reduced. Following the quarterly reports of 1996 Ed Staub & Sons discontinued to run the filtration system, believing that there was no longer a contamination problem.

Although, as early as 1998 the "Levels of contaminants rebounded and got worse," says Stultz.

MTBE, Methyl-Tert-Buthyl Ether a gasoline additive which has come under fire by environmentalists, is the biggest concern in the cleanup process. According to Stultz, MTBE is more mobile, flows faster and is the hardest contaminant to treat, since the cleanup technology has not been thoroughly looked into.

A quarterly report of the municipal wells off of West 10th Street, near Nipa's, and East A returned negative on signs of MTBE. PC Exploration Inc., has placed a monitoring well under 10th street and North Court St. to detect how wide spread the contamination problem is, which will give Ed Staub & Sons, Ron Campbell, and Chevron a better perspective at the boundaries they have to work with.

Ed Staub & Sons are now in the works of installing a new Hi-tech Dual Phase Extraction System, which would pump ground water through a series of carbon filters before releasing into the municipal sewage system.

The installation process is anticipated to be finished within the next two to three months.

"We anticipate the ground water contamination levels will decrease drastically within the next year to year and a half," says Stultz.

Fire season opens - burn and campfire permits needed

"As we prepare to go into fire season, we want to remind the public of the extreme dry conditions this year," announced Randy Hall, Deputy Fire Management Officer on Modoc National Forest. Burn permits have been required since May 1 and are needed for all incinerators, burn barrels, door yard pile burning and any open burning.

"Burn permits could be suspended early this season so residents should plan to have their burning completed soon," stated Hall. Campfire permits are also required, and includes using portable stoves and barbecues. These permits are available at no cost at Modoc National Forest headquarters in Alturas, as well as district offices in Adin, Cedarville and Tulelake.

Fire season will officially open on Modoc National Forest and on Lava Beds National Monument, Sunday, May 20. The Forest coordinates with Bureau of Land Management, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service and neighboring forests to determine when fire season should begin. The Forest is currently gearing up by hiring personnel for the summer to staff lookouts, fire engine crews, and hand crews.

Live fuel moisture samples taken from the first, are showing that we are well below the seasonal average for this time of year. Grass that is generally green at this time is curing rapidly. Dead wood and logs that typically retain moisture into June are completely dry and most streams, lakes and stock ponds are lower than normal. These are all indicators of a potentially severe fire season. "The Modoc National Forest has already been sending personnel to fires in Nevada and parts of California, putting us on alert," said Hall. He went on to say that he could not stress enough how important it will be to use extreme caution while camping, gathering wood, or otherwise enjoying the public lands this summer.

For more information on Emergency Equipment Rental Agreements (EERA) contact Robin Bruzza, Plumas National Forest, P.O. Box 11500, Quincy, CA 95971, or phone (530) 283-7782.

Users of the Forest are reminded to respect fire and safety riles, and report any unsafe conditions to Forest personnel or the local Sherrif's Office.

BLM State Director will attend stewardship committee meeting

Members of the Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Steering Committee will discuss natural resource management issues with Mike Pool, the Bureau of Land Management's California state director, during their business meeting, Friday, May 25.

The meeting, open to the public, gets underway at 9 a.m. in the Church Hall of the Cedarville Community Church, Center at Bonner Streets, Cedarville.

The state director will begin his visit to Surprise Valley with a community open house set for Thursday, May 24, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the BLM Surprise Field Office, 602 Cressler St.

Following the meeting with Pool, committee members will discuss several local management issues, including a technical review team recommendation for the Nevada Cowhead/Bally Mountain grazing allotment, status of the Home Camo grazing allotment, and the status of wild horse and burro herd management.

Also on the agenda are a status report on implementation of the Warner Mountain Range Project in the Modoc National Forest, a proposed field day focusing on livestock utilization monitoring methods, and planning for the committee's annual fall range tour. Committee members will also hear reports from the BLM, the Modoc National Forest, California Department of Fish and Game, Nevada Division of Wildlife, Modoc County, and the Natural Resource and Conservation Service. Time will be set at 11 a.m. for public comments.

The Modoc-Washoe group, one of three Congressionally-established Experimental Stewardship committees, works with the BLM and Forest Service to find consensus on innovative approaches to rangeland management. Members include representatives of the livestock industry, area ranchers, environmental interests, wild horse and burro interests, and local, state, and federal agency representatives.

Ft. Bidwell Barbecue plans for good food, fun and crowd

It's a relaxing setting at the Ft. Bidwell Barbecue, creekside with tall shade trees and open air dining at the Community Center and Park in Ft. Bidwell on Sunday, May 27 for a Memorial Day weekend time to get-together with old friends or meet new ones.

Everyone is invited to come enjoy the afternoon with barbecued mouth-watering New York steak, chicken or hamburgers served from 11:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. hot off the grill with special sauce, baked potato, beans and salad.

The Ft. Bidwell Fire Department and Fort Bidwell Civic Club members co-host the annual Ft. Bidwell Barbecue no matter what the weather. The event has been well received each year, going into its 29th year. It has a well-earned reputation for good food, nice setting, and all ages have fun.

Booths featuring a little bit of everything from hand-crafted items to collectibles will be set up for browsing and buying.

Prize drawings will include a beef hindquarter; beef forequarter, all cut, wrapped and frozen, plus many other prizes. Tickets for chances to win are $1 each or six for $5. Tickets for the meal with all the trimmings remain the same price at $10 for adults; children six to 12 years, $6; Children five years and younger are free, when accompanied by a paying adult.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

I'm comin' to Modoc anyway. . .

Dear Editor:

I've read many letters here that seen to echo what people everywhere worry about. Ecology vs. economy; Democrats vs. Republicans; us vs. them. I don't live in Modoc, but I own land there, and will someday hang my hat there.

I watched a infomercial once that said, "Buy land in beautiful Modoc County", so I did. I try to visit two or three times a year, and keep up on the local happenings. I've always felt welcome, the people are good people, and the air is clean and the lifestyle is mellow. I love the outdoor life.

Some of the letters I've seen here are very negative, a "Stay Out" kind of mentality, directed at people who disagree with the norm. I don't believe that everybody in Modoc is like that; a very few, I'm sure.

- I understand that water is important to the ranchers and farmers everywhere, but let's face facts; farming and ranching is not just a lifestyle, it's a business. In businesses, you pay. We pay too. Nothing is free in this world. The water there is or its not. You can't control the weather. I feel for you, understand your hardships, but that is life and the career you have chosen for yourself.

We all pay the price for your hardships, not just you. I personally don't belong to any political party, I vote with my intellect and heart, not by party loyalties. I actually did well the last eight years. I know a lot of people didn't. I understand that people lost jobs because of environmental causes. But do we cut down all the trees for lumber? Or do we try to come up with a new solution, such as steel framing for homes, that will save the trees?

Am I am tree hugger? Maybe. I just hate to see all the trees gone, the air dirty, and the land barren. It looks like that where I live now. So welcome those who see things differently. . . they just want to save what you already cherish.

--Sean Blair -Orange, CA

Proud of our farmers' protest

Dear Editor:

(Dictionary Definition: Pogram - an organized, often officially encouraged massacre or persecution of a minority group [Russian, outrage, havoc, from pogromit, to wreak havoc]).

The pain could be seen in so many faces and hear in the voices of those farmers and their wives and children who spoke. Statistics won't tell the story - numbers can't convey the hurt, confusion, and subdued rage that one sees in the faces and hears in the voices of the victims of this outrageous crime. Yes - it is a crime when lives and whole communities are wiped out by the stroke of a pen in total disregard of the most basic of our Constitutional guarantees.

What kind of society is so obsessed with making sure that every loser has whatever the government thinks he needs: clean needles so that he can shoot AIDS-free dope into his veins, free abortion, food stamps, etc., ad nauseam, then uses a totally unproved and obviously flawed study to deprive the hardworking farmers of their property and their means of making a living. It gets even worse! Many of the farmers of the Klamath Basin were specifically invited to homestead that area and promised. . . promised their water "forever."

Imagine what the reaction would be if a similar action were taken in San Francisco? Does anyone honestly think there would be a peaceful demonstration; that a high school singing group would sing the National Anthem; that little children would recite and all would join in the Pledge of Allegiance and then bow their heads to hear the invocation? That's what happened at the Bucket Brigade demonstration in Klamath Falls, Oregon, on May 7th.

This far-left sponsored and federal government facilities travesty against those, who represent the best this country has to offer, defies description. It leaves one breathless in its enormity and the fact that it is happening in the United States of America sickens. The total dedication to the Endangered Species Act at the expense of the American people cannot continue. this atrocity (the complete water cut-off to the Klamath Basin farmers) is just the continuation of the disintegration of our unique American tradition of personal freedom and private property rights.

The dam has been breached and those downstream will suffer even more than these early victims. The gathering momentum of the flood will increase in size ad force, as more and more of out Constitutional guarantees are swept away. No one should feel safe because the precedent has been set. The farmers that didn't have the numbers to stem the tide will just the appetizers for those who think people have fewer rights than spotted owls, sucker fish, slugs and weeds.

No feeling person who loves this country and our way of life could witness the dignified, measured conduct of the Klamath Basin farmers without being awed. In sharp contrast to the leftist lunatics who trash equipment and chain themselves to trees, these people who are real victims showed the world how dissent should be expressed. Their example should inspire the rest of us to join with them for, if we don't, our turns will come. As Martin Neimoller said, "In Germany they came first for the Communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists and I didn't speak up because I wasn't trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time, there was no one left to speak up."

--Bill Benner -Eagleville

The other side of the green

Dear Editor:

A few weeks ago, I was treated to the letter by Mr. Breunig. I found it amusing that he states he and a large group of people like him will get into positions of power and then become dictators, in essence (something I thought only evil Republicans do).

Here are some common sense thoughts on the issues he brought up. First of all, if the Bay Area and southern California are such wonderful havens of your enlightened ideas, why move here? Buffalo are equally if not more "damaging" to the "ecosystem". Last time I checked, there was plenty of trout in the few lakes that have not drained to fill the pools of rich liberals in southern CA.

Wildlife tries to flourish, but the mountain lions that are not controlled continue to thin herds. Aside from a supermarket and a few gas stations, I am not aware of any chain stores in Modoc. You state that the police will be told to stop harassing the poor and powerless of the community and go after the white collar. If you and your like seize the reigns of power, won't the farmers and evil republicans types be the powerless?

You say yourself that you and your people will buy up the private land and control the political power. Mr. Breunig, I have seen your type before. You save the spotted owl, but complain that you have less and less land to enjoy. Save the old growth red woods, and complain about the price of lumber for that new deck. Demand clean air standards and yell about the price of gas, smog checks, or worse, yet, drive some beat up worn out pollution producing heap of junk.

Tell the farmers what fertilizers he can use, then gripe about how the fruit isn't quite the same. Decry the use of water for irrigation, but you're the first to wash the car and fill the pool. The reason there is clean air, cheap land, low crime, and lots of blue skies in Modoc, is because there are not a lot of people like you. So please, you and your friends, stay in Berkeley, do it for the environment.

--Jason Utt -Alturas

OBITUARIES

John B. Laxague, Sr.

John B. Laxague, Sr., one of the most respected Supervisors in Modoc County history, passed away May 12, 2001 at home in Wilton, Calif.

John B. was born on March 5, 1911 in Eagleville, Calif. to Jennie Laxague, one-and-one-half months after his father John B. Laxague, Sr. was killed at Little High Rock.

He graduated from Surprise Valley High School in 1929 where he was a star athlete, honor student and student body president. He enrolled in the University of Nevada at Reno, but later completed his college education at Armstrong Business College in Sacramento. He married Janie Espil on October 1, 1938. They devoted their lives to raising their family and developing their ranching operation. For 30 years, Mr. Laxague was a member of the Modoc County Board of Supervisors, over 17 of them as its Chairman. In the first 25 years, he missed only one meeting. Highlights included completing the zoning of the county, construction of many county buildings, the nursing home in Alturas and, the Surprise Valley Hospital. When asked why he became a Supervisor, he said that because he was not able to serve in World War II, this was a way to give back to the people of Modoc County, with another kind of service.

When he retired from the Modoc County Board of Supervisors, letters poured in from around the state. A special letter came from then President Ronald Reagan who had tried to recruit him to be his Secretary of Agriculture when he was Governor of California. None of that meant as much to him as the warm retirement reception from the people of Surprise Valley.

Mr. Laxague served as President of the Wool Growers Association. Starting in 1940, he served on the Bureau of Land Management district, state and federal advisory boards. He was named Cattleman of the Year twice, both for his excellent ranch operation and for his public service.

He was an avid sports fan of the San Francisco 49'ers, the San Francisco Giants and more recently the Sacramento Kings, attending Kings' games this past season.

His wife Janie passed away in 1986. In 1990, he and Connie Kingston of Boise, Idaho were married in Reno, Nev.

He is survived by his daughter Lucie Fjeldstad of Bellevue, Wash.; his son John B. Laxague, Jr. of Gardnerville, Calif.; and three grandsons; his wife Connie of Cedarville and her three children Bryan, Kori and Kyle and their families of the Sacramento area. He is also survived by a brother Frank Arreche of Cedarville; sister Faye Harrington of Pine Grove, Calif.; and several nieces and nephews. He is survived by many people whom he has mentored and loved throughout their lives.

Mr. Laxague was a remarkable man who touched the lives of many people and will be missed by all.

Mass of Christian Burial was held at St. James Catholic Church in Cedarville on Wednesday, May 16 at 10 a.m. Interment followed at the Cedarville Cemetery. Pall bearers were William Laxague, Sr., Bud Laxague, Ron Laxague, Ron Henderson, Louis Arreche, Tom Espil, Steve Hicks and Erik Nissen.

Remembrances in memory of John B. may be made to the Surprise Valley Medical Center, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104.

Jerry W. 'Kearney' Goodwin

Jerry Whitney Goodwin, better known to his friends as Kearney, passed away at the Surprise Valley Community Hospital in Cedarville, Calif. on May 10, 2001. He was 86.

Kearney was born in Cedarville, Calif. on March 20, 1915 to Lawrence and Daisey Goodwin. He was the first of six children; the others being Mildred, Isabel, Bea, Marion and Dale.

He married Jessie Fay Miller Rinehart in Alturas on February 1, 1937. The couple worked on various ranches before Jerry entered the Army to serve during World War II.

Upon his discharge on February 20, 1943, the couple moved to Vya, Nev. where he was employed with Washoe County Road Department. He later was hired by the California Department of Roads, and worked as a heavy equipment operator for 20 years, moving throughout the state as his job required. After retiring, they moved back to Cedarville where Mr. Goodwin enjoyed haying and riding for cattle. The riding was what he loved most. He was a member of the Odd Fellows during his lifetime. Jessie preceded him in death on September 26, 1997.

He is survived by his sisters Mildred Webb of Alturas, Calif.; Isabel Scott of Elko, Nev.; Marion Goodwin of Winnemucca, Nev.; brother Dale Goodwin of Cedarville, CA; numerous nieces and nephews. He was also preceded in death by his parents and sister Bea Winnop. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted services at graveside on Tuesday, May 15 at Lake City Cemetery in Lake City, Calif.

Donations in Mr. Goodwin's memory may be directed to the Surprise Valley Community Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104.

Weller Webster Spaulding

Weller Webster Spaulding, 87, passed away of pneumonia on May 15, 2001 at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, Calif.

Services for the long-time Modoc resident, will be held on Wednesday, May 23 at 1:00 p.m. graveside at the Alturas Cemetery. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra will officiate.

Weller was born to Hattie (Poindexter) and Chester Spaulding on June 18, 1913 in Davis Creek, Calif. As a young man he lived on the family ranch on Cedar Pass. He left home at a young age to enter the logging business in Lakeview, Ore. He later worked on ranches.

In July 1940, he married Marie Hack of Superior, Wisconsin in Reno, Nev. The couple worked for Bailey Dorris, south of Alturas. Marie cooked and Weller worked around the ranch. In the 50s, he went to work for Alturas building contractors Gibbons and Zick and later for Clovis Bagwell.

Mr. Spaulding loved to fish, especially at the F and C Reservoirs on Modoc's Devil's Garden.

He was preceded in death by his wife Marie, three brothers Charlie, Elwood, Harvey and a sister Myra DeWitt.

Mr. Spaulding is survived by a sister Leola Bartholomew of the Skilled Nursing Facility, Alturas; a half-sister Marge Cain of Merrill, Ore.; and numerous nieces and nephews; and special friends Laverna Thompson, Ken and Jacquie Skaufel and good neighbors Dot and Earl Clark.

SPORTS

Modoc girls win SCL track title

Modoc's varsity girls team won the Shasta Cascade League track title Friday with 121 points over Trinity with 104, Fall River with 71, Mt. Shasta with 61, Etna with 39, Weed with 28 and Burney with 21. "It was exciting for us and our girls really competed well," said coach Mike Martin. "We scored points in every girls event except the high jump and pole vault. We also qualified 18 of 19 athletes for the small schools meet this weekend."

Only winners of each event at small schools move on the North Section Finals the following week. Martin said Blake Wilson, Colleen McElwain, Sophomore Colleen McElwain led the way for the Braves, winning the 100 meters in 12.9, taking second in the 200 meters at 27.2, second in the long jump at 14-6 and third in the 400 at 69.2.

Caitlin Cook, who was brought up from the junior varsity won the shot put with a heave of 26-9 1/2 and was sixth in the discus at 62-0. She also ran on two relay teams.

Kayla Harness took a second in the 1600 meters at 6:14, Katelyn Tate was fourth at 6:38 and Amanda Moriarity was fifth at 6:67. Harness also placed second in the 400 meters at 68.7 and Maria Duran was fourth at 74.0. Harness also was second in the 800 meters at 2:49 and Moriarity was sixth. Harness took second in the 3200 meters with a clocking of 15:18. Tate was third at 15:28.

Amy Gentry took a fourth in the 100 hurdles at 22.1, a fourth in the 300 meters hurdles at 63.4 and a sixth in the 100 meters at 14.2.

Tatum Dunn was third in the triple jump at 28-9 1/2, was fourth in the long jump at 13-6, and sixth in the 200 at 30.2.

Modoc boys team finished fourth in league with 46 points, behind Trinity's 156, Fall River's 95, Weed's 59. Etna had 28, Burney had 16 and Mt. Shasta had 11.

Blake Wilson was the top finisher for the Braves with a second in the discus at 126-5 1/2. Wilson also finished fifth in the 200 at 29.9 and sixth in the shot at 36-5.

Tyler Belarde placed third in the 1600 meters at 5:03 and Luke Hughes was fourth at 5:15. Hughes took a third in the 800 meters at 2:19

Tony Willis was fourth in the shot at 38-0. Jonathan Richert was fourth in the discus at 111-4 and Richard Tate was sixth at 105-2. For the boys junior varsity, Clint Tate won the shot put, Scott McMaster was second and Todd Clark took the high jump at 5-2.. Clayton Broman was fifth in the 400 meters at 59.2.

Modoc and Etna predicted for Championship game

The Braves beat seventh seed Esparto, Friday in a 6-1 win advancing them to play Mt. Shasta, who beat Durham late Friday afternoon. Modoc had the game won by the bottom of the first inning when they posted a 4-0 lead in the first round of the NSCIF Division III baseball playoffs. The Braves went on to take the game 6-1 and increasing their season record to 16-4.

Seventh-seeded Biggs pulled a no show by dropping out of the tournament, rather than travel to play the number two-seeded Modoc. Esparto was sent to play the Braves only after the next two seeds elected to not compete in the playoffs.

Kris Server brought home two runs with a bases-loaded double in the top of the first, and was sent home by a hit from Blake Thorn. Glen Christensen and Server led the Braves with two hits, followed by Eric Miller, who brought in a pair of runs on a double.

Modoc had six runs on nine hits and had no errors against Esparto. Lucas Tramontanas was the winning pitcher only allowing four hits in seven innings, striking out nine batters and walked three.

- "We have been working extremely hard in practice on our fielding," said team manager Brad Server. After the Braves 18 errors against Burney, which cost Modoc a league title and the number one seed in playoffs, Server has been moving around a few players attempting to strengthen his team's defense.

"And it has paid off," says Server, as Modoc has only made two errors in the last 21 innings of play

"We are hoping the hard work the boys have been putting in practice will carry us through the play-offs."

The Braves played number six seed Mt. Shasta yesterday and results from that, and a possible championship, game will be posted next week.

The Lady Braves are creeping their way through the Division V softball playoffs, with a win over 15th seed Portola, who had a 9-1 record.

Portola was seeded so low, even though they had only lost one game because CIF penalized the team because their pitcher had pitched for the American Softball Association in Reno.

Both teams were stagnant up until the top of the fifth inning when Portola posted a one to nothing lead.

Fortunately for Modoc, three of their strongest hitters were up to bat Stephanie McMaster, Shay Farmer, and Kristen Clough.

McMaster was walked but advanced two bases off a double from Farmer. Clough toed up to the plate and hit a fly ball which fell into the gap in center field. McMaster made it home as did Farmer, but an infield error forced Clough to dirty her uniform beating out the throw. The Lady Braves were now up 3-1.

Portola brought in one run in the sixth, but the Lady Braves rose above them with smart and efficient infielding, and the Lady Braves took the win advancing them to meet Fall River.

Modoc was hit three for three while their opponents were eight for two beside the plate.

Results from that game will be posted next week.

MHS school soccer for 2001?

Will soccer be a sanctioned sport for Modoc High School in 2001? That's a question that could be answered soon.

The Modoc Youth Soccer League presented the proposal for a high school soccer team at Tuesday's Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustee meeting. It was greeted primarily with support and will be brought back at the next meeting of the board for a decision. According to the proposal, soccer would be open to any grade 9-12 student, male or female, who meets athletic requirements of Modoc High School. The team would be under the California Interscholastic Federation rules and regulations.

The organizers are expecting a 12-game season, with opponents being Surprise Valley, Tulelake, Liberty Christian, Weed, Burney, Butte Valley and Fall River

According to the presentation, the impact on other fall sports, including volleyball, cross country and football would be minimal. Only one player out of 37 kids came from one of those sports to play soccer in the MYSL under 19 team over the past two years.

The overall cost for the program is expected to be $3,693.86 annually, according to the proposal. Whether that funding would have to come from the current athletic budget or would be added is up to the board. If it came from the current budget, other areas could have to be cut.

The MYSL is agreeing to supply the uniforms, balls, scrimmage vests, referee flags and portable goals at no cost to the district.

End of Road for local Golfer

Kris Server earned ranks in the top 10 at the NSCIF Large Schools Golf meet, but not in the top four where we would have had to place in order to advance to the NorCal Championship. Server scored a total of 82 on 18 holes.

Greene wins northstate JC 800 title

Modoc High School graduate Ginny Greene won the northstate Junior College 800 meter championship last week and will compete in the state finals May 19 at American River College.

Greene won the northstate finals with a 2:18.9 clocking and will be racing Saturday against seven other girls, four from the south and four from the north.

She is finishing her junior year at San Jose State University, where she received a full scholarship for cross-country. She still runs cross-country at San Jose State, but they do not have a track program so she runs at West Valley Community College in San Jose under a cooperative agreement.

Greene is a business marketing major at San Jose.

MAY 24, 2001

Large fire at Cal Pines signals early start of threat

Most fire officials in the northwest are extremely worried about this coming fire season, spawned by a severe drought that has no end in sight.

The start of that fire season came Sunday afternoon when a slash pile apparently erupted in California Pines near Hilton Spike camp. As of Wednesday, the fire had charred 386 acres, destroyed on abandoned travel trailer but was expected to be fully controlled by Friday evening.

According to the California Department of Forestry, the fire is burning in heavy vegetation and steep terrain. Northerly winds, high temperatures and low humidity have created conditions conducive to significant burning. There are residences in the area and none were threatened as of Wednesday, although some full time California Pines residents in the area were preparing to leave the area.

The CDF credited the local volunteer fire departments and local CDF crews with getting a quick handle on the fire and stopping it from spreading. The strong winds in the area fanned the flames, but firefighters were able to slow its march up the mountain.

This fire hit extremely early, according to CDF, before the agency has its seasonal firefighters on board. Because of the lack of seasonal personnel, teams from throughout the state were called in to help.

CDF's incident commander, Dale Walters said of all the crews he's dealt with, none can remember fighting a fire of this nature this early in May.

According to CDF, current resources assigned to the incident are 23 engines, 21 hand crews, 10 dozers, seven water tenders, five aircraft, three helicopters, totaling 602 personnel. While there was one vehicular accident on the fire, but there have been no injuries. At midnight May 22, the CDF suspended all burning permits in Modoc, Lassen and Plumas Counties because of the unseasonable dryness. No burning is allowed, but that ban does not affect the city of Alturas, where burning permits are available. Burning is allowed in the city from 6 a.m. until noon, only, and fires must be dead out by noon.

Things are getting a touch edgy the U.S. Forest Service and they too are in the process of hiring seasonal and permanent fire firefighters for what looks like explosive fire conditions.

Currently, according to Modoc National Forest Information Officer Nancy Gardner, the Palmer Index now shows Modoc is experiencing a severe drought, bordering on extreme.

What's scary, she said, is that the dead fuel moisture is running very high, with indicator maps looking more like late June than mid-May. The fuel moisture is critical in determining fire potential and the fire danger is looking very bad.

The good news in all of this, if there is any, is the Forest Service is adding more firefighters and crews locally this year. There will be 24 new permanent employees, 11 new temporary employees and one contract lookout. In addition, under the National Fire Plan, there is funding for lookouts, equipment, vehicles and communication gear. According to the Fire Plan, staffing on the Modoc Forest will include; nine type III engine crews, one new in Alturas; one new national type one Hotshot crew in Canby; one type II watertender, one new in Adin; four wet prevention units; five lookouts, one new at Blue Mountain; one Emergency Command Center with four personnel, one new employee in Alturas; nine program leadership (Fire Management Officers, one new in Alturas.

Big Carlos Street project on line for summer

The reconstruction of Carlos Street in Alturas is the major project on line for the city this summer and while and official start date is not cemented, the work will be done before winter.

Stacy Chase, Alturas Public Works Director, said the $1.3 millon project will include all of Carlos Street from Main to Warner and Warner Street from Carlos to Park Street. In addition to redoing the street surface, the project includes curb and gutter the entire way and some replacement or addition to sidewalks.

The project has been in the planning stages for years and Carlos Street is widely recognized as one of the worst streets in the city. The street also serves as one of the city's designated truck routes.

BLM State Director attends stewardship committee meeting

Mike Pool, the Bureau of Land Management's California state director, will meet with members of the Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Steering Committee during its business meeting, Friday, May 25.

The meeting, open to the public, gets underway at 9 a.m. in the Church Hall of the Cedarville Community Church, Center at Bonner Streets, Cedarville.

The state director will begin his visit to Surprise Valley with a community open house set for Thursday, May 24, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the BLM Surprise Field Office, 602 Cressler St.

Following the meeting with Pool, committee members will discuss several local management issues, including a technical review team recommendation for the Nevada Cowhead/Bally Mountain grazing allotment, status of the Home Camp grazing allotment, and the status of wild horse and burro herd management.

Also on the agenda are a status report on implementation of the Warner Mountain Range Project in the Modoc National Forest, a proposed field day focusing on livestock utilization monitoring methods, and planning for the committee's annual fall range tour. Committee members will also hear reports from the BLM, the Modoc National Forest, California Department of Fish and Game, Nevada Division of Wildlife, Modoc County, and the Natural Resource and Conservation Service. Time will be set at 11 a.m. for public comments.

The Modoc-Washoe group, one of three Congressionally-established Experimental Stewardship committees, works with the BLM and Forest Service to find consensus on innovative approaches to rangeland management. Members include representatives of the livestock industry, area ranchers, environmental interests, wild horse and burro interests, and local, state, and federal agency representatives.

Drought Assistance Center opens

Anyone in the Tulelake-Newell area who is in need of help because of the drought should stop by and check out the Tulelake-Newell Assistance Center.

The grand opening is on Thursday, May 24, 2001 at noon. The Center is located at the Elementary School at the corner of Second and C Streets in Tulelake. Services are available to residents of both Modoc and Siskiyou County. Joan Loustalet, Executive Director of the Tulelake Community Partnership, will be the Center Manager. All of Modoc and Siskiyou Counties are suffering from drought, but the situation in the Tulelake Basin is drastic. Virtually every family in the Tulelake-Newell area is feeling the effects. The Center offers a wide variety of help at one location.

People can find help looking for a job or training for a new job. Employers can get information on employment issues. Programs to help with food, bills and transportation will be available. People can get information on stress management and how to help their families get through the hard times. The Center can refer people for crisis intervention, drug and alcohol counseling, and other services. Farmers can get information on various programs available through the U.S. Department of Agriculture and find out where to apply. Someone will be there to translate for Spanish speakers. A play area is available for the kids.

Nancy Ballard, Modoc County Office of Emergency Services, explains that the Assistance Center is one of the many efforts underway to help people get through the drought. Modoc County is now covered by disaster declarations by the Board of Supervisors, Governor Gray Davis. the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, and the Small Business Administration. Governor Davis allocated $5 million for new irrigation wells in the Tulelake area to provide enough water for cover crops to prevent topsoil loss.

Both Modoc and Siskiyou Counties have asked Governor Davis to request a Presidential declaration that would make programs available through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Impacts of the drought will be felt throughout the County. Those outside the Tule Lake Basin can contact various program offices in Alturas, call the Center with questions, or contact Ballard at 233-4416 or 1-888-233-4416 for referrals.

The Tulelake-Newell Assistance Center is a joint effort of the Tulelake Community Partnership and Siskiyou and Modoc Counties. Many agencies and private groups are participating. For more information about available services or about how to help out, call the Center at (530) 667-3121.

Ft. Bidwell Barbecue plans for good food

It's a relaxing setting at the Ft. Bidwell Barbecue, creekside with tall shade trees and open air dining at the Community Center and Park in Ft. Bidwell on Sunday, May 27 for a Memorial Day weekend time to get-together with old friends or meet new ones.

Everyone is invited to come enjoy the afternoon with barbecued mouth-watering New York steak, chicken or hamburgers served from 11:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. hot off the grill with special sauce, baked potato, beans and salad.

The Ft. Bidwell Fire Department and Fort Bidwell Civic Club members co-host the annual Ft. Bidwell Barbecue no matter what the weather. The event has been well received each year, going into its 29th year. It has a well-earned reputation for good food, nice setting, and all ages have fun.

Booths featuring a little bit of everything from hand-crafted items to collectibles will be set up for browsing and buying.

Prize drawings will include a beef hindquarter; beef forequarter, all cut, wrapped and frozen, plus many other prizes. Tickets for chances to win are $1 each or six for $5.

Tickets for the meal with all the trimmings remain the same price at $10 for adults; children six to 12 years, $6; Children five years and younger are free, when accompanied by a paying adult.

Letters to the Editor

Bay Area no paradise

Dear Editor:

I read with some sense of irony the letters of the tree hugger from San Francisco.

San Francisco is the recipient of water from a reservoir built at the cost of the destruction of Hetch Hetchy Valley, which was carved by the Tuolumne River. This Valley and the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne is said to be grander than Yosemite Valley. The river drops 4000 feet in six miles. There are actually pinwheels of mist up to 40 feet high created when the falling water strikes rock. What wasn't destroyed was made inaccessible by the people of San Francisco. When some misguided, Birkenstock denizen of San Francisco starts talking about how they are going to correct all that is wrong with the way of life in the mountain areas of the west, I point to Hetch Hetchy and tell them to drain it, clean it up, restore it, then we'll talk.

--Hank Ortega, Former resident of Modoc County

CIA has caused drought

Dear Editor:

All of the people discussing the Klamath Basin water war are missing the point, because no one has acknowledged who caused the drought. The CIA caused the drought. One of the main purposes of the U.S. Space Program is to use satellites to control the weather. My guess is that in this case the CIA was primarily interested in reducing the supply of hydroelectric power from the Northwest to California. The potatoes vs. fish controversy is just a sideshow of that larger campaign.

Why would the CIA want to sabotage Californians' electricity supply? Because we are nice people. Before the electric power crisis, the State Government had a big surplus of money, and the Californians would expect some of that money to be spend on housing and schools and health care - things that really help people.

The danger from the CIA's point of view was that California would set a good example for the rest of the country. So they created an electric power crisis to use up the surplus money and to slow down the economy of the state.

It is also true that the CIA wants total control over America's food supply, and part of that campaign is to put independent, family-run farms and ranches out of business. But really, I think in this instance, California's sources of electric power was the main target.

--Judy Newman Lake City

Community needs cooperation

Dear Editor:

As a Berkeley resident, I was horrified to read some of the correspondence initiated by my apparent Bay Area neighbor, George Breunig. My wife and I have nourished our dreams of moving to Modoc County since before we were married. We climbed Eagle Peak together and loved what we saw.

However, if it becomes possible for us to move to Modoc we don't want to be part of a political war. It was not so much Breunig's politics, some of with which I should confess I am probably in substantial agreement, that set me off, but the superior, politically correct style. This is an attitude that is particularly familiar in Berkeley. It leads me to much declaiming and ridiculing of opposing views, but relatively little constructive action. Berkeley politics in general and the Berkeley City Council specifically is notorious for this kind of uproar.

- I must say straight out that I don't care for G.W. Bush, but the polls tell me that right now, most people do. I assume that many of those people who do are thoughtful, caring people who deserve my respect, and I expect the same from them. Similarly, I want to protect the environment, but not by simply ignoring people's need to earn a livelihood and enjoy recreation. I know most people in Modoc County care about the environment, at least as much as any environmentalist, or they'd be living somewhere full of traffic and largely covered by concrete (as, unfortunately, I do to date).

Most of all, what I want to express is my belief that no group of people, no community, can ever act effectively while they are devoting their energy to tearing each other down. Political action that does result from crushing the plans and desires of the opposition doesn't make for a great place to live. Recent events surrounding the situation at Tulelake probably show what happens when people don't plan together. Grim prospects and lots of bitterness and blame appear to be the result.

Anyway, I hope that there is, and always will be, room for many different views, (even the politically correct ones) in the wide, open spaces of Modoc.

--Richard Moore, Berkeley, CA

State on dangerous ground

Dear Editor:

The article in the May 12, 2001 issue of the Record Searchlight, "State Democrats Struggle To Fight Power Crises", in which State Treasurer Phil Angelides said "The state should seize generators power plants and operate themselves this summer if energy prices keep rising", evoked a sense of mild amusement and deep cynicism in the Dahle family.

Over the past six months, we have been victimized several times by governmental, big business, and eco-terrorist special interest groups. The first insult was in the Tule Lake Basin, where our family owns more than 400 acres. On April 7, 2001, the deeded water rights, given to our grandfather when he won his Veterans Homestead there in 1931, were revoked to save a (supposedly) endangered sucker in Klamath Lake. This cost our family dearly and destroyed the life of our lessee who need that irrigated land to grow alfalfa for his cattle.

Second, the Dahle family is part owner of Much Valley Hydroelectrics Project located on the Pit River between Big Valley and Fall River Valley. As a result of the PG&E default, this 30-megawatt plant has not been paid for hundreds of megawatts of electricity generated over the last year.

Governor Gray Davis advocated several weeks ago that all independent hydro and co-generation plants, owed money by PG&E should write those debts off. Now we see from the article of May 23 that the state not only wants their write-offs, but is contemplating the seizure of the plants. Let me assure Governor Davis that the Dahle family members are strong proponents of the fourth Amendment (against unreasonable search and seizure) and the second Amendment (right to keep and bear arms).

- We are deeply offended that our property (water) rights were illegally taken away from us and hundreds of our friends and former neighbors in the Tule Lake area. We will not let the State seize Much Valley Hydro to provide cheap energy to power air conditioners in Los Angeles. If necessary we will use our second Amendment rights under the constitution to protect our fourth Amendment property rights.

--Dan Dahle, Bieber

Memorial Day to remember

Dear Editor:

Is Memorial Day a day of big sales, schools closed, banks closed, and officials get a paid holiday?

The dictionary says a day designed in the United States for "honoring dead servicemen". We would not be a free country if it weren't for our servicemen.

My dad was a serviceman, and I honor him. Think about it.

--Ellen Holdorff Alturas

OBITUARIES

Clyde Vernon 'Bud' Hasting

Clyde Vernon "Bud" Hasting remained active throughout his 80 years of life. The well-liked and decorated World War II veteran and long-time Likely resident passed away May 18, 2001 in Cedarville, CA. Services will be held today, May 24 at 12 noon at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas, with interment at the Likely Cemetery.

Born March 18, 1921 in the small town of Dairy, Ore., he was better known to his friends and family as "Bud." His parents, Vern and Mary Hasting moved from Dairy to a small ranch on Devil's Garden, Weed Valley. They traveled in a covered wagon from Oregon when Bud was only a month old. As a young child, Bud started haying and milking and doing the farm chores. He could always expect a little help from his older sister Wayve. He also has two younger sisters, Ruth and Bobbie.

His father built a home which stands today on Rine Street in Alturas. The children enjoyed town life, while his father continued to ranch and work as a railroad fireman. Bud attended various country schools with his sisters and he became quite a fiddle player.

Alturas changed through the years and a new high school was built. Bud attended Modoc High and enjoyed football as one of the first Modoc Braves at the new school. He graduated from the new Modoc High with the first class in 1940. While in school, he continued to help his father with the ranching in addition to holding a job of his own. His first job was around age seven or eight for Bailey Dorris, for whom he continued to work throughout his teen years.

In 1942, Bud joined the Army to fight in World War II under General Patton. He was part of the Yankee Division; Company A, 26th Infantry Division. He left for overseas on January 14, 1943 where he fought in the Tunisian Campaign, Sicilian Campaign and the Invasion of France and the Campaign of Northern France. He received many recognitions including two Purple Hearts, a Good Conduct Medal, a European-African Medal, an Eastern Campaign with four Bronze Stars, a Combat Infantry Badge, plus three Foreign Service Bars. He returned from foreign service as a Private First Class due to battle injuries.

He was a brave man and saw many battles fought, some won and some lost. His family credits his living history accounts about the war in making history come alive for his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He endured much and his family was very proud of him.

After he returned home to Alturas, he spent his next 20 years working as a ranch hand for Bailey Dorris.

In 1945, Bud was married for the first time. In 1948 he had his first child, a son named Gary Clyde. A year later, his first daughter was born, Betty Kay. In 1952, his second daughter Dallas Marie, and in 1959, his son Ricky Charles was born.

Bud went to work for Tennessee Ernie Ford on Ford's ranch in Eagleville in 1959. The ranch changed hands three times in the three years he worked there. Eventually, he went to work for the Flournoys, first for Rob and then for Rob's son, Pearce. He worked at the Willow Creek Ranch on Devil's Garden for the Flournoys for about 20 years. Family members recall Bud always had tales to tell, but he could tell a real "lunker" now and then. He had a talent for cutting horses and rein stocked them. He was also talented at rawhide braiding, making reins and ropes by painstakingly curing his own hides and working the leather. Some of his beautiful leather artwork continues to decorate walls.

He tried a bit of rodeo-ing in his time out in Likely, but decided it wasn't much for him. He got enough rodeo-ing out on the range gathering in cattle when every once in a while his horse would take him for a ride. Since retiring, he enjoyed the countryside and telling stories, and saved a good joke for the right moments. He made many friends in his 80 years and was dearly loved by his many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

He is survived by his sister Wayve Goings, Red Bluff and Barbara Lunley; daughters Betty K. McGinnis of Illinois; Dallas Upton of Likely and son Rick C. Hasting of Nevada; step-children Ken Gloster, Alturas; Shannon Tribal Peace; Kessler Gossage, Alturas; Drucilla Van Riper, Ore.; numerous grand-children and great-grand children and nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his sister Ruth and son Gary V. Hasting. Contributions in Mr. Hasting's memory may be directed to the American Lung Association.

Harry Heath Haviside (No photo available)

Inurnment for Harry Heath Haviside will take place Memorial Day, May 27, 2001 in the Bonner Family plot in the Cedarville Cemetery. Mr. Haviside passed away in Pebble Beach, Calif. on January 31, 2001 at the age of 80.

Born April 26, 1921, he was the son of Olsen and Mary Bonner Haviside of Berkeley, Calif. and the grandson of John Heath Bonner and Elizabeth N. Bonner, the great grandson of Margaret E. Carter, the nephew of Charlie Lee Papst, all of Cedarville and Margaret Bonner Towler of Oakland. He enjoyed his early childhood days visiting Cedarville in the summers.

Harry graduated from Berkeley High School and attended the College of the Pacific and University of California at Berkeley. In 1942, he enlisted in the U.S. Coat Guard for service during World War II. He earned his California State Real Estate License after the war and was active in the Bay area counties for many years.

The early 1990's firestorm in the Berkeley and Oakland hills destroyed the Haviside home in Berkeley, where many century old books and records from the Bonner home in Cedarville, were lost. Harry moved to his summer home in Pebble Beach to be near family and to re-establish some of the family records and old photographs. Mr. Haviside kept in touch with daily life in Modoc County by subscribing to the Modoc County Record. He read with interest, about the activities and new in the county and kept in touch with friends in Cedarville and members of the Cressler family.

He is survived by his sister Elizabeth Bonner Haviside, nephews Hamid and Jamal Noorzoy, niece-in-law Cecilia Austin Noorzoy, neice Aisha Noorzoy Krechuniak and nephew in law Kevin Krechuniak, two grand nieces and a grand nephew, all of Pebble Beach; cousins Herbert Bonner Towler and Janet Hughes Towler of Piedmont; Marjorie Towler Witt and Douglas C. Witt of Carmichael.

Laura Marie Pisel

Laura Marie Pisel was interested in everything and everyone; "she loved life," as one of her Lake City friends described.

Mrs. Pisel, a 20-year resident of Ft. Bidwell, passed away at her home in Ft. Bidwell, CA on May 14, 2001. She was 90 and joins her late husband "Carl in the arms of our loving heavenly Father," express family members.

A memorial celebration is pending and planned for the month of June.

Todd McGiffen and Scot Menez will conduct the service at the Ft. Bidwell Community Church.

Born Laura Marie Stanton on March 24, 1911 in San Pedro, Calif., she completed the twelfth grade at Lomita, CA. She married Carl Frisbie Pisel of Roxbury, Kansas on April 28, 1930 and the two were blessed with 67 years of marriage until Carl passed away on May 4, 1997.

Mrs. Pisel was a homemaker, in addition to being a Sunday school teacher throughout the years and supporter of missionary work throughout the world. She enjoyed singing and gardening and was involved with several organizations, among them, Christian Women's Associations, the Fort Bidwell Civic Club and Fort Bidwell Women's Fellowship, and the Yucca Valley Evangelical Free Church.

The family had a favorite saying about Laura, "Never give her a piece of paper with writing on it, because she would stop whatever she was doing to read it," as she was interested in the world around her. Mrs. Pisel is survived by her daughters Genevieve Hall of Port Orchard, Wash; Kathryn Pisel, Fort Bidwell, CA; LeAnn Eubanks, Cedarville, CA and son John Pisel, Yucca Valley, CA.; eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews and many, many friends. Mrs. Pisel was also preceded in death by her three brothers: John, Stanley and Walter Stanton.

Contributions in her memory may be directed to the Surprise Valley District Hospital or a favorite charity of the donor's choice.

SPORTS

McElwain wins small schools 100

Modoc High School sophomore Colleen McElwain won the North Section Small Schools 100 meters Friday and will advance to the Large School Section meet this Friday at West Valley.

McElwain ran a 12.9 time, and coach Mike Martin believes she can clip that mark at the large schools meet. She also placed second in the 200 meters and qualifies as an alternate for that event. Kayla Harness paced second in the mile with a time of 6:10 and is an alternate for the large school meet along with the Braves 4x400 meter relay team of Tatum Dunn, McElwain, Harness and Amanda Moriarity, which placed second.

Caitlin Cook took a fifth in the shot put and Dunn placed fifth in the triple jump.

Modoc's varsity boys team was led by Blake Wilson who placed second in the discus at 125-6. He qualifies as an alternate for the section finals.

For the junior varsity boys, Clint Tate won the shot put competition.

Jackson wins state JC title

Two of Modoc High School's best-ever female athletes, Ileah Jackson and Ginny Greene, proved their talent Saturday in the California Community College State Championship track meet at American River College.

Jackson, now of Shasta College, who ran track for Big Valley High School and then for Modoc High School won the heptathlon championship with 4,590 points, over second place Mireya Beltran of Mt. SAC, who had 4,509.

Of the seven events, Jackson won the shot put outright, with a put of 34-10 and placed second in the javelin at 118-6. She also ran the 100 meter hurdles in 15.6 and the 200 meters in 26.95. The events in the heptathlon include those plus the 800 meters, high jump and long jump.

Points are awarded for each event and the winner is determined by the most overall points.

Greene, who runs for West Valley Junior College in San Jose, placed a very respectable fifth in the state championships in the 800 meters, clocking a 2:21.30. Greene also runs cross-country for San Jose State.

Lady Braves finish season with 2nd place in North Section CIF

It came down to the first and second seeds, East Nicolaus and the Lady Braves, in the NSCIF Division V softball championship in Chico, Saturday. East Nicolaus propelled their 2-2, bottom of the fourth inning tie to an 8-2 victory, ending Modoc's incredibly successful season with a 21-3 record, and second place in NSCIF.-

Modoc made it into the Championship after beating Fall River, Wednesday, 5-1. The Lady Braves scored two runs in the third and three in the fourth innings.

Modoc was about to pack up their gear for the season against the ladies of Biggs, who scored two runs in the first inning and denied Modoc any leeway with another scoring run in the fifth, posting a 3-0 lead.

The Lady Braves were down but proved they were not out. Brianna Berchtold toed up to the plate and ripped a line drive out into center field as she stood her ground on second, before advancing to third on a single from Stephanie McMaster.

Berchtold stole home on an overthrow to first base, putting the Lady Braves on the score board. Modoc's only run was followed by the third out, sending them into the last inning of the game.

Biggs beginning lineup hit a pop fly and a grounder which was easily picked up by Modoc's defense, allowing them one more chance to take the lead.

The Lady Braves' Kristen Clough and Laura Toaetolu covered first and second by the time Charlene Stevens hit a single that scored Clough. Toaetolu stole home on a wild pitch that was over thrown to third tieing the game at 3-3.

Niki Poindexter managed to dodge another wild pitch and Stevens, who stole home giving Modoc the win and the advancement to the NSCIF championship.

The mid-day sun forced the temperature into the high 90' s and low 100's in Chico Saturday as the Lady Braves warmed up for their last game of the season.

East Nicholas' pitcher, Danika Dukes, threw three K's in the first inning of play and two more in the second, while Modoc kept with catchable pop flys and smart infielding.

Niki Poindexter got on base with a single before stealing second, making room for Julie Watters, who was walked. McMaster got an RBI with a single scoring Poindexter, before Modoc suffered an out at third and two strike outs.

East Nicholas saw what Modoc had and fired back with two runs of their own, one of which was due to a Modoc error.

Stevens tied the game in the fourth, when Poindexter got under the ball for an RBI, but that would be the last run for the Lady Braves. East Nicholas added to the already scorching heat with four runs in the fourth inning on four singles and two doubles.

The Lady Braves weren't able to hit the ball out of the sand trap with pop flies and easy outs and first, in the fifth and sixth innings. East Nicholas made the best of Modoc's bad luck with runs in the fifth and sixth, posting an 8-2 lead, making for an eight and two win. McMaster moved on up to the big leagues and saw a pitcher more to her stature who threw to 28 batters and struck out 12, while giving up six hits and two walks.

Modoc's loss is not the end of the road for the Lady Braves' manager Dennis Banister and star pitcher Stephanie McMaster, both of who will be going on to the All-league team. Dennis Banister was nominated and elected to coach the team and Stephanie will accompany him, to pitch.

Braves second in CIF ball

Etna and Modoc came together on Saturday to finish what they had started earlier in the season, when they split games, and worked their way through the Shasta Cascade League to end up head to head in the NSCIF Division III baseball championship bout.

Both teams entered the game with four losses under their belts, but Etna led with 20 wins compared to the Braves' 17.

The Etna Lions scored off of Lucas Tramontanas' first pitch in the bottom of the first inning to Hauser, who hit a home run, putting Etna in the lead. That was until Kris Server hit a solo home run that tied the game in the third inning.

Etna took the lead in the bottom of the fifth on a walk, that was brought in by a sacrifice bunt.

Modoc had a chance to take the lead in the top of the sixth. With one out, Server and Brett Spicer both got on base with singles. Tramontanas got up to bat and struck out, with Jared McGarva on deck. McGarva nailed the ball deep into center field. Etna's Asa Bennett sprinted out to the fence where he dove into the wall and came up with a severe cut in his chin which would later need stitches, and the ball making for the third out.

Modoc loaded the bases in the top of the 7th with Server up to bat. Server hit a line drive to the shortstop, who made the play to end the game at 4-1.

The Braves finished the season with a 17-5 record and runner-up in the NSCIF Division III playoffs.

Super Bull tickets give buyers action-filled seats

Exciting and fast action from professional bull riders from around the country and plenty of entertainment will take place during the fifth annual Modoc Super Bull Rodeo at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville on Saturday, June 23.

Participants will compete in Open Bull Riding in a six-event series, with the top Bull Rider and Bronc Rider to walk away with Red Bluff Buckles. Two thousand dollars has been added to this year's purse to attract riders. The finals will be held in McArthur on Labor Day weekend.

Gates will open at 6 p.m. with the action to start at 7:00 p.m. in the Modoc District Fairgrounds arena. The two, to two-and-a-half hour event will be followed by a dance in the fairground's covered, but open pavilion.

New this year will be the specialty act of Wild Bill Lyle of Morgan Hill, Calif. and clowns Tony Scott and Dominic Georgy. Guest PRCA Rodeo announcer Don Jesser and local announcer Eric Duarte will add even more style to the popular event.

In addition to the bull riding, local riders will compete in the six head Ranch Bronc Riding and the daring Cowboy Poker. The last of four poker players still seated at the arena table, while a bull is running loose around the arena, wins. There is no entry fee for Cowboy Poker.

The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce will be operating the concession stand with everything from hot dogs to hamburgers. The Cedarville Fire Department will offer beer and wine for those age-eligible spectators and follow up with a more extensive bar selection during the dance.

Dave Jones, experienced President of Modoc Super Bull, credits Warner Mountain Rodeo Productions owners Danny Reagan and Ed Hill of Surprise Valley for providing this year's stock for the event. Rodeo participant entry fee is $120. To enter, call June 4 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. to 530-279-2135.

Spectator presale tickets are now available at $12 each at Modoc Motor Parts, Seab's True Value, Jay's Clothing, in Alturas; Page's Market, Surprise Valley Motor Parts and Western Irrigation in Cedarville.

Tickets will be $15 at the gate. Admission free for children under age 7.

 

MAY 31, 2001

 

BLM state director advises cooperation on issues

Bureau of Land Management State Director Mike Pool gave high marks to Surprise Valley Resource Area Manager Susie Stokke and staff during a meeting last week with the community and with the Modoc-Washoe Experimental Stewardship Committee in Cedarville. "I'm very pleased with Susie Stokke and the Surprise Valley staff," Pool said. "There have been significant improvements to the Nevada rangelands and I also complimented the efforts of Edie Asrow at the U.S. Forest Service for their efforts in the Warner watershed."

Pool said his open meeting with the community and then the Stewardship Committee were beneficial and he hoped he imparted onto them the need to cooperate to find solutions by working within the system and staying on course.

"There will be tough issues and to the extent possible, it's important not to personalize things but keep everything issue based," said Pool. "I'm hopeful we can get refocused on the issues, re-energize the committee and have a more open mind about what we have to do."

Pool cautioned people about thinking major changes in land management standards and guidelines will change because of a new federal administration. He said since more than 90 percent of the grazing permittees on BLM land meet those guidelines, a huge groundswell to change them may not be forthcoming. In addition, he said the change in those regulations is a massive and long process. "For instance , the Surprise Area had five allotments which had some problems, and in a few months we're down to just one," said Pool. "I'm impressed with the work of the staff and the permittees in bringing those issues to solution."

Those standards and guidelines for grazing took years to develop and include thousands of public comments, Pool stated. If a permittee ends up having a problem with an Area Manager's decision on the allotment, then he should use the administrative appeal process, he said.

"People are not always going to agree, but they need to be able to use the policies and regulations to come to a solution," said Pool. "It's important that they understand and they get out on the ground. People also need to understand that things are changing on public lands and multiple use will continue to change. We need to deal with the changes, whether it's in grazing, recreation, wildlife or conservation."

Pool said he was impressed with the Stewardship Committee and recognized it had accomplished "a lot of good things" in its long existence. He sees the committee as a continuing vital link in the effort to manage public lands with local concerns addressed and all sides of issues being at the same table.

Pool said he supports the BLM's efforts on rangeland improvements and the efforts of the SV Resource Area in its efforts to bring allotments into compliance.

Meeting with the community and then with the stewardship committee gave him a clear look at the local picture and he recommends continued workshops and work groups on issues pertaining to public land management.

Stokke was also pleased with State Director's visit and also credited members of the Modoc Land Use Committee for their efforts to help identify issues where local solutions can be formulated by the Stewardship Committee.

Fire dangers at summer levels

With fire fuel levels more like mid-summer than spring, local fire officials are concerned and advise extreme caution in all of Modoc County.

A huge fire in Lassen County was sparked by people shooting at targets Sunday afternoon and rushed through nearly 5,000 acres in scary fashion. That fire caused some homes to be evacuated in Susanville and threatened the western edge of town. What worried firefighters was the incredible speed at which the fire gobbled up trees and brush.

The fire came on the heels of last week's California Pines area fire that also moved through the dry trees and brush fast and charred about 400 acres.

The dry conditions have prompted the California Department of Forestry to cancel all backdoor burning permits in this area and other agencies are stressing the need for extreme caution with fire. There are no restrictions on campfires on the Modoc National Forest, but fire officials remind people to practice fire safe rules and to make certain all campfires are dead out before leaving the site. The strong winds in the area fanned the flames at Cal Pines and were the major culprit in Susanville as well. The weather is supposed to be calmer today, but are expected to increase by Friday through Monday.

These fires hit extremely early, according to CDF, before the agency has its seasonal firefighters on board. Because of the lack of seasonal personnel, teams from throughout the state were called in to help.

The CDF suspended all burning permits in Modoc, Lassen and Plumas Counties because of the unseasonable dryness. No burning is allowed, but that ban does not affect the city of Alturas, where burning permits are available. Burning is allowed in the city from 6 a.m. until noon, only, and fires must be dead out by noon.

Film maker motors through Alturas on historic auto trip

In 1903, retired Vermont doctor Horatio Nelson Jackson agreed to attempt to cross the continent by car in 90 days, on a $50 bet. That route took him through Alturas in late May to early June.

Last week, Dayton Duncan came through Alturas retracing Jackson's trip. He and Ken Burns of Florentine Films of Walpole, New Hampshire are producing a film on the trip. The original trip in 1903 was from San Francisco to New York in his two-cylinder, 20-horsepower Winton. It took 63 days.

While here, Duncan and a cinematographer spent time at the Modoc County Library and Modoc Museum researching the impact of Jackson's 1903 visit as covered in the local press. He was also seeking information on the population of the area in 1900 and wanted some photographs that depicted people, streets, homes and buildings and historical shots.

He received great help from the folks at the Library and Museum. The film is currently under production. Florentine Films has produced several documentary films, including The Civil War, Baseball and Jazz.

Fair Queen deadline Friday

Miss Modoc Fair Queen contest application deadline is Friday, June 1. Applications are now available from the Modoc District Fair office, Cedarville and L&B Ranch Supply in Alturas.

Contest chairperson Bekki Ingraham encourages young women who reside in Modoc County and who are between the ages of 16 to 21, to make application. Judges will base their decisions on horsemanship skills, poise and personal interview.

Judging is based on horsemanship skill, poise, personality and a personal interview.

Applications must be received in the Modoc District Fair office by Friday, June 1 at 5 p.m. or postmarked by Friday, June 1. For more information call 233-2578.

Hunters complain about Fish & Game's PLM program

Hunters in northeastern California are agitated over the indifference of California's Department of Fish & Game (DFG) to their plight. An unofficial spokesman for a group of local hunters, Jesse Bayer, says that their concerns center around nearly a 20-year-old program that discriminates against the average hunter who is forced to rely on a lottery system to get a hunting tag in favor of those who can afford to pay exorbitant prices, in some cases as much as $3,000, for the privilege of hunting wild game on private land.

Bayer, a resident of Westwood, complains that the Private Land Wildlife Habitat Enhancement and Management Area Program (PLM), is badly flawed and misguided, failing to meet its stated goals to conserve and improve wildlife habitat while providing, instead, exclusive hunting rights to a select few who are not subject to the lottery system.

Public information officer for the DFG, Paul Wertz, dismisses the complaints as old news, saying that these issues have been addressed and answered long ago when the program was first instigated. He assures that the track record of the PLM Program speaks for itself.

Bayer agrees that the PLM track record speaks for itself, but asserts that it is not a positive record. He insists that declining wildlife populations record. He insists that declining wildlife populations in northeastern California are clear evidence, in the face of it, that the program is failing in this area. "If this program is so good, how come the deer keep declining? The tags in California keep declining. So, this program can't be working at their own admission!"

Wertz acknowledges and sympathizes with the predicament of hunters that fail to get a tag year after year. "It's frustrating to not be able to draw a tag," he admits. But in his view, the shortage has more to do with the increased demand for tags than a game shortage. He notes that wildlife numbers in this area are declining, but insists that it should come as no surprise to anyone since recent area development has had a detrimental effect on wildlife populations.

Bayer questions the DFG's oversight of the enrolled landowners, saying that there is little true-follow-up, given the large number of participants and total acreage involved when compared with the meager staff at DFG dedicated to reviewing the performance of PLM participants. "I asked Job Hobbs and Frank Hall (DFG employees), When was the last time you checked these ranches, if they're enhancing what they're supposed to be doing?" And they couldn't give me an answer."

Additionally, a biologist from Sacramento who spoke in a commission meeting a year ago, confirmed the lack of oversight in the PLM program, according to Bayer. "He admitted that there was no way for them to check. They (DFG) don't have the manpower, the resources or the money to do it."

The result, according to Bayer, is a flawed system. The program, likely, produces little or no additional game while giving preference to the rich hunter, leaving the average hunter to sometimes go years between tags while the wealthy can secure a tag annually, if they so desire, buy buying from a PLM-participating landowner at whatever the going price.

Applicants have been turned down and others have been "booted out" of the program, assures Wertz. He notes that all game wardens are "extra aware" and careful to monitor the compliance of PLM participants.

Since wildlife populations in northeastern California are on the decline, Bayer insists that each new landholder that receives hunting tags under PLM diminishes the total number available to the general public in the lottery system of tag allocation. Hence, he concludes, with the number of tags available to general public declining each year, the day may come when there will no longer be a lottery, and no tags left for hunting on public lands, only tags for use on PLM properties that will then be sold to the highest bidder.

"For example, if the logging interests, who are simply tree farmers, get into this program with their vast land holdings," says Bayer, "then all the remaining tags could go to them. Those tags will bring them more money than a pine tree!"

Indeed, adds Bayer, the day may come when only private landowners, under the PLM program, will be issued hunting tags, and they alone, not the DFG, will se the price for hunting in the state. That possibility should give even DFG officials pause for concern for they will have lost control of their own role. "It's already begun," says Bayer with resignation.

Wertz insists that PLM tags do not come out of the total number of tags allocated to the general public each year. The PLM tags, says Wertz, come from increases anticipated by conservation measures taken by landowners who participate in the program. He adds that the PLM tags are only a small fraction of the total number of tags issued yearly.

The DFG created the lottery system to ensure that all hunters had an equal chance at a hunting tag, according to Bayer, but the PLM program thwarts that by giving preference to a selected group of private landholders who can profit handsomely by selling their allotment of tags to the highest bidder.

Wertz scoffs at such a notion, saying there is nothing wrong with using the profit motive as an incentive to landowners to make their land more habitable by game. "That (the profit motive) applies to a lot of areas in life, not just to deer hunting," asserts Wertz. But Bayer believes that the profit motive, in this instance, may misplace equal access to game by all hunters, not preference to a few, privileged under the exclusive control of large landholders. "To me it's kind of a farce," says Bayer. "Basically what they're doing is denying the average citizen an opportunity to hunt."

Perhaps not coincidentally, wildlife populations have been in declined over the same 20-year period that the PLM program has been in effect, notes Bayer, adding that even if one were to acknowledge that the PLM program works, it apparently has not been successful enough to percent the decline of wildlife populations in northeastern California. Bayer clearly feels that another solution must be found.

A related concern voiced by this group of hunters is the proximity of the PLM land to homes and property of neighbors who do not benefit from the program, who are, nevertheless, placed at risk by the increased possibility of stray rounds doing property damage or even injuring individuals.

Bayer observes that proximity to homes, people and property was not a problem in the past since hunters typically went into the hills to hunt game. In that case, there was little chance of stray rounds doing any harm.

With the advent of the PLM program, which encourages improved wildlife habitat on ranch and farm land and, hence, the increased presence of wildlife there, hunting on developed land adjoining seem-populated areas is on the increase. Chances that errant rounds will be accidentally fired by hunters rises dramatically, says Bayer, putting individuals and property bordering PLM lands at increased risk.

The DFG feels that such concerns are unwarranted since all hunters are required, by law, to be well trained in gun safety programs that emphasize concerns for errant rounds. Wertz notes that anyone with such concerns should approach the property owners in the PLM program and request that hunters be made aware of the potential dangers.

Bayer feels that such an attitude avoids the core issue, that it is the nature of the PLM program itself that creates this potentially lethal situation. Thus, it is the responsibility of the DFG to come up with a remedy.

Clearly, the concerns and resentment of local hunters for the PLM program is on the rise.

Resources Committee comes to Klamath

A field hearing by the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Resources is set June 16 in Klamath Falls.

The hearing will consider the topics of water management and enforcement of the Endangered Species Act in the Klamath Basin. By allowing a closer scrutiny of the drought in the Basin, the hearing may help to develop recommendations for changes that would ensure similar situations do not reoccur.

Congressman Wally Herger and Oregon Congressman Greg Walden requested the hearing of the Resources Committee on May 4th. In his letter to Chairman James Hansen (R-Utah), Herger outlined the economic concerns in the Klamath Basin, caused by the drought. In early April, the Bureau of Reclamation told farmers in the Klamath Basin there would be no water for farming this year.

"The Klamath Basin is the poster child for the dire need to reform this misguided law, (Endangered Species Act)" Herger preaches. "It is inexcusable that a federal agency decision based on speculation and unknowns can bring down the economy of this rural area. This is an unspeakable tragedy and an appalling example of the power of the ESA."

The House Resources Committee hold jurisdiction over the Bureau of Reclamation, responsible for allocating water in the Klamath Basin, as well as over the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency which administers the ESA, and crafted one of the Biological Opinions upon which the Klamath decision is based.

Officials dedicate new Canby Family Practice Clinic

Staff of the Canby Family Practice Clinic joined state and other officials on May 29, 2001 to dedicate the new medical and dental facility built in Canby.

The Canby Family Practice Clinic was constructed with more than $1 million in grants from a variety of state and private agencies. The 5,000 square-foot building replaces an outmoded clinic and is already serving 15-20 new patients a week from Modoc, Siskiyou and Lassen counties.

"This community should be proud of its new facility and the work it took to build it," said Dr. David Carlisle, Director of the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. "This clinic shows what can be accomplished in providing quality health care, even in the more remote areas of this state.

"The Canby Family Practice Clinic is a role model for communities that strive to make health care accessible to everyone, including the disadvantaged and elderly. My office is proud to be a part of this outstanding achievement."

Others speaking at Tuesday's ceremonies included Fred Johnson, Executive Director of Rural Health Policy Council, which contributed $100,000 to the project.

'This clinic is a shining example of what rural health care can be when communities band together in a shared vision," Johnson said. "We expect rural communities around the state will look to Canby to see how it can be done."

The Clinic's parent organization, I'SOT Inc., first opened a home for dysfunctional families, juveniles and young adults in 1969. Since then, the Clinic has broadened it's purpose and outgrown two previous facilities as the patient load surpassed available room. The new state-of-the-art clinic boasts four dental suites, a large dental laboratory and sterilization room in addition to four medical exam rooms, including one for minor surgery and diagnosis, a drug-testing suite, medical lab and sterilization room.

This expansion project also includes the Behavioral Health Department directed by the clinic's on-site licensed clinical psychologist, Raymond Mandel.

The Clinic's Medical Department offers free child health exams, immunizations, pre-employment physicals, primary and family medical care, limited surgical and diagnostic procedures, drug testing, family planning and patient education.

- The Dental Department offers services in all seven areas of dentistry, including general dentistry, orthodontics, jaw joint treatment, oral surgery, endodontics, periodontics, pediatric dentistry, and prosthodontics.

The Behavioral Health Department offers psychological assessment, individual and group counseling, testing and evaluation.

In addition, both the medical and behavioral health referral services are available through telemedicine, making distance appointment with providers possible without the stress and expense of travel. Other contributors to the Clinic include the following: California Department of Health Services Health Families Rural Demonstration Project, California Rural Health Policy Council - Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, Sierra Health Foundation, an independent foundation supporting health-related activities in northern California, far Northern Regional Center, Modoc/ Siskiyou Community Action Agency Community Service Block Grant, Northern Sierra Rural Health Network, The Tides, County Medical Services Program, The California Endowment, the state's largest health foundation, established in 1996 to expand access to affordable, quality health care for undeserved individuals and communities, and to promote fundamental improvements in the health status of all Californians, Delta Dental Plan of California, The California Wellness Foundation, an independent, private foundation created in 1992 to improve the health of people of California by making grants for health promotion, wellness education and disease prevention programs, and bright SMILES, a Dental Health Partnership for Northern California, funding made possible in part by The California Endowment.

Letters to the Editor

Fire crews did great job

Dear Editor:

I am writing in response to your letter last week regarding the fire at Cal Pines. In addition to the CDF and the volunteer crews, the Forest Service provided additional four engine crews and over-head that were instrumental in the initial attack and containment of the fire. BLM also provided two engine crews on this fire. These crews worked very long hours with little sleep to assist in suppressing the fire.

It looks as though this is the beginning of a very busy fire season, and I am sure that these crews would appreciate recognition for all of their dedication and hard work.

In closing, I would like to send a short message to all of the fire crews from all of the different agencies - thank you, each and everyone, for all of your hard work and dedication.

--Barb Hill Cedarville

Great stuff at Center

Dear Editor:

The Senior Center dining room was in great need of painting. The estimate from a painter was more than could be afforded. We decided the staff could take on the task. What a great staff! We got it done.

Many thanks to Wilma Heryford, for wallpapering and cleaning; to Chuck Hoover, for painting and cleaning; to Ron McCullough, of repairs and doing the carpentry work; to Karen Wissmath, for keeping us in ice water; and to Marie Smith, for painting and supervising. This is what makes our Senior Center special - Caring staff. Come out and see our new dining room.

--Sincerely, the Seniors at Modoc County Senior Citizens, Alturas

Sometimes we have to yell

Dear Editor:

In response to your last editorial stating that the gentleman from Berkeley was only joking - do you have any idea how frustrated some people in agriculture are right now? Would you be as nonchalant if he was threatening to take away your typewriter and your printing press?

Those of us who make our living off the land, whether private or public, are tired of being criticized by individuals with no real attachment to anything derived from dirt, but who only seek to lock up the land and look at it.

Our rural communities are being economically crippled, one at a time, all over this country. We are friendly, we work hard, and we mind our own business; but now and then we have to speak for ourselves.

--Vaudine Cullins Canby

We make our lives miserable

Dear Editor:

God has given us a very simple life to live. It is not he who makes our lives difficult, it is "self" that denies obedience to God that gives us the problems we endure each day. If we were to be obedient to the Word of God, our problems would disappear. It is our self elected obedience to God that gives Him the joy of his children. The obedience of children to their parents is evident of the parents obedience to God.

"By whom a man is overcome of the same is he brought into bondage" (2 Peter 2:19).

Did you know that to whomsoever you yield yourself a servant to obey, his servant are you? (Ro. 6:16) Think about it, it's your choice.

--Robert Byerley Alturas

SPORTS

Super Bull tickets give buyers action-filled seats

Exciting and fast action from professional bull riders from around the country and plenty of entertainment will take place during the fifth annual Modoc Super Bull Rodeo at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville on Saturday, June 23.

Participants will compete in Open Bull Riding in a six-event series, with the top Bull Rider and Bronc Rider to walk away with Red Bluff Buckles. Two thousand dollars has been added to this year's purse to attract riders. The finals will be held in McArthur on Labor Day weekend.

Gates will open at 6 p.m. with the action to start at 7:00 p.m. in the Modoc District Fairgrounds arena. The two, to two-and-a-half hour event will be followed by a dance in the fairground's covered, but open pavilion.

New this year will be the specialty act of Wild Bill Lyle of Morgan Hill, Calif. and clowns Tony Scott and Dominic Georgy. Guest PRCA Rodeo announcer Don Jesser and local announcer Eric Duarte will add even more style to the popular event.

In addition to the bull riding, local riders will compete in the six head Ranch Bronc Riding and the daring Cowboy Poker. The last of four poker players still seated at the arena table, while a bull is running loose around the arena, wins. There is no entry fee for Cowboy Poker.

The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce will be operating the concession stand with everything from hot dogs to hamburgers. The Cedarville Fire Department will offer beer and wine for those age-eligible spectators and follow up with a more extensive bar selection during the dance.

Dave Jones, experienced President of Modoc Super Bull, credits Warner Mountain Rodeo Productions owners Danny Reagan and Ed Hill of Surprise Valley for providing this year's stock for the event. Rodeo participant entry fee is $120. To enter, call 530-279-2135 on June 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Spectator pre-sale tickets are now available at $12 each at Modoc Motor Parts, Seab's True Value, Jay's Clothing, in Alturas; Page's Market, Surprise Valley Motor Parts and Western Irrigation in Cedarville.

Tickets will be $15 at the gate. Admission free for children under age 7.

Hawkins wins shot, McElwain sixth in section 100 at CIF

Modoc's High School's Colleen McElwain placed sixth in 100 meters at the North Section CIF Track and Field Championships at West Valley Friday night.

McElwain, a sophomore, ran a 13.16. The winner of the race was Kelly Enos of Willows, who ran a 12.13.

Big Valley High School's Jamie Hawkins won the shot put championship and will move on to the state finals this weekend at El Cerritos College. She put the shot 40 feet one-and-one-half inches, beating second place by more than a yard.

Big Valley's David House took a sixth in the high jump at 6-0. The winning jump was 6-8.

Lassen baseball camp coming

The Lassen School of Baseball will be conducting a baseball camp in Alturas June 18-22, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. each day for boys and girls ages five through 15.

The camp cost is $16, and includes instruction in hitting, pitching, infield and outfield play, catching, throwing and base running. There will be drills, game situations and team strategy lessons. The camp is broken down into morning instruction and drill sessions, lunch break and game play in the afternoon.

Pre-registration is requested. A minimum number of participants is required to run the camp. For registration forms, please contact Lassen College at New Directions or Ed Harris of Alturas.

Likely men's clubs holds tourney

The Likely Links Men's Club is hosting a two-person better-ball golf tournament June 3, with tee time at 10 a.m.

There will be three flights, one each for men, women and Calloway with entry fee of $12 per person. Green fees are $10 for non-members and cart fees are $10 per cart. Deadline to sign-up is 9 a.m. June 3.

JV softball finishes 8-1

Modoc's junior varsity softball team finished the season with an 8-1 record, capping it off with a 13-1 win over Big Valley's varsity this month.

Andrea Harris went the distance in the win, striking out five and walking six batters. Erica Stevens and Amy Ridgway each had two singles. Kelsey Kerwin, Harris, Roseanne Ginochio and Heather Gallardo each had hits in the game.

The win followed a stunning loss to Lost River's varsity, 8-1. Jennifer Davis and Erica Stevens had two of Modoc's three hits. Brianna Berchtold added the other hit, a solo home run in the top of the sixth. Berchtold pitched a three-hitter, behind an error-plagued defense which committed 11 miscues.

In the nightcap, Rose Wingate picked up her first win as a pitcher. Stevens made her first appearance in the fourth and Harris closed out the game. She faced eight batters, struck out five and walked none.

Davis led the offense with four hits while Harris and Stevens each had doubles. Kristen Taylor smacked a single, and on her next at bat, knocked one to the fence for an inside-the-park home run.

 

JUNE 7, 2001

County considers adoption of Williamson Act provisions to protect ag lands

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday started the ball rolling on adopting the Williamson Act in Modoc, which would lessen the tax burden on some agricultural properties, but may end up beneficial to the countyÕs general fund coffers.

A key to the Williamson Act is the protection of prime agricultural lands. Landowners who opt into the program must sign a contract with the county to leave that land as agricultural for a minimum of 10 years.

The Modoc Williamson Act model contract will be discussed at the June 26 meeting, at which time landowners will be able to hear and comment on the conditions and regulations up for adoption of the Act in this county.

Initial estimates by Modoc County Assessor Josie Johnson show that, in most cases, the county general fund would actually receive more for lands in the Williamson Act. Johnson said the totals would depend primarily on the overall amount of land put under Williamson Act contracts.

That comes because of a state subvention that makes up the difference in the tax paid.

Johnson cautioned there may be some impacts to other agencies which share in general property tax dollars, such as special districts. County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said he will be looking into the impacts, if the county adopts the Act, to see what remedies are available. He said the county doesnÕt want to negatively impact those districts.

Maxwell said there is a lot of work to do on the contract and conditions, but suspects the June 26 meeting will be able to clear the picture up substantially. One of the major discussion areas, he said, will be in allowable or compatible uses for Act designation. And overview of the Williams Act is as follows:

What is the California Land Conservation (Williamson Act)? The California Land Conservation Act, better known as the Williamson Act, has been the state's premier agricultural land protection program since its enactment in 1965. Nearly 16 million of the state's 30 million acres of farm and ranch land are currently protected under the Williamson Act.

The California Legislature passed the Williamson Act in 1965 to preserve agricultural and open space lands by discouraging premature and unnecessary conversation to urban uses. The Act creates an arrangement whereby private landowners contract with counties and cities to voluntarily restricts land to agricultural and open-space uses. The vehicle for this agreement is a rolling term 10 year contact (i.e. unless either party files a "notice of nonrenewal" the contract is automatically renewed for an additional year). In return, restricted parcels are assessed for property tax purposes at a rate consistent with their actual use, rather than potential market value.

What benefits do Williamson Act contracts offer to landowners? The Williamson Act is estimated to save agricultural landowners from 20 percent to 75 percent in property tax liability each year. One in three Williamson Act farmers and ranchers said in a survey that without the Act, they would no longer own their parcel (Source: Land in the Balance, University of California: December 1989).

What is an agricultural preserve?

An agricultural preserve defines the boundary of an area within which a city or county will enter into contracts with landowners. The boundary is designed by resolution of the board of supervisors (board) or city council (city) having jurisdiction. Only land located within agricultural preserve is eligible for a Williamson Act contract. Preserves are regulated to ensure that the land within the preserve is maintained for agricultural or open space use.

How many acres are required for an agricultural preserve? An agricultural preserve must consist of no less than 100 acres. However, in order to meet this requirement, two or more parcels may be combined if they are contiguous, or if they are in common ownership. Smaller agricultural preserves may be established if a board of council determines that the unique characteristic of the agricultural enterprise in the area calls for smaller agricultural units, and if the establishment of the preserve is consistent with the General Plan. Preserves may be made up of land in one or more ownerships. Property owners with less than 100 acres may combine with neighbors to form preserves, provided the properties are contiguous.

What is a Williamson Act Contract?

A Williamson Act Contract is the legal document that obligates the property owner, and any successors of interest, to the contract's enforcement restrictions.

How long does a landowner initiate a Williamson Act contract? A landowner interested in enrolling land in a contract should contact the local planning department of the county in which the land is located to obtain information and instructions.

How long must the land be maintained under a Williamson Act contract?

The minimum term for a contract is 10 years. However, some jurisdiction exercise the option of making the term longer, up to twenty years. Contracts renew automatically every year unless nonrenewed.

What is the nonrenewal process?

A notice of nonrenewal starts the nine-year nonrenewal period. During the nonrenewal process, the annual tax assessment gradually increases. At the end of the nine-year nonrenewal period, the contract is terminated.

What is a cancellation?

Only the landowner can petition to cancel a contract. To approve a tentative contract cancellation, a county or city must make specific findings that are supported by substantial evidence. The existence of an opportunity for another use of the property is not sufficient reason for cancellation. In addition, the uneconomic character of an existing agricultural use shall not, by itself, be a sufficient reason to cancel a contract. The landowner must pay a cancellation fee equal to 12 1/2 percent of the unrestricted, current fair market cancellation valuation of the property.

Must a landowner comply with the terms and the conditions of a contract?

Yes. A Williamson Act contract secures an enforceable restriction. Failure to meet the terms and conditions of the contract may be considered a breach of contract.

What happens to a Williamson Act contract upon sale of the property?

A Williamson Act contract runs with the land and is binding on all successors in interest of the landowner.

What are the land uses permitted within an agricultural preserve and contracted land?

The Williamson Act states that a board or council, by resolution, shall adopt rules governing the administration of agricultural preserves. The rules of each agricultural preserve specify the uses allowed. Generally, any commercial agricultural use will be permitted within any agricultural preserve. In addition, local governments may identify compatible uses permitted with a use permit.

What happens if an owner fails to comply with the terms and conditions of a contract?

In the case of a breach of a contract, the local government may seek a court injunction to enforce the terms of the contract. Where the breach of the contract is a violation of land use restrictions, normal zoning enforcement provisions will also apply.

Does my county participate?

As of May 2001, all counties except Del Norte, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Inyo, Modoc and Yuba offer Williamson Act contracts. How can an agricultural landowner permanently protect his land from development pressures?

An agricultural conservation easement is a voluntary, legally recorded deed restriction that is placed on a specific property used for agricultural production.

California Farmland Conservancy Program (CFCP) grant funds may be used by a local government or a qualified nonprofit organization (i.e. park district, resource conservation district or land trust) to purchase a landowner's development rights. The Department of Conservation can assist landowners in identifying appropriate entities that would be qualified to apply for a CFCP grant on their behalf.

What is the State's role?

The Department of Conservation is responsible for the interpretation of the Williamson Act, research of related issues and policies, and enforcement of Williamson Act provisions and restrictions.

For more information, contact: The Department of Conservation, Division of Land Resource Protection, 801 "K" Street MS 13-71, Sacramento, CA 96814. Phone: (916) 324-0850.

National forest fully funded for fire protection, fuel reduction

There was good news from the U.S. Forest Service during TuesdayÕs Board of Supervisors meeting the amount of funds for fire programs more than doubled with the newly implemented National Fire Plan.

Modoc National Forest Fire Management Officer Elizabeth Cavasso informed the board the new money means better protection, hazardous fuels removal and forest fire prevention treatment as well as 24 new permanent employees in Modoc.

"We are now fully funded to our Most Efficient Level," she told supervisors and that they still had 15 jobs to fill after three rounds of hiring. Cavasso said finding qualified people has been a test. She said the forest plans on treating about 16,000 acres this year for hazardous fuels management and reduction. ThatÕs up from about 3,000 acres per year over the past few years. Those treatments will include mechanical thinning and use of prescribed burns. Cavasso said about 5,000 acres have been treated so far this spring. The forest is concentrating on high risk areas first.

Cavasso also said the potential for catastrophic fire in Modoc is high and the forest will be attacking all fires quickly to keep them under control. She said some of the fuel reduction management plans should help this year.

Cavasso highlighted several areas of the National Fire Plan, which supervisors generally lauded as overdue and welcomed. Some of the highlights include one new Hotshot fire crew stationed in Canby, six vehicles and fire-fighting equipment, new engines and an overall better level of preparedness.

According to Cavasso, the Happy Camp Lookout is being reconstructed to go on line with four others at Manzanita, Blue Mountain, Timber Mountain and Round Mountain. There will be engines located at Buck Creek, Cedarville, Crowder, Canby, Adin, Long Bell, Dry Lake, Lava Beds and one new in Alturas.

Additionally, there is a community assistance portion with a $90,000 request for activities in an economic action programs including a feasibility study of a Canby cogeneration plant, the fire safe council work, a high school fire awareness academy and a juniper biomass harvest test.

Cavasso said the implementation of the National Fire Plan is a "must do priority" and there will be extensive coordination between all factions in the forest.

The National Fire Plan budget for the Modoc Forest includes $4,515,000 for firefighting preparedness, $130,000 for facilities, $3,000 for rehab and restoration, $2,8881,000 for hazardous fuel reduction, $100,000 for forest health projects and funds for community assistance.

Canby Barbecue celebrates 25 years

No matter where you call home, everyoneÕs invited to the Canby Volunteer Fire DepartmentÕs annual Steak Barbecue at the Canby Fire Hall and park on Saturday, June 9. Serving will be available from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

"WeÕre hoping for a really good turnout this year for the 25th annual barbecue," encourages Ron Sherer, Canby Volunteer Fire Department Chief. "ItÕs a really nice community get-together and everybody pitches in to help," said Sherer. "Last year we had a good crowd, which helped us decide to do it again this year. WeÕre hoping to see a good crowd again this year."

Be prepared to relax and feast on barbecued 8 oz. top sirloin steaks, baked Tulelake potatoes, country baked beans, a salad bar with choice of five different types of salads, French bread, dessert and coffee. Mixed drinks, beer and sodas will be sold at the feast.

Tickets for the feast are $8 for adults and $3.50 for ages under 12. The hall and park sit on the side of Highway 299, smack dab in Canby.

The setting is shady, with tables and benches and fun for all ages. The hall will be open for those who wish to dine indoors. The kids have playground equipment to keep them busy, while the adults visit with friends and meet new neighbors.

Proceeds will aid the equipment fund for the Canby Volunteer Fire Department.

CHP starts radar on public county roads

In an effort to make county roads safer, which have been deemed "high accident" and "high complaint" areas, the Modoc office of California Highway Patrol Modoc is notifying the public they will be working radar enforcement on all maximum speed zones on all public roads within the county.

Allowing for a 30-day "conditioning" period for the public, the CHP officers will issue verbal warnings But, by the first of July, in time for the Independence Day holiday traffic, the public is being apprised that citations will be given as deemed necessary by CHP officers.

The CHP is taking action on the request of the Modoc County Board of Supervisors in cooperation with Modoc County Road Department. They will be taking seriously the speeding complaints on many public county roads including, but not limited to County Rd. 1 in Eagleville; Pencil Road, Centerville Road and County Rd. 91.

Skateboard park rolling toward July

Alturas skateboarders will have a place to ply their skills, hopefully by the middle of July.

According to Modoc County Superintendent of Schools Carol Harbaugh, the project came to fruition Monday at noon when the TEACH, Inc. Board voted to expend necessary funding to purchase the land at the Corner of Fourth and West C Streets and to put down a concrete base.

The Modoc County Office of Education had purchased skateboard park equipment a couple of years ago and had originally planned for a supervised, fenced in skateboard area and BMX bicycle track. That did not materialize as planned, but there was still interest in the skateboard park.

"Several people came to us asking if there wasnÕt some way we could make use of the equipment," Harbaugh said. "The TEACH Board needs to be commended for taking the step to make this possible." What will happen, said Harbaugh, is MCOE and TEACH will purchase the land (the old Fourth Street Market Parking area), build the facility and then donate it to the City of Alturas. An oversight committee will be organized to handle the operation of the facility. Harbaugh said the facility will be built and operated so that it fits under the cityÕs current liability programs. On June 16, two people will be on hand to insure the facility ramps are built and fit into the insurance program. By that time, said Harbaugh, the concrete pad should be poured and she is optimistic the facility can be built and in operation by mid-July.

The overall cost of the project, said Harbaugh could be between $60,000 and $75,000. The MCOE has already spent about $25,000 for the equipment, so the remaining funds will come from TEACH. One thing good about the location, said Harbaugh, is that it has good visibility and is a part of the block already containing the Youth Park in Alturas. That area contains basketball courts, several baseball and softball fields, the Junior Livestock Showgrounds and parking areas.

Building strong in county

Building in the City of Alturas was minimal for the month of May, according to records of the Alturas Building Department. The city issued eight permits worth an estimated $8,240 and collected $202.51 in fees.

In April, building was better with 12 permits issued, worth an estimated $51,340.

There was more building activity in the county as 25 permits were issued, with an estimated value of $500,745. Two new homes were included in the totals, one in New Pine Creek and one on County Road 60. There were also 10 permits for agriculture pumps in the Tulelake-Newell area.

For April, the county issued 21 building permits worth an estimated value of $454,706.75.

Tour celebrates wildflowers

Rare orchids, India paintbrush and Penstemon are just a few of the wildflowers that may be viewed on a field trip hosted by Lakeview BLM Botanist, Lucile Housley, on Saturday, June 9, or Sunday, June 10.

Persons interested in learning about native plants and plant communities of the Lakeview area can meet at the Lakeviw Interagency Office (BLM and Forest Service Building, south of Lakeview on Highway 395, HC 10 Box 337, Lakeview, Ore.) at 8:30 a.m. on either day.

Saturday, June 9, the group will tour Fremont National lands and on Sunday, June 10, the field trip group will tour BLM lands. Field trips are free of charge. Participants are encouraged to bring a lunch, water and a hat. Please leave the dogs at home. The group will car pool and return at 4:00 p.m. each day.

Please call the Interagency Office at 947-2151 or 2177 for more information.

Letters to the Editor

Government not doing its job

Dear Editor:

It doesn't matter whether you are a Republican or a Democrat, this has got to be the most outrageous thing the government has done to the people of the United States.

You took the water from the Klamath and Tule Lake Basins to save the fish. That caused millions in economic losses to the north state. Hundreds are out of work, have or are going to lose their farms, and there will be no crops this year. Then, you have the nerve to barbecue, for 300 people, the very things you want us to save. Even the radical environmental groups should be yelling fowl!

Those of us who live here, know that the real reason is that the government wants the Tule Lake Basin for a refuge. "Willing sellers" are those who have been put out of business by this takeover. Instead of being worth $3,000 - $4,000 dollars per acre, it is worth only hundreds.

You would scream if this was done to your home or office building. But no, this is the government, and they can do what they want. The American people are beginning to wake up and realize that this is no longer government by the people, or for the people, but a Congress and a Senate that is so intent on bashing each other that the country is going to hell while they fight. I, for one, am fed up with the party line bickering and wish that you all would go back to doing things that make common sense and will pull this land together.

--Peggy S. Brown, Canby

Cheerleading, a sport or not?

Dear Editor:

I know that this subject has been going round and round for years. The school pays for all the other sports uniforms, but not cheerleading.

Cheerleading is a sport and the school should help with the cost of their uniforms. I have talked to a lot of parents who said that they discourage their children from trying out for this sport because of the cost.

We pay anywhere from $200 to $400 a year for their uniforms. I just wish that the school Board would take a second look at this and help our cheerleaders.

--Jane Crnkovic, Alturas

SV dentist enjoyed stint

Dear Editor:

After having served the residents of Surprise Valley and other areas of Modoc County, May 18 was my last day at the Surprise Valley Dental Clinic. I first began treating patients here in early 1997 and, after those wonderfully rewarding four years, had to make the difficult decision to cut back my work hours and attend to family matters at home.

I made the 720-mile round trip each month from Santa Rosa with the great anticipation of working with a fine staff and treating the best patients anywhere. I want to thank Joyce Gysin, the Surprise Valley Hospital Administration for her guidance and support, the Board of Directors for loosening their pursestrings at times, and our very able hospital staff (including Pat Grove, Linda Shultz, Cheryl Azevedo, Donna Vermillion, Mary Alice Sandstrom, Janet Hill, Kevin Small and countless others).

I also wish to thank my most able dental staff (Cathy Ross, Margie Ferguson, Mary Ann Hicks, Chrissie Bicondoa, Margarette Johnson and Tracy Glenn) for reducing the stress level, politely scolding me when I needed it, and making the workdays fun and rewarding. To the medical/nursing staff: (Steve Johnson, Ginny Reeves, Jan Freeman, Kathy Pulfer, Heather Linda Gooch, Joyce, Drs. Parr and Roberts) thanks for the fun, conversation and the great coffee. Most of all, I want to thank my patients for making me feel so welcome. It was a privilege to have served you. I will miss you all.

I ask that those of you who do not need immediate treatment will be patient enough to wait for my replacement dentist (we are trying to find one as soon as possible). For those who require ongoing and/or emergency treatment, I warmly recommend the fine dental practitioners in Alturas, Canby and Lakeview.

--Barry N. Schmidt, D.D.S., Santa Rosa

Obituaries

Donald William Squires

Donald William Squires of Alturas, passed away early Tuesday morning, June 5, 2001 at Modoc Medical Center. Services are pending at this time. A complete obituary will follow next week.

 

"Jack" John Williams Flournoy (no photo available)

"Jack", John Williams Flournoy passed away in Bakersfield, CA on June 1, 2001.

Jack was gladly welcomed into a family of six girls on April 27, 1921 in Likely, CA. His parents, Gladys Williams Flournoy and William Flournoy, were descendants of some of the first settlers in South Fork Valley.

Jack enjoyed growing up on the family ranch in Likely. He attended South Fork Elementary School through the eighth grade. He graduated from Modoc Union High School where he enjoyed sports. He set a record in the 100 yard-dash that wasn't broken for years. He finished two years of college at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, before being drafted into the Army in World War II.

Jack joined his wife and son Charles after the War ended. They lived in Likely until the family ranch was sold in 1946. The young family moved around California, trying different business ventures, but Modoc was always on Jack's mind.

In 1952, Jack and his wife, Carol, moved to Cedarville and bought what became Flournoy's Market. Jack kept busy with the VFW organization, the Cedarville Fire Department, the Rotary Club, and church.

His first marriage ended, and he remarried. Myra added three children to the family: Nancy, Alice-Lu and Johnnie.

All of the children were grown by 1980, so Jack and Myra made another move. For ten years, they owned an animal care center in Lemoore, CA. After a few years, they decided to retire to Myra's home-town of Kingsburg, CA. There, they enjoyed retirement until Myra's death. Jack then decided to move to Bakersfield to be close to his son Bruce.

Jack never lost his love for Modoc County. He cherished his memories of Likely and Surprise Valley. He enjoyed the cattle drives with friends in Nevada. For years, Jack and six of his good friends went on an annual trip to the South Warners. He was always ready to help in community activities. Jack was a good friend who will be missed by everyone who knew him.

A memorial service will be held in the Old Likely Church on Highway 395 on June 15, 11:00 a.m., followed by a gathering at the Likely Fire Hall.

The family suggests contributions in Jack's name, be made to the Modoc County Historical Society, Alturas, CA.

Jack was preceded in death by his son Charles, his wife Myra, parents Gladys and Will Flournoy, sisters, Eunice and Henrietta. He is survived by sisters, Ruth, Claire Goulden, Lois Enefer, June Lord, many nieces and nephews.

SPORTS

Duck Race gears up for 2001 Fandango

The 2001 Great Pit River Duck race has a shiny new black Jeep Wrangler as the top prize. That Jeep is parked at Alturas Tire, on the Corner of Main and 12th Streets at the flashing red light.

The race is scheduled for Fandango Days, July 7 in Alturas.

Tickets for the Jeep and a host of other great prizes are $25 each, which buys a duck for the race and a coupon book filled with super values. Tickets have always sold out prior to the race, so it's advisable to purchase tickets early.

Only 3,000 ducks will be sold at $25 each, giving the buyer a chance to win many other prizes.

New this year will be a Turbo Turtle category. The Turbo Turtles will be sold in groups of four at $25 each, and will be entered into the race for an All-terrain vehicle. The turtles will replace what was the Gold Crown blue ducks that were sold in groups of 10.

Tickets will be available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Lassen baseball camp coming

The Lassen School of Baseball will be conducting a baseball, softball camp in Alturas, June 18-22, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. each day for boys and girls ages five through 15.

The camp cost is $16 and includes instruction in hitting, pitching, infield and outfield play, catching, throwing and base running. There will be drills, game situations and team strategy lessons. The camp is broken down into morning instruction and drill sessions, lunch break and game play in the afternoon.

Pre-registration is requested. A minimum number of participants is required to run the camp. For registration forms or more information, please contact Lassen College at New Directions or Ed Harris of Alturas.

Junior Show ready to go

The 53rd Annual Junior Livestock Show and Sale is rapidly approaching. The following is the schedule for the June 11-15 event.

Monday, June 11

Horse Performance Classes: 8 a.m. Showmanship: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H; Groom and Fit: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H.. Break and tack/clothing change (15 minutes); Open English Equitation, Open English Pleasure, Open Hunter Hack; Bareback Equitation: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H; Western Equitation: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H; Western Pleasure: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H; Trail: Senior 4-H, Junior 4-H, Novice 4-H.

Gymkhana classes

These classes will follow the same order as the Performance classes: Barrels, Scramble Barrels, Pole Bending, Single Stake Race, Keyhold Race, Egg in Spoon wraps up horse events for Monday.

Tuesday, June 12

Rabbit Division - Sale Ring: 8:00 - 9:00 a.m. - Weigh-in; 9:00 a.m. - Market Classes, Breeding Class, Showmanship.

Poultry Division - Sale Ring: 8:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. - Weigh-in; 9:00 a.m. - Market Classes, Breeding Class, Showmanship.

Wednesday, June 13

Weigh-in for Beef, Sheep, and Swine is from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Thursday, June 14

Market Classes: 9:00 a.m. - Market Swine; 11:00 a.m. - Market Beef (in Arena), Market Sheep (in Sale Ring); 2:00 p.m. - Pee Wee Showmanship - Sale Ring.

Breeding Classes: 3:00 p.m. - Breeding Swine (in Sale Ring); 3:30 p.m. - Breeding Sheep in Sale Ring and Breeding Beef in Arena; 4:30 p.m. - Livestock Judging Contest in Sale Ring.

Friday, June 15

Showmanship: 8:00 a.m. - FFA Swine, Senior 4-H Swine, Junior 4-H Swine, Novice 4-H Swine; 9:30 a.m. - in Ring - FFA Sheep; Senior 4-H Sheep, Junior 4-H Sheep, Novice 4-H Sheep, Goats Showmanship. In Arena is Senior 4-H Beef, Junior 4-H Beef, Novice 4-H Beef, FFA Beef; 2:00 p.m. - in Ring - FFA Round Robin, Senior 4-H Round Robin, Junior 4-H Round Robin, Novice 4-H Round Robin; 4:30 p.m. - in Ring - Barbecue sponsored by Modoc County CattleWomen, Junior Livestock Show Grounds; 5:15 p.m. Awards Presentation - Sale Ring; 6:30 p.m. Livestock Sale - Sale Order: poultry, rabbits, hogs, beef, lambs.

Posse announces top riders

Riders from ages eight to 18 turned out to show their horsemanship skills while the weather stayed perfect for the 48th year of the Modoc County Sheriff's Posse Junior Horse Show last Saturday, June 2 at the Junior Livestock Grounds in Alturas.

The Sheriff's Posse has watched many young riders grow up with the event over its many years, with many returning to compete until they are past the age limit. Riders in both the Junior and Senior divisions competed in Pleasure, equitation, trail, buckaroo, pole bending, barrel racing and keyhole racing. place winner, Dylan Sponseller, earning herself a ribbon, halter and lead rope. Junior division winners included Anna Nelson in second place; Willie Mohr in third, Kristi Zendejas in fourth place. All earned ribbons for their fine efforts.

Senior Division first place winner, Megan McCulley of Canby, won the halter and lead rope, plus blue ribbon. Deidra Jeppson won second place winner with Ryan Carrithers in third place; Elizabeth Younger won fourth place and Moe Sphar won fifth place.

Modoc County Sheriff's Posse gives thanks to Rebecka Ingraham who acted as Judge; announcer Don Collis; the clerical expertise of Cathy Baldwin; Gilbert Brown who volunteered as timer and Four Corners Market for their support. The show opened at 10 a.m. and continued until 3 p.m.

Blue Lake Camp offers great summer activities

Blue Lake Camp offers a solution to giving kids something special to consider as a part of summer fun.

Plans are under way for another great year at the Blue Lake Youth Camp. The camp is located at the East end of Blue Lake, in the South Warner mountains on a site leased and operated under USDA Modoc National Forest permit by the Federated Church.

All kids entering the third through twelfth grades are welcome to attend camp for a great summer experience. The camp offers canoeing, swimming, crafts, learning about God and the world and making new friends. Well established for many years, the camp has welcomed hundred of local and visiting children over the years.

Camp Dates

Dates for the camps will be third-fourth grade, July 11 to 13 for $50 per youth; fifth and sixth grade campers, July 23-27 for $95 each; seventh and eighth grade campers, July 16-20 for $95 each; and ninth through twelfth graders, July 30-31 for $25 each.

Be a counselor

Youths from seventh grade to adults are encouraged to consider being a counselor at the camp. Applications for counselor positions are available by contacting the Federated Church at 233-2718. Please leave a message on the answering machine.

When to register

Camp registration will open Monday, June 11, which happened to be the Monday after school is out. Registration information and application availability will be posted at a later date.

All camps are filled on a first come-first served basis. The USDA prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs and marital or familial status.

 

JUNE 14, 2001

 

With 50% less water, summer may be long

With most of Modoc suffering about half an average water year, summer could be long and hot. It could also mean some conservation efforts by irrigators and agencies.

According to Modoc National Forest Hydrologist Sue Becker, the total precipitation for the water year from October to now stands at 5.55 inches compared to the average of 10.54. The probability of more water this summer is not good.

According to Becker, the average precipitation from now through September is about 2.07 inches. And so far this June, very little rain has fallen. Monday night's storm showed .03 inches.

The Forest Service has noted there is little stored water on the forest with many traditional well supplied stock water holes dry or nearly dry.

The month-by-month water picture since October tells the story of this drought, combined with the fact that the months just prior were not wet. In October, things started well with 1.6 inches, above the average of .99 inches. But November slacked off to .71 inches compared to an average of 1.43 inches. December was scary as .28 inches was measured, well below the 1.5 inch average. January was worse with .28 measured, well short of the 1.51 inch average. There was little relief in February with .54 inches of water, compared to an average of 1.44 and March had .70 inches compared to a normal .37 inches. April was a bright spot with 1.42 inches of moisture falling, above the 1.04 average. But in May no rain fell when an average year would have had 1.26 inches.

Local irrigators are concerned, with some ranchers not getting much from normal water supplies. Water supplies on Devil's Garden are well below normal levels.

The main reservoir on the Garden, Big Sage, is at about 48 percent of capacity, but should serve the Hot Springs Irrigation District through this year. Another dry year, however, would spell real problems. Currently, irrigators on the Pit River are coordinating the irrigators by alternating dam releases and that conservation is easing the burden on Big Sage.

The South Fork Irrigation District, works out of West Valley reservoir, and is looking at much lower than a normal year with less than 50 percent of capacity in the reservoir. And there is little snowpack in the south Warner Mountains to change that picture.

County jobless rate drops to 6.4 percent

Modoc County's unemployment rate for May, 2001 dropped to 6.4 percent, down from April's 8.2 percent. The number of people claiming unemployment benefits dropped from 320 in April to 250 in May.

The national unemployment rate for May was 4.1 percent and the state jobless rate was 4.1 percent.

In May, Modoc ranked 35th of the state's 58 county's for highest unemployment. Lassen County has a jobless rate of 6.5 percent, ranking it 37th and Siskiyou County was at 7.9 percent, ranking it 42nd.

Alturas swimming pool opens June 16

The Alturas Municipal Swimming Pool opens for the season June 16, at noon for lap swim and at 1 p.m. for the public. Saturday is a free day.

The pool schedule for lap swimming is daily from 12 noon to 1 p.m. and Monday through Friday, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Public swim is Monday through Friday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.

General admission is $2.50 and a season pass is $60 for an individual and $80 for a family.

Fire restrictions on the horizon

While June 22 officially kicks off summer, forest conditions resemble late July, in other words, it is dry-dry-dry.

Take extra fire safe precautions while out in the woods, due to dry and windy spring, fire conditions are reaching critical levels. Take advantage of the cooler, moister times during the day to cut firewood.

Modoc National Forest will impose fire restrictions June 24. Under restrictions, all units will be closed to woodcutting except in DG-IP, a popular area on the Devil's Garden Plateau. Other fire restriction affecting open campfires and off highway vehicle use will also take effect.

Rangeland specialist, Jenny Jayo, says that most springs on the "Garden" are dry and will dry up within a month. Stock ponds are lower than last year and grass is about six weeks ahead of usual growth. "Grass is already cured out; it has grown to its maturity. In some areas, water is expected to go before the feed." Livestock permittees have been alerted that they will probably have to bring their livestock home early.

The Devil Fire in Susanville burned nearly 3,000 acres in 8 hours, and the Skunk fire, which occurred at the 7,000 foot level in the Warner Mountains, is more evidence to the critical year. In a normal year, this area of the Warners would still have snow.

The potential for devastating wildfire with rapid rates of spread is a serious concern of fire management officials. Elizabeth Cavasso, Forest FMO encourages people to do hazard reduction around homes and outbuildings. "This clearance will assist fire suppression forces should a fire occur in the area."

The Lassen National Forest, Bureau of Land Management and Plumas National Forest will also be going into fire restrictions. Please contact your local office for further information.

MCCA Spring Field Day Beef BBQ a success for cause

On Sunday, June 10, the Modoc County CattleWomen's Association held its annual Spring Field Day at Tulelake/Klamath area who are suffering from the current devastating water decision.

MCCA hosted a Beef Barbecue Benefit to raise funds to contribute to the Legal Defense Fund to support the issues these families are facing. MCCA is pleased to announce that the donations before and at the barbecue, raised over $2,500.

The MCCA wants to thank those who so generously supported: Chub and Dorothy Coffin, Janesville; Rena Harris, Alturas; Spike and Joyce Humphfrey, Round Mountain; John and Anna Baker, Alturas; Dale and Anita Goodwin, Cedarville; Tony and Kathy Alves, Alturas; Russ and Vonda Milton/Modoc Motor Parts, Alturas; John and Mary Weber, Alturas; George and Shirley Wright, Likely; Tule and Dale Chiono, Summer Lake, OR; Leale and Irma Harris, Cedarville; B & P Nuebert Ent., Inc., Alturas; Larry and Kathy Brown/Brown's Pharmacy, Alturas; Kent and Heidi Mullis, Alturas; Kerry and Cheryl Wilson, Alturas; Mr. and Mrs. George Demetakos; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rhodes; Pug and Theresa Smith; Bill and Ruth Nesh; Dick and Bev Moulton; Terry Williams, Cedarville; Cheri Adams; Martinez DJ Ranch, Alturas; Manuel and LeVerne Silva, Klamath Falls, OR; Stephen, Linda and Ginny Nelson, Alturas; Chris and Dick O'Sullivan; Deb Crisp/Tulelake Growers Assn.; Pete and Carolyn Carey Ranch, Alturas; Judy "Sam" McNeil; Will Ross; Likely Land & Livestock; Walk and Bonnie Tomogni; Cliff and Bertha McKoen; Don Lancaster, Alturas; Randell D. Erps; Ken and Jackie McGarva Ranch, Likely; Althea Baird; Fisher Ranch, Alturas; Jacqui Krizu, Tulelake; Gary and Cindy Wright, Tulelake; Heath & Heather Wright, Tulelake; Seus Family Farms; Dennis and Kathy Smith Station Ranch, Cedarville; D & D Cattle Company; Peggy Callas and girls; Ed Baley; Sharer Bros. Farming; Ned & Valerie Coe/Bill & Son's; Janey Stripe, Alturas; Duane McGarva, Likely; Rich Hamel, Likely; Mike and Bev Byrne/Robert A. Byrne Co.; Dan and Geri Byrne/Robert A. Byrne Co.; Bob and Cori Byrne, Tulelake; Ray and Peggy Page Ranch, Cedarville; Willy Hagge, Alturas; Ron and Lynne Sculter/Lynne's Deli, Alturas. "Wow! Again, we thank all of you who extended your support to our fellow countrymen in the Tulelake/Klamath area. It means so much to stand together through these hard-times for those folks most affected by this water decision," said Terry Martinez of MCCA. On Saturday, June 16, they will be holding a public hearing with the US House of Representative Committee on Resources at the Klamath County Fairgrounds in Klamath Falls, Oregon, beginning at 8:00 a.m. If possible, please plan to attend.

 

Young singer's summer fills with engagements

Megan Moore of Alturas is kicking off the 10th year of her life and her summer with an earful of good news, lining up a promotional, travel-filled summer for the up-and-coming singer.

A call over the weekend has arranged for Moore to sing at five rodeo bull riding events in Nevada and Northern California during June, July and August.

"This time, I'll be paid to sing and I'll have a room when I travel," said an enthusiastic Moore on Monday afternoon at the Record. Moore will give 30 minutes of musical entertainment at each of five events; starting this weekend before a sold out crowd of 3,000 in Yerington, Nev.

On June 23, she will sing before a local crowd at the Cedarville Super Bull event and will give her first live performance of "I Love You," a song written by her mother Kathy.

"She even yodels in this one," described her mother. Moore will offer an upbeat display of her singing talent, along with her new song which has proven to bring a tear to the eye. Her final performances will be in Fallon, Nev. and McArthur. All along the way, Megan will be signing photographs and selling her CD's recorded by Kevin Sherer of Canby. Those sales will help fund her travels to Nashville mid-July, followed by an opportunity for a radio interview and to compete at the Jimmy Dean True Value Showdown in Taos, New Mexico. She plans to sing her heart out at the Country Showdown to try her best at winning the $50,000 prize money. This time the whole family will get to go.

"It will be great exposure for her," offered her mother.

The thought of winning the oversized check, presented by a "big star at the Grand 'Ol Opry," gives young Moore a thrill, she admits. Before leaving the state, Moore will sing the"Star Spangled Banner" for the Fandango Days Parade in Alturas on Saturday, July 7, and follow up with competition at the True Value Country Showdown in Susanville, then leave for Nashville for Don Reed's Affinity Music recording studio "Kid Star" promotion. This next Affinity Music video will be used widely as promotion and appear on the national network through CMT, (Country Music Television), notes Kathy. The other good news is Megan is now earning 25 cents instead of the original 8 cents, each time someone accesses her first video via Internet, created through Affinity Music.

"We won't have time to make cd's of her new song, 'I Love You' before we hit the road. We'll be trying to get photographs and CD's made to sign and sell at upcoming events. It's going to be a busy summer, to say the least," says Mom Moore. Moore's cds are currently available at Top Hat Entertainment in Alturas.

Feeling a little tired on her real birthday, Monday, June 11, after celebrating the day before at Water Works Park in Redding, Moore sat quietly contemplating her whirlwind summer schedule, then seriously expressed aloud to her mom, "I might have to start home study if this keeps up."

But, first things first, the family has responsibilities at the local Junior Livestock Show, where son Tyler will be showing and selling his pig and Brett and Kathy are 4-H Swine Project leaders.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Humane Society needs help

Dear Editor:

The Modoc Humane Society would very much appreciate any donations in terms of doghouses, food bowls, pens, animal carrying crates, kennels and of course "hard currency".

Please know that all money goes directly to the animals. We have no administrative/personnel overhead. All are volunteers. The money is used for spaying, neutering, food, vaccinations, and medical emergencies. It is also used to purchase chain link fencing, hoses, materials to provide shade and shelter, etc.

Please send all monetary donations to: High Plateau Humane Society, P.O. Box 1383, Alturas, CA 96101. (p.s. it's deductible!) For all other donations, please call 233-3978.

--Sue Rutledge Alturas

Was it an unfair decision

Dear Editor:

On Tuesday evening, June 5, 2001, I witnessed a true Kangaroo Court when the Modoc Joint Unified School District Board convened and demoted Marshall Kirkpatrick from Transportation Supervisor, to bus driver-mechanic.

This action occurred after many people spoke eloquently on behalf of Marshall in his attempt to retain his position and that they felt the demotion was too harsh for the charges against him. Those charges were "using profane language" and "raising his voice to an employee". Mr. Kirkpatrick admitted that he had used foul language on several occasions, and had raised his voice to impress on an employee the importance of the "precious cargo" they were carrying on the busses they were driving.

I, too, believe that the punishment was too harsh, and that receiving an appropriate letter of warning, and the sure knowledge that a more severe action would follow if he did not mend his ways would be a fit punishment for the offense. I also believe that Dr. Kevin Jolly was the guiding hand in this action; a bullet in his belt, so to speak. Mr. Kirkpatrick has worked for the School District for 12 years, this was the first time that he had received any form of complaint against him, the two persons who had made the complaint did not even bother to show up at the Board meeting. After hearing the results of the Board vote, four to one demotion (Ken Fogle being the dissenting vote), I think they knew their complaint would be upheld. There are many more issues that could be brought up in this letter that support Marshall, but basically, I am saying the majority of this Board, at the urging of Dr. Jolly, had made up their minds to demote him before hearing any of the supporting arguments for him.

I had high hopes for the Board after the last election, but his action had convinced me that it is situation normal at the Modoc Joint Unified School District.

--Darrel L. Brewer Alturas

OBITUARIES

Carl Clifton 'Bob' Cannon

After a long illness, Carl Clifton Cannon, better known as "Bob," died unexpectedly of a massive heart attack in Redwood City, Calif. on June 2, 2001. He was 64.

The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted services at graveside, June 7 at 11:00 a.m. at the Alturas Cemetery, Alturas, Calif.

Bob was the only son of seven children, born to Edna (Royce) and William Jesse Cannon of Alturas. He was born July 8, 1936 in Alturas, Calif. and lived in Alturas his entire life, with the exception of a brief time in Redwood City, where he died unexpectedly.

He attended local schools and after leaving school, worked for many years as a ranch hand and buckaroo on various cattle ranches around the Alturas area. He loved horses and calf roping.

Mr. Cannon was fond of square dancing and was considered quite good at it. He and a friend traveled as far as Idaho for some of the square dance jamborees.

Mr. Cannon is survived by two sisters Jessie Genung and Ruby Marx, both of Redding and aunts Lucille Gysin Chandler and Ruth Royce both of Alturas; and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Jesse and Edna Cannon and four sisters, Opal "Babe" Smith, Irene Blevins, Edna Pearl Meredith and Lodena Brister Burmister.

Pallbearers were Bill Brister, Marion Smith, Gary Blevins, Newt Stanley, Delwon Cannon. Kerr Mortuary was in charge of arrangements.

Donald William Squires

Donald William Squires, 70, passed away June 5, 2001, at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, after a battle with cancer. Services for the former business owner and long-time area resident will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, June 15, at Kerr Mortuary Chapel in Alturas. The Rev. Patrick Henry of Sacred Heart Catholic Church will conduct the memorial service. Inurnment will follow at the Alturas Cemetery, with the three veterans' organizations giving the committal for their fellow serviceman.

Don was born on August 28, 1930 in Sonora, Calif. to dentist, Dr. Charles and Dorothy Squires. He graduated from Adin High School in Adin, Calif. where he met his future wife Laura Staub of Bieber, when she was 14.

He followed high school with four years in the U.S. Navy during the Korean Conflict on the U.S.S. Midway and the U.S.S. Oriskany aircraft carriers.

He and Laura corresponded throughout this time, until he was discharged in November 1954 as a Commissary man III Class. After his discharge, he was fond of saying "after seeing the world through a port hole, I was ready to settle down in a quiet, peaceful area."

He returned to Bieber where he and Laura were married November 27, 1954. The two shared 46 years of marriage, and friendship that spanned over 50 years. Don worked for McCloud River Lumber Company for four years, while the couple lived in Burney. Their daughter Linda was born in 1956 and daughter Betsy in 1958. The family moved to Santa Rosa where Don worked for Clover Dairy for seven years, before they moved to Alturas, 37 years ago. Don worked for Staub and Sons and as a custodian for Modoc Middle School until he retired in 1986. While both held other jobs, and made Alturas their home, he and Laura owned and operated their popular Don's Valley Burger in Cedarville for 10 years, until they sold the business. It was part of Don's nature to "kid" everyone, no matter what age they were, and he always had a warm smile to follow his words.

In his leisure time, he enjoyed his grandchildren, camping, travel and family reunions. He was fond of watching western movies, and reading books authored by Louis L'Amour. Donald had been a member of the Alturas Volunteer Fire Department.

He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother Bill Squires of Belmont, Calif.

He is survived by his wife Laura of Alturas; daughters and sons-in-law Linda and Joe Battram and Betsy and Randy Calkins, Alturas; grandchildren Marissa Calkins, Chico; Stacy and Jennifer Calkins, Christopher and William Battram, Alturas; sister and brother-in-law Rosemary and Erney Ellison, Corte Madera; sister Carol McCloone, Simi Valley; Ella Fabian, Windsor; brother and sister-in-law George and Reb Squires, San Jose; sister and brother-in-law Patricia and Michael Christopher, Hayward and numerous nieces and nephews. Contributions in memory of Mr. Squires be made to the American Cancer Society, 3290 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA 96002 or to the Modoc Tobacco Coalition, 441 N. Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.---------- Jimmie Johnnie Washoe

Jimmie Johnnie Washoe, age 96, passed away June 9, 2001 at Mayers Memorial Hospital in Fall River Mills, Calif., following surgery for a broken hip.

Funeral services will be held today, Thursday, June 14 at 11:00 a.m. at the Lake County Fairgrounds in Lakeview, Ore. The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra of Cedarville will officiate. Interment will follow in the family plot at the I.O.O.F. Cemetery in Lakeview, Ore.

A reception at the Lake County Fairgrounds will follow the burial service.

Family and friends are invited to share copies of photos on a sharing table which will be provided at the services. Visitation will be from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. on Thursday at Ousley Osterman Huffstutter Chapel in Lakeview.

Jimmie was born on December 15, 1904 in Lakeview, Ore. to Charlie and Bonnie Washoe. He worked at several large and small ranches in southern Oregon and northern California. He also trained race horses and jockeyed in horse racing. Mr. Washoe was a skilled horseman who appreciated a good show and work horse.

He is survived by his daughter, Johanna Washoe of Redding, CA; two nieces, Bertha Townsend of Fort Bidwell, CA and Lorraine DeGarmo of Alturas; four nephews, Merle DeGarmo of Nixon, Nev., Edson DeGarmo of Klamath Falls, Ore., Burt and Ralph DeGarmo of Fort Bidwell, CA. and numerous relatives. Preceding him in death were his parents, Charlie and Bonnie Washoe and sister Nettie DeGarmo.

Contributions in memory of Jimmie may be directed to the Surprise Valley Community Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104 or the Lake County Roundup Museum c/o John Flynn, 438 Mountain View Lakeview, OR 97630 or to a charity of the donor's choice.

Delphia Evelyn Warren (No photo Available)

A funeral service was held for Delphia Evelyn Warren June 11, 2001 at the Eagleville Church in Eagleville. Mrs. Warren, age 85, died in Klamath Falls of natural causes June 5, 2001.

She was born April 26, 1916 at Blackfoot, Idaho to George W. and Nancy Ellen Jones. She was the youngest of 11 children. The family moved to Cedar Pass in the winter of 1929-30. She moved from Fallon, Nevada, to join the family at Cedar Pass in July, 1930. She married Willis Warren December 24, 1932 and moved to the Willis Ranch two miles south of Eagleville. Willis preceded her in death in 1987.

She lived on the Willis ranch until 1996 when she sold the family ranch. She was a self-employed rancher who raised cattle and hay. She was a 1935 graduate of Surprise Valley High School, having gone back to finish her senior year. She had left high school in Cedarville after the first semester of her senior years in 1932 and went back when first daughter Betty was one year old.

Mrs. Warren loved quilting and embroidery work, genealogy, her kids and grandkids. She also loved poems and prayers, photos, collecting things about farms and the history of Eagleville. She also loved traditional hymns. She was a member of the Ladies Club, Senior Center and Women's Glee Club, doing plays in Northern California.

She is survived by a daughter, Betty Jewell of Klamath Falls, son and daughter-in-law, Gerald and Nancy E. Warren of Mooresville, Indiana; daughter-in-law, Nancy Warren of Reno; sister Velma Nelson of Los Angeles; grandchildren, Monica Warren, Alturas; Melanie Warren, Judith Warren, Reno; Rina an Neal Ganey, Davenport, Iowa; Diane Clow of Vancouver, Wa.; Steven and Judith Jewell of Klamath falls; great-grandchildren, Whitney and Joshua Warren, Terra Fatheree, Sarah and Nathan Clow, Russell, Daniel and Alan Jewell. Her parents, husband, nine brothers and sisters and a son, Willis E. Warren preceded her in death.

Interment was in the Eagleville Cemetery and Dr. Ben Zandst

SPORTS

State Cal-Hi Rodeo finals set in Quincy

Quincy is the site of the California High School Rodeo Association State Finals June 17-24.

Several of District One's high school rodeo athletes are in the competition and look to do well.

Leading the way is Bieber's Luena Harbert, who not only serves as Queen, but goes into the finals as the All-Around Cowgirl for District One. She will compete in breakaway roping where she ranked first, goat tying, where she ranked second, girls' cutting where she ranked fifth and is an alternate in pole bending.

Alturas' Victor Madrigal goes into the finals as the number one ranked bull rider from District One and Jeremy Price, of Cedarville enters the finals as the fifth ranked bareback rider for the district.

Modoc's Conner home for training

Alturas' Josh Conner finished his first season at Lindsey Wilson College, (Kentucky) by breaking his right wrist in a bicycle race crash, but is looking forward to going back.

Conner ended up being the third ranked rider on the bike team, and was expected to race in the criterium and time trial at the collegiate nationals before the accident. He finished in the top 20 riders in the conference.

He also walked on and earned a baseball scholarship, becoming one of the team's top pitchers. The broken arm also ended his baseball season, after he started well, going 5-0 with a 1.91 earned-run average.

He'll be heading back east in mid-July, and has been at home since the middle of May training and getting his strength back.

Duck Race gears up for 2001 Fandango

The 2001 Great Pit River Duck race has a shiny new black Jeep Wrangler as the top prize. That Jeep is parked at Alturas Tire, on the Corner of Main and 12th Streets at the flashing red light.

The race is scheduled for Fandango Days, July 7 in Alturas. Tickets for the Jeep and a host of other great prizes are $25 each, which buys a duck for the race and a coupon book filled with super values. Tickets have always sold out prior to the race, so it's advisable to purchase tickets early.

Only 3,000 ducks will be sold at $25 each, giving the buyer a chance to win many other prizes.

New this year will be a Turbo Turtle category. The Turbo Turtles will be sold in groups of four at $25 each, and will be entered into the race for an All-terrain vehicle. The turtles will replace what was the Gold Crown blue ducks that were sold in groups of 10.

Tickets will be available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

JUNE 21, 2001

Forest turns up campfire restrictions

Extreme fire danger due to north winds and low moisture in forest vegetation has caused officials of Modoc National Forest to set special fire restrictions on the forest. The fire prevention measures will begin Sunday, June 24, Forest Supervisor Dan Chisholm announced.

What this means to Forest users is: fires outside developed recreation sites or designed areas are prohibited. Use of lanterns or portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel won't be restricted; smoking must be within an enclosed vehicle or building, or within a designated developed recreation site; operating internal combustion engines, except on a forest development road or designated trail, is prohibited; possession or use of a motorized vehicle off forest development roads or outside designated recreated sites is prohibited.

A current valid California Campfire Permit must be in their possession. Campfire permits are free and available at all Forest Service offices. Chisholm said that fuelwood cutting will be allowed only on Devil's Garden Ranger District in area DG-1P until 1:00 p.m. All wood cutting permits issued throughout the Forest prior to June 24 will be honored in that area. Woodcutters must telephone the number listed on their permit for conditions.

Further information can be obtained by calling Forest headquarters in Alturas at (530) 233-5811, Big Valley Ranger District, Adin, (530) 299-3215, Doublehead Ranger District, Tulelake, (530) 279-6116. As always, using extreme caution is necessary while using public lands.

No MTBE found in city water

Chevron Station in Alturas now being monitored for MTBE (a gasoline additive) contamination, there is none of that chemical in the city's drinking water supply.

The City just released its annual drinking water quality report, saying they have tested for MTBE three times in the last nine months and it was not detected in the water.

"We're proud that our drinking water meets or exceeds all federal and state requirements," said City Public Works Director Stacy Chase.

Chase said the Environmental Protection Agency is currently reviewing the standards for arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic occurs naturally and Chase said it's important to note that Alturas water arsenic levels are lower than the level currently under consideration by the EPA. The maximum contaminate level now is 50 micrograms per liter and the level for Alturas water was at 3.4, well below acceptable levels.

Chase explained the levels by saying one part per billion or microgram per liter corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years or a single penny in $10 billion. Not much.

Alturas water comes from four deep wells and has always tested very high in quality. Most of the small levels of chemicals found in the water occur because of the erosion of natural deposits in the aquifer.

The City has mailed a copy of its report to water users, but for more information contact City Hall at 233-2512.

Roadwork contracts awarded by county

The Modoc County Road Department awarded bids on two major highway projects this week, announced by Road Commissioner Tom Tracy at Tuesday's Board of Supervisor's meeting.

Fitch Sand and Gravel, of Alturas, was awarded a $1,225,877 bid to overlay 8.6 miles of County Road 1 at Eagleville.

An 11 mile overlay on CR 91, from 139 to Lookout, was awarded to J.F. Shea at a cost of $1,732,225.

According to Tracy, the bids came in within allotted funds and will allow for additional mileage to be asphalted. He said streets in Canby, Lookout and Eagleville will be repaved.

In addition, the Board approved a proposed project at Likely to install a storm drain on the east side of Highway 395 through town to alleviate flooding problems.

Tracy will take the proposal before the Modoc County Transportation Commission for approval at one-half the total cost of the project, $250,000 to $275,000.

Drought relief well spews precious water

The first of a dozen emergency drought relief wells went on line June 15 at noon in the Tulelake Basin, two miles south of the California-Oregon about one-half mile south of Kandra Road.

The funds of wells came from the Governor's Office of Emergency Services and the California Department of Water Resources. Governor Gray Davis allocated $2.5 million in state emergency funds to the Tulelake Irrigation District to drill more than a dozen wells in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties. Although the water will not be sufficient to restore farms to pre-drought levels, it will prevent the valuable topsoil from blowing away this summer by allowing for a cover crop.

According to the OES, about 5,000 acres are expected to receive water from these wells.

Modoc's 2001 Junior Livestock Show and Sale a real success

By Melinda Sandstrom, Jr. Show Advisor

The 53rd Annual Modoc County Junior Livestock Show and Sale was blessed with great weather, incredible community support, and strong participation in each division. The combination of community support, both before and during the show, the kids' hard work and a nice facility made for a successful combination.

As reported from last week's article, the high point winners in the Horse Performance Division included: Elizabeth Younger, Alturas FFA for the Senior Section. Junior Section Winner was Anna Nelson from New Pioneer 4-H Club, and Novice winner was Shelby Anderson, Eagleville 4-H Club. The fast paced Gymkhana Division ended the busy day. The Senior High Point winner was, Niki Poindexter, Alturas FFA. In the Junior Section Christjan Bidwell from Bieber 4-H and was the High Point winner. There was a tie in the Novice Gymkhana High Point with Kristi Zendejas and Tyler Stains, both from the New Pioneer 4-H Club.

Tuesday, the Poultry Division was expanded due to the overwhelming response of last year's show. This year a Reserve Champion Meat Pen class was added and the Showmanship class were expanded to a Senior, Junior and Novice. There were eight entries in the market poultry class. Anna Nelson, New Pioneer 4-H, took home the Grand Champion award for her pen of two market birds. Brandon Colbert, New Pioneer 4-H Club, received the Reserve Champion ribbon.

There were 48 breeding class entries from 4-H and FFA members. This year, the showmanship division was divided into three age categories, Senior, Junior and Novice. Shannon Emard, High Grade 4-H Club won the Senior section. Edwin Osornio-Centerwall, Schaffer Mt. 4-H Club received the Junior Showmanship trophy and Neil Mohr, Schaffer Mt. 4-H took the Novice award.

The Rabbit Division was next with Sarah Teuscher, Cedarville 4-H, winning the Overall High Point Award. In the Single Fryer Meat Division, Travis Orr, Lookout 4-H, received the Grand Champion award, and Tristin Teuscher, Cedarville 4-H, was the Reserve Champion winner. The Pen of Three Grand Champion, went to Kyle Roberts of Hilltop 4-H. Reserve Champion was won by Alysha Northrup, Hilltop 4-H Club. The Best of Show winner for the overall breeding division went to Shelby Anderson, Eagleville 4-H. Tristen Teuscher, Cedarville 4-H received Reserve in Show. Wednesday was weigh-in day with over 150 animals passing over the scales in preparation for the market classes on Thursday.

Thursday was Market and Breeding classes. Market Swine started at 9:00 a.m. and was judged by Ty Kliewer from Klamath Falls, Ore. Grand Champion Market Swine went to Jessica Strain, High Grade 4-H. The Reserve Champion winner was Landon Brown, New Pioneer 4-H. The Modoc Raised Market Swine Plaque when to Landon Brown.

Market Beef started at 11:00 a.m. in the arena, being judged also by Ty Kliewer while Market Sheep were in the sale ring, being judged by Clay Carlson of Chico. The Grand Champion Market Beef winner was Jodie Jones-Zandstra, Surprise Valley FFA Chapter and the Reserve Champion went to Ryan Imbach, New Pioneer 4-H. The Modoc Raised Market Beef winner was Jodie Jones-Zandstra. The Grand Champion Market Sheep went to Ryan Imbach, New Pioneer 4-H and Reserve Champion went to Victor Madrigal, Alturas FFA Chapter. Modoc Raised Market Lamb went to John LeNeave, Davis Creek 4-H Club. Shawn Boulade was announced as the winner at the awards presentation, but that was incorrect; John LeNeave was the correct winner.

The Pre-Novice kids did a wonderful job showing their animals, in Pee Wee Showmanship. Seth Weidner and his chicken won the Kindergarten through first grade Division and Victoria Gardner won the second and third grade Division with her chicken. The judge, Ty Kliewer found judging PeeWee Showmanship very challenging and asked the audience for assistance. In the Kindergarten through first grade Division, Jamie Brazil and her dog received second place. Third place went to Mike Ponti, with his chicken; Fourth place went to Lucas Skinner, and his Guinea Pig, "Mini". Elizabeth Weidner received fifth place with her chicken. In the second through third grade section, Wesley Osornio-Centerwall received second place with his chicken. Cole Stevenson took home third with his puppy and Jesse Freeman won the fourth place award.

Following Peewee Showmanship were the Breeding classes. Breeding Swine was the first class. Grand Champion Breeding swine went to Faren Graham, Bieber 4-H. Breeding Sheep and Beef followed the swine classes. Rachel Stevenson won Grand Champion Grade Ewe. Registered Breeding Sheep was back this year. Heather LeNeave, Davis Creek 4-H won the Overall Registered Breeding Sheep Division. Breeding Beef went next. There were no entries in the Registered Female. The Grand Champion Grade Female went to Shannon Ochs, Alturas FFA. There were no winners for the Reserve Champion Grade Female Class. The Livestock judging contest was the last event on Thursday. Jenica Minto, Cedarville 4-H was the high scoring individual for the 4-H division. Garrett Haury, Big Valley FFA won the FFA division, and in the adult division, Clayton Oilar was the high scoring individual.

Friday's schedule involved Showmanship, the Round Robin competition, and the Grand Finale, the Sale with the addition of Goat Showmanship. FFA Swine Showmanship started the day off with Ryan Graham, Big Valley FFA winning the first place. Landon Brown won the Senior 4-H division, Wade Frutuozo, Eagleville 4-H Club was the winner for the Junior 4-H class and the Novice 4-H award went to Dillon Flournoy, New Pioneer 4-H Club. FFA Sheep and Novice 4-H Beef were being judged at the same time in different arenas. Victor Madrigal, Alturas FFA Chapter, won the FFA Sheep Showmanship. Rachel Imbach took the Senior 4-H class; Junior 4-H went to Eric Shultz, Lookout 4-H Club; and Rachel Stevenson won the Novice 4-H Sheep Showmanship. In the Beef Division, Kolton Wofford, High Grade 4-H won the Novice class, Justin Mason, New Pioneer 4-H Club won the Junior 4-H. The Senior 4-H Showman was Stacey Curnow of High Grade 4-H Club and Jodie Jones-Zandstra won the FFA class. Goat Showmanship was won by Edwin Orsonio-Centerwall.

Round Robin followed Showmanship the FFA Round Robin winner was Jodie Jones-Zandstra. For the Senior 4-H division, the winner was Stacey Curnow. In the 4-H Junior division, Sarah Teuscher, Cedarville 4-H Club earned the top award and the 4-H Novice winner was Rachel Stevenson. Friday concluded the week-long event with the CattleWomen's delicious Trip-tip Barbecue, followed by the awards ceremony and then the sale. Friday evening's Junior Livestock Show ceremonies began with the Awards Presentation with Pearce Flournoy announcing. Sponsors of the awards presented their trophies and cash awards in recognition of the members' hard work and dedication to their projects.

Eric Duarte, auctioneer, 114 lots, bringing in over $90,000. There were many factors involved in the success of this event, but none more important than the outstanding community support, strong Buyers' Committee and the hard work of the Junior Show Board. All groups should be commended for a job well done. This year's board was made up of seventeen members: Cassie Cockrell, President, Ashley Cockrell; Vice-President, Jodie Jones-Zandstra; Secretary/ Treasurer, Roseanne Ginochio, Landon Brown, Shawn Boulade, Shannon Ochs, Monica Vermillion, Beau Ferry, Stacey Curnow, Rachel Safford, Jake Bonham, Glen Kresge, Cassie Weaver, Megan McCulley, Will Welsh and Deidra Jeppson.

In addition, the board had tremendous assistance and support from the FFA Advisors, 4-H Leaders, parents, volunteer leaders and the community. Friday's sale began with the newly added division of Poultry. There were four members each selling a pen of two market poultry for an average price of $18.55 per pound. The rabbit division had two lots of single fryers and three groups of threes, selling for an average price of $42.48 per pound. Fifty-eight hogs sold for an average price of $3.30 per pound. Twelve head of steers went for an average price of $1.53 per pound. In the sheep division, 35 lambs sold for an average price of $5.59 per pound.

Dr. Tom Krauel and Curt Talbott started the sale off by purchasing the Grand Champion pen of two chicken from Anna Thorsborne-Nelson for $24.00 per pound. Reserve Champion went to Brandon Colbert and was purchased by Debbie Zolnay and B&V Trucking for $24.00 per pound. The Grand Champion Rabbit single fryer was bought by Fitts Ranch, Mike and Janet Kelly, LaDonna's Beauty, Atlantis Estates and was sold by Travis Orr for $75.00 per pound. Tristin Teuscher sold the Reserve Champion Single Fryer for $55.00 per pound to the Modoc District Fair. The Grand Champion Pen of Fryers was sold by Kyle Roberts and purchased for $47.50 by United Country Stevenson Realty. The Reserve Champion Pen of Fryers was sold by Alysha Northrup and purchased for $35.00 by High Desert Online. Heard Plumbing purchased the Grand Champion Market Hog from Jessica Strain for $6.50 per pound. Surprise Valley Electric purchased the Reserve Champion hog, raised by Landon Brown, for $3.50 per pound.

The Grand Champion Market Beef was raised by Jodie Jones-Zandstra and was purchased by the Modoc Veterinary Center, Merial Pharmaceuticals, Western Veterinary Supply, Pfizer Animal Health, Fort Dodge Pharmaceuticals, Schering Plough Pharmaceuticals, Inman and Company, Boehringer Englheim Pharmaceuticals and Y Tex Ear Tags for $2.75 per pound. Les Schwab purchased the Reserve Champion Market Beef raised by Rachel Imbach for $1.60 per pound.

Modoc Drilling purchased the Grand Champion Lamb from Ryan Imbach for $10.00 per pound. The Reserve Champion raised by Victor Madrigal was bought by Pat and Traci Green for $4.00 per pound.

Dr. and Mrs. Pat Sabin, DDS of Lakeview, Ore. gave $50.00 to each of their patients. Modoc Insurance Services added on $50.00 to all their clients' children. Lee Conner added on $25.00 to each of the Surprise Valley Lamb Project kids.

Auctioneer Eric Duarte again did a magnificent job. Eric Nelson, Tim MacDonnell, Monte French and Roy Bailey worked the ring and sought out the bidders. Wadsworth Stock Corrals from Orland floored the hog prices, Modoc Auction Yard floored the Beef prices, and Larranaga Ranch of Alturas, floored the Lamb prices again. Andy Weber, Weber Trucking and Eddie Ginochio generously donated their time and truck to haul the animals to the appropriate slaughter facilities. Frank Watkins of Frank Watkins Agency generously donated his time to take the pictures for the buyer's cards. Susie Philpott, K.C. Geaney, Jeanne Pearcy, Carmen Kresge and Debra Cockrell staffed the sale table. Nikki Duarte assisted Eric Duarte at the Auctioneer stand and Cathy Baldwin helped the sale table run smoothly and pointed out buyers for the kids.

Congratulations to all the members, and thank you to the leaders, parents, Junior Show Board members, Rotary, Buyer's Committee, and Ringmen for all their hard work in keeping the show running smoothly. A special thanks to the CDF-Devil's Garden Conservation Camp-Captain Kawayer and his fire fighting crew, thanks for all their hard work and with the upkeep of the John Cummings Memorial Show Grounds with over 5,000 man hours.

225 geese stolen from farm near Termo

A thief or thieves made off with about 225 young geese from Cummings Farms, east of Termo, sometime during the evening hours of June 26 or early on June 27, according to Ed Kranz, farm manager.

"We'd like our geese back," says Kranz, who is deeply troubled by the incident. He rhetorically asks, "How can people be so low?" Kranz, who has been raising fish in the desert, purchased 290 hatchlings as another of his experimental projects. His plan was to test the feasibility of raising the birds commercially.

For the first few weeks of their young lives, the goslings were kept in large, well-protected pens. While there were no evident attempts by predators to take the birds, Kranz determined that it would be possible to leave them in the field overnight in a giant, portable coop of his own design.

The night the goslings were taken, Kranz decided to leave them out to graze on their own, assuming that all would be well.

"That was a big mistake," moans Kranz, who feels responsible for not closing all 290 geese safely into the coop that night. The next morning, he could only find 52 remaining birds.

Thinking that his loss was possibly caused by predators, Kranz immediately contacted a state trapper, Kent Mullis. However, after carefully examining the area for signs of predators, Mullis concluded that coyotes had possibly taken a few geese, but could not account for the loss of over 200 birds. No other predator signs were found.

"We circled the whole thing, Ed and I, and there were no tracks leading away," says Mullis.

At that point Kranz concluded that the predator or predators were probably the two-legged variety. He contacted the Lassen County Sheriff's Department. Deputy Pete Holman was dispatched to investigate the incident.

Holman reported that there was no evidence since the perpetrators' footprints or tire tracks had been obliterated by searchers who had combed the field looking for the remaining geese the morning following the theft. Without that evidence and with no witnesses, there is little to go on. There are no suspects, according to Holman, who believes that this is a "fairly isolated" incident.

Kranz speculates that the perpetrators, who drove in under cover of darkness, had a distinct advantage since the geese were accustomed to humans and would not scatter upon their arrival. The thieves could have used a little feed as bait to draw the geese out of their coop or gather them out of the field, then easily ensnare them and load them into an enclosed vehicle, again using feed as an enticement. The whole operation would have taken only minutes, claims Kranz.

It may be that thieves knew something of the operations since the geese and their coop were located in an area away from the county road and farm outbuildings, making it nearly impossible for strangers to spot them or even know they were there.

The goslings were little more than five weeks old, weighing about five to seven pounds each - about the size of a fully-grown chicken. In six months, they would have been premium size for goose dinners. Kranz estimates their present value at about $10 per bird or $30 each at maturity, bringing the total loss to as much as $6000.

Kranz asks that anyone with information on the whereabouts of over 200 young geese contact the sheriff's office. He notes that the geese are still white with new feathers just beginning to show.

Kranz also makes an appeal to the perpetrators that they not give medicated feed to the geese. "It will kill them," he laments. "Most people don't know that."

Annual Modoc Picnic date set

The 60th annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 5 at the Carmichael Park in Carmichael, Calif.

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this annual potluck event. Bring a dish to share, own place setting and own beverage. Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advised to arrive early so that attendees may have a chance to visit before the group sits down to lunch.

Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The picnic will be located at the rear of the park, near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information please contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider (916) 645-2995.

Letters to the Editor

Need some better care

Dear Editor:

In reading Mr. Robert Byerley's current letter to the editor, I noted the following scripture verses stated incorrectly.

The first text taken from 2 Cor. 5:17 reads "old" (not "cold") things are passed away, all things become new."

The next text taken from Col. 3:3 reads "...your (our) life is hid (not 'kind') with Christ in God."

The third text misstated and taken from Col. 2:20 would read "Since you died (not did) with Christ to the basic principals of this world why do you submit to its rules."

Lastly, from the same Col. 2, text verse 23, the scripture states "Such regulations have an appearance of wisdom with their self-imposed worship, false humility (not 'humanity') and neglect of the body, but they lack any value in restraining sensual indulgence."

One error in a six inch column could be understandable, four are inexcusable.

If Mr. Byerley is presenting material which is illegible and you're guessing words, you might suggest he gets a typewriter.

If it is a case of carelessness or obfuscation, as it has appeared to be over time, I would correct the matter with immediacy.

The Word of God is precise and of truth and must be treated with all sacredness.

--Dick Bourdlaies Vya, Nev.

Help save the pack station

Dear Editor:

Regarding Pepperdine Pack Station, "We need to light a match to the place" said district ranger Edie Asrow, as quoted in a recent news article. Ever heard a statement as rude or with less compassion? This is so typical of the arrogant, heavy-handed and irresponsible attitude of some U.S. Forest Service employees.

According to a quote by Dan Chisholm, Modoc National Forest Supervisor, the Forest Service has the authority to "dispose of the cabins and return the site to its natural condition". What a shame! Our family and many of our friends, along with countless others, have used and enjoyed the pack station for many years. It has become a part of Modoc's history. Where does the Forest Service get off saying the camp has no historic value? It certainly has a 70 year historical value for many Modocers, as well as visitors from other areas.

It is unfortunate that individuals who may only be here for a few years have the authority to make changes that cannot be undone. What a shame that our great grandchildren would only see another empty meadow and never know the history of the area. We understand there is a deadline of July 1, after which, the destruction of the camp will begin. Once the camp is destroyed, it will be gone forever and can't be restored.

Why not follow the suggestion of Mr. Collis and the Modoc Historical Society that the original cabin be preserved and the camp be declared a historical site?

Anyone interested may contact Modoc National Headquarters at 800 W. 12th St., Alturas, CA 96101. Thank you.

--Jim and Barbie Chrysler Alturas

Community support great

Dear Editor:

I would like to thank the businesses and private individuals for all their support to make yet another outstanding Junior Livestock Show and Sale. The community support for the 4-H and FFA members is greatly appreciated. Thanks again for everything.

--Melinda Sandstrom 4-H Program Rep. Jr. Show Advisor Alturas

Obituaries

David Carter Ford

David Carter Ford, 46, passed away June 18, 2001 at Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Calif., following a long battle with diabetes.

David was born in Alturas, Calif. on December 16, 1955 to Roy and Mary Ford.

After graduating from Modoc High School in 1974, David attended College of the Siskiyous and earned his Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts in 1977.

David met his wife, Cheryl Coffin, in 1981 and he became an instant family man when he married her, along with her two children, Heather and Rob. David and Cheryl celebrated their 20 years of marriage recently.

During David's youth, he was active in Modoc Little League and high school sports, having won several awards for his achievements. David holds the distinction and honor of being the first basketball player to score points in the Griswold Gym at Modoc High School, after it was newly-opened. He continued to participate in sports as an adult, as well.

David worked as a logger, a mill hand and a laborer until he injured his back in 1985. He then went to work as a program specialist until he underwent a kidney transplant in 1991. He found joy in spending time with his family, coin collecting, reading, wood working and light gardening. He was preceded in death by his father and his brother Kenneth Ford.

He is survived by his wife Cheryl of Alturas; son Rob Waitron and wife Stacy of Boise, Idaho; daughter Heather Northrup and husband Kevin of Alturas; son Aaron Ford in the Navy; daughter Hilary Ford of Alturas; mother Mary Ford of Alturas; brothers and sisters Jim Ford and wife Barbara of Emmett, Idaho; John Ford and wife Charlotte of Alturas; and Barbara Aristo and husband Donald of Winnemucca, Nev.; nieces and nephews Gary Ford, Wendy Renfro, Holly Elliott, Andrew Ford all of Idaho; John "JJ" Ford of Reno; Katina Ford of Sacramento; Tiffany Ford of Alturas, and Brandon and Jordan Aristo of Winnemucca, Nev.; and numerous great nieces and nephews.

A memorial service was held Wednesday, June 20 at 2 p.m. at Faith Baptist Church. Pastor Rod Bodmer conducted the service.

Donations in memory of David may be made to the "David Ford Memorial Scholarship" in care of Plumas Bank, 520 North Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

Joseph Lee Parman

Joseph Lee Parman, a fifth generation rancher, who lived and loved cattle ranching for all his 75 years of life, passed away on June 15, 2001 in Cedarville, Calif.

Born September 11, 1925 in Lake City, Calif. to Vonetia and Lawrence Parman, he finished the ninth grade in Cedarville before deciding that ranching was what he wanted to do most in life. Always a hard worker, Mr. Parman also loved to ride horses and really enjoyed helping neighbors during branding season. He had a quiet dignity and self confidence about his work.

He met his wife and partner Bettie Wescott of Sacramento who was visiting in Cedarville when Joseph was 20. Their's has been a 55-year marriage meant to be, when they exchanged vows on March 28, 1946 at the Federated Church in Alturas, after a brief courtship. They reared three daughters and have enjoyed their grandchildren and great-grandchildren, as well. In their early years of marriage, Joe and Bettie raised 30 dairy cows and sold the milk to Mountain Lily Dairy in Alturas. In addition to the Lake City Ranch, the Parmans purchased two ranches in Nevada at Sand Creek, on the California and Nevada border and Board Corral. On January 1, 1997, a surprise raging mountain mud slide from the Warner Mountains, wiped out their Lake City ranch and home and brought heartache, but the couple endured. They relocated to a new home in Lake City, but Joe's health was declining, following years of battling allergies and asthma throughout his life on the ranch and later pneumonia. Bettie cared for her husband at home during his declining health.

The Rev. Dr. Ben Zandstra conducted services at the Surprise Valley Community Church, Cedarville on Monday, June 18, followed by a graveside service at the Lake City Cemetery.

- Mr. Parman is survived by his wife Bettie of Lake City; mother Vonetia Phipps of Yreka, Calif.; daughters Carol Ann Green and husband Nate of Wilder, Idaho; Nina and husband Ronnie Heard of Stockton, Calif.; Bonnie and Mickey Bunyard of Lake City; sister Joy Wilson and husband Harry Bill of Winnemucca, Nev.; sister Freda Wilson and husband Jim of Yreka; brother George Parman of Eureka, Nev.; five granddaughters, seven great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by grandson Joe Courtney of Lake City.

Donations in memory of Mr. Parman may be made to the charity of choice or to the Surprise Valley Community Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104.

SPORTS

'Super Bull' promises plenty of action

"We've had a great response from the bull riders and we'll have outstanding bull riders for the Cedarville show," expressed Dave Jones, President of Modoc Super Bull event coming up Saturday.

Exciting and fast action from professional bull riders from around the country and plenty of entertainment will take place during the fifth annual Modoc Super Bull Rodeo at the Modoc District Fairgrounds in Cedarville on Saturday, June 23.

Gates will open at 6:00 p.m. with the action to start at 7:00 p.m. in the Modoc District Fairgrounds arena. The two, to two-and-a-half hour event will be followed by a dance in the fairground's covered, but open pavilion. Participants will compete in Open Bull Riding in a six-event series, with the top Bull Rider and Bronc Rider to walk away with Red Bluff Buckles. Two thousand dollars has been added to this year's purse to attract riders. The finals will be held in McArthur on Labor Day weekend.

New this year will be the specialty act of Wild Bill Lyle of Morgan Hill, Calif. and clowns Tony Scott and Dominic Georgy. Guest PRCA Rodeo announcer Don Jesser and local announcer Eric Duarte will add even more style to the popular event. An added attraction will be the voice of Alturas' 10-year-old Megan Moore who will sing for the hometown crowd.

In addition to the bull riding, local riders will compete in the six head Ranch Bronc Riding and the daring Cowboy Poker. The last of four poker players still seated at the arena table, while a bull is running loose around the arena, wins. There is no entry fee for Cowboy Poker.

The Greater Surprise Valley Chamber of Commerce will be operating the concession stand with everything from hot dogs to hamburgers. The Cedarville Fire Department will offer beer and wine for those age-eligible spectators and follow up with a more extensive bar selection during the dance.

Dave Jones, experienced President of Modoc Super Bull, credits Warner Mountain Rodeo Productions owners Danny Reagan and Ed Hill of Surprise Valley for providing this year's stock for the event.

Spectator presale tickets are now available at $12 each at L&B Ranch Supply, Modoc Motor Parts, Seab's True Value, Jay's Clothing, in Alturas; Page's Market, Surprise Valley Motor Parts and Western Irrigation in Cedarville.

Tickets will be $15 at the gate. Admission is free for children under age 7.

Duck Race may finish park

The Alturas Rotary's 2001 Great Pit River Duck race may raise enough money to finish the projects at the Youth Park in Alturas. And that may be a real relief.

What's planned for this year's funds will be the construction of new restrooms, which will be handicapped accessible and make the walk from the new fields much shorter and less stressful.

The Rotary Youth Park has benefited from the proceeds from the Duck Race each year, netting above $30,000 each race. Those funds have built new ballfields, soccer areas and provided an accessible and quality athletic facility. It has also given the community a facility with no debt. The funds have also been used on the Junior Livestock Showgrounds and parking areas.

The Rotary Clubs sell 3,000 ducks at $25 each for the race. Those people who buy a minimum of four ducks also receive a Turbo Turtle, which gives them a special chance at an All Terrain Vehicle.

- The top prize this year is a new black Jeep Wrangler from Rotary and Carstens. That Jeep is parked near Plumas Bank. The race is scheduled for Fandango Days, July 7, about 2 p.m. It starts at the Estes Street bridge and finishes at the Main Street bridge. With the drought year, organizers are hoping the ducks swim in pretty shallow water.

Tickets have always sold out prior to the race, so it's advisable to purchase tickets early. Each ticket comes with a coupon book full of valuable discounts.

The prizes are pretty exceptional and this year may be the best and most. The race has come a long way since it started in 1996 with just six prizes. Second prize is a six-person hot tub from Rotary and North State Mobile Homes; third is a complete 12-foot fishing boat setup with motor and trailer from Rotary and J&S Roofing; fourth is a Monitor heater from Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum; fifth, a set of four tires from Les Schwab; sixth, a Buzz Electric Scooter from Seab's True Value; and as follows: one family membership at Arrowhead Golf Course; D-Z Lift Chair from Home Medical; Whirlpool refrigerator from Phillips Appliance; Hunter Ceiling fan and light from Randall Electric; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; a dozen donuts per week for a year from the Donut Shop; 55 gallons of oil from Don Harbert Oil; $300 gift certificate from Four Corners; load of driveway rock from Fitch Gravel; one $5 car wash per week for a year from Williams Texaco; $250 in Modoc Bucks from Modoc Respiratory Care; an Optimus Stereo Keyboard from Seab's Electronics; a $250 auto care gift certificate from Walton's Auto Care; a free muffler and tail pipe from Ron Campbell, Inc.;, a Husqvarna chainsaw from Modoc Engines; two tons of grass hay from Likely Land and Livestock; facial/cosmetic/wardrobe lesson from Classie Lassie; pedicure/manicure, color or perm products from Kaleidoscope Family Salon; two night motel stay at Best Western; one pair of sunglasses from Dr. Tom Krauel; one night stay and dinner for two at Mill Creek Lodge; one night retreat and spa package at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging; one weekday night stay at Surprise Valley Hot Springs Villa; 25 movies passes to the Niles Theater; toilet and tank from A&M Plumbing; truck lettering, vinyl graphics from Planet Press; free pair of shoes from Family Footwear; handcrafted clock by Jim Russell; $100 savings bond from Bank of America; one dozen roses from Susan's Flowers; 12 sessions of tanning from Kelly's Hair Studio; a $100 savings bond from U.S. Bank; and a Tidal Wave rocket kit from Lucy's Hobbies. Tickets are available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Modoc Classic car show shaping up great for Fandango

One of the real highlights of Modoc's Fandango Days, The Modoc Classic Cruisers Car Show and Shine is shaping up well.

The local club normally has 70 to 100 sparkling classic cars show up for the event. Some of the really cool classics are owned by local members of the club. Cars come from throughout the region. The night before the show, the group is hosting a Poker Run.

The 11th annual car show has registration beginning at 7 a.m. July 7 at Veteran's Memorial Park. Those cars wishing to join the Fandango Parade will line up at 9 a.m. and the show and shine will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Car show awards will be presented following the Alturas Rotary Duck Race, which begins at 2 p.m. The Classic Cruisers are also offering a raffle for a cherry 1969 Jeep Jeepster, shown at Alturas Tire. Prices for the Jeepster raffle are seven tickets for $5 and spending $20 gets a buyer an extra ticket on drawing for wheels and tires valued at $600. The Jeepster winning ticket will be drawn at the Car Show July 7. The proceeds fund the Classic Cruisers annual scholarship.

The Poker Run July 6 is from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and starts at the City Park. The cost is $5 per hand with the winner receiving $500 and the low hand will win $250. Registered participants in the car show get one free hand and the event is open to the public.

Silver Streak series ongoing

M.H.A. Silver Streak Series continues this Sunday, June 24, 8:00 a.m., at the roping arena in Alturas.

All ages and levels of skills are welcome. Events are held in four speed divisions. Included are barrels, poles, single stake and Birangle-potato races. Jackpot classes will run if there is enough interest. Cost is $3.00 for M.H.A. members, per run; non-members, $4.00. For more information, call 233-3179; leave a message for Wendy.

MHA hosts All English Schooling Show

The Modoc Horseman's Association has scheduled their second show of the season for Sunday, June 24, 2001. The All English Schooling Show will be held in Alturas at the Junior Livestock Showgrounds. Entry fees per class: $3.00 M.H.A. Members and $4.00 for nonmembers

The show will begin at 9:00 a.m., however the office will be open at 7:00 a.m. for early sign-ups. There will be no refunds on "scratches". No show clothing/equipment is required as this is a "fun" show. However, helmets are required in all classes.

A total of 29 classes are scheduled which include: Model Hunter (Halter); English Pleasure Warm Up, Walk/Trot; English Pleasure & English Equitation. For those "jumping" enthusiasts 13 classes are available and include: Hunter Hack; Low Hunter Over Fences; Hunter Over Fences & Open Jumper.

Three classes are on tap for those wishing to show their "Junior" horses (five years & under): English Pleasure Warm Up, Walk/Trot; English Pleasure, and Hunter Hack.

High Point awards for the day will be presented in four age divisions: 12 & under, 13 through 17, 18 through 39 and 40 & over (age as of January 1, 2001.) These winners will be based on the same horse/rider (the horse is to be ridden by only one rider) combination.

For further information or to request a program/entry please contact Pat Gaylord, P.O. Box 160, Adin, CA (530) 299-3310.

JUNE 28, 2001

 

State well program going strong in Tulelake

If there was any doubt about the severity of the 2001 drought, California Department of Water Resources Northern District Chief Dwight Russell put it into perspective at Tuesday's Modoc Board of Supervisor's meeting. "Our latest information shows this is the worst drought on record," Russell said, prior to presenting a positive report on the state's emergency well drilling program in the Tulelake Basin. "This is only the second time in state history that an emergency has been declared because of drought." Modest precipitation Monday and Tuesday did not put a dent in the drought conditions, but did settle the dust around the county. Tuesday, the Board also voted to continue the emergency designation with supervisors acknowledging things are looking worse.

Russell and his department received high praise from Supervisors Tuesday, for the quick implementation following Governor Gray Davis' proclamation of an emergency in Siskiyou and Modoc Counties on May 4. That declaration came quickly on the heels of the Bureau of Reclamation's decision April 6 to shut off water to most farmers in the basin. The shut off came because of the drought in an effort to protect endangered coho salmon in the Klamath River and suckers in Klamath Lake and the basin. The decision came after a federal judge ruled the BOR had violated the Endangered Species Act last year by releasing water to the irrigators without consulting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife and Marine Fisheries Agencies.

Governor's Davis' Office of Emergency Services allocated $5 million to drill at least 14 wells, hoping to provide about 30,000 gallons per minute for cover crop irrigation. That drilling program began May 26 and the results have astounded the DWR.

The governor is also looking for $1 million to fund groundwater investigation starting in July and another $1 million for resolution of water rights issues and a long-term solution of water supply issues in the Klamath Basin.

Russell said the first well came in at 750 feet, well short of the projected 2,000 foot depth and was a real gusher, spewing 9,500 gpm. DWR had projected an average depth of 2,000 feet per well and an output of 2,000 gpm per well.

Well number one was a real bright spot in an otherwise dark period for the Tulelake Basin. The first well is expected to serve about 5,000 acres. Russell is optimistic the remaining 13 wells will be productive and could enable more land to receive water and hopefully provide a cash crop for some farmers this year.

The water is also available for wildlife use, said Russell, and is being tested for quality. He sees no real water quality issues since other wells have been operating in the basic for decades.

As of June 22, another well had been completed and a third was being drilled. One was drilled to a depth of 2,370 feet and is currently being tested. Russell said the cooperation of local, state and federal agencies and governments has been instrumental in the success of the drilling program. Russell also stressed his agency will be testing to insure the new wells do not adversely impact existing wells. Additionally, Oregon ground water laws are different than California's and since six of these new wells and being drilled along the Oregon border, the issues are more complex. Russell fully expects the drilling program to continue on what has been a quick pace and is pleased with the success so far. He credits the Tulelake Irrigation District and the Westside Improvement District for their assistance in the program. He was also pleased with the state and federal agencies working on the project.

DA assistant position status still in limbo

The question of whether District Attorney Tom Buckwalter will be able to hire an assistant DA remains in limbo following Tuesday's meeting of the Board of Supervisors.

There are some members of the board who do not see the need for the position and others who see the need of part time, or emergency coverage. The issue came to light when the Board opted to establish a separate county counsel position following a case where Buckwalter filed charges against two county Child Protective Service workers. Those charges were eventually dropped.

The addition of the new county counsel position, which had been a duty of the District Attorney's office, amounts to about $160,000 annually, including staff and office space.

What's in question now is whether Buckwalter needs the full time Assistant DA he had until the termination and departure of Jordan Funk, at the end of May.

Supervisor Mike Dunn is most insistent there needs to be no help, while other members of the board indicate the county needs some coverage, at least, at times when Buckwalter is unavailable.

One of the key points to law enforcement is that once an arrest is made, charges have to be filed within 48 hours. Additionally, they worry that some cases may not get the attention they deserve because of time constraints. Dunn said he just can't justify funding an Assistant DA position. Buckwalter currently has an extra-help assistant DA who is working about 37.5 hours per week.

Buckwalter also presented the Board with his work time study that showed him working an average of just over 13 hours per day over a six-day period. He told the board flatly that without an assistant he will not be working weekends to take up the slack.

Supervisor Willy Hagge said he felt Buckwalter should come back at the next meeting with "an array" of options for the board to consider, including part-time, half-time or even a retired DA out of a Public Employee Retirement pool to help out. Hagge said he can't justify a full time position. Hagge also pointed out to Dunn that simply approving the ordinance to establish the position doesn't mean it will be filled unless the board approves.

Actually, on the agenda item following the establishment of the position, the board voted that Buckwalter could not fill the position permanently until the issue is fully resolved. The Board did approve Buckwalter continuing with this extra help assistant through July 31.

Buckwalter insists his workload for his office requires a full time assistant, while the majority of the board is leaning against that idea. Supervisor Patricia Cantrall said she has heard from some members of law enforcement and they're concerned that a lack of an assistant could have negative impacts on their work.

- Supervisor Nancy Huffman said she also believes there needs to be coverage, but can't see that meaning a full time assistant. The issue is scheduled to come back at the next board meeting on July 3.

Drought forces emergency horse, livestock removal

More than 400 wild horses will be rounded up, and hundreds of cattle are being taken off public ranges more than three months earlier than normal, as a record drought continues to impact extreme northwestern Nevada. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Field Office in Cedarville says operations will begin Thursday, June 28, to round up wild horses in the Little High Rock Canyon and Fox Hog herd areas before they begin to die of dehydration.

- "Normally, reliable water sources are now dry," said BLM Field Manager Susie Stokke. "This is forcing the horses to congregate on the few water sources that remain, and those waters will not last much longer. We will leave 48 horses in the Little High Rock herd area and about 70 horses in the east pasture of Fox Hog. There is no livestock in either area."

Stokke said the emergency gathers are being conducted separately from the current work to determine the appropriate management level for the Little High Rock herd. The Surprise Field Office is currently accepting public comments on an environmental assessment setting the herd management level. Comments will be accepted until Thursday, July 5.

Horses taken from the region will be trucked to the BLM's Wild Horse and Burro Corrals from grazing allotments that normally support grazing until September.

"I've heard from nay ranchers who are bringing their cattle home now. At the low elevations, the grass just didn't grow and the water is scarce," Stokke said. "The drought could have a devastating impact on many of these ranching operations."

Stokke said she has authorized emergency water hauling in some areas where there is livestock forage, but no water.

Precipitation records available to the BLM indicate the drought is the worst on record, Stokke said. Unseasonably hot spring weather intensified the conditions caused by a winter that brought less than half the normal amount of precipitation.

MJUSD opts to go forward with gym

The Modoc Joint Unified School District Board of Trustees opted to move forward with plans to construct a new gymnasium at Alturas Elementary School at Tuesday night's meeting.

Plans are to construct the facility near the elementary school. It will include a gymnasium, music room, stage and kitchen facilities at an estimated cost of about $2.2 million. According to Superintendent Dr. Kevin Jolly, one of the real positives about this plan is the state would pay for 50 percent of the cost, if approved, with the district picking up the other half. No bond issue would be required.

The district is holding a second public meeting on the project July 17, 7:30 p.m. at the district offices. Plans and architect drawings will be available. Currently, the music departments, lunch program staff and Alturas Elementary School Principal Randy Wise are going over the initial plans to make recommendations.

The public will have its chance to comment or suggest changes at the July 17 meeting. One of the key elements is that the public have access to use the facility.

Cruisers invite public for poker run July 6

The Modoc Classic Cruisers Car Show and Shine is shaping up well and will once again be a major highlight of the Alturas Fandango celebration. The local club normally has 70 to 100 classic cars and pickups show up for the event. The vehicles come from throughout the region. The night before the show, the group is hosting a Poker Run. The poker run is open to the public and doesn't require a classic car.

- The 11th annual car show has registration beginning at 7 a.m. July 7 at Veteran's Memorial Park. Those cars wishing to join the Fandango Parade will line up at 9 a.m. and the show and shine will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Car show awards will be presented following the Alturas Rotary Duck Race, which begins at 2 p.m.

The Classic Cruisers are also offering a raffle for a great 1969 Jeep Jeepster, shown at Alturas Tire. Prices for the Jeepster raffle are seven tickets for $5 and spending $20 gets a buyer an extra ticket on drawing for wheels and tires valued at $600. The Jeepster winning ticket will be drawn at the Car Show July 7. The proceeds fund the Classic Cruisers annual scholarship.

The Poker Run July 6 is from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and starts at the City Park. The cost is $5 per hand with the winner receiving $500 and the low hand will win $250. Registered participants in the car show get one free hand and the event is open to the public.

Historic Sugar Hill Lookout suffers extensive damage

Visitors to the Sugar Hill Lookout recently discovered that it had been heavily vandalized and immediately reported the damage. Sugar Hill Lookout is located on Modoc National Forest's Warner Mountain Ranger District.

Vandals pulled wooden shutters away from the frame of the building, broke all the windows, and destroyed the furniture and most of the interior paneling. After wreaking such havoc, they then threw all the furniture, appliances and fire detection equipment onto the ground and rock piles below the lookout.

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed the lookout in 1931. It was the first K-B tower (battered, open galvanized steel angle iron K-brace) erected in California and has been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. It is now only occasionally used to detect fires. The site has become a popular spot for hang gliders. Hang gliders from throughout the United States, Canada, and other countries launch from Sugar Hill while participating in National Hang Gliding Competitions. They return each year, considering this a prime area for soaring.

The Forest Service is offering $500 reward for information leading to the identification and prosecution of suspects. Every effort will be made to ensure confidentiality. For further information or to report vandalism, contact the U.S.F.S. at (530) 252-6400 or (530) 667-8660.

Stokke heading towards BLM position in Nevada state office

Susie Stokke, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Field Office Manager, will be leaving her position in August to become the Assistant Deputy State Director for Renewable Resources for the BLM's Nevada State Office in Reno.

A replacement for Stokke has not yet been named.

"I feel privileged to have worked in Modoc County for the past 12 years," said Stokke, who served seven years on the Modoc National Forest before joining the BLM in Cedarville. "Here in the Surprise Field Office, I am proud of the work we have accomplished in partnership with the ranchers and all other interested in the public lands. We have worked together on the ground to find solutions to resource management issues that will provide the foundation to sustain ranching and healthy public lands for our communities."

In a letter to the Modoc County Board of Supervisors, BLM California State Director Mike Pool expressed pride in Stokke's work, and pledged to keep Modoc County interests in mind when selecting a replacement.

"This represents a promotion and a wonderful opportunity for Susie professionally and personally, and we are sorry to see her go," Pool said. In her new position, Stokke will work closely with Nevada BLM managers and resource specialists on natural resource management issues across the state where BLM manages 48 million acres of public lands. Stokke has more than 20 years' experience in natural resources. She started her career with the BLM in Susanville, and worked with the Forest Service in North Dakota, Montana, Oregon and Nevada before moving to Modoc County. She rejoined the BLM as Surprise Field Manager in 1995.

Radar 'conditioning' period ends with June

Starting July 1, 2001, the 30-day "conditioning" verbal warning period of radar enforcement on all maximum speed zones on all public roads within the county, will end. Citations will be given as deemed necessary by the Modoc Office California Highway Patrol Officers starting July 1.

In an effort to make county roads safer, which have been deemed "high accident" and "high complaint" areas, the Modoc Office of California Highway Patrol notified the public in May that CHP officers would be working radar enforcement on all maximum speed zones on all public roads within the county.

Allowing for a 30-day "conditioning" period for the public, the CHP officers have been issuing verbal warnings. But, with the onset of the first of July, in time for the Independence Day holiday traffic, the public is being apprised that citations will be given as deemed necessary by CHP officers. The CHP is taking action on the request of the Modoc County Board of Supervisors in cooperation with Modoc County Road Department. They will be taking seriously the speeding complaints on many public county roads including, but not limited to County Rd. 1 in Eagleville; Pencil Road, Centerville Road and County Rd. 91.

Top knotch cattle dogs coming to World Champion Challenge

Something new will be pulling into Alturas this August, with a crowd expected to follow it out to the Bill and Carolyn Wilson Ranch.

The attraction will be the second annual World Champion Cow Dog Challenge presented by the Western Cow Dog Association, from August 9 though 12. The world's best cattle dogs and handlers will vie for the title of "World Champion Cow Dog" and a share of the estimated $32,000 in cash and prizes. These actual working dogs display their intelligence and show off their cattle handling skills.

The Wilson Ranch will provide the 1,000 head of cattle needed, some horses and the ranch grounds to stage the show. Spectating will be free admission, but entry fees are $400 with a limit of two dogs per handler.

Competition will run 50 dogs in a day in two arenas, say promoters and Challenge Board members Al and Stacie Vieira of Orland, who were in Alturas this week in preparation for the event. Handlers will ride horseback to keep the "western flavor to it," notes Stacie, which is not the case at some trials.

In addition, Alturas Rural Fire Department will offer concessions and vendors are encouraged to contact the Alturas Chamber of Commerce if interested in participating.

Al Vieira, who retired this June from 36 years of teaching at California State University, Chico, has 40 years of experience in showing and training working cattle dogs at the family's Orland home where they operate "Vieira's Stock Dogs, Home of the Diamond Dogs."

Vieira is a familiar face to some Modoc residents for having started the stockdog sale at the Red Bluff Bull Sale in 1980. He is also a part of the Western Cow Dog Association.

The Challenge Committee includes President, Mike Gaston of Chico; Secretary, Stacie Vieira; Association and Challenge Treasurer, Carol Sartori and Cow Dog Association Secretary, Patty Wells. The Association Board includes Al Vieira, Dave Ward, Butch Sartori, and Roger Urricelqui of McArthur, who suggested the Wilson Ranch and approached the Wilsons with the idea, knowing of Bill's past involvement with the Masten Ramsey Stockhorse Jubilee Benefit for the D.A.R.T. Center. The Junior Showgrounds in Alturas were first considered for the setting, but the Wilsons said they would host the event at the ranch.

The inaugural show was held to be held in conjunction with the Reno Ranch Rodeo, until the rodeo was canceled in 2000. The Challenge continued on its own and was held at a ranch in Fernley and at the University of Reno, Nev. last year with some 1500 to 2000 guessed to have been spectators.

Dogs and handlers came from throughout the U.S. including Oklahoma and Texas and from as far as Canada and New Zealand. The New Zealand dog won the competition. Some 50 handlers responded last year to the format with rules.

"It's a family thing," described Stacie Vieira of the four-day event. Some people come in their RV's, with their dogs and horses in tow, or they stay in motels for the live competition.

The Vieiras noted last year, the Sheep Dog Trials were held at the Running Y Resort in Klamath Falls, Ore., but these dogs in August will solely be working cattle.

- Each year, working cow dog trials are held in many states around the country. Based on the skills needed by actual working dogs to perform everyday tasks at home on the ranch, these trials are condensed into a competitive format. Those numerous trials now have an annual culmination in the inception of the World Champion Cow Dog Challenge. More than just an average dog trial, it will offer one of the largest purses ever for a stockdog trial, it also offers other events including a Junior Handlers Challenge for handlers 18 years and younger and a Calcutta before the finals. Four action-packed days of competition will be the goal. "These dogs prove that they are not only man's friends, they are also his best helper," said Stacie.

Annual Modoc Picnic date set

The 60th annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 5 at the Carmichael Park in Carmichael, Calif.Ê

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this annual potluck event. Bring a dish to share, own place setting and own beverage. Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advised to arrive early so that attendees may have a chance to visit before the group sits down to lunch.

Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The picnic will be located at the rear of the park, near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information please contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider (916) 645-2995.

Wood Artisans show in works for Fandango show opening

Plans for the Art Center's annual Wood Artisans Show are now being readied with the opening reception scheduled for Fandango Friday, July 6, from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the center, 317 So. Main St., Alturas. Additional artists and craftsmen interested in participating may phone Pat Schluter at 233-3556 (work) or 233-5207 (home). Items including furniture, frames, toys, carvings, decorative painting, driftwood sculpture, wood art objects, shelves, chests, racks and both fun and functional gadgets will be featured throughout the month of July.

Opportunity to help

The Art Center is currently seeking people who are interested in helping to keep the Art Center's doors open to the public Tuesdays through Saturdays during the summer or longer, if willing. For information about becoming a volunteer and to arrange times and days, please call Margot Curtis at 233-2730 or the Art Center at (530) 233-2574.

Prepare for fun as C.A.T. Presents outdoor comedy in Rose Garden

Cedarville Actors Theater (C.A.T.) has been presenting impromptu and informal evenings in Surprise Valley, much to the delight of their audiences. The few in number, but talented and experienced acting group, will open their first formally-staged production for the public, with Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit during three outdoor performances.

The set has been constructed and the actors are ready for opening night Friday, June 29 at 7:30 p.m., followed by a Saturday, June 30 show at 7:30 p.m. and July 1, Sunday matinee at 3:00 p.m. in the Country Hearth's Rose Garden in Cedarville.

"Blithe Spirit is a wonderful English comedy that pokes a great deal of fun at British society and its pretenses," describes Sandy Boldon, co-organizer of C.A.T. Boldon and good friend and fellow actor Ellen Thornton, who recently relocated from Ashland, Ore. to Ft. Bidwell, formed Cedarville Actors Theater, a small, improvisational theater group.

The Actors

Blithe Spirit , written by Noel Coward and first performed in 1941, revolves around Charles Condomine, played by David Bowling, a 40-year-old novelist who lives in his quiet country home with his wife of seven years, Ruth, played by Sandy Boldon, and their housemaid, Edith, played by Nancy North-Gates.

To gather background information for a novel he's writing about a murdering trance medium, Charles invites his local mystic, Professor Arcati, played by Larry Shippen, to his home to stage a seance. He and Ruth, together with their good friends, the cynical Dr. Violet Bradman, played by Leni Sinclair, and her gullible husband, George, played by John Thornton, settle in to try to connect with the spirit world.

And connect they do, to disastrous results, as Charles' first wife, Elvira played by Ellen Thornton, is called from the astral plane and is trapped in Charles and Ruth's home, where she throws trantrums, pouts and flirts her way back into Charles' life.

Ruth decides to take drastic action to rid her home of Elvira's influences, and the result is a hilarious whirlwind of miscues and other-worldly happenings that propel the story to its crazy outcome.

The outdoor performances will be staged in the Country Hearth Restaurant's Rose Garden, 551 Main St., Cedarville. Tickets are $5 and available at the door or at the Country Hearth Restaurant.

- In case of inclement weather, the show will go on, but it will be held inside Surprise Valley Community Church on Bonner St., Cedarville.

C.A.T. is not a part of Modoc Performing Arts Theater, although several of the actors are and have been involved with MPAT productions.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

Vandals hit preschool

Dear Editor:

We, the children of The Budding Tree preschool, located next door to St. Michael's Episcopal Church, would like to let you and the community know that because of vandalism, we can not go outside to play until our teachers put equipment back to where it was because of safety reasons.

dog collars and other pieces of clothing. We also ask that our neighbors around us please keep an eye on our school and let the police know if there is anyone trying to destroy our school.

--The Children and staff of Budding Tree Alturas

OBITUARIES

None this week

 

SPORTS

 

Duck Race motoring right along to July 7

The major event of the Alturas Fandango celebration, Alturas Rotary's Great Pit River Duck Race, is motoring right along.

The actual Duck Race takes place July 7, 2 p.m. starting at the Estes Street bridge on the Pit River and finishing at the Main Street bridge. The race attracts most everyone celebrating the holiday with a huge crowd at the Main Street bridge and lining the river.

The event is sponsored jointly by the Alturas Sunrise and Alturas Lunch Rotary Clubs. Proceeds from the Duck Race each year, netting above $30,000 each race, benefit the Youth Park in Alturas. Those funds have built new ballfields, soccer areas and provided an accessible and quality athletic facility. The funds have also been used on the Junior Livestock Showgrounds and parking areas.

The Rotary Clubs sell 3,000 ducks at $25 each for the race. Those people who buy at least four ducks also receive a Turbo Turtle, which gives them a special chance at an All Terrain Vehicle. There are still tickets available, but they always sell out prior to the race, so it's advisable to get tickets as soon as possible.

The top prize this year is a new black Jeep Wrangler from Rotary and Carstens. Tickets have always sold out prior to the race, so it's advisable to purchase tickets early. Each ticket comes with a coupon book full of valuable discounts.

The prizes are pretty exceptional and this year may be the best and most. The race has come a long way since it started in 1996 with just six prizes.

Second prize is a six-person hot tub from Rotary and North State Mobile Homes;

third is a complete 12-foot fishing boat setup with motor and trailer from Rotary and J&S Roofing;

fourth is a Monitor heater from Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum;

fifth, a set of four tires from Les Schwab;

sixth, a Buzz Electric Scooter from Seab's True Value;

and as follows:one family membership at Arrowhead Golf Course; D-Z Lift Chair from Home Medical; Whirlpool refrigerator from Phillips Appliance; Hunter Ceiling fan and light from Randall Electric; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; a dozen donuts per week for a year from the Donut Shop; 55 gallons of oil from Don Harbert Oil; $300 gift certificate from Four Corners; load of driveway rock from Fitch Gravel; one $5 car wash per week for a year from Williams Texaco; $250 in Modoc Bucks from Modoc Respiratory Care; an Optimus Stereo Keyboard from Seab's Electronics; a $250 auto care gift certificate from Walton's Auto Care; a free muffler and tail pipe from Ron Campbell, Inc.; a Husqvarna chainsaw from Modoc Engines; two tons of grass hay from Likely Land and Livestock; facial/cosmetic/wardrobe lesson from Classie Lassie; pedicure/manicure, color or perm products from Kaleidoscope Family Salon; two night motel stay at Best Western; one pair of sunglasses from Dr. Tom Krauel; one night stay and dinner for two at Mill Creek Lodge; one night retreat and spa package at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging; one weekday night stay at Surprise Valley Hot Springs Villa; 25 movies passes to the Niles Theater; toilet and tank from A&M Plumbing; truck lettering, vinyl graphics from Planet Press; free pair of shoes from Family Footwear; handcrafted clock by Jim Russell; $100 savings bond from Bank of America; one dozen roses from Susan's Flowers; 12 sessions of tanning from Kelly's Hair Studio; a $100 savings bond from U.S. Bank; and a Tidal Wave rocket kit from Lucy's Hobbies. Tickets are available from any Rotary member and at many businesses, including Seab's True Value, Home Medical, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, 4-Corners Market and 12th Street Texaco.

Alturas Men's softball league standings

Standings of the Alturas Men's Softball League as of June 26 are as follows: Pepsi, 5-1; Lakeview 5-1; Alturas Tire 3-1; Hooters 2-3; Styx 1-4 and Warriors 0-6.

The schedule for this week is: Thursday, 4 Corners vs Alturas Tire, 6:30 p.m. Hooters Vs Warriors, 8:30 p.m., both in Alturas; Friday, Lakeview Vs Hooters, 6:30 p.m. in Cedarville, Lakeview Vs Styx, 8:30 p.m. in Cedarville.

Low water means trout plants modified

State trout hatcheries are stepping up the pace of their fish plants in many northern watersheds because of dry, warm conditions that have dropped water levels and raised temperatures at some fishing sites, and may soon do the same at others.

The Department of Fish and Game's Region 1 office said a second year of relatively light snowpack in the north state's mountain ranges east and west of Interstate 5 has caused some early changes in trout release schedules at Darrah Springs and Crystal Lake hatcheries in Shasta County and Mt. Shasta Hatchery in Siskiyou County.

"We've got September water conditions in June," said Chuck Keys, Darrah Springs manager.

The DFG said the number of waters remaining on planting schedules continues to far outweigh the number being dropped. Examples of mainstays expected to receive fish for many weeks to come include sections of upper Hat Creek, Lake Siskiyou, the upper Sacramento River, Baum Lake, Grace Lake, McCloud River, South Fork Battle Creek, Deer Creek, Whiskeytown Lake and Lewiston Lake.

The hatcheries have been planting between 20 and 30 waters weekly six of Region 1's eight north states counties.

Fish and Game said the results of each week's trout plants for Tehama, Trinity, Siskiyou, Shasta, Lassen and Modoc counties are described beginning Friday afternoons on a recorded telephone message from the DFG office. The number is (530) 225-2146.

Stocking parameters recommended that the sport-sized rainbow, brown and brook trout "catchable" size in DFG parlance -- not be stocked in streams flowing at below 10 cubic feet per second if the water temperature reaches a sustained 75 degrees or in lakes with a surface temperature of 78 degrees.

Streams with as little as two-cubic-feet-per-second flow may be stocked with sport-sized trout if their temperatures are below 70 degrees. The flow and temperature relationship help determine the water's oxygen content. Fish and Game said the terribly dry year east of the Cascade Range forced Crystal Lake Hatchery to cancel eight eastside waters without making any trout plants this year. The eight are the middle Susan River and Buckhorn, Long, McCoy Flat, Round Corral and Smith Flat reservoirs in Lassen County and Dorris Reservoir in Modoc County.

Some waters already planted may reach very low, or dry conditions by year's end, the hatchery said.

Mt. Shasta Hatchery said plants are being increased in frequency as Siskiyou County's seriously dry conditions peak. The hatchery said it has ceased plants at Bass Lake, Greenhorn Reservoir and Little Shasta River and experts to eliminate further plants within the coming month at Antelope Creek, the lower end of Butte Creek, Lake Shastina, Eden Pond and Mumbo and Gumboot lakes.

Carville Pond in Trinity County also is expected to soon fall below the plantable criteria, according to the hatchery.

Darrah Springs said it has halted plants at Gurnsey Creek along Highway 36 and the upper Hamilton Branch of the Feather River. Some scheduled stream plants are expected to be shifted to lakes as the summer wears on, the DFG said.

English Horse Show results

The Modoc Horseman's Association presented an "All English" Schooling Show at the Junior Livestock Showgrounds on Sunday, June 24. This was the second in their series of five horse shows this year.

Their next event is the (formal) Midsummer Classic event and is planned for two days, August 4 and 5, with one day being devoted to English classes and the other to Western classes. Programs for the "Classic" will be in the mail shortly after July 4.

Last Sunday's English show was judged by Debbie Hunt of Davis Creek. Vicki Hughes, not only was general manager of the event, but she also served as announcer for the day. Ryan Verling, from Klamath Falls, did a fine job presenting ribbons all day long. The jumping classes were designed and supervised by Julie Miller. Craig Miller's assistance with the P.A. system was appreciated. Susie Younger, Dyan Sponseller and Joe Bonham helped in several capacities, from working the gate to helping set up and take down the jumps.

A special thank you from M.H.A. goes to Jerry Cooley and the City of Alturas. Thanks to Jerry for donating the services of his water truck to keep the dust down, and to the City for donating the water.

High Points Awards presented in three age groups.

The winners were as follows:

12 and Under: Champion - Caitlin Doshier riding T.C. Dun Deal; Reserve - Dylan Sponseller riding Smokin' Cherokee.

13 thru 17: Champion - Elizabeth Younger riding Smokin' Frecklesnic; Reserve - Cindy Anderson riding Joe's Magic Merlin.

18 thru 39: Champion - Carmen Anderson riding Ginger; Reserve - Veronica Allan riding Ultimate Lake (tied with) Marisa Brooke riding Skip My Esteem.

40 and Over: Julie Miller riding I'm Super Well Dun; Reserve - Lynn Leehmann riding Major Cool.

Individual class placings are as follows:

Model Hunter - Mares: 1st - Carmen Anderson; 2nd - Lois Barron; 3rd Tutsy Wilson; 4th - Leon Barron.

Model Hunter - Gelding/Stallions: 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Cindy Anderson; 3rd - Marisa Brooke; 4th - Lynn Leehmann; 5th - Julie Miller.

English Pleasure W/T - 12 and Under: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Hannah Moyer; 3rd - Dylan Sponseller; 4th - Tim Verling; 5th - Anna Nelson.

- English Pleasure W/T - 13 thru 17: 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Kate Hill; 3rd - Cindy Anderson.

English Pleasure W/T - 18 thru 39: 1st - Carmen Anderson; 2nd - Veronica Allan; 3rd - Marissa Brooke.

English Pleasure W/T - 40 and Over: 1st - Julie Miller; 2nd - Lynn Leehmann.

English Pleasure W/T - Junior Horse: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Julie Miller; 3rd - Kate Hill; 4th - Marisa Brooke; 5th - Veronica Allan.

English Pleasure - 12 and Under: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Hannah Moyer; 3rd - Dylan Sponseller; 4th - Anna Nelson; 5th - Tim Verling.

English Pleasure - 13 thru 17: 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Cindy Anderson; 3rd - Kate Hill.

English Pleasure - 18 thru 39: Carmen Anderson; 2nd - Veronica Allan; 3rd - Marisa Brooke; 4th - Theresa Newell.

English Pleasure - 40 and Over: 1st - Julie Miller; 2nd - Lynn Leehmann.

English Pleasure - Junior Horse: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Cindy

-Anderson; 3rd - Julie Miller; 4th - Veronica Allan; 5th - Carmen Anderson.

English Equitation - 12 and Under: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Dylan Sponseller; 3rd - Tim Verling; 4th - Hannah Moyer; 5th - Anna Nelson.

English Equitation - 13 thru 17: 1st - Cindy Anderson; 2nd - Elizabeth Younger; 3rd - Kate Hill.

English Equitation - 18 thru 39: 1st - Carmen Anderson; 2nd - Veronica Allan; 3rd - Marisa Brooke; 4th - Theresa Newell.

English Equitation - 40 & Over: 1st - Julie Miller; 2nd - Lynn Leehmann.

Hunter Hack - 12 and Under: 1st - Caitlin Doshier; 2nd - Dylan Sponseller; 3rd - Hannah Moyer; 4th - Tim Verling; 5th - Anna Nelson.

Hunter Hack - 13 thru 17: 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Kate Hill.

Hunter Hack - 18 thru 39: 1st - Marisa Brooke; 2nd - Carmen Anderson; 3rd - Theresa Newell.

Hunter Hack - 40 and Over: 1st - Julie Miller; 2nd Lynn Leehmann; 3rd - Tracy Nelson.

Hunter Hack - Junior Horse: 1st - Marisa Brooke; 2nd - Kate Hill; 3rd - Julie Miller; 4th Cindy Anderson; 5th Dylan Sponseller.

Low Hunter Over Fences - 18" to 2': 1st - Theresa Newell; 2nd - Dylan Sponseller; 3rd - Carmen Anderson; 4th - Julie Miller; 5th - Tracy Nelson.

Open Jumper - 18" to 2': 1st - Theresa Newell; 2nd - Elizabeth Younger; 3rd - Julie Miller; 4th - Anna Nelson; 5th - Carmen Anderson.

Hunter Over Fences - 2' to 2'6": 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Theresa Newell; 3rd - Carmen Anderson; 4th - Dylan Sponseller; 5th - Anna Nelson.

Open Jumper - 2' to 2'6": 1st - Elizabeth Younger; 2nd - Theresa Newell; 3rd - Tracy Nelson; 4th - Anna Nelson; 5th - Dylan Sponseller.

Hunter Over Fences - 2'6" to 3': 1st - Marisa Brooke; 2nd - Theresa Newell; 3rd - Dylan Sponseller; 4th - Anna Nelson.

Open Jumper - 2'6" to 3': 1st - Marisa Brooke; 2nd - Dylan Sponseller; 3rd - Theresa Newell; 4th - Anna Nelson.

If you are not included on M.H.A.'s mailing list and you would like further information (different classes, costs, stabling, motels, etc.), on the two day Midsummer Classic Horse Show, please contact Pat Gaylord, (530) 299-3310.

Aerial fish releases set

Once on hold because of possible impacts on Cascade frogs, the north state's annual aerial planting of trout into dozens of wilderness lakes is scheduled to get underway.

The Department of Fish and Game's Region 1 office said that if weather permits, flights out of Redding and Weed beginning Monday will deliver an estimated 451,000 fingerling-sized brook, brown and rainbow trout to 250 back country waters. The flights are expected to be completed by Thursday afternoon.

At the same time, the DFG announced that it will begin next week sending three-person crews into wilderness areas such as the Trinity Alps and Marble Mountains to survey lakes and surrounding wetlands for signs of Cascade frogs and to assess lake trout populations.

Data collected during the summer surveys will be added to Cascade frog information already in hand that has been collected by other scientists. The surveys this summer and over the next two will help the DFG determine if it should modify the aerial trout drops either for the benefit of frog populations or to improve trout fishing.

Based on preliminary information, Fish and Game has removed 38 wilderness lakes from this year's planting schedule. Twenty-four of the 38 wilderness lakes from this year's planing schedule. Twenty-four of the 38 will be planted every other year beginning next season, the agency said. As they have for several decades, the coming weeks plants will deliver the two-inch trout to several high elevation and wilderness areas in the north state. Targets will include Coast Range, Trinity Divide, Siskiyou Mountains, Trinity Alps, and the Yolla Bolly, Marble Mountains, Salmon-Scott Mountains, Golden Russian, Thousand Lakes, and Caribou wilderness areas.

Modoc and Lassen counties' Warner Mountains Wilderness lakes were planted by air in late May.

The young trout are expected to grow to sport size within one to two years. The lakes have been planted annually for decades, providing uninterrupted fishing opportunity for back-country anglers.

Cancer Benefit provides winners, golf prizes

The number of golfers doubled who participated in the Modoc Unit of the American Cancer Society second annual benefit gold tournament held June 16 at Arrowhead Golf Course, Alturas.

ÒIt was a wonderful turnout this year, and we expect it to double again next year, with more golfers,Ó added Don Eppler, co-president of the Modoc Unit of ACS.

Forty golfers showed up to play for a good cause. Everyone received something for their participation, noted Tony Lelli who helped organize the event with Monica Fisher of Arrowhead.

The results follow:

Danny Parker tied with Kris Server with a gross of 69. Parker was deemed the winner in a playoff. Greg Valencia was the Net winner with Jim Tillett and Blake Thorne in a tie for second. Penny Keeney was Net winner with a score of 71 with Evie Younger is second with a 72. Younger also won the $100 gas certificate for being closest to the pin. Darlene Buffum won the $25 gift certificate for the accuracy drive. Webb Pierce won first in the Calloway with Steve Shaffer in second. The men's long driver was won by Jake Aaron of Lakeview. Women's long drive winner was Ivy Smith.

Golf tournament proceeds will benefit the Modoc Unit of the American Cancer Society.

Jump start Saturday for Fandango golf tourney

The annual Fandango Golf Tournament has been moved to Saturday, June 30 with a 9:00 a.m. tee time. In the past the tournament has been held on Fandango Day morning, but organizers have chosen to change the date to allow golfers to attend the events on July 7 in Alturas and tournaments which are scheduled in neighboring areas.

Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas is the site for the June 30 tournament with men, women and junior welcome to play. The $20 entry fee per person includes green fees and tournament fee. Both net, gross and Calloway offered with prizes for each in addition to a Longest Drive and Closest to the Pin challenge.

Individuals may register at 8:30 a.m. on the morning of the event or call Arrowhead Clubhouse at (530) 233-3404 to register.

JULY 5, 2001

Saturday is big day for Fandango celebration

Alturas will celebrate its version of the Fourth of July on Saturday, July 7 with a full Fandango Celebration, highlighted by the Great Pit River Duck Race and the Modoc Classic Cruisers Car Show.

The theme for 2001 is in celebration of Alturas' 100th anniversary as a city. The annual Fireworks Show will be held Saturday night at California Pines around dusk.

New for this go-round is a family street dance July 6, from 9 p.m. until 11 p.m. at the Walt's Market parking lot. The band "Mystery" will provide the music.

The Fandango Days Parade is scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, with lineup at 9:30. Seab McDonald, owner of Seab's True Value/Seab's Electronics is the year 2001 Fandango Grand Marshal. McDonald has been a supporter of the community and county for years. New this year is the parade will setup and start at Main and 10th Street, instead of the customary Fifth Street start.

The Duck Race is set for 2 p.m. and always draws a huge crowd. Top prize in the race is a brand new Jeep Wrangler, with plenty of other great prizes in the offing. The finish line is the Main Street Bridge. There are still tickets left, at $25 each, but they're moving quickly.

Classic Cars will show up Friday night for a Poker Run and the car show is Saturday at the park in Alturas. Expect some of the really fine classic cars and hot rods for this event. Many of them will be in the parade.

Events start in the park at 12 noon Saturday with the tasty Alturas Lions and Elks barbecue under the pavilion. There are other food and craft booths throughout the area.

The Gandy Dancers will be bring a miniature train display and a horseshoe tournament will run throughout the day. In addition, a Cow Pie Bingo Contest will be held.

CLOAK is sponsoring a dunk tank and several other kid's game are on the schedule, including pie eating contest, watermelon eating contest, a bounce room and a wheel barrel obstacle course.

The annual Horseshoe pitching contest, which draws some fine throwers from around the region will begin at noon at the park horseshoe pits.

Fandango Days has been trimmed from three days to one, and generally brings in throngs of visitors to Alturas. It's also a time when former residents come back to meet with old friends. It's a full day of fun and activities.

Survey of Alturas housing to begin

The Great Northern Corporation will be doing a door-to-door housing survey in Alturas and Modoc starting in about two weeks, according to John Ashton, of GNC.

The purpose of the survey is to help the city and county qualify for helpful Community Development Block Grant and Economic Development Block Grant funding to help upgrade the community. Ashton said each of those grants amounts to $800,000 annually.

The actual survey will be done by two-man teams, but generally no more than four people will be in Alturas for the survey at any one time. Ashton expects the survey to start this month and go through August, September and October.

Part of the housing survey will simply be a "view from the street" type assessment. Those assessments would be for things like the need of new windows, doors, roof, siding, foundations, etc.

In addition, an income survey will also take place. Questions on the income survey will center around general income levels, not specifics.

Ashton said it is very important and beneficial that people participate in the survey, especially the target area of about $35,000 per year family income. These people could get some help for housing or even rental renovations.

Ashton said the survey is being undertaken because some of the state and federal programs currently offered to rural areas require the housing condition and income information.

"This survey is for the benefit of the city and county," said Ashton. "Our survey people are experienced and will explain.

There will be water for Duck Race on Saturday

There has been more than a little concern that Saturday's Great Pit River Duck Race would not have adequate water. But the fears have Sharply erased.

The drought has created some serious concern here and the folks who control the dam near the Railroad trestle east of town, Randy and Carol Sharp, are storing some water now in preparation for the race.

The Sharps have been instrumental in increasing the flow of the Pit River through town for each duck race.

On Saturday, they will once again release enough water to float those ducks from the Estes Street Bridge to the Main Street Bridge. But they caution, the release will be conservative. The race may be a little slower than normal, but the Pit will receive enough water for the event.

Alturas Rotary Clubs have praised the efforts of the Sharps and their community support in a wide variety of areas.

The actual Duck Race starts at 2 p.m. and attracts a huge crowd at the Main Street bridge.

The event is sponsored jointly by the Alturas Sunrise and Alturas Lunch Rotary Clubs. Proceeds from the Duck Race each year benefit the Youth Park in Alturas. Those funds have built new ballfields, soccer areas and provided an accessible and quality athletic facility. This year, the proceeds will go to building new restrooms. The funds have also been used on the Junior Livestock Showgrounds and parking areas.

The Alturas Little League program used the facilities this year and filled up the new fields. Modoc Youth Soccer is expecting the use them this fall.

The Rotary Clubs sell 3,000 ducks at $25 each for the race. Those people who buy at least four ducks also receive a Turbo Turtle, which gives them a special chance at an All Terrain Vehicle. There are still tickets available, but they always sell out prior to the race, so it's advisable to get tickets as soon as possible.

The top prize this year is a new black Jeep Wrangler from Rotary and Carstens. Each ticket comes with a coupon book full of valuable discounts.

The prizes are pretty exceptional and this year may be the best and most. The race has come a long way since it started in 1996 with just six prizes. Second prize is a six-person hot tub from Rotary and North State Mobile Homes; third is a complete 12-foot fishing boat setup with motor and trailer from Rotary and J&S Roofing; fourth is a Monitor heater from Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum; fifth, a set of four tires from Les Schwab; sixth, a Buzz Electric Scooter from Seab's True Value; and as follows: one family membership at Arrowhead Golf Course; D-Z Lift Chair from Home Medical; Whirlpool refrigerator from Phillips Appliance; Hunter Ceiling fan and light from Randall Electric; 18-speed mountain bike from D&L Distributing; a dozen donuts per week for a year from the Donut Shop; 55 gallons of oil from Don Harbert Oil; $300 gift certificate from Four Corners; a load of driveway rock from Fitch Gravel; one $5 car wash per week for a year from Williams Texaco; $250 in Modoc Bucks from Modoc Respiratory Care; an Optimus Stereo Keyboard from Seab's Electronics; a $250 auto care gift certificate from Walton's Auto Care; a free muffler and tail pipe from Ron Campbell, Inc.; a Husqvarna chainsaw from Modoc Engines; two tons of grass hay from Likely Land and Livestock; facial/cosmetic/wardrobe lesson from Classie Lassie; pedicure/manicure, color or perm products from Kaleidoscope Family Salon; two night motel stay at Best Western; one pair of sunglasses from Dr. Tom Krauel; one night stay and dinner for two at Mill Creek Lodge; one night retreat and spa package at Cockrell's High Desert Lodging; one weekday night stay at Surprise Valley Hot Springs Villa; 25 movies passes to the Niles Theater; toilet and tank from A&M Plumbing; truck lettering, vinyl graphics from Planet Press; free pair of shoes from Family Footwear; handcrafted clock by Jim Russell; $100 savings bond from Bank of America; one dozen roses from Susan's Flowers; 12 sessions of tanning from Kelly's Hair Studio; a $100 savings bond from U.S. Bank; and a Tidal Wave rocket kit from Lucy's Hobbies.

Tickets are available only at Seab's True Value, Holiday Market, Belligerent Duck, Alturas Tire and at Duck Central near the Main Street Bridge Saturday.

County goes part way on DA assistant

While the Modoc County Board of Supervisors didn't quite get to the halfway point on District Attorney Tom Buckwalter's request for a full time assistant, they did at least get off ground zero.

On Tuesday, the board voted to advertise for a Deputy District Attorney at 960 hours per year, at $30 per hour. That works out to not quite half-time, staying under a 1,000 hour ceiling that would invoke the county's benefit package and its related costs.

Buckwalter had asked for a 30-hour per week position, which was what he said his current extra help assistant would agree to work. The board didn't spend much time considering that request.

One of the problems, said Buckwalter, is Modoc's remote location doesn't lend itself to an abundance of qualified attorneys. And whether anyone responds to the current offer is something the Board wants to consider.

The Board did vote to amend an existing ordinance which had created the Assistant DA/County Counsel position. The board opted to remove that part of the ordinance and the position.

The county separated the County Counsel/District Attorney position as a response, largely, to Buckwalter filing criminal charges against two county Child Protective Services workers. Those changes were later dropped by Buckwalter, but the Board had lost faith in Backwalter's advice.

The county then created a separate county counsel position and office, which was funded at about $160,000 annually. Vickie Cochran is now serving in that position.

While most supervisors were agreeable that Buckwalter needed some level of help in his office, Mike Dunn was stubbornly opposed, saying he just couldn't justify the expense to the taxpayers. He said he agreed with the $160,000 expense for the separate County Counsel's office.

Dunn said he felt Buckwalter should be able to handle all the cases and court trials himself without an assistant. Buckwalter told Dunn he should follow him around for a day to find out just what the DA's job entails. Buckwalter said Dunn has never set foot in his office to discuss the situation or get a feel for the workload.

Willy Hagge tried to come to terms with what the county and Buckwalter could work out and finally settled for the position at 960 hours per year. Both Supervisors Nancy Huffman and Pat Cantrall were leaning toward providing some assistance, but were not leaning toward much over half-time. Chairman Terry Williams was in concurrence.

The advertisement will now be placed and depending upon what response is generated, the county will move forward on the issue.

In other action Tuesday, the Board opted to support legislation that would convene the national Endangered Species Committee, the "God Squad" in response to the drought situation in the Klamath Basin. The committee could overturn actions of the ESA, if it determined there was undue harm.

It also agreed to join a Rural Health Design Consortium, which will be seeking grant funding and methods to design and build rural hospital facilities which are similar in design and meet state standards and building codes.

Modoc Medical Center is facing a variety of problems meeting state regulations, including those on earthquake preparedness. If the program works as presented, County Administrative Officer Mike Maxwell said a new hospital could be built with little or no expense to the county.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Vandals should be ashamed

Dear Editor:

I believe that it is time to speak out about the many vandalism incidents we are reading here in the Record.

I believe it is time that we get tough on these vandals. These pranksters, like the ones who trashed the preschool, might be youngsters or teenagers, but their parents must have an idea that they have been into mischief and are (or should be) financially responsible including counseling and community service work.

The Forest Service sign crushers and the Sugar Hill destruction are not children and should be prosecuted severely.

Now, I can not believe that no one has an idea of who these misfits are or that they were in the area.

I am tired of the attitude "its none of my business" or "I don't want to get involved." That kind of thinking puts you in partnership with them, you may as well have helped them.

I am also tired of the spray paint graffiti I see here in the City. There is no art in this junk, just an ugly scrawl of nonsense. It is very plain that they have not practiced on their homes or rooms before creating the mess in public view.

The act of defacing your neighbors building is also illegal and is an embarrassment on the entire community, as a whole, that we can not raise our young people to be respectful of others.

Why hasn't the Record reported on the follow up of the other destructive activities they inform us about? What has happened with the 185 pheasants that were killed, the Goslings that disappeared, or the junk yard, batteries and shooting south of town?

I want to take pride in my community. I thank the Rotary and VFW, the 4-H and all the organizations and business, that work to provide a wholesale and attractive environment for this area.

I no longer have family here, so I do not see the school bulletin boards. I do hope that these organizations post their activities that invite our young people to volunteer, to participate and get involved in the events and project.

Trashing the tower at Sugar Hill has deprived some visitors to the community of viewing our local history and scenery and will now consume our tax dollars to repair the damage, not to forget that the equipment and furniture may not be able to replaced or restore.

Anyone who visits our historical sites and monuments are always impressed at the work and effort that is placed in providing accurate restoration to the sites, especially when the community participates.

I'm thinking of the restoration and community involvement at Sutter's Fort. Alturas and Modoc County have a wide variety of historical sites. The number of visitors is sparse and infrequent, but just as important. Most of all, these are our monuments and tax money to provide and maintain them. These dorks or inconsiderate brats have insulted and injured the county as a whole. If you know or suspect their identity, do not procrastinate, report it.

--Mike Leahy Alturas

Pepperdine needs to be preserved

Dear Editor:

(An open letter of apology to the public).

I am sorry for leaving such a big mess at Pepperdine Camp in the Warners. I had until July 1 to remove anything I wanted to salvage from the pack station. I could not see the Forest Service burning all the buildings, so I moved as many as I could. I got the last one, late the afternoon of June 30.

I called the Forest Service several weeks ago and asked for a few days grace to clean the place up a bit. I got a flat "No." They were taking over July 1.

Since then, I have been to a meeting of the Historical Society of Modoc Co. and found out there are a lot of people that are interested in salvaging some of the old cabins and keeping them in place. I think it would be an asset to the area and someone could get some use for them. There are two cabins I am leaving and the barbecue pit, along with a lot of local history.

If any of you out there have any local history to add, do so in a letter to the F.S.

After the F.S. removed the gate from my driveway several years ago, (for no other reason but to harass me), I have lost several items from the premises. So the person who took my propane refrigerator, I have the latches you need to close the doors. Contact me if you want them.

--Don Collins Alturas

Cal Pines b-days are special

Dear Editor:

It has been brought to my attention that with our birthday and anniversary celebrations, the lodge's restaurant is also open on Tuesdays. This is wrong, the restaurant is not open to the general public for meals that night. The manager has graciously consented to opening the lodge for this once a month affair.

I, as well as other residents, their friends and non residents, are extremely grateful to her. It shows a good start for the mending of community relationships which are dampened. Look in this issue of the Modoc Record, under Gatherings, for more information regarding date, time, ect.

--John C. Schneider Cal Pines

OBITUARIES

Edward Pate (photo not available)

Funeral services for former Alturas businessman Edward Pate, age 84, of Toledo, Oregon, will be held July 6, 11 a.m. in Alturas with burial in the Alturas Cemetery.

Mr. Pate died of natural causes July 1, 2001 in Newport, Oregon. He was born in Murphysboro, Il., on July 5, 1916.

He owned and operated a donut shop in Alturas for many years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the Toledo First Baptist Church and the Toledo Grange.

He married Alice Neaves in Clark County, Nevada April 4, 1947. She preceded him in death in 1983. He then married Janet Thompson in Toledo, Oregon, May 25, 1996.

He is survived by his wife, Janet of Toledo, Or., daughters, Patricia Case, Riverside Ca., and Cheryl Matthews, Redding; a son, Alan Pate of Henderson, Nv., sister Nell Taggerd, Bishop, Ca.; brother, George Menkie, Bishop Ca.; stepsons George Daniel, Toledo, Or. and Jimmie R. Daniel, Evansville, In.; stepdaughters, Marilee Ashworth, Stockbridge, Ga., and Billie Ann Settle, Oregon City; five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, 10 step grandchildren and 16 step great grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his first wife, brother Jim and Robert Pate and a sister, Margaret Menkle.-

Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer's Foundation or Gideons.

Ashley Slinkard (photo not available)

Former Eagleville resident, Ashley Slinkard, passed away June 24, 200, in Redding, Calif. Private family services were held with interment in the Olinda Cemetery.

Ashley was born in Eagleville, Calif. to Steve and Mary (Connolly) Slinkard on July 5, 1920. He attended school in Cedarville, Calif., graduating with the class of 1938.

In July 1939, he and Thomasine Carmony were married in Reno, Nevada. They later resided there where Ashley worked for White Pine Lumber Company. Ashley joined the Army in 1944 and was shipped to the Pacific Theater, where he served with the 40th Infantry Division. He and his four brothers served in the service. Ashley was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Anderson.

After his discharge from the military in 1946, the family settled in Olinda, Calif. where Ashley was employed by the Ralph L. Smith Lumber Company and later by Kimberly Clark Lumber Company in Anderson, Calif.

He leaves his wife Thomasine, son Dean and daughter Linda of Olinda; four brothers: Warren J. of Nashville, TN.; Marion (Al) of Lewiston, Calif.; Steve of Alturas and Thomas of Baltimore, Maryland, and two sisters: Stephanie Egle of Alturas and Nikki Patterson of Winters, Calif.; seven grandchildren, several great-grandchildren, one great-great grandchild and numerous nieces and nephews.

SPORTS

Soccer sign-ups to begin

Children, ages 4 1/2 by July 31 through Eighth grade are invited to sign up for the AYSO Modoc Youth Soccer League Fall Season practices begin starting on August 28 and games will start on Sept. 8.

Registration for the season will be on July 12 at Modoc Middle School lawn area, 4th St. Alturas, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.; July 17 at the Alturas Park during Family Park Night, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; July 19 at the Alturas Elks Lodge on Main St., from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.; and during soccer camp at Alturas Elementary School on August 8, 9, and 10, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The last day to register is August 10.

Parents are needed to help coach soccer teams in all age groups. Training is available for parents interested in coaching. Interested parents are encouraged to call Bill Hall at 233-5807.

Registration for this year's season is $30 for one player, $55 for two or more players in a family.

If you are unable to register at the above dates and times, or need more information, call Debbie at 233-7125 or Victoria at 233-2820.

"Fun Nights" for families

Modoc families and friends of all ages are invited to attend "Family Fun Nights" scheduled for July and August.

Free family swim nights at the Alturas Swimming Pool will be held on Thursday nights, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., on July 5, 12 and 19

Family park nights at the Alturas Veterans Memorial Park will be held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., on July 17 and August 14. Sandbox, bubbles, basketball, soccer, volleyball, frisbee, watermelon eating contest, egg races and gunny sack races are all a part of the fun.

These events are sponsored by "Families Matter" Modoc Child Abuse Prevention Council and CLOAK 21st Century After school Program.

If you are interested in helping run the games at the park nights, or need more information, please call Debbie at 233-7128.

JULY 12, 2001

Modoc pounded by lightning, storms

Thunderstorms blasted Modoc County with lightning this week, but fires have been kept in check by quick response.

According to the Modoc National Forest, as of noon Tuesday, 462 lightning strikes in Modoc resulted in 19 fires, but they were kept to three acres total. Cedar Pass and Jess Valley had the heaviest concentration of lightning in the Warners, while Ambrose, Big Sage and just south of the Lava Beds were also hit hard on Devil's Garden.

Thunderstorms continued through Tuesday keeping fire-fighting crews on high alert as the first series of storms dropped very little precipitation. As of Wednesday morning, 20 additional fires were reported on the Modoc Forest, with the largest being 12 acres on Doublehead Mountain. The remaining 19 fires were small, totaling about two acres. Forest officials expect more small spot fires to be discovered.

By Wednesday afternoon, another thunderstorm bad moved into Modoc and was blasting areas around Alturas with heavy lightning and large hailstones. Fire crews remain on high alert as these storms move through the region.

A reconnaissance plane was flown Tuesday to search any other fires and also spot any areas where fires may be still burning. The Forest Service notes 10 engines, two crews and miscellaneous personnel form the Six Rivers and Mendocino National Forests are helping handle this situation. Two Modoc engines responded to Nevada to help BLM with fires also caused by Monday's lightning storm. BLM also dispatched a hot shot crew to this area and the Intermountain Conservation Camp sent two crews. The Forest Service implemented the National Fire plan this year, enabling the Modoc National Forest to hire a hot shot crew in Canby, add a fire engine to its fleet and provide assistance to local fire departments with a means to receive training, equipment and personal protective gear. BLM, CDF, local volunteer departments and private cooperators are helping with fire suppression efforts. The firefighters assisting Modoc are from other forests which were added to their units as a result of the National Fire Plan.

"In this drought-stressed season, the additional people and resources on board to respond to initial attacks are especially valuable," said Carol Sharp, Information Specialist. "With more lightning expected in the next three to four days, they will all continue to be very busy."

The local CDF office reported 32 lighting strikes on land it protects while there were four on BLM ground, with the largest fire so far being in the Ravendale area.

Canadian man dies in vehicle accident July 5

A 53-year-old Canadian man died from injuries sustained in a vehicle accident July 5, 5:20 p.m. on Highway 395 north of Sage Hen Summit. The California Highway Patrol reports that Gary Earnest Clare, age 53, of Coquitlam, British Columbia was a passenger in a 1995 Chevy driven by Lillian Irene Clare, age 51, also of Coquitlam. The vehicle ran off the road on the east side of the highway and began fishtailing side to side. It rolled several times, ejecting Gary Clare. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Lillian Clare sustained major injuries and was transported to Redding Medical Center for treatment.

An accident involving two Forest Service vehicles resulted in an explosion which completely destroyed both vehicles on Service Gulch Road, south of Forest Service Road 42N56 July 5, 8:50 p.m.

The CHP reports Curtis E. Stanley, 38, Malin, Or. was driving a Forest Service engine southbound on Service Gulch Road when he entered a blind left turn and met a Forest Service pickup driven by Abel J. Ramoz, 34, of Adin, who was northbound.

The rigs collided on the turn and the pickup's impact ruptured the engine's fuel tank. The leaking fuel ignited and both vehicles became completely engulfed in flames. They were both destroyed. All occupants were able to get out and only one, Brian L. Wolske, 21, Hewitt, Texas, sustained minor injuries.

Because of the intense heat of the vehicle fire, several of the oxygen tanks on the fire engine exploded and triggered a small brush fire which was extinguished by Forest Service and California Department of Forestry personnel.

Moderate injuries were reported for Cathy Ann Johansen, age 45, Alturas, in a single vehicle accident July 8, 7:45 p.m. on County Road 66, near County Road 64.

Johansen was driving a 1996 Ford Explorer southbound on CR66 at about 30 to 40 miles per hour. She allowed the vehicle to drift onto the west shoulder. She re-entered the road without incident, but allowed the Ford to drift off the east shoulder. She overcorrected to the right, then overcorrected to the left. The vehicle collided with a dirt embankment. Johansen returned to her residence, but later sought treatment at Modoc Medical Center. She was treated and released, sustaining mild whiplash, abrasions to her chin and a chest contusion.

There were no injuries in a single vehicle accident on CR71, 1.7 miles south of CR 72 July 7, 8:25 p.m.

The CHP states that Ernesto Gargarita, age 54, San Jose, was driving a 2000 Chevy van northbound when he observed two cows in the road. He slowed to allow the cows to cross and saw a medium sized calf standing in the southbound lane. He waited for the calf to cross but it did not move from its spot. He accelerated to get around the calf, but it ran in front of the van and was killed.

Melvin R. Young, age 20, Cedarville, sustained minor injuries in a July 3 accident on County Road 31, east of County Road One.

He was driving a 1973 For pickup eastbound on CR31 when he swerved to miss a housecat in the road. He lost control of he pickup, veered off the road and struck a Johnson Vertical Pump. The rig continued eastbound over the pump and struck a Surprise Valley Electric power pole. The pickup spun around and overturned, coming to rest on its left side.

No injuries were reported in a two-vehicle crash July 5, 10:20 p.m. on County Road 56, east of County Road 57.

According to the CHP, Jenica Chavez, age 16, Alturas, was driving eastbound at about 60 m.p.h.. when a car in front of her driven by Ryan Conklin, age 17, Red Bluff, made a U-turn and came the other way. Chavez, a new driver panicked seeing the headlights coming at her and applied the brakes hard. Her 1989 Nissan slid into the westbound land and struck the front of Conklin's 1985 BMW in the front.

Modoc Fandango celebration continues July 4th traditions

The City of Alturas was honored Saturday, July 7 as county residents and visitors celebrated in a fanfare of festive activities during Modoc's Fandango Day Celebration.

"Centennial of Alturas" was the theme this year, in recognition of Alturas' 100th birthday. A street dance held the night before in the parking lot of Walt's Market, kicked off this year's Fourth of July celebration.

"It was a real good turn out," said John Vass, president of the Alturas Chamber of Commerce. The dance, a non-alcoholic event geared to attract families, drew in 100 to 150 people, he said. It will become an annual activity of Fandango, with a variety of music and earlier starting time planned for next year.

A balmy morning greeted spectators of Saturday's parade, "It was an excellent crowd. The kids enjoyed the Shriner's motorized tin lizzies," Vass said of the Klamath County Tin Lizzies Unit. Alturas Casino won the first place trophy in the Commercial and Sweepstakes Division for its replicas of the largest Farris wheel and Cole Brothers circus tent.

Vass said there were more food and crafts booths at the Alturas Veterans Park this year, compared to 2000. School aged children had messy faces of cream filling and fruit juice from competing in the pie and watermelon eating contests. Others gave their best aim to sink their peers in the dunk tank. Rock and roll tunes played by the music group Heartless roared the center stage. Face painting, displays of fancy cars and the clanging of pitched horseshoes were a few other laid back activities that encompassed the day. Alturas resident Vickie Miller received $500 in Alturas Bucks for the "winning" square in the Cow Drop, featuring Molly the cow. Vass said the contest was such a hit that the chamber plans on having two grids next year.

Alturas resident Mike Mason was selected as Rotary's Citizen of the Year. Willy Hagge, vice president of the Sunrise Rotary, presented Mike with a plaque of appreciation near the Main Street Bridge before the Great Pit River Duck Race began. Mason was praised for his strong sense of altruism and his dedication to different organizations, such as Little League and the county's mentoring programs. "Mike was a deserving citizen for this award," Hagge said Tuesday. "I think he made an excellent recipient of it." "I truly owe a lot of this credit to friends and family," Mason said Wednesday. "People who have made a difference in my life have helped me make a difference in the lives of others," he said, mentioning in particular, his wife Debbie, and children, Justin 13 and Sarah, 7.

Mason moved to Modoc with family while he was in high school When his parents decided to return to southern California, he opted to stay and complete his education. To accomplish this, he moved in with Dean and Marie Neer, who described him as " . . . true teachers of unselfish giving." The 1981 graduate of Modoc High School has worked for the Modoc County Sheriff's Department since 1986. He said this award was special to him, since two of his siblings were present to see him receive it.

Dino Bhavindhu of Alturas had the winning duck in this year's river race. The first turbo turtle to cross the finish line belonged to Jeff and Deby Hunt of Davis Creek. Race organizers said the water flow began slowly this year, as they were careful to not waste any of the supply. Unlike years' past, the ducks came across the finish "line" in a single file, so it was easy to keep track of them. Grand Marshal Seab McDonald placed the ducks from the Pit River at the finish line.

Saturday night, thousands of people enjoyed an excellent fireworks display sponsored at California Pines by the California Pines Property Owners' Association.

"Everybody I talked to said this was one of the better Fandango Days," Vass said. He commenced Bob Stevens of Public Works and trustees for keeping the park so clean that day. He gave equal recognition to the crews from Devil's Garden, and Modoc County Probation Department for setting up and tearing down and to chamber members for helping with the clean up. Next year, Vass said, Fandango Days will be extended to two or three days, and will include a fire muster and logging events.

Other trophy winners included Klamath Shrine Club Tin Lizzies Unit, Civic/Service Clubs; C.L.O.A.K. After School Program, Youth Organizations; Canby Band, Non-Marching; Country Jam, Special Musical; Happy Birthday to Alturas - Zach and Dina McElwain, Novelty Float; Rez Riderz Native Drum and Dancers, Native Americans; Miss Modoc 2001, Shannon Ochs, Equestrian-Single; Susanville Rodeo Association, Equestrian-Group; Sandy Stevenson, Equestrian-Horsedrawn; Milee Ugalde of Reno, Nev., Car 50 and Newer; and John Curtis, Car 50 and Older.

OES wants information on drought

The Modoc County Office of Emergency Services is trying to find out just how the drought is affecting people. The information that is gathered will be used to portray the problems to officials at the State and Federal levels and to determine what kinds of assistance might be needed as the situation progresses.

Nancy Ballard, Deputy Director of Emergency Services, explains, "We are particularly interested in whether wells are drying up and in the forage situation. We need to know how widespread the problems are and how people are coping."

The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture has granted a disaster declaration for Modoc and Siskiyou Counties and five contiguous counties due to agriculture losses from the drought. The Governor declared a state of emergency for Modoc and Siskiyou Counties in May, making disaster assistance programs available from the State. That declaration provided money to drill irrigation wells in the Tulelake Basin and for operation of the Local Assistance Center in Tulelake. The task now is to discover what impacts cannot be offset with existing programs and to try to find ways to meet those needs.

Please call Nancy Ballard at the Sheriff's Office at 233-4416 or toll-free at 1-888-233-4416 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, to report problems that you may be having because of the drought.

Annual Modoc Picnic date set

The 60th annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 5 at the Carmichael Park in Carmichael, Calif.

All Modoc'ers, former Modoc'ers and families are invited to this annual potluck event. Bring a dish to share, own place setting and own beverage. Lunch will begin at 12 noon or thereabouts. It is advised to arrive early so that attendees may have a chance to visit before the group sits down to lunch.

Carmichael Park is located at the corner of Fair Oaks Blvd. and Grant Ave. The picnic will be located at the rear of the park, near the playground. Just follow the signs. For further information please contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider (916) 645-2995.

Cultural family event open to community

The fifth annual Junior PowWow will be held at the Alturas City Park on Saturday and Sunday, July 14 and 15 with everyone invited to participate or just come and watch.

This year, Resources for Indian Student Education, Inc. (RISE) youth have organized a two-day event to include more activities than in the past. Saturday activities begin at 9:30 a.m. at the park with workshops on traditional tobacco and sexually transmitted diseases (STD and HIV) education, Gourd Dancing, the PowWow, exhibition dancing and traditional dance contests. The Grand Entry for the PowWow will be at 12 noon Saturday. Reentry for the PowWow is Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. The dinner break at 5:30 p.m. includes several exhibition dances and a Cake Walk. Everyone who signs-in at the PowWow registration table with Dana Knighton, may take part in the Cake Walk.

Sunday's events begin with the Grand Entry at 11:30 a.m. Dance contest awards will be presented at 3:00 p.m. Flags will be retired at 4:00 p.m. Many donations for the Junior PowWow raffle have been received from Alturas businesses and community members to support the 2002 scholarship for RISE students continuing on to college. Drawings for those items will be held throughout Saturday and Sunday, and the public and guests are invited to receive a free raffle tick by initialing in at the registration table. Vendors will be on hand both days with indigenous art, clothing, jewelry, music, supplies and foods.

Master of Ceremonies for the Junior PowWow this year will be Irma Amaro-Davis of the northern, all-women's drum "Mankillers." Arena Director is Judy Strang, the Director of Four Winds of Indian Education in Chico. RISE youth selected both women for their tireless support to Native youth and the teaching of traditions. Host drums are Wocus Bay Singers and Willow Creek Singers, with five other drums traveling to Alturas to sing for over 300 pre-registered dancers and guests.

Funding for this youth-oriented event has been received through Prop. 99, Plumas County Health Services, Rising Nations and the RISE, Inc. membership. More information may be obtained by contacting Duanna Knighton at 233-2226.

Cowboys tell it like it is

Where is my John Wayne; Where is my Prairie Son? Where is my happy ending; where have all the cowboys gone? --Paula Cole

Cowboys have achieved nearly mythical status in our culture. They came into being as our young nation grew westward, and they have endured in regions where ranching is a way of life.

Some have likened them to the knights of Medieval times, complete with their own code of honor and chivalrous tradition. Hollywood made them larger than life.

Here in northeastern California, we rub elbows with cowboys daily. They may be our next-door neighbor, even a family member.

Two such cowboys are George Binning, 78, of Madeline and C.M. "Snooks" Bishop, 80, of Alturas. With the perspective that comes with a lifetime of experience, both Binning and Bishop have strong views about their chosen profession.

"Cowboying is a very prideful profession," starts Bishop. "It is with me, and probably George is the same way. You ask any of these guys who's ever cowboyed. He might have went and done something else in his life. But you ask him, 'What was the best part of your life?' and he'll tell you, 'It's when I was cowboyin'."

Be careful what word you use to describe these two.

"Wrangler . . . that's dude language to me," laughs Bishop. "Cowboys don't wrangle. I never thought so, anyway."

And cowboy and buckaroo are not synonymous. "There's a difference between cowboys and buckaroos," says Bishop. Apparently, a buckaroo is the quintessential cowboy, making his living exclusively from the back of a horse. A cowboy, on the other hand, may have other professions. That's why truck drivers and ranchers are sometimes also called cowboys. It's clearly more a matter of attitude, experience, and lifestyle than profession or definition.

However, not everyone who considers himself a cowboy can really lay claim to the title. "There's a lot of these so-called cowboys that can't even tell a sick cow," adds Binning.

Rugged individualism seems to universally characterize cowboys. "It's born and bred in ya," says Bishop, explaining that the demands of being a cowboy shape the personality of all who engage in it.

A rugged, hardy lifestyle and an unflagging determination to do the job, no matter the obstacles or hardships, makes the cowboy a unique figure in today's world.

Perhaps it's something in an individual's nature that predisposes him to become a cowboy. That uniqueness is then forged and hardened, like steel, in a lifetime of hard-won experience.

"Experience, boy," emphasizes Bishop. "You get so you can smell trouble." Bishop gives the following as an example.

"A good cowboy can start down the road with two or three hundred head of cows. He'll watch them old lead cows, and he'll know what's goin' on. "These other people . . . go along with their foot in each other's stirrup, and the wreck's already took place before he ever knows it. But a good cowboy'll head that wreck off.

"And they say, 'Boy, these cows are sure movin' easy.' H-ll, yes, because you got some g-d d-mn good help! That's the reason they're movin' easy." Most cowboys don't make a conscious decision to follow their occupation. They simply seem to gravitate to it.

A common denominator among cowboys may be their upbringing. "My dad, being a cowboy, it was natural for me," says Binning. "It's the only thing I know, bein' around it all the time."

Most were raised on a ranch where they learned the lessons of the land and the animals from an early age. "I started out about 65 miles northwest of Needles, California, up in the high desert," says Binning. Living on a ranch where his father worked, he found the lifestyle to his liking. While one need not be raised on a ranch or in a ranching area to become a cowboy, it certainly helps, according to these two. Country kids have a good head start.

"Most of the good hands that I know were kids that were born and raised on a ranch," says Bishop. "You just grew up doin' it."

"I don't think it's any different than a doctor choosin' to be a doctor . . . or any other thing. It's just the way your makeup is that says, 'Hey, this is what I want to do.' This satisfies my inner soul." Bishop adds. "I didn't choose it, it chose me."

Part of a cowboy's character comes from the land. Because he works outdoors, on the land every day, he learns to take what it offers without allowing the land and the elements to wear him down.

Another part of a cowboy's nature comes from learning to handle animals, horses and cows. According to Bishop, "If you're handling horses, you learn to kind of 'flow' around 'em. You don't make any quick moves around a horse, 'cause it'll scare the h-ll out of 'im. That's the first thing you gotta learn if you're gonna handle these horses. You've just gotta flow around that son-of-a-gun, so he knows where you are all the time."

"You gotta have some definite rules," adds Binning. "You can't let 'em get away with (misbehavior)."

"We're all animals," observes Bishop, "that's me, you, George, my horses, George's cows, dogs, anything else. Basically, they're all just about the same. You treat 'em with respect, and they'll respect you. You don't treat 'em with respect, and that dog will bite you, that horse will buck you off, and that old cow will run over you. If you teach 'em respect, you can ride that horse, you can head that old cow off and your dog will follow you in the house. If a kid can be taught to train a horse, then, as an adult, he will understand how to deal with people in daily life."

Like any other profession, cowboying doesn't make a man good and moral. But, as Hollywood is wont to do with icons, like the American cowboy, it created its own myth of nobility. But there is apparently some truth behind the legend, according to our two buckaroos. Most cowboys have a similarly strong moral code. This leads to an informal code of justice, a vigilante attitude that sets the rules for the culture. Like common law, it arises from shared views of right and wrong, views that spring from the necessities created by living in a hard, unforgiving environment. A shared attitude about the world around them is also common in cowboys. Once again, each individual learns the same lessons as the others through a common, shared experience in nature.

Cowboys tend to be quiet, solitary people. Again, this comes from the very nature of the cowboy, as well as the solitude imposed by his work. "You'll find most old cowboy guys are pretty quiet. They don't say too much. But if he tells you something, you better listen," smiles Bishop, adding "Most of 'em don't interfere in anybody else's life."

Binning's comment is appropriately brief. "I like riding alone," he says. After describing an incident where other drovers were mishandling a herd, he explained that he went back later to put things right, adding, "I'd rather take care of things on my own."

Most notable among cowboys is a conservative view of life. It is a down-to-earth attitude that is also a product of living close to the land. While mother nature can provide generously to those who understand her, proffering sustenance, beauty and shelter, she can also be unforgiving and destructive to any who forget or disregard her laws. Lessons learned by cowboys in mother nature's school of hard knocks carry over into their relationships with others, shaping their view of the world.

It is the shared experience of all who have tasted the cowboy way of life that creates the unique cowboy culture. "It's a different psychology," says Bishop. "It's the way your mind works."

Unlike intellectually contrived philosophies, viewpoints and attitudes so often promoted and popularized in the wider American culture, all cowboys share a common attitude born of their very lifestyle. It binds the two together, leading them to think very much alike on a wide range of issues. It is also the reason why intellectuals often dismiss cowboys as unthinking dullards. A cowboy doesn't have to "think" about how he feels about anything. He automatically "knows" because it's as much a part of his nature as breathing. The fact that a cowboy cannot always articulate his views makes them no less valid.

Bishop explains: "You can have more trouble on your mind than you can understand. You give me a d-mn good horse, send me off out here in the brush by myself, and when I come back, I'll have an answer to that. It's the greatest place in the world, boy, to clean your mind out. You can untangle your mind. That's what I call it."

For those raised in the cowboy culture who choose another path in life, the experience acquired in their youth serves them well. "The opportunities the ranch kids have . . . is different. Take these kids raised in town. If he's got any ambition, he's going to get in trouble. But a ranch kid, he's got chores to do and wood to pack and a cow to milk and all that kind of stuff. He learns to take responsibility."

Cowboys who attempt to move into other careers are usually unsuccessful. "I drove dozer for a little while," says Binning, "but . . . I didn't stay too long."

If you want to be a cowboy, "You better learn how to saddle a horse and bridle one, to start with," says Binning. "Some of these guys don't even know how to put a collar on a horse. Learn the basics."

A strong desire for the work helps. "I like to go ropin'," says Binning. "I'd rather go ropin' then eat! I just always like to rope and try to make a decent horse. And you don't do it in 30 days."

"It's a h-ll of a good way to live, but it's a d-mn poor way of makin' a living," observes Bishop. "And you better be used to it before you start!" Bishop's summary is perhaps the best.

"Cowboyin's the most honorable profession there is because there's very few people who can do it. Lots of guys can be a truck driver; lots of guys can work in a grocery store; lots of guys can do a h-ll of a lot of things. But there's g-d d-mn few people that can be a cowboy, and be a good one! "I've always been proud as h-ll of bein' one. "I'm not a d-mn bit of afraid to tell anybody. I've been a cowboy all my life, and I'm d-mn proud of it."

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Paper support appreciated

Dear Editor:

My name is Judy Ford. I, and my partner, Greg Smith, run the High Plateau Humane Society Animal Shelter. I want to tell the people of Modoc County about what a wonderful service this paper does for us. Without the Modoc County Record, we would not find any homes for homeless pets. Without exception. I truly mean this. This exceptional weekly paper lets hundreds if not thousands of people know about what we are trying to do and let you know what animals we have available for adoption. We could not do this without them, because we would not find homes, therefore there would be no point in doing what we are doing.

Please, if you have a pet and if you are moving or think you might move, or "things are just not working out" with your pet or your "life", please, please run an ad in this paper, (I recommend two weeks in a row). The cost is nominal and you have, at least, the feeling that you tried.

I wanted to let you know about this because it works. It does work. Not for everyone and not all the time. People can't know about something through the small town thingÊof "word of mouth". I'm sorry, but it does not work, i.e. you are trying to sell furniture, tractor, mobile home, car, whatever, by telling all the folks you know. Good luck! You will need it. You are not reaching enough people and this paper does that.

This is not an advertisement for the Modoc County Record. All I am trying to tell you is that this wonderful paper does one heck of a job letting many, many people know what you want them to know, whatever it may be. Thank you Modoc County Record, for your help, without it everything we are trying to do would fail.

--Judy Ford and Greg Smith, Founders of High Plateau Humane Society Animal Shelter Alturas

Modoc is special place

Dear Editor:

Fair time is fast approaching and I would like to remind and encourage everyone to enter something. Do not participate in anticipation of a large prize because that will not happen. Do not enter for a blue or sweepstakes ribbon. Enter instead to support our community and show all who view the exhibits that Modoc is special.

We who live in this county, are a unique "breed". We are accustomed to hot/cold, dry, windy weather. Water is, and always had been, a special, precious resource. Modoc County has also always been know for it's people. I have a friend from Redding who visited last summer. Her parting comment was about my garden. "If you grow all this in Modoc, just think what you could grow in a good climate!"

Well, I'll take this climate any day. And, I'll take the Modoc people any day. So let's overwhelm the building with entries. When I come to enter my stuff, I want to stand in line. Modoc is special!! Let's make sure everyone knows. See you at the fair!

--Kathleen Dale Moore Tulelake, CA

Town of Adin looking great

Dear Editor:

Have you been to Adin lately?

Thanks to the extraordinary effort, organization and hard work of two young women, the town looks lovely!

Becky Albaugh and Kristi Dodgen took it upon themselves to recruit several strong and willing workers (forty to be exact), trucks, mowers, trailers and assorted tools to spruce up the town.

In one day ( and many, many loads to the dump) the town took on a wonderful resurrection. Flowers sprung up on every corner. The pride of Adin began to show up on every corner and side street.

The busy young ladies have taken on the responsibility of watering and caring for all the flowers. Becky the south end of town and Kristi( and her three youngsters in a red wagon) the north end of town. Each day, more and more "Adinites" volunteer to donate flowers, rebuild falling structures and even scheduled a July 7 second "clean up day".

We are truly proud of Adin; it is a lovely place.

--Jim and Janet Wolter Adin, CA

OBITUARIES

Norma Tyeryar Dole

Norma Tyeryar Dole, a native of Surprise Valley, passed away July 7, 2001 in Klamath Falls, Ore. where she was visiting friends.

Born to Hattie and Randolf Tyeryar on July 17, 1919, she attended school in Cedarville and enjoyed lifelong friendships with many of her classmates.

In 1943, Norma married Jack Dole. The couple made their lives in Rio Vista where they raised their three children: Bobby, Billy, and Julie and ran their family business, Dole's Hardware Store.

Mrs. Dole was preceded in death by her husband Jack. Norma will be deeply missed by family and friends.

Memorial gifts may be given to Surprise Valley Community Hospital, P.O. Box 246, Cedarville, CA 96104 or to the charity of choice.

Celia E. Davis Fenimore

A very special lady, Celia E. Davis Fenimore, died at Klamath Falls, Ore. on July 2, 2001 at the age of 73. A memorial service was held for her on Saturday, July 7, at the Paisley Community Center with the Rev. Roderick Gabbert officiating.

She was born at Lake City, Calif. to E.R. and Mary Jane Hughes on April 3, 1928. E.R. was a well driller and drilled the first well in Lakeview, Ore. which is still in use. Celia graduated from Surprise Valley High School in Cedarville with the Class of 1945.

On December 22, 1947, Celia married Robert H. Davis in Carson City, Nevada. They lived and worked on various ranches in northern California and Nevada before moving to Lake County in 1961. They purchased the present Chewaucan Garage in Paisley in 1963. Celia became involved in the community through the V.F.W. Ladies Auxiliary and the Order of the Eastern Star. She was one of the founding members of the Paisley Disaster Unit and was an active member of the Paisley Methodist Church. Celia was a Paisley school bus driver for many years and also worked for Martin's market (currently K&L Market).

Following Bob's death in 1979, Celia married Clyde Fenimore from the west side. They traveled extensively for approximately 10 years before Celia's health started declining. She spent her final years at the Hillside House in Klamath Falls, Ore. under the loving care of Sheila Thomas.

She is survived by two children, Bob Davis of Paisley, and Kathy Peterson of Custer, South Dakota; grandchildren, Robert and Gregory Davis and Jennifer and husband Mike Shepperd of Issaquah, Wash.; great-granddaughters, Emily Kathleen Shepperd and sister Jean Gorzell and husband Wilson of Lake City, Calif. Celia was preceded in death by a sister and a brother.

The family states, "We have all been in mourning for her for years...finally she is free."

Thomas Irvin Lawry

Former Modoc County Undersheriff, Thomas Irvin Lawry, 84, passed away in Crescent City, Calif. on June 7, 2001.

Mr. Lawry was born on December 7, 1916 in Manganese, Minnesota. He was a 47-year resident of Del Norte County. He was a veteran, having served with the U.S. Navy during World War II and was a member of the V.F.W. Post #1381.

Mr. Lawry started in law enforcement in Richmond, Calif. as a patrol officer. He and his family moved to Modoc County where he was the undersheriff. Thomas later moved to Humboldt County, where he worked in the sheriff's department and served as Chief Civil Deputy with the Del Norte Sheriff's Office and then served as the undersheriff. He was elected sheriff in 1966 and retired in 1977. Mr. Lawry was a member of the Crescent City Masonic Lodge, Crescent City Elks Lodge and was a charter member of the Alturas Elks Lodge 1756. Thomas served as a community member of the Pelican Bay State Prison Citizens Advisory Committee. He was a member of the California Sheriff's Association and California Peace Officers Association. His greatest joy was spending time with his family. His favorite hobbies were fishing and woodworking.

Survivors include his wife of 60 happy years of marriage, Dorotha Lawry of Crescent City; sons, Richard and wife Jean Lawry of Eureka; Lance L. and wife Bonnie Lawry of Eureka; sister Ann and husband Felix Garcia of Marysville; sister-in-law Judith and Don Cline and family of Beaverton, Ore.; grandchildren Kelli and Ross Costa of Fieldbrook, Matt and Tammy Lawry of Rohnert Park, Mark Lawry of Eureka, Tommy Lawry of Phoenix, Ariz.; great-grandchildren Ashley Carterby of Fieldbrook, Blake Lawry of Eureka, Hailey and Jacob Lawry of Rohnert Park. He was preceded in death by his brothers Jim and Harry Lawry.

The family suggests contributions in memory of Tom, may be directed to Wild Feline Rescue, 1279 Second St., Crescent City, CA 95531 or Rowdy Creek Hatchery, P.O. Box 328 Smith River, Calif. 95567. At Mr. Lawry's request, no formal services were held. Arrangements were under the direction of Wier's Mortuary Chapel of Crescent City.

SPORTS

Modocs senior stars eliminated

Modocs 2001 Senior League All-Stars were eliminated from the district tournament last weekend in Susanville.

They opened with a 4-3 win over Intermountain, but lost to Susanville 9-4 and then to Intermountain 9-6.

Marty Stevens hit .455 for the tournament and Robert Flournoy batted .400. Stevens had one triple, Flournoy had a pair of doubles and Shiloh Pierce had two doubles and one triple.

The manager was Ernie Givan with coaches Craig Flournoy and Brad Server.

Alturas team wins Basin softball tourney

The M&C White Sox, an Alturas Mens softball team, had to come from the losers bracket, but won the Burney Basin Days Fastpitch softball tourney last weekend.

The White Sox survived a grueling five-game day Sunday for the title. Ernie Givan from Alturas and Donny Trotter of Anderson were co-Most Valuable Players for the event. Bryan Gerig, of Bieber, was named to the All-tourney team.

M.H.A. hosts 19th Midsummer Classic Horse Show

The Modoc Horseman's Association will be presenting it's 19th annual "Midsummer Classic" Horseshow Saturday and Sunday, August 4th & 5th, 2001 at the Junior Livestock Show Grounds in Alturas. This year's agenda includes a total of 66 classes. By popular demand M.H.A. is continuing to divide the age groups into four divisions: 12 and under, 13 through 17, 18 through 39 and 40 and over. Age is as of January 1, 2001. Teri Brown will officiate as judge for the day while Craig Miller will assume the judging duties for all of the Trail events. A concession stand will be available for cold drinks, light meals, and snacks.

All M.H.A. Members will be charged $4.00 per class (except Trophy & Stake classes), Non-Member M.H.A. Members will be charged $5.00 per class (except Trophy & Stake classes). Entry fees for the four Trophy Classes (Western and English Pleasure/Western and English Equitation) are $10.00. Fees for the three $100.00 Stake Classes Trail, Western Pleasure and English Pleasure) are $12.00.

Saturday, August 4th - 9:30 a.m. This day is devoted to all of the dedicated English riders with a total of 28 classes. Included are: English Pleasure, Walk/Trot; English Please; English Equitation; Hunter Hack; Low Hunter; Hunter Over Fences; Beginning Jumper & Intermediate Jumper. M.H.A. has also scheduled two equitation classes (one for 17 and under and the other for 18 and over) for all of the 1st & 2nd year riders. Three separate classes for Junior Horses (5 years and under) are on tap as well as two "Trophy" classes (one for English Pleasure and the other for English Equitation. The morning's events include a $100.00 Stake, English Riding Pattern event.

Sunday, August 5th: 8:30 a.m. Sunday is "Western Day" with a total of 38 classes. Included are: Showmanship; Halter; Western Pleasure, Walk/Trot; Western Pleasure; Western Equitation and Trail. Two equitation classes are included for those 1st and 2nd year riders. Three classes are on tap for Junior Horses. Also on the schedule are two "fun" classes, Super Senior Horse (horse 18 years & over) and the other for the "Jack Benny" 50 years and over, non professional, group. Sunday's events include two Trophy Classes (Western Pleasure and Western Equitation) but the highlight of the day are the two $100.00 Stake classes one for Trail - "Gambler's Choice" and the other for Western Riding Pattern. High Point Awards will be presented in eight separate divisions: 12 and under, 13 through 17, 18 through 39, 40 and over, Junior Horse (5 year and under), Western Horse/Rider Combination, English Horse/Rider Combination, and High Point Overall Horse/Rider Combination. All High Point Champions and Reserve Champions in each division will be presented with awards at the conclusion of the show on Sunday afternoon. High Points will be accumulated for a one horse/one rider combination (horse to be ridden by only one rider to count for any High Point Award). Please note, that to be eligible for consideration for any of these High Point Divisions, the rider must declare their intentions to do so before the first class, No. 01, on Saturday morning. (Please refer to Entry Form).

All entries must be postmarked by Friday, July 27, 2001, however Post Entrees (+50%) will be accepted. Post Entry fees will not be charged if rider is entered in at least 12 classes. Early entries would be appreciated. A limited number of stalls are available on a first come, first serve basis with initial bedding furnished by M.H.A. Stall fees are $20.00. Electrical hook-ups are also available for all "out-of-towners". Note, for all "early birds", the Show Office will be open for business at 6:30 a.m. each day. To request a copy of the show schedule/entry forms, if you have any questions please contact Pat Gaylord, Show Secretary, P.O. Box 160, Adin, CA 96006 or call her at (530) 299-3310.

Grouse cards due August 13

Hunters have until 5 p.m. on August 13 to reach the Department of Fish and Game's license office in Sacramento with postcard applications for one of this year's pair of Lassen County Sage Grouse hunts to be held September 8 - 9, the DFG's Region 1 office said today.

The Aug. 13 deadline also applies for sage grouse hunts in Mono and Inyo counties.

The state Fish and Game Commission will adopt California's upland game bird hunting regulations, including those for sage grouse, at a public meeting, Aug. 4. The new rules will set seasons, bag limits, in the case of sage grouse, permit quotas.

The DFG said it is recommending a cut in the number of free permits from 250 to 200 for the east Lassen hunt and from 100 to 75 for central Lassen, based on extremely dry conditions east of the Cascade Range for the past year. The bag limit would remain two per season for the two Lassen areas. Frank Hall, wildlife biologist in Susanville, said surveys indicate the rain-starved area hampered nesting success of the birds this spring. He said the conditions on the eastern high desert habitats are expected to result in "vast areas" devoid of birds this fall.

To apply, up to four hunters may submit a single postcard for one of the hunts and must include their names, addresses, current hunting license numbers and the hunt choice. The cards must be sent to Department of Fish and Game, Sage Grouse Permit Drawing, 3211 S Street, Sacramento, CA 95816.

Hunters also may apply via the Internet at www.dfg.ca.gov/licensing.

Plan ahead for golf tourneys

The Arrowhead Mens Club will hold the 2002 Zone Tournament on August 18 and 19 at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas. This will be a two-man, best ball tournament, open only to Mens Club members, at least 18 years of age. The cost is $50 per team.

The winning two teams will be representing Arrowhead Golf Club at Spyglass and Poppy Hills golf tournaments next year.

The Arrowhead Tournament with Lakeview will be held August 12 at Arrowhead Golf Course.

The Member-Guest Tournament will be held September 7, 8 and 9. For more information on any of the above tournaments please call Arrowhead Clubhouse at (530) 233-3404.

Youth Golf Camp opens, lesson sign ups Monday

Registration for the week-long Evie Capik Youth Golf Camp will open Monday, July 16 at Arrowhead Golf Course, Alturas. Registration will continue until the program begins July 30.

The program is open to youths, ages 8 to 18, from July 30 to August 3 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon Monday through Thursdays at Arrowhead Golf Course in Alturas.

Harold Montague, Modoc High School golf coach, will teach the lessons with assistance from Arrowhead Mens and Womens Golf Club members. Lessons will be divided into two playing sections: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. for beginning golfers; 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon for intermediate/advanced golfers. The program will have four, 20 minutes stations each day. Participants will learn the following golf concepts: putting, swing mechanics, short game, rules and scoring and course management.

Tournament will be held Friday, August 3, 9 a.m. to 12 noon with a nine-hole shotgun start for the intermediate to advanced golfers. The beginning golfers will play a three-hole tournament from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. A barbecue and awards presentation will follow from 12 to 12:30 p.m.

Golf equipment will be furnished if needed. The camp fee is $5 for the entire session, per participant.

The program is made possible through donations to the Evie Capik Youth Program. Donations for the Youth Program can be sent care of Rose Boulade, Treasurer of the Arrowhead Ladies Golf Club, in care of Plumas Bank, 510 N. Main St., Alturas, CA 96101.

Contact Arrowhead Clubhouse for further information at (530) 233-3404.

JULY 19, 2001

County seeks direction on Tulelake drought

Modoc County is seeking some direction on how to assist farmers and water users in the Tulelake area. The Board of Supervisors directed County Counsel Vickie Cochran to meet with legal representatives of both Siskiyou and Klamath Counties to see what options or strategies may be effective or agreeable.

In the Klamath-Tulelake area, the worst drought in 75 years has forced the Bureau of Reclamation to shut off irrigation water to farmers. That action has prompted farmers in the area to ask for a change in the Endangered Species Act, since the action was, in part, to reserve necessary water levels for Klamath and Shortnose suckers as well as downstream coho salmon. While farmers are citing the issue as them against the suckers, the real issue is much more complex, according to the BOR, and includes the major drought, water rights, the needs and requirements of Indian Tribes and of the Marine Fisheries and Fish and Wildlife Service. In addition, a Federal judge ruled the BOR released water to irrigators last year illegally and the federal courts thus far have backed the BOR decision.

Farmers have forced open the main canal gates on several occasions recently in a protest of the decisions and Klamath authorities have not made any arrests. Federal marshals have since arrived to protect the gates. The situation, according to Supervisor and Tulelake area farmer, Nancy Huffman, is tense and there is a sense that not every faction in the area is moving in a constructive or potentially successful strategy.

She explained she was very concerned about the "loss of community" in the area and would like to see the three counties come up with options that will be helpful. She explained the county and the water users do not necessarily have the same issues on the table.

Supervisor Mike Dunn, said he was concerned with the current situation in the area, where frustration is leading to desperate acts and he fears a possibility of future violence.

He said the county needs to take a bigger role in the water issue. He said he'd like to see all three counties come up with a workable strategy. Huffman agreed, but stated it's too late for use of irrigation water for this year. She's hoping there can be some dialogue and work to ensure there is a workable plan for the future.

One of the main potential problems she sees at the moment is the State of Oregon is involved in the adjudication process for Klamath Lake and tributary water. That adjudication will involve water rights for Indian tribes, irrigators, fishers and other entities. She said the water has apparently not been adjudicated previously, in terms of quantity. Cochran told the Board she will be involved in two days of mediation on a suit involving the water issue this week. That mediation is in Eugene and includes Klamath and Modoc Counties, with Siskiyou County as a supporter but not in the lawsuit.

The water users were dealt another setback last week when the Federal Government opted not to convene the "God Squad" to possibly overturn the BOR's decision. The "God Squad" has the ability to overturn ESA decisions, but must look at all aspects of the issues.

Cochran told the board she would be investigating options, but will need some time because of a heavy schedule between now and next week's meeting.

Lightning continues barrage of Modoc

Powerful thunderstorms continue to pound Modoc County and are keeping fire crews on the run.

As of Monday morning, 89 fires have erupted in the area with the largest being the Fern Fire, near Parker Creek, which had charred 11 acres by Monday morning, but was still burning out of control. It was controlled by Tuesday.

The Forest Service had three crews and one helicopter assigned to that fire. The total acreage as of Monday was 37 acres burned. The lightning storms have been non-discriminatory, hitting all sections of Modoc.

As of Wednesday, two more human-caused fires and one more lightning fire were reported. All were controlled quickly.

Modoc National Forest Information Officer Nancy Gardner said crews are very busy and outside crews have been assigned to Modoc for extra coverage. Additionally, she said local crews and assistance has been great. Gardner said local support has been exceptional, from the Devil's Garden Conservation camp, to area schools who have provided camping areas, and to local businesses who have been supporting with food and necessary supplies.

Modoc and this part of the west are experiencing the worst drought in 75 years, according to the state Department of Water Resources. That drought has increased fire danger dramatically and is also affecting farming and ranching operations throughout the west.

According to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management officials, the forage for wildlife and livestock is lean. That has meant not as many livestock were allowed on the public range and some may have to be pulled off earlier than normal.

Big Valley driest since 1943-44

In June, the California Department of Water Resources' Dwight Russell told the Modoc Board of Supervisors the current drought is the worst in 75 years of record keeping. Things haven't changed since then.

Tuesday the Board continued its declaration of drought emergency and Office of Emergency Services Coordinator Nancy Ballard said things are very dry all over. She is looking for information on wells that may be having problems in the county and asks that property owners contact her to report any adverse situation.

Supervisor Willy Hagge said stock ponds on the range were "a mess" and forage at this point on the rangeland was not looking good. Ballard said there are grazing concerns reported all over the county.

Supervisor Pat Cantrall said Dry Creek near Likely usually runs well into the summer, but this year dried up three days before the end of April. She said people are very concerned.

Precipitation figures amassed by the U.S. Forest Service's Big Valley Ranger Station show the worst water year since records were kept, 1943-44. For the water year July 2000 to June 2001, only 7.52 inches of precipitation were measured,about 48 percent of normal. The average rainfall is 15.72 inches.

The previous lowest year on record was in 1991-92 when 8.25 inches were measured. In 1943-44, 8.66 inches fell.

The wettest year on record was in 1997-98 with 26.03 inches measured. With the exception of 1991-92, the past decade has been good with the following precipitation levels: 1992-93, 19.62; 1993-94, 11.33; 1994-95, 22.94; 1995-96, 21.58; 1996-97, 18.51; 1997-98, 26.03; 1998-99, 17.86; 1999-2000, 15.06. The Modoc National Forest in Alturas has water records showing about half normal precipitation and very dry conditions throughout the forest

Grand Jury report points out some problem areas

The 2000/2001 Modoc County Grand Jury Report released this week cites some areas where problems exist and makes some specific findings and recommendations in a variety of areas, primarily the Modoc County Sheriff's Department, the Hot Springs Irrigation District, and the County Office of Education.

The full report is printed in this week's edition of the Modoc County Record. While the Grand Jury investigated and reported on some problem areas and complaints, it also exonerated the Alturas Police Department in a "hot pursuit" case and the Modoc County Planning Department in a conflict complaint. It also determined that a harassment complaint against the Sheriff's Office from the Tulelake area, was unfounded.

One area where the Grand Jury came down hard was on a citizen's complaint concerning Modoc Sheriff Bruce Mix. The complaint charged that Mix was "verbally abusive and unprofessional" as an employer. The Grand Jury interviewed the complainant and several witnesses and came to the conclusion that Mix was verbally abusive and unprofessional and that he attend semi-annual educational training to improve his "employee management" skills. The report also states that Mix was unable to meet with the Grand Jury for a scheduled appointment.

That charge brought an immediate response and rebuttal from Mix. First of all, he said, he was in a Redding hospital suffering from pneumonia on the scheduled interview date. The Grand Jury, he said, did meet with Undersheriff Mark Gentry concerning the complaint.

The Sheriff also took exception to the language and findings of the Grand Jury. "I can only believe that it is a slanted and biased report, with inflammatory language," Mix said. "The complaint is obviously from a disgruntled ex-employee and some witnesses are probably disgruntled current or ex-employees."

Mix admits chewing out employees, and states: "These are armed cops, not a classroom of children. When they don't perform up to the standards I feel they should, they're going to hear about it."

Mix said the Grand Jury language was too harsh. He said he would have accepted language that was aimed more at him toning his actions down or being more considerate of employees.

The Grand Jury also looked into a complaint concerning the Task Force trailer which had been donated by Former District Attorney Hugh Comisky near the end of his term. The Grand Jury reports the trailer belonged to Bill Long, but the Task Force voted to pay Comisky $7,500 for the trailer when Comisky offered to sell it.

The Grand Jury found no identifying numbers on the trailer frame, found that neither Comisky nor Long has the title to turn over to the county, states the State Attorney General cleared the sheriff and Task Force on illegal activity in the purchase. In addition, Long has filed a civil suit against Comisky for the $7,500.

The Grand Jury recommends that any county agency get clear title and/or bill of sale for any purchase or gift.

A citizen's complaint against the Hot Springs Irrigation District (involving Big Sage and other waters) was also investigated. The two complaints were that a board member received payment for a job without the job being put out to bid and payment was made before work started.

The Grand Jury found that complaint to be true and recommends that the District follow county ordinance requiring all jobs over $10,001 be put out to formal bid.

The second complaint involved district Watermaster Joe Battram releasing district water after the irrigation season to a hydroelectric company and being paid for that water.

The Grand Jury found that Battram did release the water from dams following the irrigation season, received funds for his work with the company and the company also compensated the owners of the dams as was negotiated by Battram. Irrigation District members without dams were not compensated.

The Grand Jury found that Battram was acting for the hydroelectric company in negotiating scheduled water releases after the irrigation season and recommends that the Hot Springs Irrigation District board members determine whether his actions are a conflict of interest.

A complaint concerning the condition of the building and quality of education at the Modoc County Community School was also investigated. The Grand Jury found some problems with the current location in the TEACH building and recommends that a permanent location be found for the school.

The Grand Jury also recommended the current Social Services Director continue her efforts to improve management at that department, that the public be informed of the importance of visibly posting their address for the 9-1-1 system, and that police complaint forms be made available without an interview with the Chief of Police first.

Vandals hit Train Museum

Sometime between Saturday night and Sunday morning vandals struck at the Alturas Train Museum, just west of the Alturas Airport.

According to Acting Chief of Police Ken Barnes, the vandals got over the fence, broke out between 15 and 20 windows in the buildings, three windows in one locomotive and one each in two other locomotives. They also took the fire extinguishers from the engines and sprayed them outside.

According to Barnes, the locomotive windows have a replacement cost of about $300 each. He estimates total damage to the facility at over $2,000. Anyone with information on the crime is asked to call the Alturas Police Department at 233-2011 or the Modoc County Sheriff's Office at 233-4416.

County places hold on digital cell towers

The construction of digital cellphone communication towers in Modoc has been placed on a six-month moratorium as of this week.

County Supervisors agreed with a request from County Planner Scott Kessler to invoke the moratorium until the county can write and adopt an ordinance covering the equipment.

Kessler told Supervisors Tuesday there were plans for about 36 digital cell phone communication towers along highways in Modoc and Lassen Counties. Those towers, Kessler said, are about 200 feet high and resemble oil derricks. His plan is to include some design requirements in the ordinance to make the towers more aesthetically pleasing.

Youths carry on cultural traditions

The setting was perfect, along with the weather, for the fifth Junior PowWow at the Alturas Park last weekend. Five hundred and fifty youths, their families, both local residents and guests from afar showed their support for the youth and tradition-oriented event.

Resources for Indian Student Education (RISE) organized the two-day event, featuring educational workshops, traditional Grand Entries, Native American dance category awards for Shawl, Jingle, Grass and Traditional dancers. It was also a positive opportunity for the young people. They gathered, rekindling friendships from past Junior PowWow years, and striking up new friendships. Toddlers to young adults were able to witness the support of their cultural traditions, by the adults and military veterans who attended and participated in blessing the arena, carrying of the flags and the invocation.

Master of Ceremonies Irma Amaro-Davis of the all-women's drum group "Mankillers," announced the activities and welcomed host drums Wocus Bay Singers, Willow Creek Singers and five other drum groups who traveled to sing for the weekend. Vendors and concessions were available.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Doghouses are Godsend

Dear Editor:

I want to thank Larry and Shirley Swallow of Canby for the wonderful donations of four doghouses to the High Plateau Humane Society. These folks went through a lot of trouble to do this because the vehicle that we had, though we made two trips to pick them up in three different vehicles, were only able to bring back three after much hard work.

Mr. and Mrs. Swallow ate their 6:00 o'clock dinner at 9:00 that night. Then, Mr. Swallow offered to bring the fourth doghouse to the humane society foster home the next day, which he did. These folks spent hours trying to help us and I wanted to thank them from the bottom of my heart and let the people of Modoc know what special people they are.

Thank you Larry and Shirley. We utilized two of the four the very day we received them and we are working on the other two.

--Judy and Greg, High Plateau Humane Society, Alturas

OBITUARIES

Samuel G. Rojas

Samuel G. Rojas passed away on Tuesday, July 10, 2001 at the age of 69 in Sacramento, Calif. Father Patrick Henry held a Memorial Service on Monday, July 16 at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Alturas, Calif. Sam was born on July 11,1931, in Los Angeles, Calif. He married Mary C. Garcia on June 17, 1956. They had three children, Linda Anne Rojas, Diana Sue Rojas and Elizabeth Marie Rojas.

Mr. Rojas served in the U.S. Air Force for four years. He worked for Union Pacific for 17 years, and then for Downey Unified School District until he retired. After he retired, they moved to California Pines in 1993.

He is survived by his wife Mary C. Rojas of Cal Pines; daughters, Linda Madrigal and husband Frank of Irwindale, Calif.; Diana Chrisco and grandson James Ira Chrisco of Horseshoe Bend, AR.; Elizabeth (Liz) Gladu and husband Lenny and grandchildren Roxsanne, Meagan and Lenny Gladu, all of California Pines.

Mr. Rojas will be missed by all who knew and loved him.

JoAnn Grudenic (No Photo Available)

JoAnn Grudenic, 75, a resident of Alturas for the past 13 years, passed away July 12, 2001 in Alturas, Calif., following a long illness.

Born JoAnne Stahl in Elk City, Oklahoma on June 21, 1926, she attended Los Angeles schools and graduated as a cosmetologist from Los Angeles Trade Tech.

She married Steve Grudenic on January 29, 1950 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The couple reared three children. Mrs. Grudenic enjoyed sewing, doing needlepoint and growing plants.

Her husband preceded her in death on December 7, 1975. She was also preceded in death by her son Steve, formerly of Gearhart, Ore.

Survivors include her son Raymond Grudenic of Alturas, Calif.; daughter JoAnne Grudenic of Gearhart, Ore.; grandsons Nicholas, Michael and Galen Grudenic, and daughter-in-law Rhonda Grudenic-Burke, all of Gearhart, Ore.

Services were private with the family.

Thomas Lloyd Chappell

Thomas Lloyd Chappell, 83, called Modoc County home for the past 25 years. The California Pines resident passed away at Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, Calif. on July 15, 2001.

Born March 26, 1918, to Elizabeth and William Chappell in San Francisco, Calif. He graduated from San Diego High School.

Mr. Chappell served with the U.S. Navy during World War II as an Electrician's Mate II Class. He received his discharge in 1945. He worked briefly as a dairy product delivery person "milk man," before becoming a Journeyman Electrician.

As an electrician, he worked mainly in the San Diego area. He worked for two years at the San Onofre Plant. Mr. Chappell was a 30-year member of the electrician's IBEW Union #569 and served as a member of the union's board of directors.

He and Rosalind Louise Hall were married in San Diego, Calif. on March 20, 1950 and shared 41 years of marriage. They had seven children. Rosalind passed away December 1, 1991, and Thomas was preceded in death by four sons, Thomas, William, Kenneth and Timothy James. Mr. Chappell had an outgoing personality and enjoyed debating topics. He kept current with the news and enjoyed fishing, hunting and camping. He is survived by his son Paul Chappell, owner of Refuge Radiator in Alturas; daughters Elizabeth Chappell of Bend, Ore. and Marietta Kelsey of Wildomer, Calif.; a sister, Blossom Roberts in Nebraska; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Services will be private, with his cremains to join his wife's.

SPORTS

 

Susanville Ford wins best car at Classic Cruisers' Fandango

A 1940 Ford owned by James Hardy of Susanville was judged Best of Show in the Modoc Classic Cruisers Fandango Days Show and Shine July 7. The local car club shows its vehicles, but not for judging purposes. The winner of the Best Paint award went to Mike and Cec Kaczorowski, Burney, with their 1931 Plymouth 4-door. Best Engine went to George Engelin, Susanville and his 1970 Barracuda. Best Interior went to Jim and Linda Luke, Susanville for a 1935 Ford panel.

Organizers were pleased with this year's car show, with over 90 out-of-town entries. The winner of the 1969 Classic Jeepster was Dave Hunt of Davis Creek.

The winners by categories were as follows:

Stock cars, 1954 and older: First, Bob and Bonnie Lewis, Susanville, 1950 Ford Club. Second, Cris and Dawn Minch, Litchfield, 148 Studebaker.

Stock cars, 1955-64: First, Ed Traverso, Macdoel, 1958 Corvette. Second, Dennis Savage, Lakeview, 1955 Studebaker President.

Stock Cars, 1965-75: First, Susan Shaffer, Janesville, 1965 Mustang. Second, Gene and Anne Rinehart, Klamath Falls, 1967 Buick Grand Sport.

Stock Convertibles: First, Dan and Pat Steckler, Whitmore, Ca., 1967 GTO. Second, Gene and Shara Cox, Lakeview, 1966 Chevy Impala SS.

Under construction: First Mike and Cec Kaczorowski, Burney, 1931 Plymouth 4-door sedan.

Modified cars, 1940 and older: First, James Hardy, Susanville, 1940 Ford. Second, Lon and Jan Casebeer, Klamath Falls, 1931 Ford HiBoy.

Modified cars, 1941-54: First, Clarence Norris, Shasta Lake, 1948 Plymouth Deluxe. Second, Dan and Kathy Paulson, Susanville, 1947 Chevy Fleetmaster.

Modified cars, 1955-1964: First, Art and Jean Lawrence, Susanville, 1955 Chevy BelAir. Second, Jim Standart, Adin, 1956 Chevy.

Modified cars, 1965-75: First, George Engelin, Susanville, 1970 Barracuda. Second, Dale Barnard, McArthur, 1967 Chevy Malibu.

Modified convertibles: First, David and Geraldine Vollmers, Redding, 1971 Ford Mustang.

Stock Trucks, 1959 and older: First, John and Norma Garate, Susanville, 1957 Chevy pickup. Second, Kenneth Shaffer, Janesville, 1929 Ford Model A.

Stock trucks, 1960-1975: First, Bear and Jan Medley, Susanville, 1960 Chevy pickup. Second, David Van Slyke, Klamath Falls, 1966 Chevy pickup.

Modified trucks 1959 and older: First, Jim and Linda Luke, Susanville, 1935 Ford panel. Second, Ed Huntsmand, Westwood, 1957 Ford Ranchero.

Modified trucks, 1960-75: First Howard Alcorn, Klamath Falls, 1961 Chevy pickup. Second, Larry Wedmore, Klamath Falls, 1966 GMC pickup.

MHS athletes need physicals

Modoc High School students planning to participate in fall sports this year are reminded to get physicals and have completed sports information cards in before the first practice.

Forms are available at the school or district office.

3-on-3 hoop tourney July 27

A 3-on-3 basketball tournament players for incoming sixth graders to outgoing 8th graders will be held July 27, starting at 10 a.m. at the basketball courts behind Modoc Middle School.

Participants may pick their own teams for some of the tournament games. There will be two divisions for both boys and girls: players who are incoming sixth and seventh graders and another for players who are incoming eighth and ninth graders. Other tournament games will consist of participants being divided into teams at random by the tournament director.

Early registration is encouraged by calling 233-7115. The event is sponsored by CLOAK and "Families Matter" Modoc Child Abuse Prevention Council.

Men's league results

The standings of the Alturas Men's Fastpitch Softball League are as follows:

Alturas Tire, 8-1; Lakeview, 7-3; Pepsi, 7-4; Hooters, 5-4; Styx, 1-8; Warriors 0-8.

The schedule for the week is: July 19 in Alturas, 4-Corners vs Warriors, 6:30 p.m.; Styx s Alturas Tire, 8:30 p.m. July 20 in Alturas, 6:30 p.m. Lakeview vs 4-Corners; 8:30 p.m. Lakeview vs Alturas Tire. July 24 in Alturas, 7:30 p.m., Warriors vs Alturas Tire; in Cedarville 7:30 p.m. Styx vs Hooters.

 

JULY 26, 2001

 

Big Valley rallies behind working circle

The communities in Big Valley are rallying around the Sustained Yield Unit in an effort to get at least some of the logging industry back into the area.

A meeting is scheduled Saturday, July 28, 1 p.m. in the Big Valley High School Gym where U.S. Representative Wally Herger and other officials will be speaking and listening to the people's concerns.

The closing of Big Valley Lumber in Bieber in May shocked the entire community. With its closure came uncertain times for about 80 employees an annual payroll to the Big Valley area of nearly $3 million.

Big Valley Lumber is a second generation, family-owned business. Bruce Main's father started the Bieber mill in the late 60s.

Steve Gagnon, owner of Big Valley Market and a member of a lead committee trying to revitalize the Sustained Yield Unit, said it's crucial for people in Big Valley and the surrounding communities to attend Saturday's meeting and be heard.

Herger met with Chief of the Forest Service Dale Bosworth July 17 and will be discussing that conversation. Gagnon said Bosworth may attend the meeting. The local group, including Lassen County Supervisor Brian Dahle, Gagnon, Mike Schroeder and Big Valley Lumber owner Bruce Main are also meeting with Washington officials as well as Modoc National Forest Supervisor Dan Chisholm.

Gagnon said the future may not mean opening Big Valley Lumber again under Main family ownership, but getting the Sustained Yield Unit back in operation would make the facility attractive to other operators. Main has the support of the community, said Gagnon.

The Sustained Yield Units are designated by Congress to provide timber for mills within the boundaries of each "working circle." Only four remain in existence, the other in this area is in Lakeview, Oregon. The original, and remaining, intent of the working circle is to provide some stability to rural areas when lumber mills provide economic health and structure.

The people in Big Valley are saying the Modoc National Forest has not kept up its bargain to provide timber each year from that circle. They say the Lassen Forest has provided timber.

The Modoc Forest contends there is about nine million board feet available annually from that unit, and in fact have dropped total forest-wide timber production to about 12 million per year.

Modoc used to produce 50 to 60 million board feet annually, but Chisholm expects that level to be substantially lower. He said the Forest will be working with the lumber industry to help with the adjustments.

"It's unfortunate, but that working circle capacity is only about nine million board feet per year on a 10-year plan," Chisholm has said. "And much of that is biomass or small logs. There is not a lot of saw timber available. Most of it will be in the six to eight inch trunk diameter range."

"Nine million is as good a guess as any right now," sad Big Valley District Ranger Sue Wheatley. "Currently, there is a ceiling of nine million board feet out of the Sustained Yield Unit. We will be offering timber sales out of the unit, but there are not a lot of big trees involved. Most will be small logs."

Over the past decade, Big Valley has sold 59 million board feet and harvested about 84.5 million including insect salvage. Wheatley points out that available in the unit for timber sales is about 60,000 acres.

The 1992 drought, weakened trees and eight salvage sales were harvested inside the unit in 1994-95. Of that, 66 mbf were saw logs and 18 mbf was for chips and biomass, "For a mill to survive at Big Valley Lumber's size, they're going to have to find another source for enough timber volume," said Wheatley. "It's true that over the last three years we have not offered sales from the unit. One thing that has happened is the forest was only funded for 12 million board feet. As a result, we managed for focused areas, and not as individual districts."

Wheatley said Sierra Pacific has purchased much of the private timber in the area and Big Valley Lumber had relied on those lands for about 45 million board feet annually. With that timber out of the marketplace, a new twist is added to finding enough to operate.

The meeting Saturday will be a place to address the issues and clear up the picture. Organizers are also looking for some answers and a method to turn the saws back on at Big Valley Lumber. To organizers, a community is at stake.

75,000 acre feet released from Klamath Lake

The Bureau of Reclamation approved release of 70,000 to 75,000 acre feet of water to Klamath Project Farmers on Tuesday. While that's well short of the normal 350,000 acre feet normally needed, it will help, but none of it will get to the wildlife refuge.

The release was approved by Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton following a determination by the BOR that Klamath Lake is at a higher level than projected. The actual water release will be coordinated between the BOR and Irrigation Districts.

The reason for the increased water level, said Norton, was because irrigators above the Klamath Basin Project have conserved more water than previously projected and scattered thunderstorms have added some precipitation.

"The BOR will divert all the water released to contractors within the Klamath Basin Project," said Norton. "The Irrigation Districts will then be responsible for deciding on the allocation and distribution of the water, under their contracts with BOR. It's estimated that about 10,000 acre feet of the total will be needed to prime the canal system for the releases."

None of the water will reach the National Wildlife Refuges. "There simply isn't enough water to do more than provide a little relief to some desperate farm families during the remainder of this season," said Norton. "In the months ahead, we'll be looking at a number of options to assist the over-wintering bald eagles. These may include seeking new sources of groundwater, purchasing water from willing sellers and developing plans for supplemental feeding."

Norton said the Department of Interior is "committed to working with all interested parties in the current mediation process" that will "hopefully lead us to solutions that avoid a repeat of this situation next year and in the future."

Additionally, both the U.S. Government and the State of California have approved emergency funding for the farmers in the Klamath Basin. Congressman Wally Herger announced this week that a $20 million dollar emergency aid fund had been approved in a bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and is expected to pass the Senate and be signed by the President.

Also, the California State Senate passed its version of the state budget Sunday morning. That budget includes $8 million for drought relief to the Klamath Basin. That comes on top of a $5 million allocation earlier this year that was used to drill wells in the area in an effort to save topsoil. Herger, as well as state Senator Maurice Johannessen, were instrumental in getting the funding for the farmers, and both say the amount is well short of the impact caused by the initial April 6 no water decision by the Bureau of Reclamation.

The worst drought in 75 years and a Federal Judge's ruling that the Endangered Species Act was violated last year, forced the Bureau of Reclamation to shut off the irrigation canal to most farmers. That action prompted farmers in the area to ask for a change in the Endangered Species Act, since the action was, in part, to reserve necessary water levels for Lost River and shortnose suckers as well as downstream coho salmon. In protest, farmers have forced open the main canal gates on several occasions recently and maintained a symbolic presence at the "A" Canal headgates in an effort to draw national attention to their plight. Federal marshals are on the scene to protect the gates.

While farmers are citing the issue as them against the suckers, the issues are more complex, according to the BOR, including the major drought, water rights, the needs and requirements of Indian Tribes and of the Marine Fisheries and Fish and Wildlife Services.

Also at the moment, the State of Oregon is involved in the adjudication process for Klamath Lake and tributary water.

Rural cops included in state budget

The state budget will put substantial amounts of money into rural law enforcement budgets, according to State Senator Maurice Johannessen, of Redding.

He said the budget includes a $500,000 annual allocation to sheriff's departments in each county with fewer than 260,000 people. Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix, who lobbied for the increase said it will allow for more patrol officers and overall better public protection.

In addition, the police technology grant program for cities was increased from $20,000 to $30,000 on a continuing basis, Johannessen said. Agriculture will also be a big winner, according to Johannessen. The industry will get a permanent tax break for the purchase of liquid propane, farm machinery and equipment, forestry machinery and equipment, breeding stock and an agriculture diesel exemption. Food processors and homeowners will also get the same tax break for the purchase of propane. Klamath Basin farmers will also get an additional $8 million for drought relief.

BLM land swap underway

Anyone who owns land adjacent to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land, the Alturas Field Office may want to swap land - some of theirs for private property - if all other considerations are in order.

An initiative to amend the existing land use plans of the BLM Alturas Field Office is nearing completion, according to the field office manager, Timothy J. Burke. The proposed amendment to the existing Land Tenure Adjustment (LTA) plan would make many parcels of public land available for sale or exchange to private land owners in Lassen, Modoc, Siskiyou and Shasta counties.

This is no small undertaking as it potentially involves thousands of acres of land in Northeastern California.

"Our ultimate objective is to improve public and private land use in a four county area," says Burke, emphasizing the practical value to all concerned of the land exchange program.

The existing LTA plan dates back to 1973 when certain parcels of public lands were earmarked for sale or exchange for private lands. Nearly all those transactions have been completed. Since then, private landowners have filed over 100 additional proposals for land exchanges or purchases, creating an imperative to update the existing plan. Additionally, the BLM Alturas Field Office has identified a number of areas where exchanges and acquisitions would improve their management of private lands.

The purpose underlying the plan is to simplify and streamline BLM's husbandry of public lands while maintaining all BLM's responsibilities. A glance at the BLM maps clearly shows the need to consolidate its scattered holdings by purchasing selected private lands for purely practical reasons. At the same time, the maps also demonstrate the practicability of selling some BLM holdings into private hands for the same reasons. On the face of it, the plan appears to be a "win/win" situation for both BLM and private land owners.

According to BLM documents, the amended plan identifies some acres of public land that should not be swapped for a variety of reasons, some environmental, some archeological, some recreational, some for habitat management, and some simply for practical reasons. Other areas, "smaller private holdings" presently within or adjoining larger expanses of public lands are earmarked for acquisitions from "willing owners' due to their "higher public resource values." Still, other parcels are designated for transition to private ownership. These are described as ". . . smaller, scattered, isolated parcels surrounded by private land . . . " that could, assumably, be more useful to those private landholders than to BLM because of their "low public resource values."

"I think it's definitely a step forward," says Burke, adding that there is "real strong . . . wide-spread support" in both the public and private sector for the updated, amended plan.

Sales, exchanges or acquisitions of land will be conducted on a case-by-case basis, according to Burke. Each will be evaluated separately. The use of "modified competitive bidding procedures". established by law, will predominate. However, in a few cases, due to "equitable consideration or public policies" there will be no competitive bidding. Every effort will be made to take the interests of private parties into consideration without compromising the BLM's objectives.

Obviously, these exchanges will be welcomed by many. Some existing ranches and rural communities will benefit economically. Several access problems to public and private lands may be resolved. BLM expects to realize a considerable savings in resources and manpower presently dedicated to a variety of problems directly connected to these isolated parcels, for example, fence construction and maintenance to prevent trespass.

Concerns about the effects of these exchanges on tax revenues, as expressed by some public officials, is "no major hurdle," according to Burke. He notes that there should be no major shift of land from public to private domain, or vice versa. The net effect of the BLM land swap will be "a wash," at most, resulting in a "slight reduction in public lands," leaving no real impact on tax revenues.

The amended plan has been in the works for many months while BLM officials solicited input from all interested parties and considered all options. Burke expects to finalize the amended plan by September, when the process of developing priority lists will begin. Such exchanges, notes Burke, are "complicated," but very worthwhile for all concerned.

DFG to review north state coho salmon for CESA

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) announced it will commence a status review of coho salmon that inhabit coastal streams from San Francisco Bay north to the Oregon border to determine whether to recommend the popular commercial and sport angling fish for listing as endangered under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA). The year-long status review will solicit biological information and public comment from a variety of sources to help develop the basis for DFG's conclusions.

The review process began in April when the California Fish and Game Commission (Commission) accepted for consideration a petition from the public to list the north state coho salmon, also known as silver salmon, as endangered. Once the Commission accepted the petition for consideration, coho salmon became a candidate species under the provisions of CESA and DFG was required to undertake the status review. DFG has until April 2002 to present its report and its recommendations to the Commission, which will then make the decision to list the fish or not, and at which category, threatened or endangered.

This week, DFG mailed public notices that announced to various constituents and interested parties that the statues review has begun. The notice also contains a solicitation for information and comments that will assist in the review. Responses must received by August 31, 2001 to be considered in the final report to the Commission.

Information and comments should be sent to California Department of Fish and Game, Native Anadromous Fish and Watershed Branch, 1807 13th Street, Suite 104, Sacramento, CA 95814, Attention: Coho Status Review. Coho salmon were once a popular commercial and sport angling fish in California. They are found in coastal streams from the Oregon border south to Santa Cruz County. The decline of California populations of coho salmon in recent years has resulted in severe restrictions on commercial and recreational fishing. In 1995, the Commission listed coho salmon that inhabit streams south of San Francisco as state-listed endangered. All California populations of coho salmon are listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Special Act.

Top cow dogs come to World Champ Challenge

The second annual World Champion Cow Dog Challenge presented by the Western Cow Dog Association will be held at the Bill Wilson Ranch, outside Alturas, from August 9 to 12.

The world's best cattle dogs will vie for the title of "World Champion Cow Dog," while displaying their cattle handling skills to spectators. An estimated $32,000 in cash and prizes is expected to be awarded.

The Wilson Ranch will provide the cattle needed, some horses and the grounds to stage the show. Spectating will be free. Competition entry fees are $400 with a limit of two dogs per handler.

Competition will run 50 dogs in a day in two arenas, say promoters and Challenge Board members Al and Stacie Vieira of Orland. Handlers will ride horseback to keep the "western flavor to it," which is not the case at some trials.

Organizers have stated that Alturas Rural Fire Department plans to offer concessions.

The Challenge Committee includes President, Mike Gaston of Chico; Secretary, Stacie Vieira; Association and Challenge Treasurer, Carol Sartori and Cow Dog Association Secretary, Patty Wells. The Association Board includes Al Vieira, Dave Ward, Butch Sartori, and Roger Urricelqui of McArthur.

Dogs and handlers from throughout the U.S. and Canada are expected. Each year, working cow dog trials are held in many states around the country. This is the culmination of those competitions.

More than just an average dog trial, it will offer one of the largest purses ever for a stockdog trial. In addition, other events including a Junior Handlers Challenge for handlers 18 years and younger and a Calcutta will be held before the finals.

Eagleville welcomes all to celebrate 56 years of community barbecues

Dine, dance and help celebrate Eagleville's 56th annual Barbecue on Saturday, July 28.

The years of serving the community's own special barbecue sauce, renown for its good flavor, and pit barbecued beef plus good times, will be repeated at the Eagleville Community square. Public and children welcome. Dinner will be served from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. In addition to the beef and vegetables, pit barbecued, beans, green and potato salads, rolls, and coffee to be served with other beverages offered for sale.

The food is still prepared the same way as it was when the barbecue first started following World War II. The day before the barbecue the meat is rolled with vegetables and seasonings, then wrapped in a layer of butcher paper and burlap. Early the next morning, the bundles are dipped in water and carefully laid on the coals of the pit-fires which were lit the previous evening. The meat cooks all day, and is ready just as festivities get underway in the evening.

A ticket to the dinner also includes the dance from 9:00 p.m. to midnight. The Eagleville Fire Department and community's few hands will chip in to make the event possible for so many.

Tickets for the dinner/dance are $10 at the door, adults; or pre-sale $9 available at Eagleville Fire Department, and Seab's True Value in Alturas and Page's Market, Cedarville. Children, ages six to 12, tickets are $4; under five, served free.

Everyone is invited to join the fun. All proceeds will benefit the Eagleville Volunteer Fire Department.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Hot Springs has problems

Dear Editor:

We read with interest your editorial in last week's paper along with the article concerning the Hot Springs Water District and the Grand Jury Report.

The watermaster and one Director of Hot Springs Water District are currently working for hire (along with family members) on a dam project west of town for the District. Is this not also a "conflict of interest"?

Regarding the selling of water last fall, we would like to know why our irrigation water was stopped five days short of the regular season. Was this to conserve water during a drought year? Then, approximately Oct. 5, 2000, water was released from Big Safe Reservoir by the watermaster for about 20 days.

How do we know? Our ranch is the first property served by Big Sage water and we were flooded, before this water got to the Pit River. It was after this release of water from Big Sage that the property owners on the Pit River pulled their dam boards for money. Money which was paid to them from the Hydroelectric Power Company, with a fee being paid to the watermaster, who arranged the deal.

Two of the property owners being paid for pulling dam boards on the Pit River are also directors of the Hot Springs Water District.

When we confronted the Directors with this information, we were told one of the property owners was only a 50 percent owner of the dam. The other 50 percent ownership of the dam belonged to the Hot Springs District. The District did "not" receive any of the money. The money paid for pulling dam boards went 100 percent to the property owner.

We would like to know how much money the watermaster was paid by the Hydroelectric Company, for arranging the release of Big Sage water after the irrigation season during a drought year!

The watermaster's duties end with the irrigation season of Sept. 30th. On November 25, 2000, the watermaster pulled our dam boards releasing all of our stock drinking water. Did the Hydroelectric Power Company pay him for this also?

If the drought continues, we would think the Grand Jury would find this act of selling water was a more serious offense than just a "conflict of interest".

This current irrigation season, water has been sold by the Hot Springs Board of Directors and watermaster on at least two occasions.

When water is so precious to Modoc County, how could these individuals take it upon themselves to sell it?

How much is water worth? If we do not have water next year, it will cost us our way of life as ranchers. As stated in your paper last week, there is also the fish and recreation to think about when Big Sage is drained dry! If the Director who profited from the "pulling of dam boards" last fall has to now haul stock water to his cows on Devil's Garden - I'd say to him, "What goes around eventually comes around." Maybe next year, there will not be any more water to haul.

--Lawrence and Sandi Ray Alturas

An affair to remember

Dear Editor:

What started out as just a few old friends getting together turned into a very special event when over forty people got together at the Cal-Pines Lodge the weekend of July 15 for a reunion of friends who grew up in Canby in the forties and fifties.

Some of us haven't seen each other in forty-five years and it was guess work as to who some were and some thought it was wise to wear name tags. There were some tears of joy and many happy and funny stories as each of us shared our happy growing up days in Canby.

Those of us who lived in the little town share a special connection to one another. There were those who came from all over California, Oregon and even Ohio.

Among the families represented were the Nelsons, Cates, Richardsons, Phillips, Tappe's, Sykes, McDonalds, Courtneys, Endicotts, Browns, Holloways, Hammachs, Ross's, Parsons, Davis, Pingles, Keeney's, Blacks, Tillmans, McKenzies, Fulfers, Drague's, Payne's and there were some who came just because they wanted to share in the fun such as the Hardings.

This is to thank all of the staff at the Cal Pines Lodge who were so gracious and accommodating to all of us. It was truly "An Affair to Remember".

--Charlene (Nelson) Mikolon Fairfax, CA

OBITUARIES

Madge M. Nolan (No photo available)

Alturas resident Madge M. Nolan passed away July 18, 2001 at Modoc Medical Center in Alturas, due to throat cancer.

Born Madge Spring on February 21, 1936 in San Diego, Calif., she finished high school in Melbourne, Florida. A marriage in July 1957 to Michael F. Nolan in Manhattan Beach, Calif. ended in divorce in 1961.

Mrs. Nolan worked as a receptionist and clerical employee with an aircraft company in Southern California. After moving in 1989 to Alturas, she enjoyed yard work.

She was preceded in death by her mother, Dorothy M. Spring of Alturas, in February 25, 2001.

No services will be held. Inurnment will be private. Memorial donations may be directed to cancer study and research.

SPORTS

3-on-3 hoop tourney July 27

Young 3-on-3 basketball tournament players from incoming sixth graders to outgoing 8th graders need to get ready for a tourney July 27, starting at 10 a.m. at the basketball courts behind Modoc Middle School.

Participants may pick their own teams for some of the tournament games. There will be two divisions for both boys and girls: players who are incoming sixth and seventh graders and another for players who are incoming eighth and ninth graders. Other tournament games will consist of participants being divided into teams at random by the tournament director.

Early registration is encouraged by calling 233-7115. The event is sponsored by CLOAK and ÒFamilies MatterÓ Modoc Child Abuse Prevention Council. Players can sign up the day of the tourney at 9:30 a.m.

MHS athletes need physicals

Modoc High School students planning to participate in all fall sports this year, are reminded to get physicals and have completed sports information cards in before the first practice.

Forms are available at the school or district office. SV athletes need sports physicals before practice

The Surprise Valley Clinic is offering all Surprise Valley student athletes physicals at a special rate from August 6 through August 10. Call 279-6115 to make an appointment.

Surprise Valley High School Volleyball practice will start August 20, at 3:15 p.m. for junior varsity and 5:15 p.m. for varsity. Physicals must be completed by first day of practice.

Men's softball league standings

The current standings of the Alturas Men's Softball League are as follows: Alturas Tire 9-1, Lakeview 7-3, Pepsi 7-5, Hooters 6-4, Styx 1-8, Warriors 1-8. Games on tap are: July 26 in Alturas, 6:30 p.m. Hooters vs Pepsi; 8:30 p.m. Styx vs Warriors; July 27 in Cedarville, 6:30 p.m. Lakeview vs Hooters, 8:30 p.m. Lakeview vs Styx; July 31 in Alturas, 7:30 p.m. Alturas Tire vs Warriors; in Cedarville, 7:30 p.m. Hooters vs Styx.

Alturas Tire fourth in tourney

The Alturas Tire men's fastpitch softball team placed fourth at the Big Valley Days tournament last weekend, with the host team Big Valley, winning the title.

The Burney Law Dogs placed second and Lakeview was third in the event which was a round-robin the first day and single elimination the second day.

Big Valley's Jeff Boyle, Bryan Gerig, Jason Schwert and Josh Conrad were named All-tourney with Alturas Tires' Greg Valencia and Noel Holloway also making the team.

The Most Valuable pitcher was Alturas' Ernie Givan and MVP was Jason Stroh.

 

AUGUST 2, 2001

Angry Big Valley community fights for life

It was standing-room only in the Bieber High School gym last Saturday afternoon, July 28th, when Big Valley residents gathered to hear from politicians and bureaucrats regarding lagging timber harvests from the Big Valley Sustained Yield Unit.

United States Congressmen Walley Herger noted that he and his colleagues in Congress had allocated all the funds that the Forest Service requested to sell timer. Hence, in his opinion, a lack of funding could not be a valid reason for failure to offer the timber for sale.

Citing the "challenge" that the Endangered Species Act presents to commercial logging, Herger said, "This is serious. This is just one more example of what we see happening all over the West . . . This is a battle that the radical environmentalists have declared on all of us in rural areas." According to Herger, a recent Wall Street Journal editorial used the term "rural cleansing" for what is happening in this area. "Regrettably, that's what we're seeing," offered Herger. "We're seeing the radical environmental movement . . . trying to have a rural cleansing in our area! "We can both take care of our environment and also be able to provide for our economy at the same time," Herger declared emphatically. "Those should not, nor are not mutually exclusive goals."

Dan Chisholm, Modoc National Forest supervisor and principal spokesman for the Forest Service at the meeting, began answering Herger by noting that wood harvest is not the only goal of the agency, that watershed and wildlife management were at least as important as logging the forest. "Whether we like it or not," said Chisholm, "we have those objectives on Forest Service land."

Cows coming home early -- no food, water

Cattle are coming off the public range in droves, and it's way too early for that to normally occur.

The severe drought conditions plaguing this area is the culprit. Livestock and wildlife forage just didn't get the necessary water for normal growth and the absence of watering areas is also a major concern.

The Modoc National Forest reports the problem is forest-wide and most livestock will probably be off the first of this month, much earlier than the historical late September or early October off dates.

CPS workers file suit against county, DA

A pair of Modoc County Child Protective Services employees, Mary Ann Prock and Jacqueline King, filed a suit July 24 in Modoc Superior Court against District Attorney Tom Buckwalter, the County of Modoc and the State of California.

The suit stems from a case last year where Buckwalter filed charges against the two when they removed a child from a mother's care. Buckwalter, at the time, said they violated a court custody order, while both CPS workers argued they did what was best for the child in question.

Annual Modoc Picnic Sunday

The 60th annual Modoc Picnic will be held Sunday, August 5 at the Carmichael Park in Carmichael, Calif.

For further information please contact either Guy Fender at (916) 371-3725 or Frank Rider (916) 645-2995.

Top cow dogs come to World Champ Challenge

The second annual World Champion Cow Dog Challenge presented by the Western Cow Dog Association will be held at the Bill Wilson Ranch, outside Alturas, from August 9 to 12.

For more information call the Alturas Chamber of Commerce at 530-233-4434.

SPORTS

Alturas Skate Park opening Friday

The Alturas Skate Park is planned to open sometime Friday, August 3, 2001.

T.E.A.C.H., Inc. will deed the property to the City of Alturas at a special Alturas City Council meeting, 5:00 p.m., August 1, 2001. The park will be closed in a few weeks so the painting can be completed. For more information call Carol Harbaugh at 233-7101 or Carol Callaghan at 233-3111.

MHS sets practice dates

Modoc High School sports teams will begin practicing this month. Athletes are reminded they must have sports information cards and physicals in before they can practice.

The Braves football teams will start practice August 13, 6 p.m. for both junior varsity and varsity. Gear will be handed out to those players who have not yet picked it up on August 10, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Modoc Volleyball will start August 20 with the junior varsity at 9 a.m. and the varsity at 5 p.m. Junior varsity coach is Kim Schmidt and the varsity coach is Matt Dorgan.

Modoc High School is looking for a cross country coach and needs one soon. Anyone interested is asked to call Athletic Director Shaun Wood at 233-7201, ext. 409.

Willis in Lions All-star game

Modoc's Tony Willis will play for the North team in the annual Lions Club All Star High School Football Game Saturday at Shasta College.

Willis, who graduated last year, was the Shasta Cascade League's Most Valuable Lineman and a three year starter for Modoc's Braves varsity. Game time is 7:30 p.m.

Make applications for waterfowl opener

The time is drawing near for the Opening Weekend at Modoc National Wildlife Refuge for the 2001-2002 Waterfowl Hunting Season. Spots to hunt the first two days of the season are available through a random drawing. Hunters must complete an application form and submit a $3 per hunter fee to be eligible for the drawing. An application and instructions on applying can be found on the Refuge's web site at http://pacific/fws/gov/modoc. Interested hunters can also stop by the Refuge office (off County Road 115) to pick up an application from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Applications will not be mailed out or faxed this year. Applications must be postmarked by August 11, 2001.

If you have any questions regarding the Opening Weekend at Modoc National Wildlife Refuge, please contact the Refuge staff at (530) 233-3572.

Ash Creek accepts applications for 2001 Junior Pheasant Hunt

Ash Creek Wildlife Area will hosts it's 2001 Junior Pheasant Hunt on Saturday, September 15.

To be included in the drawing for one of 75 permits, mail the following information to the address below: your name and complete mailing address, your phone number, your 2001 Junior Hunting License number, choice of the morning (8 a.m. to noon) or afternoon (1 p.m. to 5 p.m.) hunt period. Applications must be received at Ash Creek Wildlife Area, P.O. Box 37, Bieber, CA 96009 no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, August 24. Drawings will be held at that time, and permits will be mailed to successful applicants. Call (530) 294-5824 if you have any questions.

AUGUST 9, 2001

Modoc Forest battling huge fires

The Modoc National Forest was blasted by more than 1,400 lightning strikes last Thursday, which sparked more than 50 fires, some of them burning out of control and gobbling up acreage.

The biggest of the fires started near Blue Lake and has burned nearly 28,000 acres in the south Warners. It continues its march up the mountain with no containment in sight.

Blue Lake Camp Ground survived the blaze intact, but a boys barracks at the Church Camp at Blue Lake was destroyed. Fires are also burning in the Warner Mountain Wilderness but one has been contained.

According to the Forest Service more than 4,000 fire fighters are battling that blaze and another set of fires on DevilÕs Garden, which have burned more that 4,600 acres.

A fire camp has been set up at the Youth Park in Alturas, which houses 3,000 fire fighters, which may be in place for a month.

County opposes bill citing 'over-allocation' of water in Tulelake

The Modoc County Board of Supervisors Tuesday opted to send to a letter to the California Congressional delegation in opposition to language in a farm bill citing "over allocation" of water as a prime problem in the Klamath Basin.

U.S. Congressman Mike Thompson, who represents the north coast, has included the language in the Agricultural Act of 2001. The county believes his language "formulates a new policy statement for the Federal Government that has not been presented or ratified locally or in Congress." The county is arguing that over allocation of water was not the problem with the shut off of water this year, and points instead to the implementation of the Endangered Species Act as the main cause.

Modoc assessment inches up

The total local assessment roll of Modoc County went up 3.42 percent over last year, even though the unsecured property assessment dropped by 10.65 percent.

Modoc Assessor Josie Johnson reported a total local roll of $597,085,213 for 2001-02, compared to $577,347,089 in 2000-01.

The secured roll for 2001-02 went up 3.96 percent, from 2000-01 at $555,852,712 to this year's $577,880,036. There were 27,410 parcels broken down as $330,736,503 for land; $209,523,322; $41,660,347 for personal property, $4,009,062 and exemptions, $8,049,198.

The unsecured property roll dropped from $21,494,377 last year to $19,205,177 for 2001-202. There were 1,015 parcels reassessed last year while this year they dropped to 966. There were approximately 2,542 parcels reappraised due to change of ownership and 352 had new construction triggering reappraisal.

Re-roofing dominates city building

Of the 14 building permits issued by the City of Alturas in July, six were for re-roofing projects.

The value of the construction was $33,522.31 and the city collected $596.16 in fees.

July was a little better than June when seven permits were issued by the City of Alturas Building Department worth an estimated $15,242. Re-roofing was also the main construction project.

The county building department issued 19 permits worth an estimated $599,204 in July. The biggest part of that was an upgrade of a PG&E communication site at about $345,000.

Ft. Bidwell Indian Health Clinic is state-of-the-art facility, structure

Residents of Surprise Valley won't have to travel out of the county so often to get their major medical and dental needs met, thanks to the completion of the Warner Mountain Indian Health Clinic.

The 4,000 square foot building, which is due to open Sept. 10, was viewed Friday by nearly 100 people during an open house ceremony, R.J. Eben of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Redding was Master of Ceremonies. "Distance was one of the overriding reasons for the building of this new clinic," said John Vass, tribal administrator of the Fort Bidwell Indian Community Council (FBICC). "In the wintertime," he said, "the mountain passes make the travel time sometimes double, and extremely dangerous for patients and transporter alike."

Home Camp livestock grazing to be released for review

An environmental assessment and proposed livestock grazing strategy for a public land livestock grazing area in northwestern Nevada will be available for public review and comment beginning Friday, Aug. 10.

Comments on the proposal for the Home Camp Grazing Allotment will be accepted by the Bureau of Land Management's Surprise Valley Field Office in Cedarville, CA, until Monday, Sept. 10.

Copies of the proposal and the environmental assessment have been provided to requesters. Copies are also available by contacting the BLM Surprise Field Office, P.O Box. 460, Cedarville, CA 96104, or by phoning the office at (530) 279-6101.

New eagles fledged at Blue Lake

Modoc National Forest's Warner Mountain Ranger District announced that the eagle pair currently occupying a nesting site in the Blue Lake Campground, has added two new eagles to the population. The new eagles have fledged and have taken up residence in the Blue Lake area.

Accordingly, now that the eagle chicks have left the nest, the campsites that were closed to public use have been opened, along with the buoyed off area of the lake.

School openers

The first day of school for Modoc Joint Unified School District is Tuesday, August 28, 2001, and it will be a normal school day.

If there are any questions, please call 233-7201: Modoc High School, Ext. 401; Modoc Middle School, Ext. 301; Alturas Elementary School, Ext. 201; Alternative Education, Ext. 441; District Office, Ext. 101.

SPORTS

Fall sports practice starts next week, kids need to have physicals

Modoc High School athletes are reminded they must have sports information cards and physicals in before they can practice.

The Braves football teams will start practice August 13, 6 p.m. for both junior varsity and varsity. Gear will be handed out to those players who have not yet picked it up on August 10, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Modoc Volleyball will start August 20 with the junior varsity at 9 a.m. and the varsity at 5 p.m. Junior varsity coach is Kim Schmidt and the varsity coach is Matt Dorgan.

Modoc High School is still looking for a cross country coach. Anyone interested is asked to call Athletic Director Shaun Wood at 233-7201, ext. 409.

Modoc is home for 2nd World Champ Cow Dog Challenge

The second annual World Champion Cow Dog Challenge will be held at the Bill Wilson Ranch this year, outside Alturas on Pine Creek Boulevard, from August 9 to 12.

The worldÕs best cattle dogs will vie for the title of "World Champion Cow Dog," in a variety of skill tests. A $32,000 cash purse is on the line. The Wilson Ranch will provide the cattle needed, some horses and the grounds to stage the show. Spectating will be free.

The event will start at 8:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday and run most of the day. Competition will begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday and SundayÕs finals will start at 10 a.m.

Eagle Lake fishing report

Despite being somewhat slower over the weekend as the full moon set in, the majority of Eagle Lake anglers continued to catch trout, but with fewer limits being reported. Trout are averaging between 2 1/2 and 5 pounds. Use of night crawlers, both trolling and still-fishing from boats, continues to be most productive. Rainbow runners and needlefish, with or without flashers, ran a close second. Anglers continue to indicate best results at depths ranging from 25 to 40 feet.

AUGUST 16, 2001

Modoc Forest ravaged by extreme fires

The Modoc National Forest was hit by more than 1,400 dry lightning strikes last Thursday and major fires have erupted in most corners of the county. The Forest Service was extremely concerned early this year that the severe drought in this area was creating a tinderbox and if a major fire got started, it would be disastrous. Their worst nightmares have come true this week.

Fires were venting quickly and moving through dry timber and brush rapidly. The hot weather, incredibly dry fuels and winds are causing very erratic and extreme fire behavior, Bright said.

The Forest Service notes that 17 percent relative humidity is a critical level for fire suppression success, and on Wednesday predictions were that by afternoon, those levels would drop to from five to nine percent.

"This shows the what the conditions fire fighters are facing in their efforts to get a handle on the fires burning in Modoc," said Carol Sharp, MNF Information specialist. "It is really dry. As of Tuesday morning there have been 74 fires on the forest since the initial lightning storm last week." The biggest and most intense of the fires started at Blue Lake and has burned more than 33,000 acres. Established lines are being reinforced on the southwest portion of the force and backfires were lit to keep it contained. There has been no threat to the town of Likely, however, fire officials were very concerned about the homes and structures in Jess Valley. Those structures are currently safe.

On Tuesday, crews were able to hold the line on the southern portion of the Blue Fire and are mopping up in that area. The northern part, however, is burning out of control and has reached Bear Camp Mountain. Patterson Guard Station was threatened, but fire crews covered it with foam retardant and it remains undamaged. The boys barrack at the Federated Church's Blue Lake Camp was destroyed by fire, but the remaining camp structures are intact as is the Blue Lake Campground. That campground was evacuated at the start of the fire. The boat ramp area was burned over, but no structures were lost. The campground and road to Blue Lake remains closed. Jess Valley Road is open to Mill Creek, however that could change with no advance notice.

The Modoc Complex, which includes the fires on the Devil's Garden, had 1,344 people fighting several fires. The Bell Fire, at 2,800 acres has a line built around it and is expected to remain intact. The Rock Fire has charred 1,400 acres and is partially lined. Ground and air attack units have hit that fire hard.

On new fire was reported in the Modoc Complex, called the Lost Fire, about eight miles north of Alturas. It was putting up a large plume of smoke Tuesday. It is situated in the Big Sage Fire Management Area and will be monitored. Initial attack is still ongoing on both the Modoc and Blue Complexes with fuels continuing to ignite as a result of recent lightning. There are 14 to 17 aircraft currently working on the fires in Modoc. The Deer, Kellogg, Fourmile, Butte, State and Line fires are contained, with crews working on suppression of all of them.

The Canyon Fire was near Highway 299 over Cedar Pass and was hit heavily by fire fighters. It was held at about 160 acres. The road over Cedar Pass was closed sporadically because of smoke. The community of Cedarville was not in ultimate danger and it is preparing to host the Modoc District Fair starting today. Fair officials stress the Fair will go on.

Much of the area burning in the Warner Mountains is prime hunting habitat and the Forest Service is advising people who intend to travel to opening deer season weekend to rethink their areas. "Those whose hunting plans include the South Warner Mountains are urged to seek alternate locations," the Forest Service said.

Anyone coming to Modoc for recreation or hunting is asked to stay away from the fire areas. Roads need to remain open for fire traffic or crews. Additionally, the aftermath of fires includes many hazards that people may not be aware of. Standing trees blow over with the slightest breeze and undetected embers may be waiting for a touch of fuel to set them off again. Visitors should check in with Forest headquarters or district offices for locations of safe and restricted areas.

City prepares for fire crew town of its own

The City of Alturas is expecting about 3,000 firefighters and related staff to locate at the Alturas Youth Park this week, creating a city within a city. The new city was springing up quickly Monday as tents were erected and trucks and trailers pulled into the park in an organized frenzy to get it ready. By Monday evening, the camp was feeding hundreds of firefighters. The Blue Incident Command Post was expected to accommodate those 3,000 people as of Monday night.

The Forest Service is battling dozens of fires in Modoc and the camp set up in Alturas will be primarily concerned with the fires in the Warner Mountains. The Blue Fire, which started at Blue Lake, is raging out of control east of Likely and crews are not predicting a control date.

The Forest Service has advised crews are currently working 12 hours on, 12 hours off shift, but some may have to go to 24 hour shifts if that becomes necessary. The 3,000 people housed in Alturas will not be there all at the same time.

Modoc Fair opens fun today

All the foods, fun and thrills open today at the Modoc District Fair in Cedarville, through Sunday, August 19. A new array of free entertainment is offered along with fresh, new looks, and plenty for fairgoers to see and do. "We have so much here this year, I'd be disappointed if people didn't come for at least one day," said Modoc Fair CEO Traci Green. "I'm very excited about what the fair has to offer this year."

The additions of the All Creatures Petting Zoo, bringing a baby camel and much more; the Incredible Creatures Museum and Show, and Pacific Animal's Wildlife Safari Zoo are all free, "exciting and unusual for this area," described Green.

A wide range of entertainment and activities are offered from today through Sunday and the "grounds look excellent," said Green. The Carnival of Fun returns with new rides and their "Kids Day" opening Friday at 11:00 a.m. with free admission for kids 12 and younger and a $10 bracelet for unlimited carnival rides until 6 p.m.

The local Warner Mountain Gandy Dancers, which are working to keep the Alturas Railroad Museum viable, will offer rides on their miniature train located on the lawn behind the Home Arts building. Bass fishing enthusiast and local businessman Jerry Sanders will provide fishing demonstration from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Kids' Day.

Fairgoers will see familiar and new faces inside the Commercial Building to be filled with booths, vendors and prize drawings at many of the booths. The exhibits are up a "small percentage over last year," said Green, with many new people jumping in to enter their work this year in many divisions.

But, if it's action that's desired, try the "mini" bungee jumping Olympic training tool or any of the rides, the Stock Car races at 7 p.m. Friday, or the Junior Rodeo Saturday at 12 noon; Demolition Derby on Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. and Alturas Elks' Barn Dance to follow from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. "Modoc's Magic: From Agriculture to Recreation," is this year's theme and Sunday's 10:00 a.m. Parade down Cedarville's Main Street will feature Grand Marshals, the Flournoy Brothers: Rob, Don and Warren Flournoy. The Flournoy Family celebrated 130 years of business in the same location in Likely on August 4, 2001.

Mountain lion attacks ranch dog

A female mountain attacked a ranch dog owned by Rick and Diana Milton at their Lake City ranch Monday night about 10 p.m.

According to Rick Milton, he heard a lot of commotion outside and went to check. He saw the lion and his dog about 20 feet away from the house. The lion had the dog's head in its mouth and was growling furiously. Milton went back into the house, got a weapon, came back out and shot and killed the lion.

Pepperdine pack tour postponed due to fires

A tour of the Pepperdine Pack Station in the Warner Mountains scheduled for August 25 has been postponed because of the fires in Modoc.

The Modoc National Forest will reschedule the tour once the fires are extinguished. A date of that tour will be announced as soon as possible. The on-site visit will help the public and agency identify possible uses for the area. For more information contact Jayne Biggerstaff at 233-8740.

Jobless rate falls to 4.9%

Modoc County's unemployment rate fell to 4.9 percent in July, down from June's 5.1 percent. According to the Employment Development Department, the workforce had 3,680 employed with 190 unemployed. The state's unemployment rate for July was 5.3 percent and the federal rate was 4.7 percent.

Of California's 58 counties, Modoc ranked 23rd in highest unemployment. Imperial County had the highest unemployment at 24.6 percent and Marin the lowest at 2.5 percent.

Lassen County showed a jobless rate of 4.9 percent for July, Siskiyou came in at 7.3 percent and Shasta was at 5.9 percent.

Observation Fire 90 percent contained at 67,700 acres

Fire fighters have made good progress toward containment of the Observation Fire, a 67,700-acre lightning-caused blaze burning near the community of Ravendale, about 50 miles north of Susanville. Full containment was expected yesterday.

The fire has damaged important wildlife habitat that supports mule deer and upland birds. No structures were damaged or destroyed.

Deaths

Harold Chism

Thelma A. Graham

Walter Boggs

Jean Dunnington

SPORTS

Fair softball tourney starts Friday night

The annual Styx-Modoc County Fair Softball Tournament starts Friday night at 7 p.m. with the Alturas Men's Softball League champion Alturas Tire taking on Stronghold Aces out of Tulelake.

That game will be followed at 9 p.m. with a title between Lakeview and the Reno Indians. The games resume Saturday morning with the Styx taking on Westwood at 8 a.m. and the Hooters will meet Giant-Yankees after that to finish the first round.

The Home Run Derby sponsored by Les Schwab will be at about 3 p.m. Saturday and the championship game is set for 2 p.m. on Sunday.

The final standings of the Alturas Men's League are: Alturas Tire 13-2, Lakeview 12-3, Pepsi 8-7, Hooters 7-8, Styx 3-12, and Warriors 2-13.

New coach takes over X-country

Modoc High School has hired Kenny Demick to take over the cross-country program and he will also take over girls varsity basketball this season. Cross county will start practice Monday, 5 p.m. Runners should meet Demick at the Modoc High School weight room and must have physicals and sports information cards completed.

Modoc High's soccer season starts Monday

Modoc High School's inaugural soccer season will open with its first practice for the co-ed team on Monday, August 20, from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. on the Modoc Middle School field, Fourth Street, Alturas.

All incoming freshmen through Seniors interested in being a part of the first Soccer Team, should show up for the initial practice. Soccer practice will continue Monday through Friday, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Modoc Middle School field.

Jay Carrithers, an experienced Youth Soccer coach, will be coaching Modoc High's team. The first game is tentatively scheduled for September 8. Game schedules are currently being formulated with information to be forthcoming.

AUGUST 23, 2001

Modoc fires under control, charred 40,000 acres of forest

Forest Fires in Modoc are under control but crews remain mopping up areas and putting out spot fires within the containment lines.

According to the Modoc National Forest, the biggest of the fires, the Blue Fire which started at Blue Lake August 9 was controlled at 34,400 acres on August 21. Firefighters are concentrating on holding the existing line, protecting structures, removing hazard trees and patrolling the area. Other fires in the South Warners were also controlled by early this week. The Parsnip Fire was stopped at 70 acres, the Shields Fire at 160 acres and the Canyon Fire, on Cedar Pass at 210 acres.

The Modoc Complex of fires on Devil's Garden was contained at 5,367 acres and mop up is continuing within the complex and the fires will be in patrol status. The Bell fire was the largest at 3,110 acres.

The Blue Fire Camp at the Youth Park in Alturas is being demobilized this week as fire units are heading home or moving on to other fires in the northwest. Most of its estimated 2,000-plus people should be gone in the next two weeks.

The southern part of the Warner Mountain Ranger District, south of Highway 299, including the South Warner Wilderness and associated campgrounds and trailheads remain closed to the public until further notice.

Fire crews have battled these fires since a massive lighting storm pounded the forest with some 1,400 lightning strikes August 9. All of the fires were lightning-caused. A severe drought has created tinderbox conditions in the forest and made fire-fighting very difficult and hazardous.

The Forest Service said 75 fires in the last two weeks have burned more than 40,000 acres. And the fire season is far from over.

Modoc Schools set to open next week

Schools in Modoc will open next week and drivers are asked to be particularly aware of students on their way to school as the summer vacation grinds to a halt

Surprise Valley Joint Unified School District schools open Monday, August 27 with all classes starting at 8 a.m.

Modoc Joint Unified School District begins classes on August 28 as a normal school day.

Skateboard park has insurance hold-up

The new Alturas Skateboard park sits like a prize waiting for the taking, but insurance concerns have kept it from opening.

The park at Fourth and West C Streets in Alturas is the result of a cooperative agreement between the Modoc County Schools Office, TEACH, Inc., and the City of Alturas.

The agreement was that once built, the City would assume ownership and provide the necessary insurance under its PARSAC self-insurance authority. Everything was going well and the city was confident the park would be covered initially. But when it came time to certify the structures, the insurance authority balked.

City attorney Fritz Barclay, is arguing that the insurance company currently covers three wooden parks in three different cities and will be asking them to cover the Alturas park at a Sept. 12 meeting of their executive board in Sacramento.

Dog did not recover from lion's attack

The ranch dog, "Blue," owned by Rick and Diana Milton of Lake City, did not recover from injuries suffered in a mountain lion attack last week. On Friday, Milton called to report his dog had been blinded in both eyes and suffered a fractured skull. He made the tough choice of putting the dog to sleep Friday.

Milton saw the lion and his dog about 20 feet away from the house about 10 p.m. August 13. The lion had the dog down and Milton went back into the house, got a weapon, shot and killed the lion.

Field trip to Pepperdine Camp and Pack Station rescheduled

The Modoc National Forest has set September 8 as the date for a field trip to the Pepperdine Camp and Pack Station. Though an emergency fire closure has been put in effect that includes the Pepperdine area, the Modoc National Forest anticipates a lifting of that closure prior to the September 8 field trip. The trip originally set for August 25, was postponed because of the fire emergency in the Warner Mountains and closure of the Warners south of Cedar Pass.

The public is invited to visit Pepperdine and to assist in identifying issues, concerns and alternatives for the future management of the area. The group will be meeting at the Modoc Forest's Supervisor's office, located at 800 West 12th Street in Alturas, at 9 a.m.

Anyone interested in the Pepperdine area but unable to attend the field trip may obtain information and submit comments to Jayne at the above phone or email, or by writing Modoc National Forest, 800 West 12th Street, Alturas, CA 96101.

Fair pulls in the crowds for 2001

Attendance at this year's Modoc Fair was up over last year, with the addition of several new features and entertainment.

"It takes a whole county and community to put on and make a fair successful," said Fair CEO Traci Green at the close of the 2001 event. Paid attendance was "way up" Sunday she noted, but Kids' Day Friday, attendance was down "a little."

The Fair opened their gates to 100 firefighters, whom they admitted free on Sunday, following the parade. Some had participated in the parade, and others had just been released from fighting fires, still smelling of smoke, when they enjoyed eating and relaxing a bit at the fair, noted Green. Nikki Duarte of Beatty, Ore. won the Trophy Saddle as the high point contestant of the combined events during Rancher's Day.

Deaths

Lillian Fitzpatrick, age 85, in Alturas. Services August 28, 11:30 a.m. at Alturas Cemetery.

Harold Chism, age 89, in Alturas.

Hazel Parson, age 96, in Alturas. Services August 23, 1 p.m. Alturas Cemetery.

Shirley Jeanne Dance, age 82, in Alturas. Services August 25, 11 a.m. at the Alturas Church of Christ.

Barbara Steffan, age 95, in Walnut Creek

SPORTS

 

Modoc's football team at Incline

Modoc High's football programs will take the varsity and junior varsity in the traditional opening scrimmage at Incline High School at Lake Tahoe Saturday.

Both teams will scrimmage North Tahoe, Quincy and Incline. Modoc could be the toughest of the teams in the scrimmage. Play will start at 10 a.m. and run through most of the day Saturday.

The Braves varsity sports 31 players, who Wood feels have very good team speed, but who are not as big as past teams.

Elks tourney draws 32

The third annual Elks Golf Tournament at Likely Links drew 32 golfers for a great event.

The team of Dean Harbaugh and Mike Monteith won the net title with a 60.5, following by Bobby Webb and Mike Macdonald with a 61.17, Jim Rollands and Jim Widby, 61.67 and Marv Conners and Bob Brooks a 63.5. The winner of the Calloway division was Steve Shaffer and Mike Morgan with a 67 and Pierce Mallory and Maurice Barnetche were second at 68. Danny Parker and Millard Porter each fired a low gross of 68.

The long drive went to Don Uhl and closest to the pin to Danny Parker.

Arrowhead Invite is set for Sept. 7-9

The 2001 Arrowhead Invitational Golf Tournament is scheduled for Sept. 7-9, with registration limited to the first 32 paid teams.

The event is open to Arrowhead Men's Club and guest as well as any two golfers from any other club. The entry fee is $100 per person and includes a free practice round Friday, green fees both days, a honey pot on Sunday, one Mulligan each day and refreshments on the course. A banquet and cocktails will be held at the course Saturday, starting at 6 p.m.

Saturday will be a best ball event with 90 percent of handicap, and Sunday will be total team low net with a 9 a.m. tee time each day.

Anyone needing a partner is asked to call the Arrowhead Clubhouse at 233-3404.

Hunter advisory for northeast California

Officials of Modoc National Forest and the Bureau of Land Management remind hunters of special fire restrictions on these public lands. Fire prevention measures are:

Fires outside developed recreation sites or designated areas are prohibited. Use of lanterns or portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel won't be restricted; smoking must be within an enclosed vehicle or building, or within a designated developed recreation site; Operating internal combustion engines, except on a forest development road or designated trail is prohibited; possession or use of a motorized vehicle off forest development roads or outside designated recreation sites is prohibited.

A current valid California Campfire Permit must be in their possession. Campfire permits are free and are available at all Forest Service and BLM offices.

A fire emergency area closure for the southern part of the Warner Mountain Ranger District south of Highway 299 is in effect until further notice.

For more information call the Modoc National Forest at (530) 233-8847. You may also check the Modoc National Forest website at www.r5.fs.fed.us/modoc/.

Demolition Derby brings winners

David Emery of Durham won the $1,000 in cash plus a trophy as the last car running in the Demolition Derby sponsored by the Surprise Valley Rotary during the Modoc Fair last Saturday night.

The heats started on time with a good crowd and 14 cars entered. A majority of the drivers and cars were from the Lakeview, Ore. area, according to Mike Ray of Cedarville, a Rotary Derby organizer. Everyone walked away without injury with the following results:

First heat (10 minute events): winner, David Agee of McArthur; second heat winner, Johnny Cobb, Lakeview; third heat winner, Don Emery, Durham. Each won $100 in cash and a trophy.

In the Main Event, David Emery won first and the $1,000 cash and trophy; second place went to his brother, Don Emery of Durham, who won $400 and a trophy; third place winner, Tina Conklin of Cedarville, won $200 in cash and a trophy; and fourth place winner, Terry Yates of Lakeview, walked away with $100 cash and a trophy.

AUGUST 30, 2001

Forest Fires contained, but areas remain closed

All the fires in Modoc County have been contained, but the fire areas, especially around Blue Lake will probably remain closed to the public through next spring.

"While the Blue Lake Campground is unburned, at this time fire could be introduced to the area from wind-blown embers from burning stumps, snags and hot spots," the Forest Service states. "The roads and trails around the lake are not safe to use due to burning and falling trees, rolling rocks and logs. Blue Lake Campground may be closed until the spring of 2002 to allow the weather to topple the most dangerous snags and completely extinguish the burning snags and stumps."

The Blue Fire Camp in Alturas is rapidly demobilizing. Most of the 2,000 personnel are returning home or being re-assigned to other fires. The camp will probably continue for the next week with about 200 people.

The MNF is soon going to be scheduling guided tours through the Blue Lake area to explain fire effects, current rehabilitation efforts, and future rehab and salvage sale efforts. Those tours will be through Jess Valley to Blue Lake and on to Patterson area.

According to the Modoc National Forest, the biggest of the fires, the Blue Fire which started at Blue Lake August 9 was controlled at 34,400 acres on August 21. Other fires in the South Warners were also controlled by early this week. The Parsnip Fire was stopped at 70 acres, the Shields Fire at 160 acres and the Canyon Fire, on Cedar Pass at 210 acres.

The Modoc Complex of fires on Devil's Garden was contained at 5,367 acres and mop up is continuing within the complex and the fires will be in patrol status. The Bell fire was the largest at 3,110 acres.

MJUSD sees positives amid state test scores

While Modoc Joint Unified School District scores in the state proficiency tests released last week were a mixed bag, local school administrators see some real positives.

"Overall, we feel our students did well, with both Modoc Middle School and Alturas Elementary School increasing their scores," said MJUSD Superintendent Dr.. Kevin Jolly. "We need to address Modoc High School and Alternative Education areas."

Both AES and MMS increased scores in most subjects, while Modoc High scores decreased in most areas.

The district is concerned because of the precipitous drop from ninth graders to 10 and 11th grade scores. For instance, the class of 2002 scored 33 in reading comprehension this year. The same class scored 56 in 1998, 47 in 1999, and 39 in 2000.

The difference in district schools from 2000 to 2001 A